Conserved Protein Domain Family
RING-HC_RBR_RNF19

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cd16629: RING-HC_RBR_RNF19 
RING finger, HC subclass, found in the family of RING finger proteins RNF19A, RNF19B and similar proteins
The family includes RING finger protein RNF19A and RNF19B, both of which are transmembrane (TM) domain-containing RBR-type E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases. RNF19A, also known as double ring-finger protein (Dorfin) or p38, localizes to the ubiquitylated inclusions in Parkinson's disease (PD), dementia with Lewy bodies, multiple system atrophy, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). It interacts with Psmc3, a protein component of the 19S regulatory cap of the 26S proteasome, and further participates in the ubiquitin-proteasome system in acrosome biogenesis, spermatid head shaping, and development of the head-tail coupling apparatus and tail. It modulates the ubiquitination and degradation of calcium-sensing receptor (CaR), which may contribute to a general mechanism for CaR quality control during biosynthesis. Moreover, RNF19A can also ubiquitylate mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), the causative gene of familial ALS. It may associate with endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway, which is related to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, such as PD or Alzheimer"s disease. It is also involved in the pathogenic process of PD and Lewy body (LB) formation by ubiquitylation of synphilin-1. RNF19B, also known as IBR domain-containing protein 3 or natural killer lytic-associated molecule (NKLAM), plays a role in controlling tumor dissemination and metastasis. It is involved in the cytolytic function of natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). It interacts with ubiquitin conjugates UbcH7 and UbcH8, and ubiquitinates uridine kinase like-1 (URKL-1) protein, targeting it for degradation. Moreover, RNF19B is a novel component of macrophage phagosomes and plays a role in macrophage anti-bacterial activity. It functions as a novel modulator of macrophage inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. Both RNF19A and RNF19B contain a RBR domain followed by three TMs. The RBR domain was previously known as RING-BetweenRING-RING domain or TRIAD [two RING fingers and a DRIL (double RING finger linked)] domain. Based on current understanding of the structural biology of RBR ligases, the nomenclature of RBR has been corrected as RING-BRcat (benign-catalytic)-Rcat (required-for-catalysis) recently. The RBR (RING1-BRcat-Rcat) domain use an auto-inhibitory mechanism to modulate ubiquitination activity, as well as a hybrid mechanism that combines aspects from both RING and HECT E3 ligase function to facilitate the ubiquitination reaction. This family corresponds to the RING domain, a C3HC4-type RING-HC finger required for RBR-mediated ubiquitination.
Statistics
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PSSM-Id: 319543
View PSSM: cd16629
Aligned: 7 rows
Threshold Bit Score: 95.5682
Threshold Setting Gi: 678210128
Created: 30-Jul-2013
Updated: 18-Aug-2016
Structure
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Aligned Rows:
 
Zn binding siteRING-HC finger
Feature 1:Zn binding site [ion binding site]
Evidence:
  • Comment:Based on the structural evidence that Homo sapiens HHARI (4KBL) binds two Zn2+ ions through its RING-HC finger.

Sequence Alignment
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Format: Row Display: Color Bits: Type Selection:
                         10        20        30        40        50
                 ....*....|....*....|....*....|....*....|....*....|....*
Feature 1         #  #              # #  #  #                 #  #      
gi 116242764 131 ECPLCLLRHskdrFPDIMTCHHRSCVDCLRQYLRIEISESRvnisCPECTERFNP 185
gi 160370005 118 ECPLCLVRLpperAPRLLSCPHRSCRDCLRHYLRLEISESRvpisCPECSERLNP 172
gi 678210128   1 ECPICLLPQppeaFPTLASCHHRSCRACLEQYLRIAISESRvpvaCPHCPALLQP 55
gi 190339131  20 ECPLCLLSQprahFPRLSSCQHRACTDCLRQYLRIEISESRvgiaCPQCPEALAL 74
gi 190579282   3 TCPICYTPKspseFPILSCCEHRTCAACLKRYVSLQISESRtnitCPECSEYFYP 57
gi 922581557  84 ECPLCAAKMpgsaFPKLKGCQHRSCRACLRQYVELSITENRvevpCPECSSYLHP 138
gi 221101532  57 MCNVCFSWKcstfFPVLLSCEHRNCIDCLRQHLTIAVRECRvlvsCPECSEVFHP 111

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