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National Research Council (US) Committee for the Update of the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. 8th edition. Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); 2011.

Cover of Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals

Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. 8th edition.

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Appendix AAdditional Selected References

SUBJECT MATTER

  • USE OF LABORATORY ANIMALS
    Alternatives
    Ethics and Welfare
    Experimental Design and Statistics
    Research and Testing Methodology
  • PROGRAM MANAGEMENT
    General References
    Laws, Regulations, and Policies
    Education
    Monitoring the Care and Use of Animals
    Occupational Health and Safety
  • ENVIRONMENT, HOUSING, AND MANAGEMENT
    General References
    Environmental Enrichment
    Genetics and Genetically Modified Animals
    Species-Specific References—Environment, Housing, and Management
    • Agricultural Animals
    • Amphibians, Reptiles, and Fish
    • Birds
    • Cats and Dogs
    • Exotic, Wild, and Zoo Animals
    • Nonhuman Primates
    • Rodents and Rabbits
    • Other Animals
  • VETERINARY CARE
    Transportation
    Anesthesia, Pain, and Surgery
    Disease Surveillance, Diagnosis, and Treatment
    Pathology, Clinical Pathology, and Parasitology
    Species-Specific References—Veterinary Care
    • Agricultural Animals
    • Amphibians, Reptiles, and Fish
    • Birds
    • Cats and Dogs
    • Exotic, Wild, and Zoo Animals
    • Nonhuman Primates
    • Rodents and Rabbits
  • DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF ANIMAL FACILITIES

USE OF LABORATORY ANIMALS

Alternatives

  1. Alternative Methods for Toxicity Testing: Regulatory Policy Issues. EPA 230/12 85 029. NTIS PB8 6 113404/AS. Washington: Office of Policy, Planning, and Evaluation, US Environmental Protection Agency;
  2. Alternatives to Animal Use in Research, Testing, and Education. Office of Technology Assessment (OTA BA 273). Washington: Government Printing Office; 1986.
  3. Stephens ML. Alternatives to Current Uses of Animals in Research, Safety Testing, and Education. Washington: Humane Society of the United States.; 1986.
  4. Pratt D. Alternatives to Pain in Experiments on Animals. New York: Argus Archives; 1980.
  5. Salem H, Katz S. Alternative Toxicological Methods. Boca Raton FL: CRC Press; 2003.
  6. Zurlo J, Rudacille D, Goldberg AM. Animals and Alternatives in Testing: History, Science, and Ethics. New York: Mary Ann Liebert Publishers; 1994.
  7. Future improvements: Replacement in vitro methods. Balls M. ILAR J. 2002;43(Suppl):S69–S73. [PubMed: 12388855]
  8. ICCVAM Recommendations on In Vitro Methods for Assessing Acute Systemic Toxicity. 2001. [accessed January 24, 2010]. Available at http://iccvam​.niehs.nih​.gov/docs/acutetox_docs​/finalrpt//finappi2.pdf. [PubMed: 11378685]
  9. Regulatory Testing and Animal Welfare. ILAR J. 2002;43(Supplement)
  10. Implementation of the 3Rs (refinement, reduction, and replacement): Validation and regulatory acceptance considerations for alternative toxicological test methods. Schechtman L. ILAR J. 2002;43:S85–S94. [PubMed: 12388858]
  11. Incorporating the 3Rs into regulatory scientific practices. Sterling S, Rispin A. ILAR J. 2002;43:S18–S20. [PubMed: 12388846]
  12. Refinement, reduction, and replacement of animal use for regulatory testing: Future improvements and implementation within the regulatory framework. Richmond J. ILAR J. 2002;43:S63–S68. [PubMed: 12388854]
  13. Stokes WS, Hill RN. The Role of the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM) in the Evaluation of New Toxicological Testing Methods. Proceedings of the 3rd World Congress on Alternatives and Animal Use in the Life Sciences; Bologna, Italy. 1999; New York: Elsevier; 2000.

Ethics and Welfare

  1. An additional “R”: Remembering the animals. Iliff SA. ILAR J. 2002;43:38–47. [PubMed: 11752730]
  2. Singer P. Animal Liberation. 2nd ed. New York: New York Review Book (distributed by Random House); 1990.
  3. Regan T, Singer P. Animal Rights and Human Obligations. 2nd ed. Englewood Cliffs NJ: Prentice-Hall; 1989.
  4. Haynes RP. Animal Welfare: Competing Conceptions and Their Ethical Implications. New York: Springer; 2008.
  5. Midgley M. Animals and Why They Matter. Athens: University of Georgia Press; 1983.
  6. Applied Ethics in Animal Research: Philosophy, Regulation, and Laboratory Applications. 2002.
  7. Gluck JP, DiPasquale T, Orlans FB. Purdue University Press. West Lafayette IN:
  8. Bioethics in Laboratory Animal Research. ILAR J. 1999;40(1) [PubMed: 11533512]
  9. Russow L-M. Bioethics, animal research, and ethical theory. ILAR J. 1999;40:15–21. [PubMed: 11533512]
  10. Donnelley S. How and why animals matter. ILAR J. 1999;40:22–28.
  11. Sideris L, McCarthy CR, Smith DH. Roots of concern with nonhuman animals in biomedical ethics. ILAR J. 1999;40:3–14. [PubMed: 11533511]
  12. Volpato GL. Challenges in assessing fish welfare. ILAR J. 2009;50:329–337. [PubMed: 19949249]
  13. Cost of Caring: Recognizing Human Emotions in the Care of Laboratory Animals. Memphis: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science; 2001.
  14. Herzog H. Ethical aspects of relationships between humans and research animals. ILAR J. 2002;43:27–32. [PubMed: 11752728]
  15. Russow L-M. Ethical implications of the human-animal bond in the laboratory. ILAR J. 2002;43:33–37. [PubMed: 11752729]
  16. Ethical scores for animal procedures. Porter D. Nature. 1992;356:101–102. [PubMed: 1545854]
  17. Tannenbaum J. Ethics and pain research in animals. ILAR J. 1999;40:97–110.
  18. Fish and welfare: Do fish have the capacity for pain perception and suffering? Braith-waite VA, Huntingford FA. Anim Welf. 2004;13:S87–S92.
  19. Jennings M, Howard B. Guidance notes on retrospective review: A discussion document prepared by the LASA Ethics and Training Group. Tamworth UK: Laboratory Animal Science Association; 2004.
  20. Guidelines for the ethical use of animals in applied ethology studies. Sherwin CM, Christiansen SB, Duncan IJ, Erhard HW, Lay DC Jr, Mench JA, O’Connor CE, Petherick JC. Appl Anim Behav Sci. 2003;81:291–305.
  21. National Health and Medical Research Council, Australian Government; 2008. [accessed January 24, 2010]. Guidelines to Promote the Well-being of Animals Used for Scientific Purposes: The Assessment and Alleviation of Pain and Distress in Research Animals. Available at www​.nhmrc.gov.au/_files_nhmrc​/file/publications​/synopses/ea18.pdf.
  22. Orlans FB. In the Name of Science: Issues in Responsible Animal Experimentation. New York: Oxford University Press; 1993.
  23. International Guiding Principles for Biomedical Research Involving Animals. Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences (CIOMS); 1985. [accessed October 2, 2010]. Available at http://www​.cioms.ch/publications​/guidelines​/1985_texts_of_guidelines.htm.
  24. Warren MA. Moral Status: Obligations to Persons and Other Living Things. Gloucestershire: Clarendon Press; 1997.
  25. Rowan AN. Of Mice, Models, and Men: A Critical Evaluation of Animal Research. Albany: State University of New York Press; 1984.
  26. Painful dilemmas: The ethics of animal-based pain research. Magalhaes-Sant’Ana M, Sandoe P, Olsson IAS. Anim Welf. 2009;18:49–63.
  27. Principles and guidelines for the development of a science-based decision making process facilitating the implementation of the 3Rs by governmental regulators. Gauthier C. ILAR J. 2002;43:S99–S104. [PubMed: 12388860]
  28. Principles and practice in ethical review of animal experiments across Europe: Summary of the report of the FELASA Working Group on Ethical Evaluation of Animal Experiments. Smith JA, van den Broek FAR, Canto Martorell J, Hackbarth H, Ruksenas O, Zeller W. Lab Anim. 2007;41:143–160. [PubMed: 17430615]
  29. National Research Council. Recognition and Alleviation of Distress in Laboratory Animals. Washington: National Academies Press; 2008. [PubMed: 20669418]
  30. Refinement of the use of non-human primates in scientific research, part I: The influence of humans. Rennie AE, Buchanan-Smith HM. Anim Welf. 2006;15:203–213.
  31. Animal Procedures Committee. Review of Cost-benefit Assessment in the Use of Animals in Research. London: 2003. [accessed January 24, 2010]. Available at http://apc​.homeoffice​.gov.uk/reference/costbenefit.pdf.
  32. National Research Council. Science, Medicine, and Animals. Washington: National Academies Press; 2004. [PubMed: 20669472]
  33. DeGrazia D. Taking Animals Seriously: Mental Life and Moral Status. New York: Cambridge University Press; 1996.
  34. Smith JA, Boyd K, editors. The Assessment and “Weighing” of Costs. Lives in the Balance: The Ethics of Using Animals in Biomedical Research. London: Oxford University Press; 1991.
  35. The Ethics of Research Involving Animals. London: Nuffield Council on Bioethics; 2005.
  36. Rollin BE, Kesel ML, editors. The Experimental Animal in Biomedical Research. A Survey of Scientific and Ethical Issues for Investigators. I. Boca Raton FL: CRC Press; 1990.
  37. Rollin BE. The Frankenstein Syndrome: Ethical and Social Issues in the Genetic Engineering of Animals. New York: Cambridge University Press; 1995.
  38. The regulation of animal research and the emergence of animal ethics: A conceptual history. Rollin BE. Theor Med Bioeth. 2006;27:285–304. [PubMed: 16937023]
  39. The Three Rs: A journey or a destination? Richmond J. ATLA. 2000;28:761–773. [PubMed: 11105200]

Experimental Design and Statistics

  1. Animal welfare and the statistical consultant. Engeman RM, Shumake SA. Am Statistician. 1993;47:229–233.
  2. Appropriate animal numbers in biomedical research in light of animal welfare considerations. Mann MD, Crouse DA, Prentice ED. Lab Anim Sci. 1991;41:6–14. [PubMed: 1849590]
  3. Festing MFW. Common errors in the statistical analysis of experimental data. Progress in the Reduction, Refinement and Replacement of Animal Experimentation: Developments in Animal and Veterinary Science. Balls M, van Zeller A-M, Halder ME, editors. Amsterdam: Elsevier; 2002. pp. 753–758.
  4. Experimental Design and Statistics in Biomedical Research. ILAR J. 2002;43(4)
  5. Howard BR. Control of variability. ILAR J. 2002;43:194–201. [PubMed: 12391394]
  6. Guidelines for the design and statistical analysis of experiments using laboratory animals. Festing MFW, Altman DG. ILAR J. 2002;43:244–258. [PubMed: 12391400]
  7. Practical aspects to experimental design in animal research. Johnson PD, Besselsen DG. ILAR J. 2002;43:202–206. [PubMed: 12391395]
  8. Role of ancillary variables in the design, analysis, and interpretation of animal experiments. Gaines Das R. ILAR J. 2002;43:214–222. [PubMed: 12391397]
  9. Sample size determination. Dell RB, Holleran S, Ramakrishnan R. ILAR J. 2002;43:207–213. [PMC free article: PMC3275906] [PubMed: 12391396]
  10. Use of factorial designs to optimize animal experiments and reduce animal use. Shaw R, Festing MFW, Peers I, Furlong L. ILAR J. 2002;43:223–232. [PubMed: 12391398]
  11. Glantz SA. Primer of Biostatistics. 6th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill; 2005.
  12. National Research Council. Sample size determination (Appendix A). Guidelines for the Care and Use of Mammals in Neuroscience and Behavioral Research. Washington: National Academies Press; 2003. pp. 175–180.
  13. Snedecor GW, Cochran WG. Statistical Methods. 8th ed. Ames: Iowa State Press; 1989.
  14. Gart JJ, Krewski D, Lee PN, Tarone RE, Wahrendorf J. The Design and Analysis of Long-Term Animal Experiments. Lyon: International Agency for Research on Cancer; 1986.
  15. Festing MFW, Overend P, Gaines Das R, Cortina Borja M, Berdoy M. The Design of Animal Experiments: Reducing the Use of Animals in Research Through Better Experimental Design. London: Royal Society of Medicine Press; 2002.
  16. What is it like to be a rat? Rat sensory perception and its implications for experimental design and rat welfare. Burn CC. Appl Anim Behav Sci. 2008;112:1–32.

Research and Testing Methodology

  1. Adjuvants and Antibody Production. ILAR J. 1995;37(3) [PubMed: 11528034]
  2. Advanced Physiological Monitoring in Rodents. ILAR J. 2002;43(3)
  3. Mechanical ventilation for imaging the small animal. Hedlund LW, Johnson GA. ILAR J. 2002;43:159–174. [PubMed: 12105383]
  4. Miniaturization: An overview of biotechnologies for monitoring the physiology and pathophysiology of rodent animal models. Goode TL, Klein HJ. ILAR J. 2002;43:136–146. [PubMed: 12105381]
  5. Klaassen CD. Casarett and Doull’s Toxicology: The Basic Science of Poisons. 8th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill; 2007.
  6. Smith JA, Jennings M, editors. Categorising the Severity of Scientific Procedures on Animals: Summary and Reports from Three Roundtable Discussions. West Sussex UK: RSPCA, Research Animals Department; 2004. [accessed January 24, 2010]. Available at www​.boyd-group.demon​.co.uk/severity_report.pdf.
  7. Clinical considerations in rodent bioimaging. Colby LA, Morenko BJ. Comp Med. 2004;54:623–630. [PubMed: 15679259]
  8. Effects of Freund’s complete adjuvant on the physiology, histology, and activity of New Zealand white rabbits. Halliday LC, Artwohl JE, Bunte RM, Ramakrishnan V, Bennett BT. Contemp Top Lab Anim Sci. 2004;43:8–13. [PubMed: 14984283]
  9. Novak MA, West M, Bayne KL, Suomi SJ. Ethological research techniques and methods. Responsible Conduct of Research in Animal Behavior. Hart L, editor. New York: Oxford University Press; 1998. pp. 51–66.
  10. Gonder JC, Prentice ED, Russow L-M, editors. Genetic Engineering and Animal Welfare: Preparing for the 21st Century. Greenbelt MD: Scientists Center for Animal Welfare; 1999.
  11. FDA; [accessed May 15, 2010]. Guidance for Industry and Other Stakeholders: Toxicological Principles for the Safety Assessment of Food Ingredients, Redbook 2000 (rev 2007). Available at www​.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation​/GuidanceDocuments​/FoodIngre-dientsandPackaging/Redbook/default​.htm.
  12. Humane Endpoints for Animals Used in Biomedical Research and Testing. ILAR J. 2000;41(2)
  13. Stokes WS. Humane endpoints for laboratory animals used in toxicity testing. Proceedings of the 3rd World Congress on Alternatives and Animal Use in the Life Sciences; Bologna, Italy. 1999; New York: Elsevier; 2000.
  14. Humane endpoints in animal experiments for biomedical research: Proceedings of the International Conference; 22–25 November 1998; Zeist, the Netherlands.
  15. Immunization Procedures and Adjuvant Products. ILAR J. 2005;46(3)
  16. Adjuvants and antibody production: Dispelling the myths associated with Freund’s complete and other adjuvants. Stills JF Jr. ILAR J. 2005;46:280–293. [PubMed: 15953835]
  17. Advances in monoclonal antibody technology: Genetic engineering of mice, cells, and immunoglobulins. Peterson NC. ILAR J. 2005;46:314–319. [PubMed: 15953839]
  18. Applications and optimization of immunization procedures. Schunk MK, Macallum GE. ILAR J. 2005;46:241–257. [PubMed: 15953832]
  19. Monoclonal versus polyclonal antibodies: Distinguishing characteristics, applications, and information. Lipman NS, Jackson LR, Trudel LJ, Weis-Garcia F. ILAR J. 2005;46:258–268. [PubMed: 15953833]
  20. Using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in regulatory testing of biological products. Clough NE, Hauer PJ. ILAR J. 2005;46:300–306. [PubMed: 15953837]
  21. Impact of Noninvasive Technology on Animal Research. ILAR J. 2001;42(3)
  22. Challenges in small animal noninvasive imaging. Balaban RS, Hampshire VA. ILAR J. 2001;42:248–262. [PubMed: 11406723]
  23. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging in animal research. Chatham JC, Blackband SJ. ILAR J. 2001;42:189–208. [PubMed: 11406719]
  24. Use of positron emission tomography in animal research. Cherry SR, Gambhir SS. ILAR J. 2001;42:219–232. [PubMed: 11406721]
  25. Integration of safety pharmacology endpoints into toxicology studies. Luft J, Bode G. Fundam Clin Pharmacol. 2002;16:91–103. [PubMed: 12031062]
  26. Morton DB, Hawkins P, Beyan R, Heath K, Kirkwood J, Pearce P, Scott L, Whelan G, Webb A. Joint Working Group on Refinement: Refinements in telemetry procedures. Seventh report of the BVAAWF/FRAME/RSPCA/UFAW Joint Working Group on Refinement, Part A. Lab Anim. 2003. [accessed August 10, 2010]. pp. 261–299. Available at www​.rspca.org.uk/ImageLocator​/LocateAsset?asset​=document&assetId​=1232712323332&mode​=prd. [PubMed: 14599304]
  27. Methods and Welfare Considerations in Behavioral Research with Animals. Report of a National Institutes of Health Workshop; NIMH; 2002. [accessed January 24, 2010]. Available at www​.nimh.nih.gov/researchfunding​/grants/animals.pdf.
  28. National Research Council. Monoclonal Antibody Production. Washington: National Academy Press; 1999. [PubMed: 22934324]
  29. Physiologic and behavioral assessment of rabbits immunized with Freund’s complete adjuvant. Halliday LC, Artwohl JE, Hanly WC, Bunte RM, Bennett BT. Contemp Top Lab Anim Sci. 2000;39:8–13. [PubMed: 11040867]
  30. Physiological monitoring of small animals during magnetic resonance imaging. Mirsattari SM, Bihari F, Leung LS, Menon RS, Wang Z, Ives JR, Bartha R. J Neurosci Meth. 2005;144:207–213. [PubMed: 15910980]
  31. Hayes AW. Principles and Methods in Toxicology. 4th ed. Philadelphia: Taylor and Francis; 2007.
  32. Refinement of neuroscience procedures using nonhuman primates. Wolfensohn S, Peters A. Anim Technol Welf. 2005;4:49–50.
  33. Regulatory Testing and Animal Welfare. ILAR J. 2002;43(Suppl) [PubMed: 12388865]
  34. Animal care best practices for regulatory testing. Fillman-Holliday D, Landi MS. ILAR J. 2002;43:S49–S58. [PubMed: 12388852]
  35. Animal use in the safety evaluation of chemicals: Harmonization and emerging needs. Spielmann H. ILAR J. 2002;43:S11–S17. [PubMed: 12388845]
  36. Future improvements and implementation of animal care practices within the animal testing regulatory environment. Guittin P, Decelle T. ILAR J. 2002;43:S80–S84. [PubMed: 12388857]
  37. Incorporating the 3Rs into regulatory scientific practices. Sterling S, Rispin A. ILAR J. 2002;43:S18–S20. [PubMed: 12388846]
  38. Possibilities for refinement and reduction: Future improvements within regulatory testing. Stephens ML, Conlee K, Alvino G, Rowan A. ILAR J. 2002;43:S74–S79. [PubMed: 12388856]
  39. Preclinical safety evaluation using nonrodent species: An industry/welfare project to minimize dog use. Smith D, Broadhead C, Descotes G, Fosse R, Hack R, Krauser K, Pfister R, Phillips B, Rabemampianina Y, Sanders J, Sparrow S, Stephan-Gueldnew M, Jacobsen SD. ILAR J. 2002;43:S39–S42. [PubMed: 12388850]
  40. Refinement, reduction, and replacement of animal use for regulatory testing: Future improvements and implementation within the regulatory framework. Richmond J. ILAR J. 2002;43:S63–S68. [PubMed: 12388854]
  41. The International Symposium on Regulatory Testing and Animal Welfare: Recommendations on best scientific practices for acute local skin and eye toxicity testing. Botham PA, Hayes AW, Moir D. ILAR J. 2002;43:S105–S107. [PubMed: 12388861]
  42. The International Symposium on Regulatory Testing and Animal Welfare: Recommendations on best scientific practices for acute systemic toxicity testing. Stitzel K, Spielmann H, Griffin G. ILAR J. 2002;43:S108–S111. [PubMed: 12388862]
  43. The International Symposium on Regulatory Testing and Animal Welfare: Recommendations on best scientific practices for animal care in regulatory toxicology. Morris T, Goulet S, Morton D. ILAR J. 2002;43:S123–S125. [PubMed: 12388865]
  44. The International Symposium on Regulatory Testing and Animal Welfare: Recommendations on best scientific practices for biologicals: Safety and potency evaluations. Cussler K, Kulpa J, Calver J. ILAR J. 2002;43:S126–S128. [PubMed: 12388866]
  45. The International Symposium on Regulatory Testing and Animal Welfare: Recommendations on best scientific practices for subchronic/chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity testing. Combes R, Schechtman L, Stokes WS, Blakey D. ILAR J. 2002;43:S112–S117. [PubMed: 12388863]
  46. The safety assessment process: Setting the scene—An FDA perspective. Schechtman L. ILAR J. 2002;43:S5–S10. [PubMed: 12388844]
  47. Tiered testing strategies: Acute local toxicity. Stitzel K. ILAR J. 2002;43:S21–S26. [PubMed: 12388847]
  48. White WJ. The use of laboratory animals in toxicologic research. Principles and Methods in Toxicology. Hays AW, editor. Philadelphia: Taylor and Francis; 2001. pp. 773–818.
  49. The use of radiotelemetry in small laboratory animals: Recent advances. Kramer K, Kinter L, Brockway BP, Voss HP, Remie R, VanZutphen BL. Contemp Top Lab Anim Sci. 2001;40:8–16. [PubMed: 11300669]

PROGRAM MANAGEMENT

General References

  1. Cost Analysis and Rate Setting Manual for Animal Resource Facilities. National Center for Research Resources; 2000. [accessed January 24, 2010]. Available at www​.ncrr.nih.gov/publications​/comparative_medicine/CARS.pdf.
  2. Disaster Planning and Management. ILAR J. 2010;51(2)
  3. Crisis planning to manage risks posed by animal rights extremists. Bailey MR, Rich BA, Bennett BT. ILAR J. 2010;51:138–148. [PubMed: 20375436]
  4. Disaster preparedness in biocontainment animal research facilities: Developing and implementing an incident response plan (IRP). Swearengen JR, Vargas KJ, Tate MK, Linde NS. ILAR J. 2010;51:120–126. [PubMed: 20375434]
  5. Introduction: Disaster planning and management: A practicum. Bayne KA. ILAR J. 2010;51:101–103. [PubMed: 20375432]
  6. IACUC considerations: You have a disaster plan but are you really prepared? Wingfield WE, Rollin BE, Bowen RA. ILAR J. 2010;51:164–170. [PubMed: 20375439]
  7. Management of rodent viral disease outbreaks: One institution’s (r)evolution. Smith AL. ILAR J. 2010;51:127–137. [PMC free article: PMC7108584] [PubMed: 20375435]
  8. Tropical storm and hurricane recovery and preparedness strategies. Goodwin BS Jr, Donaho JC. ILAR J. 2010;51:104–119. [PubMed: 20375433]
  9. Verification of poultry carcass composting research through application during actual avian influenza outbreaks. Flory GA, Peer RW. ILAR J. 2010;51:149–157. [PubMed: 20375437]
  10. Wildfire evacuation: Outrunning the witch’s curse—One animal center’s experience. Arms MM, Van Zante JD. ILAR J. 2010;51:158–163. [PubMed: 20375438]
  11. Bennett BT, Brown MJ, Schofield JC. Essentials for Animal Research: A Primer for Research Personnel. Beltsville MD: National Agricultural Library; 1994.
  12. Infectious Disease Research in the Age of Biodefense. ILAR J. 46(1) [PMC free article: PMC7108618] [PubMed: 15644560]
  13. Administrative issues related to infectious disease research in the age of bioterrorism. Jaax J. ILAR J. 2005;46:8–14. [PubMed: 15644559]
  14. Public response to infectious disease research: The UC Davis experience. Fell AH, Bailey PJ. ILAR J. 2005;46:66–72. [PubMed: 15644566]
  15. Laboratory security and emergency response guidance for laboratories working with select agents. Richmond JY, Nesby-O’Dell SL. MMWR Recomm Rep. 2002;51:1–8. [PubMed: 12515340]
  16. Suckow MA, Douglas FA, Weichbrod RH, editors. Management of Laboratory Animal Care and Use Programs. Boca Raton FL: CRC Press; 2002.
  17. National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. Use of Laboratory Animals in Biomedical and Behavioral Research. Washington: National Academy Press; 1988. [PubMed: 25032311]
  18. Using site assessment and risk analysis to plan and build disaster-resistant programs and facilities. Vogelweid CM, Hill JB, Shea RA, Truby SJ, Schantz LD. Lab Anim. 2003;32:40–44. [PubMed: 12545184]

Laws, Regulations, and Policies

  1. Animal Care and Use: Policy Issues in the 1990s. National Institutes of Health/Office for Protection from Research Risks (NIH/OPRR). Proceedings of NIH/OPRR Conference; Bethesda MD. 1989.
  2. APHIS [Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service]. USDA; [accessed May 15, 2010]. Animal Care Policy Manual. Available at www​.aphis.usda.gov/animal_welfare​/policy.shtml.
  3. Animal Care Resource Guide: Research Facility Inspection Guide. APHIS, USDA; [accessed May 15, 2010]. Available at www​.aphis.usda.gov/animal_welfare/rig​.shtml.
  4. Animal Law Section. National Association for Biomedical Research; [accessed October 2, 2010]. Available at http://www​.nabranimallaw.org/
  5. Animals and Their Legal Rights. Washington: Animal Welfare Institute; 1985.
  6. APS [American Physiological Society] Guiding Principles for Research Involving Animals and Human Beings. [accessed January 24, 2010]. Available at www​.the-aps.org/publications​/journals/guide.htm.
  7. Environmental Policy Tools: A User’s Guide. OTA-ENV-634. Washington: Office of Technology Assessment; 1995.
  8. Percival R, Schroeder C, Miller A, Leape J. Environmental Regulation: Law, Science and Policy. 4th ed. Aspen Publishers; 2003. pp. 128–133.
  9. Society for Neuroscience Policies on the Use of Animals and Humans in Neuroscience Research. [accessed January 24, 2010]. Available at http://sfn​.org/index​.cfm?pagename=guidelinesPolicies​_UseOfAnimalsandHumans.
  10. US laws and norms related to laboratory animal research. VandeBerg JL, Williams-Blangero S, Wolfle TL. ILAR J. 1999;40:34–37.

Education

  1. AALAS [American Association for Laboratory Animal Science] Technician Training and Certification. [accessed May 21, 2010]. Available at www​.aalas.org/certification/tech_cert​.aspx.
  2. CALAS [Canadian Association of Laboratory Animal Science] Registry. [accessed August 10, 2010]. Available at www​.calas-acsal.org/index​.php?option=com​_content&task​=view&id=24&Itemid=106.
  3. McCurnin DM, Bassert JM, editors. Clinical Textbook for Veterinary Technicians. 5th ed. Philadelphia: WB Saunders; 2002.
  4. National Research Council. Education and Training in the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals: A Guide for Developing Institutional Programs. Washington: National Academy Press; 1991. [PubMed: 25144011]
  5. FELASA recommendations for the accreditation of laboratory animal science education and training. Nevalainen T, Blom HJ, Guaitani A, Hardy P, Howard BR, Vergara P. Lab Anim. 2002;36:373–377. [PubMed: 12396280]
  6. Guidelines on Institutional Animal User Training. National Institutional Animal User Training Program. Ottawa: Canadian Council on Animal Care; 1999. [accessed May 15, 2010]. Available at http://ccac​.ca/en/CCAC_Programs​/ETCC/Intro-coretopics-Web11​.htm.
  7. National Research Council. National Need and Priorities for Veterinarians in Biomedical Research. Washington: National Academies Press; 2004. [PubMed: 20669470]
  8. Perspectives on curriculum needs in laboratory animal medicine. Turner PV, Colby LA, VandeWoude S, Gaertner DJ, Vasbinder MA. J Vet Med Educ. 2009;36:89–99. [PubMed: 19435995]
  9. Podolsky ML, Lucas V, editors. The Care and Feeding of an IACUC: The Organization and Management of an Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Boca Raton FL: CRC Press; 1999.
  10. Silverman J, Sukow MA, Murthy S, editors. The IACUC Handbook. 2nd ed. Boca Raton FL: CRC Press; 2006.
  11. Training and Adult Learning Strategies for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. ILAR J. 2007;48(2) [PubMed: 17420528]
  12. Formal training programs and resources for laboratory animal veterinarians. Colby LA, Turner PV, Vasbinder MA. ILAR J. 2007;48:143–155. [PubMed: 17420535]
  13. Training and adult learning strategies for the care and use of laboratory animals. Dobrovolny J, Stevens J, Medina LJ. ILAR J. 2007;48:75–89. [PubMed: 17420529]
  14. Training strategies for animal care technicians and veterinary technical staff. Pritt S, Duffee N. ILAR J. 2007;48:109–119. [PubMed: 17420532]
  15. Training strategies for IACUC members and the institutional official. Greene ME, Pitts ME, James ML. ILAR J. 2007;48:132–142. [PubMed: 17420534]

Monitoring the Care and Use of Animals

  1. Smith JA, Jennings M.A Resource Book for Lay Members of Local Ethical Review Processes. 2nd ed. West Sussex UK: RSPCA, Research Animals Department; 2009. [accessed August 10, 2010]. Available at www​.rspca.org.uk/ImageLocator​/LocateAsset?asset​=document&assetId​=1232713599355&mode​=prd.
  2. An IACUC perspective on songbirds and their use as animal models for neurobiological research. Schmidt MF. ILAR J. 2010;51(4):424–430. [PMC free article: PMC3263358] [PubMed: 21131718]
  3. Allen T, Clingerman K. Animal Care and Use Committees Bibliography. Beltsville MD: US Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library (Publication #SRB92-16); 1992.
  4. Best practices for animal care committees and animal use oversight. De Haven R. ILAR J. 2002;43(Suppl):S59–S62. [PubMed: 12388853]
  5. Community representatives and nonscientists on the IACUC: What difference should it make? Dresser R. ILAR J. 1999;40:29–33.
  6. Orlans FB, Simmonds RC, Dodds WJ, editors. Effective animal care and use committees. Special Issue. Laboratory Animal Science; Jan, 1987. Published in collaboration with the Scientists Center for Animal Welfare.
  7. Field studies and the IACUC: Protocol review, oversight, and occupational health and safety considerations. Laber K, Kennedy BW, Young L. Lab Anim. 2007;36:27–33. [PubMed: 17183342]
  8. Guidelines for the veterinary care of laboratory animals. Report of the FELASA/ECLAM/ESLAV Joint Working Group on Veterinary Care. Lab Anim. 2008. [accessed May 21, 2010]. pp. 1–11. Available at http://la​.rsmjournals​.com/cgi/reprint/42/1/1. [PubMed: 18348761]
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  10. Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Guidebook. 2nd ed. Applied Research Ethics National Association (ARENA), Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare (OLAW), National Institutes of Health; 2002. [accessed January 21, 2010]. Available at http://grants1​.nih.gov​/grants/olaw/GuideBook.pdf. [PubMed: 12271329]
  11. Principles and practice in ethical review of animal experiments across Europe: Summary of the report of the FELASA Working Group on Ethical Evaluation of Animal Experiments. Smith JA, van den Broek FAR, Canto Martorell J, Hackbarth H, Ruksenas O, Zeller W. Lab Anim. 2007;41:143–160. [PubMed: 17430615]
  12. Berry DJ. Reference Materials for Members of Animal Care and Use Committees. Beltsville MD: US Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library (AWIC series #10); 1991.
  13. Should IACUCs review scientific merit of animal research projects? Mann MD, Prentice ED. Lab Anim (NY). 2004;33:26–31. [PubMed: 14752528]
  14. Lane N, Jennings M.West Sussex UK: RSPCA; 2004. [accessed August 10, 2010]. Supplementary Resources for Lay Members of Local Ethical Review Processes: Projects Involving Genetically Modified Animals. Available at www​.rspca.org.uk/servlet​/BlobServer?blobtable​=RSPCABlob&blobcol​=urlblob&blobkey​=id&blobwhere​=1105990223463&blobheader​=application/pdf.
  15. Silverman J, Suckow MA, Murthy S, editors. The IACUC Handbook. 2nd ed. Boca Raton FL: CRC Press; 2007.
  16. The International Symposium on Regulatory Testing and Animal Welfare: Recommendations on best scientific practices for animal care committees and animal use oversight. Richmond J, Fletch A, Van Tongerloo R. ILAR J. 2002;43(Suppl):S129–S132. [PubMed: 12388867]

Occupational Health and Safety

  1. Air quality in an animal facility: Particulates, ammonia, and volatile organic compounds. Kacergis JB, Jones RB, Reeb CK, Turner WA, Ohman JL, Ardman MR, Paigen B. Am Ind Hyg Assoc J. 1996;57:634–640. [PubMed: 8686660]
  2. Allergy to laboratory mice and rats: A review of its prevention, management, and treatment. Hunskaar S, Fosse RT. Lab Anim. 1993;27:206–221. [PubMed: 8366665]
  3. An overview of the roles and structure of international high-security veterinary laboratories for infectious animal diseases. Murray PK. Rev Sci Tech Off Int Epiz. 1998;17:426–443. [PubMed: 9713888]
  4. Animal-associated human infections. Weinberg AN, Weber DJ. Infect Dis Clin North America. 1991;5:1–181.
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  6. Wilhelmson CL, Jaax NK, Davis K. Animal necropsy in maximum containment. Anthology of Biosafety: BSL-4 Laboratories. Richmond JY, editor. Mundelein IL: American Biological Safety Association; 2002. pp. 361–402.
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  10. Fleming DO, Hunt DL, editors. Biological Safety Principles and Practices. Washington: ASM Press; 2000.
  11. Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories. Chosewood CL, Wilson DE, editors. DHHS [Department of Health and Human Services]. 5th ed. Washington: Government Printing Office; 2009. [accessed July 30, 2010]. Available at http://www​.cdc.gov/biosafety​/publications/bmbl5/index.htm.
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  13. NRC. Biotechnology Research in an Age of Terrorism. Washington: National Academies Press; 2004. [PubMed: 25057686]
  14. Code of Federal Regulations. 1984. Title 40; Part 260, Hazardous Waste Management System: General; Part 261, Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Part 262, Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste; Part 263, Standards Applicable to Transporters of Hazardous Waste; Part 264, Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities; Part 265, Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities; and Part 270, EPA-Administered Permit Programs: The Hazardous Waste Permit Program. Washington: Office of the Federal Register. (Part 260 updated April 1994; 261 and 270 updated August 1994; 264 and 265 updated June 1994; 262 and 263 updated 1993)
  15. Evaluation of individually ventilated cage systems for laboratory rodents: Occupational health aspects. Renstrom A, Bjoring G, Hoglund AU. Lab Anim. 2001;35:42–50. [PubMed: 11201287]
  16. Payne KR, editor. Industrial Biocides. New York: Wiley; 1988.
  17. Infectious Disease Research in the Age of Biodefense. ILAR J. 46(1) [PMC free article: PMC7108618] [PubMed: 15644560]
  18. Issues related to the use of animals in biocontainment research facilities. Copps J. ILAR J. 2005;46:34–43. [PMC free article: PMC7108559] [PubMed: 15644562]
  19. Select agent regulations. Gonder JC. ILAR J. 2005;46:4–7. [PubMed: 15644558]
  20. Laboratory safety for arboviruses and certain other viruses of vertebrates. Subcommittee on Arbovirus Safety, American Committee on Arthropod-Borne Viruses. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1980;29:1359–1381. [PubMed: 6778230]
  21. Mechanism and epidemiology of laboratory animal allergy. Bush RD. ILAR J. 2001;42:4–11. [PubMed: 11123184]
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  23. NIAID Strategic Plan for Biodefense Research: 2007 Update. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH. [accessed January 24, 2010]. Available at www3​.niaid.nih.gov/topics​/BiodefenseRelated​/Biodefense/PDF/biosp2007.pdf.
  24. NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH Guidelines). National Institutes of Health; 2009. [accessed January 24, 2010]. Available at http://oba​.od.nih.gov​/oba/rac/guidelines_02​/NIH_Guidelines_Apr_02.htm.
  25. NIH Guidelines for the Laboratory Use of Chemical Carcinogens. National Institutes of Health. NIH Pub. No. 81-2385. Washington: Department of Health and Human Services; 1981.
  26. Occupational Health and Safety in Biomedical Research. ILAR J. 2003;44(1)
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  28. Occupational medicine programs for animal research facilities. Wald PH, Stave GM. ILAR J. 2003;44:57–71. [PubMed: 12473831]
  29. National Research Council. Occupational Health and Safety in the Care and Use of Nonhuman Primates. Washington: National Academies Press; 2003. [PubMed: 20669480]
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  32. National Research Council. Prudent Practices in the Laboratory: Handling and Disposal of Chemicals. Washington: National Academy Press; 1995.
  33. Institute of Medicine. The Emergence of Zoonotic Diseases. Burroughs T, Knobler S, Lederberg J, editors. Washington: National Academies Press; 2002. [PubMed: 22764391]
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ENVIRONMENT, HOUSING, AND MANAGEMENT

General References

  1. Biomedical Investigator’s Handbook for Researchers Using Animal Models. Washington: Foundation for Biomedical Research; 1987.
  2. Linton AH, Hugo WB, Russell AD, editors. Disinfection in Veterinary and Farm Animals Practice. Oxford: Blackwell Scientific Publications; 1987.
  3. Efficacy of vaporized hydrogen peroxide against exotic animal viruses. Heckert RA, Best M, Jordan LT, Dulac GC, Eddington DL, Sterritt WG. Appl Environ Micro. 1997;63:3916–3918. [PMC free article: PMC168702] [PubMed: 9327555]
  4. Guidelines for the treatment of animals in behavioral research and teaching. Animal Behavior Society. Anim Behav. 1995;49:277–282.
  5. Ascenzi JM, editor. Handbook of Disinfectants and Antiseptics. New York: Marcel Dekker; 1996.
  6. Handbook of Laboratory Animal Science. Essential Principles and Practices. 2nd ed. Vol. 1. Boca Raton FL: CRC Press; 2003.
  7. IESNA Lighting Handbook. 9th ed. Illuminating Engineering Society of North America; New York: 2000.
  8. Tuffery AA. Laboratory Animals. London: John Wiley; 1995.
  9. Cass JS, editor. Laboratory Animals: An Annotated Bibliography of Informational Resources Covering Medicine, Science (Including Husbandry), Technology. New York: Hafner Publishing; 1971.
  10. Tuffery AA, editor. Laboratory Animals: An Introduction for New Experimenters. Chichester: Wiley Interscience; 1987.
  11. Silverman J, editor. Managing the Laboratory Animal Facility. 2nd ed. Boca Raton FL: CRC Press; 2009.
  12. Percival SL, Walker JT, Hunter PR. Microbiological Aspects of Biofilms and Drinking Water. Boca Raton FL: CRC Press; 2000.
  13. Vandenbergh JG, editor. Pheromones and Reproduction in Mammals. New York: Academic Press; 1983.
  14. Anderson RS, Edney ATB, editors. Practical Animal Handling. Elmsford NY: Pergamon; 1991.
  15. Recent advances in sterilization. Lagergren ER. J Infect Control (Asia). 1998;1:11–30.
  16. Rollin BE, Kesel ML, editors. The Experimental Animal in Biomedical Research. Care, Husbandry, and Well-being: An Overview by Species. II. Boca Raton FL: CRC Press; 1995.
  17. UFAW Handbook on the Care and Management of Laboratory Animals, 7th ed, vol 1: Terrestrial Vertebrates. Universities Federation for Animal Welfare. Oxford: Blackwell; 1999.

Environmental Enrichment

  1. A novel approach for documentation and evaluation of activity patterns in owl monkeys during development of environmental enrichment programs. Kondo SY, Yudko EB, Magee LK. Contemp Top Lab Anim Sci. 2003;42:17–21. [PubMed: 19760829]
  2. A review of environmental enrichment for pigs housed in intensive housing systems. van de Weerd HA, Day JEL. Appl Anim Behav Sci. 2009;116:1–20.
  3. A review of environmental enrichment strategies for single-caged nonhuman primates. Fajzi K, Reinhardt V, Smith MD. Lab Anim. 1989;18:23–35.
  4. A targeted approach to developing environmental enrichment for two strains of laboratory mice. Nicol CJ, Brocklebank S, Mendl M, Sherwin C. Appl Anim Behav Sci. 2008;110:341–353.
  5. Reinhardt V, Reinhardt A. Annotated Bibliography on Refinement and Environmental Enrichment for Primates Kept in Laboratories. 8th ed. Washington: Animal Welfare Institute; 2005.
  6. Artificial turf foraging boards as environmental enrichment for pair-housed female squirrel monkeys. Fekete JM, Norcross JL, Newman JD. Contemp Top Lab Anim Sci. 2000;39:22–26. [PubMed: 11487235]
  7. Assessment of the use of two commercially available environmental enrichments by laboratory mice by preference testing. Van Loo PL, Blom HJ, Meijer MK, Baumans V. Lab Anim. 2005;39:58–67. [PubMed: 15703125]
  8. Behavioural effects of environmental enrichment for individually caged rabbits1997Lidfors L. Appl Anim Behav Sci. 52:157–169.
  9. Can puzzle feeders be used as cognitive screening instruments? Differential performance of young and aged female monkeys on a puzzle feeder task. Watson SL, Shively CA, Voytko ML. Am J Primatol. 1999;49:195–202. [PubMed: 10466577]
  10. Effectiveness of video of conspecifics as a reward for socially housed bonnet macaques (Macaca radiata). Brannon E, Andrews M, Rosenblum L. Percept Motor Skills. 2004;98(3-1):849–858. [PubMed: 15209299]
  11. Effects of a cage enrichment program on heart rate, blood pressure, and activity of male Sprague-Dawley and spontaneously hypertensive rats monitored by radiotelemetry. Sharp J, Azar T, Lawson D. Contemp Top Lab Anim Sci. 2005;44:32–40. [PubMed: 15773774]
  12. Effects of different forms of environmental enrichment on behavioral, endocrinological, and immunological parameters in male mice. Marashi V, Barnekow A, Ossendorf E, Sachser N. Horm Behav. 2003;43:281–292. [PubMed: 12694638]
  13. Effects of environmental enrichment for mice: Variation in experimental results. Van de Weerd HA, Aarsen EL, Mulder A, Kruitwagen CL, Hendriksen CF, Baumans V. J Appl Anim Welf Sci. 2002;5:87–109. [PubMed: 12738579]
  14. Effects of environmental enrichment on males of a docile inbred strain of mice. Marashi V, Barnekow A, Sachser N. Physiol-Behav. 2004;82:765–776. [PubMed: 15451640]
  15. Effects of puzzle feeders on pathological behavior in individually housed rhesus monkeys. Novak MA, Kinsey JH, Jorgensen MJ, Hazen TJ. Am J Primatol. 1998;46:213–227. [PubMed: 9802512]
  16. McCune S. Enriching the environment of the laboratory cat. AWIC Resource Series, No. 2: Environmental Enrichment Information Resources for Laboratory Animals—Birds, Cats, Dogs, Farm Animals, Ferrets, Rabbits, and Rodents. Beltsville MD: AWIC; 1995. pp. 27–33.
  17. Enrichment and aggression in primates. Honess PE, Marin CM. Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2006;30:413–436. [PubMed: 16055188]
  18. Enrichment of laboratory caging for rats: A review. Patterson-Kane EF. Anim Welf. 2004;13:209–214.
  19. Enrichment strategies for laboratory animals. ILAR J. 2005;46(2) [PubMed: 15775029]
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  21. Environmental enrichment for laboratory rodents and rabbits: Requirements of rodents, rabbits, and research. Baumans V. ILAR J. 2005;46:162–170. [PubMed: 15775025]
  22. Environmental enrichment for nonhuman primates. Lutz CK, Novak MA. ILAR J. 2005;46:178–191. [PubMed: 15775027]
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  25. Young RJ. Environmental Enrichment for Captive Animals. Oxford: Blackwell Science; 2003.
  26. de Rosa C, Vitale A, Puopolo M. Environmental enrichment for nonhuman primates: An experimental approach. Progress in the Reduction, Refinement and Replacement of Animal Experimentation: Proceedings of the 3rd World Congress on Alternatives and Animal Use in the Life Sciences; Bologna, Italy. Elsevier; 2000. pp. 1295–1304.
  27. Environmental enrichment in mice decreases anxiety, attenuates stress responses and enhances natural killer cell activity. Benaroya-Milshtein N, Hollander N, Apter A, Kukulansky T, Raz N, Wilf A, Yaniv I, Pick CG. Eur J Neurosci. 2004;20:1341–1347. [PubMed: 15341605]
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  29. Environmental enrichment may alter the number of rats needed to achieve statistical significance. Eskola S, Lauhikari M, Voipio HM, Laitinen M, Nevalainen T. Scand J Lab Anim Sci. 1999;26:134–144.
  30. Environmental enrichment of laboratory animals used in regulatory toxicology studies. Dean SW. Lab Anim. 1999;33:309–327. [PubMed: 10778780]
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  34. Guidelines for developing and managing an environmental enrichment program for nonhuman primates. Bloomsmith MA, Brent LY, Schapiro SJ. Lab Anim Sci. 1991;41:372–377. [PubMed: 1658487]
  35. Segal EF, editor. Housing, Care and Psychological Well-Being of Captive and Laboratory Primates. Park Ridge NJ: Noyes Publications; 1989.
  36. Incorporation of an enrichment program into a study protocol involving long-term restraint in macaques. McGuffey LH, McCully CL, Bernacky BJ, Blaney SM. Lab Anim. 2002;31:37–39. [PubMed: 12404014]
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  38. Nonhuman Primate Management Plan. Office of Animal Care and Use, NIH; 1991. [accessed January 24, 2010]. Available at http://oacu​.od.nih.gov​/regs/primate/primex.htm.
  39. National Research Council. Psychological Well-Being of Nonhuman Primates. Washington: National Academy Press; 1998.
  40. Psychological well-being of nonhuman primates: A brief history. Wolfle TL. J Appl Anim Welf Sci. 1999;2:297–302. [PubMed: 16363934]
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  42. Shelter enrichment for rats. Patterson-Kane EG. Contemp Top Lab Anim Sci. 2003;42:46–48. [PubMed: 19757626]
  43. Short-term effects of an environmental enrichment program for adult cynomolgus monkeys. Turner PV, Grantham LE II. Contemp Top Lab Anim Sci. 2002;41:13–17. [PubMed: 12213041]
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  45. The effect of non-nutritive environmental enrichment on the social behavior of group-housed cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Kaplan J, Ayers M, Phillips M, Mitchell C, Wilmoth C, Cairnes D, Adams M. Contemp Top Lab Anim Sci. 2003;42:117.
  46. Markowitz H, Line S. The need for responsive environments. The Experimental Animal in Biomedical Research, vol I: A Survey of Scientific and Ethical Issues for Investigators. Rollin BE, Kesel ML, editors. Boca Raton FL: CRC Press; 1990. pp. 153–172.
  47. Novak M, Petto AJ, editors. Through the Looking Glass: Issues of Psychological Well-Being in Captive Nonhuman Primates. Washington: American Psychological Association; 1991.

Genetics and Genetically Modified Animals

  1. Hartl DL. A Primer of Population Genetics. 3rd ed. Sunderland MA: Sinauer Associates; 2000.
  2. Festing MFW, Peters AG. Animal production and breeding methods. The UFAW Handbook on the Care and Management of Laboratory Animals. 7th ed. Poole T, editor. Vol. 1. Oxford: Blackwell Sciences; 1999. pp. 28–44.
  3. Assessing the welfare of genetically altered mice. Wells DJ. Lab Anim. 2006;39:314–320.
  4. Behavioral phenotyping of transgenic and knockout mice: Experimental design and evaluation of general health, sensory functions, motor abilities, and specific behavioral tests. Crawley JN. Brain Res. 1999;835:18–26. [PubMed: 10448192]
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  6. Sundberg JP, Ichiki T, editors. Genetically Engineered Mice Handbook. Boca Raton FL: CRC Press; 2006.
  7. Genetically modified animals: What welfare problems do they face? Buehr M, Hjorth JP. J Appl Anim Welf Sci. 2003;6:319–338. [PubMed: 14965786]
  8. Green EL. Genetics and Probability in Animal Breeding Experiments. New York: Oxford University Press; 1981.
  9. Hardy P. Gnotobiology and breeding techniques. The Laboratory Mouse. Hedrich H, editor. London: Elsevier; 2004. pp. 409–433.
  10. Joint Working Group on Refinement: Refinement and reduction in production of genetically modified mice2003Sixth report of the BVAAWF/FRAME/RSPCA/UFAW Joint Working Group on Refinement. Lab Anim 37Suppl 1S1–S49.Available at http://la​.rsmjournals​.com/cgi/reprint/37/suppl_1/1.pdfaccessed August 10, 2010. [PubMed: 12886901]
  11. Festing MF. Laboratory animal genetics and genetic quality control. Handbook of Laboratory Animal Science. 2nd ed. Hau J, Van Hoosier GL Jr, editors. Vol. 1. Boca Raton FL: CRC Press; 2003. pp. 173–203.
  12. Making better transgenic models: Conditional, temporal, and spatial approaches. Ristevski S. Mol Biotechnol. 2005;29:153–163. [PubMed: 15699570]
  13. Mouse functional genomics requires standardization of mouse handling and housing conditions. Champy MF, Selloum M, Piard L, Zeitler V, Caradec C, Chambon P, Auwerx J. Mamm Genome. 2004;15:768–783. [PubMed: 15520880]
  14. Persistent transmission of mouse hepatitis virus by transgenic mice. Rehg JE, Blackman MA, Toth LA. Comp Med. 2001;51:369–374. [PubMed: 11924797]
  15. Lane N, Jennings M.Projects Involving Genetically Modified Animals. RSPCA, Research Animals Department; 2004. [accessed January 24, 2010]. Available at www​.rspca.org.uk/ImageLocator​/LocateAsset?asset​=documentandassetId​=1232712279548andmode=prd.
  16. Hafez ESE, editor. Reproduction and Breeding Techniques for Laboratory Animals. Philadelphia: Lea and Febiger; 1970.
  17. Research-oriented genetic management of nonhuman primate colonies. Williams-Blangero S. Lab Anim Sci. 1993;43:535–540. [PubMed: 8158976]
  18. Rules and Guidelines for Nomenclature of Mouse and Rat Strains, rev; International Committee on Standardized Genetic Nomenclature for Mice; 2007. [accessed May 15, 2010]. Available at www​.informatics.jax.org​/mgihome/nomen/2007_strains.shtml.
  19. Standardized nomenclature for transgenic animals. ILAR News. 1992;34:45–52.
  20. The use of genetic “knockout” mice in behavioral endocrinology research. Nelson RJ. Horm Behav. 1997;31:188–196. [PubMed: 9213133]
  21. Transgenic animal technology: Alternatives in genotyping and phenotyping. Pinkert CA. Comp Med. 2003;53:126–139. [PubMed: 12784846]
  22. Transgenic gene knock-outs: Functional genomics and therapeutic target selection. Harris S, Ford SM. Pharmacogenomics. 2000;1:433–443. [PubMed: 11257927]

Species-Specific References—Environment, Housing, and Management

Agricultural Animals

  1. Hart BL. Behavior of Domestic Animals. New York: WH Freeman; 1985.
  2. Cattle: Good Practice for Housing and Care. 1st ed. RSPCA, Research Animals Department; 2008. [accessed August 6, 2010]. Available at www​.rspca.org.uk/servlet​/BlobServer?blobtable​=RSPCABlob&blobcol​=urlblob&blobkey​=id&blobwhere​=1220375292149&blobheader​=application/pdf.
  3. Reinhardt V, Reinhardt A. Comfortable quarters for cattle in research institutions. Comfortable Quarters for Laboratory Animals. 9th ed. Washington: Animal Welfare Institute; 2002. pp. 89–95.
  4. Houpt KA, Ogilvie-Graham TS. Comfortable quarters for horses in research institutions. Comfortable Quarters for Laboratory Animals. 9th ed. Washington: Animal Welfare Institute; 2002. pp. 96–100.
  5. Grandin T. Comfortable quarters for pigs in research institutions. Comfortable Quarters for Laboratory Animals. 9th ed. Washington: Animal Welfare Institute; 2002. pp. 78–82.
  6. Reinhardt V. Comfortable quarters for sheep in research institutions. Comfortable Quarters for Laboratory Animals. 9th ed. Washington: Animal Welfare Institute; 2002. pp. 83–88.
  7. Reece WO, editor. Dukes’ Physiology of Domestic Animals. 12th ed. Ithaca NY: Cornell University Press; 2004.
  8. Sack WO. Essentials of Pig Anatomy. Ithaca NY: Veterinary Textbooks; 1982.
  9. Baxter SH, Baxter MR, MacCormack JAC, editors. Farm Animal Housing and Welfare. Boston: Nijhoff; 1983.
  10. Phillips C, Piggins D, editors. Farm Animals and the Environment. Wallingford UK: CAB International; 1992.
  11. Smidt D, editor. Indicators Relevant to Farm Animal Welfare. Boston: Nijhoff; 1983.
  12. Ewbank R, Kim-Madslien F, Hart CB. Management and Welfare of Farm Animals. 4th ed. Universities Federation for Animal Welfare; 1999. (out of print; 5th edition in preparation)
  13. Miniature pet pigs. Van Metre DC, Angelos SM. Vet Clin North America Exot Anim Pract. 1999;2:519–537. [PubMed: 11229041]
  14. Mellor DJ, Hemsworth PH. Policy on the care and use of sheep for scientific purposes based on good practice. Victoria, Australia: Monash University and the Animal Welfare Science Centre; 2005.
  15. Hafez ESE. Reproduction in Farm Animals. Philadelphia: Lea and Febiger; 1993.
  16. Responsiveness, behavioural arousal and awareness in fetal and newborn lambs: Experimental, practical and therapeutic implications. Mellor DJ, Gregory NG. NZ Vet J. 2003;51:2–13. [PubMed: 16032283]
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Amphibians, Reptiles, and Fish

  1. Wright K, Whitaker BR. Amphibian Medicine and Captive Husbandry. Malabar FL: Krieger Publishing Company; 2001.
  2. Halliday TR. Amphibians. UFAW Handbook on the Care and Management of Laboratory Animals. 7th ed. Poole TB, editor. Vol. 2. Oxford: Blackwell; 1999.
  3. Poole TB, editor. Amphibious and aquatic vertebrates and advanced invertebrates. UFAW Handbook on the Care and Management of Laboratory Animals. 7th ed. Vol. 2. Oxford: Blackwell; 1999.
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  6. Spotte SH. Captive Seawater Fishes: Science and Technology. Wiley-Interscience; 1992.
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  19. Tyler MJ. Frogs and toads as experimental animals. ANZCCART News. 1. Vol. 12. 1999. Insert.
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  31. The male red-sided garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis): Reproductive pattern and behavior. Krohmer RW. ILAR J. 2004;45:65–74. [PubMed: 14756156]
  32. Tracing the evolution of brain and behavior using two related species of whiptail lizards: Cnemidophorus uniparens and Cnemidophorus inornatus. Woolley SC, Sakata JT, Crews D. ILAR J. 2004;45:46–53. [PubMed: 14752207]
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  37. Green SL. The Laboratory Xenopus. Boca Raton FL: CRC Press; 2009.
  38. Westerfield M.The Zebrafish Book. A Guide for the Laboratory Use of Zebrafish (danio rerio). 5th ed. Eugene: University of Oregon Press; 2007.
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Birds

  1. Campbell TW, Ellis CK. Avian and Exotic Animal Hematology and Cytology. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell; 2007.
  2. Birds as Animal Models in the Behavioral and Neural Sciences. ILAR J. 2010;51(4)
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  8. Domestic Fowl: Good Practice for Housing and Care. 2nd ed. RSPCA, Research Animals Department; 2008. [accessed January 24, 2010]. Available at http://content​.www.rspca​.org.uk/cmsprd/Satellite?blobcol​=urldata&blobheader=application​%2Fpdf&blobkey​=id&blobnocache​=false&blobtable​=MungoBlobs&blobwhere​=1232988515260&ssbinary=true.
  9. Ducks and Geese: Good Practice for Housing and Care. 2nd ed. RSPCA, Research Animals Department; 2008. [accessed January 24, 2010]. Available at http://content​.www.rspca​.org.uk/cmsprd/Satellite?blobcol​=urldata&blobheader=application​%2Fpdf&blobkey​=id&blobnocache​=false&blobtable​=MungoBlobs&blobwhere​=1232988515191&ssbinary=true.
  10. Fair J, Paul E, Jones J, editors. Guidelines to the Use of Wild Birds in Research. Washington: Ornithological Council; 2010. [accessed August 20, 2010]. Available at http://www​.nmnh.si.edu​/BIRDNET/guide/index.html.
  11. National Research Council. Laboratory Animal Management: Wild Birds. Washington: National Academy of Sciences; 1977.
  12. Laboratory Birds: Refinements in Husbandry and Procedures. Fifth report of the BVAAWF/FRAME/RSPCA/UFAW Joint Working Group on Refinement. Lab Anim. 2003. [accessed August 10, 2010]. pp. S1–S163. Available at www​.rspca.org.uk/ImageLocator​/LocateAsset?asset​=document&assetId​=1232712322818&mode​=prd. [PubMed: 11676346]
  13. Proctor NS, Lynch PJ. Manual of Ornithology: Avian Structure and Function. Infectious Diseases of Wild Birds. Thomas NJ, Hunter DB, Atkinson CT, editors. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell; 2007.
  14. Abs M, editor. Physiology and Behavior of the Pigeon. London: Academic Press; 1983.
  15. Pigeons: Good Practice for Housing and Care. 2nd ed. RSPCA, Research Animals Department; 2008. [accessed January 24, 2010]. Available at http://content​.www.rspca​.org.uk/cmsprd/Satellite?blobcol​=urldata&blobheader=application​%2Fpdf&blobkey​=id&blobnocache​=false&blobtable​=MungoBlobs&blobwhere​=1232988515283&ssbinary=true.
  16. Whittow GC, editor. Sturkie’s Avian Physiology. 5th ed. San Diego and London: Academic Press; 1999.
  17. The domestic chicken. Glatz P. ANZCCART News. 1996;9(2) Insert.
  18. Levi WM. The Pigeon. Sumter SC: Levi Publishing; 1974. (reprinted 1981)
  19. Use and husbandry of captive European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) in scientific research: A review and current best practice. Asher L, Bateson M. Lab Anim. 2008;42:127–139. [PubMed: 18435870]
  20. Zebra Finches: Good Practice for Housing and Care. 2nd ed. RSPCA, Research Animals Department; 2008. [accessed January 24, 2010]. Available at http://content​.www.rspca​.org.uk/cmsprd/Satellite?blobcol​=urldata&blobheader=application​%2Fpdf&blobkey​=id&blobnocache​=false&blobtable​=MungoBlobs&blobwhere​=1232988515331&ssbinary=true.

Cats and Dogs

  1. A comparison of tethering and pen confinement of dogs. Yeon SC, Golden G, Sung W, Erb HN, Reynolds AJ, Houpt KA. J Appl Anim Welf Sci. 2001;4:257–270.
  2. A practitioner’s guide to working dog welfare. Rooney N, Gaines S, Hiby E. J Vet Behav. 2009;4:127–134.
  3. Behavioural and physiological correlates of stress in laboratory cats. Carlstead K, Brown JL, Strawn W. Appl Anim Behav Sci. 1993;38:143–158.
  4. Adams DR. Canine Anatomy: A Systematic Study. Ames: Iowa State University Press; 1986.
  5. Rochlitz I. Comfortable quarters for cats in research institutions. Comfortable Quarters for Laboratory Animals. 9th ed. Washington: Animal Welfare Institute; 2002. pp. 50–55.
  6. Hubrecht R. Comfortable quarters for dogs in research institutions. Comfortable Quarters for Laboratory Animals. 9th ed. Washington: Animal Welfare Institute; 2002. pp. 56–64.
  7. Feline behavioral guidelines from the American Association of Feline Practitioners. Overall KL, Rodan I, Beaver BV, Careny H, Crowell-Davis S, Hird N, Kudrak S, Wexler-Mitchell E, Zicker S. JAVMA. 2005;227:70–84. [PubMed: 16013540]
  8. Hawkins P, Morton DB, Beyan R, Heath K, Kirkwood J, Pearce P, Scott L, Whelan G, Webb A. Joint Working Group on Refinement: Husbandry refinements for rats, mice, dogs and non-human primates used in telemetry procedures. Seventh report of the BVAAWF/FRAME/RSPCA/UFAW Joint Working Group on Refinement, Part B. Lab Anim. 2004. [accessed August 10, 2010]. pp. 1–10. Available at www​.rspca.org.uk/ImageLocator​/LocateAsset?asset​=document&assetId​=1232712323251&mode​=prd. [PubMed: 14979982]
  9. Joint Working Group on Refinement: Refining dog husbandry and care. Eighth report of the BVAAWF/FRAME/RSPCA/UFAW Joint Working Group on Refinement. Lab Anim. 2004. [accessed August 10, 2010]. pp. S1–S94. Available at www​.rspca.org.uk/ImageLocator​/LocateAsset?asset​=document&assetId​=1232712322899&mode​=prd. [PubMed: 15202954]
  10. Laboratory Animal Management: Cats. ILAR News. 1978;21(3):C1–C20.
  11. National Research Council. Laboratory Animal Management: Dogs. Washington: National Academy Press; 1994. [PubMed: 25144074]
  12. Method for long-term cerebrospinal fluid collection in the conscious dog. Wilsson Rahmberg M, Olovson SG, Forshult E. J Invest Surg. 1998;11:207–214. [PubMed: 9743488]
  13. Evans HE. Miller’s Anatomy of the Dog. 3rd ed. Philadelphia: WB Saunders; 1993.
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  15. Recommendations for the housing and care of domestic cats in laboratories. Rochlitz I. Lab Anim. 2000;34:1–9. [PubMed: 10759361]
  16. Results of the Survey of Dog Accommodation and Care. In the Report of the Animal Procedures Committee. London: The Stationary Office; 1998. [accessed January 24, 2010]. The Animal Procedures Committee. Available at http://apc​.homeoffice​.gov.uk/reference/ar98.pdf.
  17. Andersen AC, editor. The Beagle as an Experimental Dog. Ames: Iowa State University Press; 1970.
  18. Shifrine M, Wilson FD, editors. The Canine as a Biomedical Research Model: Immunological, Hematological, and Oncological Aspects. UC Davis, Laboratory for Energy-related Research; 1980. (May be ordered as DOE/TIC-10191 from National Technical Information Service, www​.ntis.gov/search/product​.aspx?ABBR=DOETIC10191)
  19. McCune S. The domestic cat. UFAW Handbook on the Care and Management of Laboratory Animals. Poole T, editor. Oxford: Blackwell; 1999. pp. 445–463.
  20. The effect of housing and handling practices on the welfare, behaviour and selection of domestic cats (Felis silvestris catus) by adopters in an animal shelter. Gourkow N, Fraser D. Anim Welf. 2006;15:371–377.
  21. The laboratory cat. James AE. ANZCCART News. 1995;8(1) Insert.

Exotic, Wild, and Zoo Animals

  1. Ramirez K. Animal Training: Successful Animal Management Through Positive Reinforcement. Chicago: Shedd Aquarium Society; 1999.
  2. Fowler ME, Cubas ZS. Biology, Medicine, and Surgery of South American Wild Animals. Ames: Iowa State University Press; 2001.
  3. CCAC Guidelines on the Care and Use of Wildlife. Canadian Council on Animal Care; 2003. [accessed January 24, 2010]. Available at www​.ccac.ca/en/CCAC_Programs​/Guidelines_Policies​/GDLINES/Wildlife/Wildlife.pdf.
  4. Young RJ. Environmental Enrichment for Captive Animals (UFAW Animal Welfare). Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell; 2003.
  5. Wobeser GA. Essentials of Disease in Wild Animals. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell; 2005.
  6. Kahn CM, editor. Exotic and laboratory animals. Merck Veterinary Manual. Whitehouse Station NJ: Merck and Co.; 2008.
  7. Carpenter JW. Exotic Animal Formulary. 3rd ed. Philadelphia: WB Saunders; 2004.
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  11. Crawford RL. Information Resources on Big Cats. Beltsville MD: USDA National Agricultural Library Animal Welfare Information Center; 2008.
  12. Fowler E. Restraint and Handling of Wild and Domestic Animals. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell; 2008.
  13. Braun CE, editor. Techniques for Wildlife Investigations and Management. 6th ed. Bethesda MD: The Wildlife Society; 2005.
  14. Shepherdson DJ, Mellen JD, Hutchins M. Second Nature: Environmental Enrichment for Captive Animals. Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press; 2007.
  15. Kleiman DG, Allen ME, Thompson KV, Lumpkin S. Wild Mammals in Captivity: Principles and Techniques. Chicago: University of Chicago Press; 1997.
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Nonhuman Primates

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  2. Bowden DM, editor. Aging in Nonhuman Primates. New York: Van Nostrand; 1979.
  3. Davis RT, Leathrus CW, editors. Behavior and Pathology of Aging in Rhesus Monkeys. New York: Alan R. Liss; 1985.
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  5. Cage sizes for tamarins in the laboratory. Prescott MJ, Buchanan-Smith HM. Anim Welf. 2004;13:151–157.
  6. Erwin J, Maple TL, Mitchell G, editors. Captivity and Behavior: Primates in Breeding Colonies, Laboratories and Zoos. New York: Van Nostrand; 1979.
  7. Fulk R, Garland C, editors. Care and Management of Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) in Captive Environments. Asheboro: North Carolina Zoological Society; 1992.
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  18. Hershkovitz P. Living New World Monkeys (Platyrrhini). Chicago: University of Chicago Press; 1977.
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  22. Primate housing: A new approach. Rudling W. Anim Technol Welf. 2003;2:143–150.
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  24. Refinement of the use of non-human primates in scientific research, part II: Housing, husbandry and acquisition. Rennie AE, Buchanan-Smith HM. Anim Welf. 2006;15:215–238.
  25. Carlson J. Safe Pair Housing of Macaques. Washington: Animal Welfare Institute; 2008.
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Rodents and Rabbits

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  2. Hebel R, Stromberg MW. Anatomy and Embryology of the Laboratory Rat. Wörthsee: BioMed Verlag; 1986.
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  6. Berry RJ, editor. Biology of the House Mouse. Symposia of the Zoological Society of London, No. 47. London: Academic Press; 1981.
  7. Westenbroek C, Den B, Gerrits M, Ter H. Chronic stress coping in isolated and socially housed male and female rats. Society for Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Annual Meeting; Cincinnati, OH. 2003.
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  11. Sherwin CM. Comfortable quarters for mice in research institutions. Comfortable Quarters for Laboratory Animals. 9th ed. Washington: Animal Welfare Institute; 2002. pp. 6–17.
  12. Boers K, Gray G, Love J, Mahmutovic Z, McCormick S, Turcotte N, Zhang Y. Comfortable quarters for rabbits in research institutions. Comfortable Quarters for Laboratory Animals. 9th ed. Washington: Animal Welfare Institute; 2002. pp. 43–49.
  13. Lawlor M. Comfortable quarters for rats in research institutions. Comfortable Quarters for Laboratory Animals. 9th ed. Washington: Animal Welfare Institute; 2002. pp. 26–32.
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  17. Effect of temperature on the behavioural activities of male mice. Ajarem J, Ahmad M. Dirasat Pure Sci. 2003;30:59–65.
  18. Effects of caging type and animal source on the development of foot lesions in Sprague Dawley rats (Rattus norvegicus). Peace TA, Singer, Niemuth NA, Shaw ME. Contemp Top Lab Anim Sci. 2001;40:17–21. [PubMed: 11560400]
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  22. Group housing for male New Zealand White rabbits. Raje S, Stewart KL. Lab Anim. 1997;26:36–37.
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Other Animals

  1. Aquatic animals as models in biomedical research. Stoskopf MK. ILAR News. 1983;26:22–27.
  2. Frye FL. Captive Invertebrates: A Guide to Their Biology and Husbandry. Malabar FL: Krieger Publishing; 1992.
  3. Effects of experience and cage enrichment on predatory skills of black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes). Vargas A, Anderson SH. J Mammal. 1999;80:263–269.
  4. Growth, feed efficiency and condition of common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) fed on two formulated moist diets. Cerezo Valverde J, Hernández MD, Aguado-Giménez F, García García B. Aquaculture. 2008;275:266–273.
  5. Ridgway SH, Harrison RJ, editors. Handbook of Marine Mammals. New York: Academic Press; 1991.
  6. Influence of diet on growing and nutrient utilization in the common octopus (Octopus vulgaris). García García B, Aguado-Giménez F. Aquaculture. 2002;211:171–182.
  7. National Research Council. Laboratory Animal Management: Marine Invertebrates. Washington: National Academy Press; 1981.
  8. Nontraditional Animal Models for Laboratory Research. ILAR J. 2004;45(1)
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  10. The musk shrew (Suncus murinus): A model species for studies of nutritional regulation of reproduction. Temple JL. ILAR J. 2004;45:25–34. [PubMed: 14752205]
  11. The prairie vole: An animal model for behavioral neuroendocrine research on pair bonding. Aragona BJ, Wang ZX. ILAR J. 2004;45:35–45. [PubMed: 14752206]
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VETERINARY CARE

Transportation

  1. Acclimatization of rats after ground transportation to a new animal facility. Capdevila S, Giral M, Ruiz de la Torre JL, Russell RJ, Kramer K. Lab Anim. 2007;41:255–261. [PubMed: 17430625]
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  6. The use of radiotelemetry to assess the time needed to acclimatize guineapigs following several hours of ground transport. Stemkens-Sevens S, van Berkel K, de Greeuw I, Snoeijer B, Kramer K. Lab Anim. 2009;43:78–84. [PubMed: 18987063]
  7. White WJ, Chou ST, Kole CB, Sutcliffe R. Transportation of laboratory animals. UFAW Handbook on the Care and Management of Laboratory and Other Research Animals. 8th ed. Hertfordshire: Universities Federation for Animal Welfare; 2010. pp. 169–182.

Anesthesia, Pain, and Surgery

  1. Alderton B. Anaesthesia in ferrets, rabbits, and guinea pigs. In: Bryden D, editor. Internal Medicine: Small Companion Animals; The TG Hungerford course for veterinarians, Proceedings 306, Stephen Roberts Lecture Theatre, University of Sydney; Australia. June 15–19; University of Sydney Post Graduate Foundation in Veterinary Science; 1998. pp. 241–268.
  2. Schaeffer D. Anesthesia and analgesia. Nontraditional Laboratory Animal Species in Anesthesia and Analgesia in Laboratory Animals. Kohn DF, editor. San Diego: Academic Press; 1997.
  3. Kohn DF, Wixson SK, White WJ, Benson GJ, editors. Anesthesia and Analgesia in Laboratory Animals. San Diego: Academic Press; 1997.
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  5. Bryant S, editor. Anesthesia for Veterinary Technicians. Somerset NJ: Wiley-Blackwell; 2010.
  6. Ross L, Ross B. Anaesthetic and Sedative Techniques for Aquatic Animals. 3rd ed. Somerset NJ: Wiley-Blackwell; 2008.
  7. Lang CM, editor. Animal Physiologic Surgery. 2nd ed. New York: Springer-Verlag; 1982.
  8. AVMA Guidelines on Euthanasia. Schaumburg IL: American Veterinary Medical Association; 2007.
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  12. Gaynor JS, Muir W. Handbook of Veterinary Pain Management. St. Louis: Mosby; 2002.
  13. Hedenqvist P, Hellebrekers LJ. Laboratory animal analgesia, anesthesia, and euthanasia. Handbook of Laboratory Animal Science: Essential Principles and Practices. 2nd ed. Hau J, Van Hoosier GL, editors. Boca Raton FL: CRC Press; 2003.
  14. Flecknell PA. Laboratory Animal Anesthesia. 3rd ed. London: Academic Press; 2009.
  15. Tranquilli WJ, Thurman JC, Grimm KA, editors. Lumb and Jones’ Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia. 4th ed. San Francisco: Wiley-Blackwell; 2007.
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  17. Karas A, Silverman J. Pain and distress. The IACUC Handbook. Suckow M, Silverman J, Murthy S, editors. Boca Raton FL: CRC Press; 2006.
  18. Flecknell PA, Waterman-Pearson A, editors. Pain Management in Animals. Philadelphia: WB Saunders; 2000.
  19. Hildebrand SV. Paralytic agents. Anesthesia and Analgesia in Laboratory Animals. Kohn DF, Wixson SK, White WJ, Benson GJ, editors. San Diego: Academic Press; 1997.
  20. Position Statement on Recognition and Alleviation of Pain and Distress in Laboratory Animals. AALAS; 2000. [accessed January 24, 2010]. Available at www​.aalas.org/pdf/Recognition​_and_Alleviation​_of_Pain_and_Distress​_in_Laboratory_Animals.pdf.
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  25. Fossum T. Small Animal Surgery Textbook. 3rd ed. Maryland Heights MO: Mosby; 2007.
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  27. Waynforth HB, Swindle MM, Elliott H, Smith AC. Surgery: Basic principles and procedures. Handbook of Laboratory Animal Science: Essential Principles and Practices. 2nd ed. Hau J, Van Hoosier GL, editors. Vol. 1. Boca Raton FL: CRC Press; 2003. pp. 487–520.
  28. Slatter D. Textbook of Small Animal Surgery. 3rd ed. Philadelphia: WB Saunders; 2003.
  29. Moberg GP, Mench JA. The Biology of Animal Stress: Basic Principles and Implications for Animal Welfare. Wallingford UK: CAB International; 2000.
  30. Flecknell P, Silverman J, Suckow MA, Murthy S, editors. The IACUC Handbook. New York: CRC Press; 2006.
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Disease Surveillance, Diagnosis, and Treatment

  1. Hrapkiewicz K, Medina L, editors. Clinical Laboratory Animal Medicine. San Francisco: Wiley-Blackwell; 2008.
  2. Current strategies for controlling/eliminating opportunistic microorganisms. White WJ, Anderson LC, Geistfeld J, Martin D. ILAR J. 1998;39:391–305. [PubMed: 11528089]
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  4. FELASA recommendations for the health monitoring of breeding colonies and experimental units of cats, dogs and pigs. Rehbinder C, Baneux P, Forbes D, van Herck H, Nicklas W, Rugaya Z, Winkler G. Report of the Federation of European Laboratory Animal Science Associations (FELASA) Working Group on Animal Health. Lab Anim. 1998;32:1–17. [PubMed: 9481689]
  5. Hillyer EV, Quesenberry KE. Ferrets, Rabbits and Rodents: Clinical Medicine and Surgery. Philadelphia: WB Saunders; 1997.
  6. Rossoff IS. Handbook of Veterinary Drugs: A Compendium for Research and Clinical Use. New York: Springer; 1975.
  7. Lewbart GA. Invertebrate Medicine. Ames: Blackwell Publishing; 2006.
  8. Ford RB, Mazzaferro E. Kirk and Bistner’s Handbook of Veterinary Procedures and Emergency Treatment. 8th ed. Philadelphia: WB Saunders; 2006.
  9. Fox JG, Anderson LC, Loew FM, Quimby FW, editors. Laboratory Animal Medicine. New York: Academic Press; 2002.
  10. Giovanni R, Warren RG, editors. Mosby’s Fundamentals of Animal Health Technology: Principles of Pharmacology. St. Louis: CV Mosby; 1983.
  11. Brander GC, Pugh DM, Bywater RJ. Veterinary Applied Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 5th ed. London: Bailliere Tindall; 1991.
  12. Booth NH, McDonald LE. Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics. Ames: Iowa State University Press; 1988. 6th rev. ed.

Pathology, Clinical Pathology, and Parasitology

  1. Sanderson JH, Phillips CE. An Atlas of Laboratory Animal Haematology. Oxford: Clarendon Press; 1981.
  2. Gresham GA, Jennings AR. An Introduction to Comparative Pathology: A Consideration of Some Reactions of Human and Animal Tissues to Injurious Agents. New York: Academic Press; 1962.
  3. Evans GO, editor. Animal Clinical Chemistry: A Practical Guide for Toxicologists and Biomedical Researchers. 2nd ed. Boca Raton FL: CRC Press; 2009.
  4. Evans GO. Animal Hematotoxicology: A Practical Guide for Toxicologists and Biomedical Researchers. Boca Raton FL: CRC Press; 2009.
  5. Gopinath C, Prentice DE, Lewis DJ. Atlas of Experimental Toxicological Pathology. Boston: MTP Press; 1987.
  6. Kapff CT, Jandl JH. Blood: Atlas and Sourcebook of Hematology. 2nd ed. 1991. Boston: Little and Brown; 1991.
  7. Kaneko JJ, editor. Clinical Biochemistry of Domestic Animals. 4th ed. New York: Academic Press; 1989.
  8. Loeb WF, Quimby FW. Clinical Chemistry of Laboratory Animals. New York: Pergamon Press; 1988.
  9. Hawkey CM, Dennett TB. Color Atlas of Comparative Veterinary Hematology. Ames: Iowa State University Press; 1989.
  10. Hayhoe GFJ, Flemans RJ. Color Atlas of Hematological Cytology. 3rd ed. St. Louis: Mosby Year Book; 1992.
  11. Innes JRM, Saunders LZ, editors. Comparative Neuropathology. New York: Academic Press; 1962.
  12. Latimer KS, Mahaffey EA, Prasse KW. Duncan and Prasse’s Veterinary Laboratory Clinical Pathology. San Francisco: Wiley-Blackwell; 2003.
  13. Jain NC. Essentials of Veterinary Hematology. Philadelphia: Lea and Febiger; 1993.
  14. Baker DG, editor. Flynn’s Parasites of Laboratory Animals. 2nd ed. Ames: Iowa State University Press; 2007.
  15. Hanson AK. Handbook of Laboratory Animal Bacteriology. Boca Raton FL: CRC Press; 2000.
  16. Gershwin ME, Merchant B, editors. Immunologic Defects in Laboratory Animals. New York: Plenum; 1981.
  17. Sodikoff C. Laboratory Profiles of Small Animal Diseases. Santa Barbara: American Veterinary Publications; 1981.
  18. Baker DG. Natural Pathogens of Laboratory Animals: Their Effects on Research. Washington: American Society for Microbiology; 2003.
  19. Jubb KVF, Kennedy PC, Palmer N, editors. Pathology of Domestic Animals. 4th ed. New York: Academic Press; 1992. 1992.
  20. Benirschke K, Garner FM, Jones TC. Pathology of Laboratory Animals. New York: Springer-Verlag; 1978. 1978.
  21. Ribelin WE, McCoy JR, editors. The Pathology of Laboratory Animals. Springfield IL: Charles C Thomas; 1965.
  22. Sloss MW, Kemp RL. Veterinary Clinical Parasitology. 6th ed. Ames: Iowa State University Press; 1994. 1994.
  23. Jones TC, Hunt RD. Veterinary Pathology. 5th ed. Philadelphia: Lea and Febiger; 1983.

Species-Specific References—Veterinary Care

Agricultural Animals

  1. Swindle MM. Basic Surgical Exercises Using Swine. 1983. New York: Praeger; 1983.
  2. Calnek BW, Barnes HJ, Beard CW, Reid WM, Yoder HW, editors. Diseases of Poultry. 9th ed. Ames: Iowa State University Press; 1991.
  3. Jensen R. Diseases of Sheep. Philadelphia: Lea and Febiger; 1974.
  4. Leman AD, Straw BE, Mengeline WL, editors. Diseases of Swine. 7th ed. Ames: Iowa State University Press; 1992.
  5. FELASA recommendations for the health monitoring of breeding colonies and experimental units of cats, dogs and pigs. Rehbinder C, Baneux P, Forbes D, van Herck H, Nicklas W, Rugaya Z, Winkler G. Report of the Federation of European Laboratory Animal Science Associations (FELASA) Working Group on Animal Health. Lab Anim. 1998;32:1–17. [PubMed: 9481689]
  6. Swindle MM, editor. Swine in the Laboratory: Surgery, Anesthesia, Imaging, and Experimental Techniques. 2nd ed. Boca Raton FL: CRC Press; 2007.
  7. Hendrickson D, editor. Techniques in Large Animal Surgery. 3rd ed. Somerset NJ: Wiley-Blackwell; 2007. 2007.
  8. Oehme FW, Prier JE. Textbook of Large Animal Surgery. 2nd ed. Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins; 1987.

Amphibians, Reptiles, and Fish

  1. An evaluation of current perspectives on consciousness and pain in fishes. Chandroo KP, Yue S, Moccia RD. Fish Fisher. 2004;5:281–295.
  2. Anesthesia and analgesia in reptiles. Mosley CA. Semin Avian Exot Pet Medic. 2005;14:243–262.
  3. Can fish suffer? Perspectives on sentience, pain, fear and stress. Chandroo KP, Duncan IJH, Moccia RD. App Anim Behav Sci. 2004;86:225–250.
  4. Sindermann CJ, Lichtner DV. Disease Diagnosis and Control in North American Marine Aquaculture. New York: Elsevier; 1988. 2nd rev ed.
  5. Bullock GL. Diseases of Fishes. Book 2B: Identification of Fish Pathogenic Bacteria. Neptune NJ: TFH Publications; 1971.
  6. Bullock GL, Conroy DA, Snieszko SF. Diseases of Fishes. Neptune NJ: TFH Publications; 1971.
  7. Anderson DP. Diseases of Fishes. Book 4: Fish Immunology. Neptune NJ: TFH Publications; 1974.
  8. Wedemeyer GA, Meyer FP, Smith L. Diseases of Fishes. Book 5: Environmental Stress and Fish Diseases. Neptune NJ: TFH Publications; 1976.
  9. Do fish have nociceptors? Evidence for the evolution of a vertebrate sensory system. Sneddon LU, Braithwaite VA, Gentle MJ. Proc R Soc Lond B. 2003;270:1115–1121. [PMC free article: PMC1691351] [PubMed: 12816648]
  10. Evaluation of rapid cooling and tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222) as methods of euthanasia in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Wilson JM, Bunte RM, Carty AJ. JAALAS. 2009;48:785–789. [PMC free article: PMC2786934] [PubMed: 19930828]
  11. Evaluation of the use of anesthesia and analgesia in reptiles. Read MR. JAVMA. 2004;227:547–552. [PubMed: 14989548]
  12. Fish and welfare: Do fish have the capacity for pain perception and suffering? Braithwaite VA, Huntingford FA. Anim Welf. 2004;13:S87–S92.
  13. Fish, amphibian, and reptile analgesia. Machin KL. Vet Clin North Am Exot Anim Pract. 2001;4:19–33. [PubMed: 11217460]
  14. Jacobson E. Infectious Diseases and Pathology of Reptiles: Color Atlas and Text. Boca Raton FL: CRC Press; 2007.
  15. McArthur S, Wilkinson R, Meyer J. Medicine and Surgery of Tortoises and Turtles. San Francisco: Wiley-Blackwell; 2004.
  16. Mycobacteriosis in fishes: A review. Gauthier DT, Rhodes MW. Vet J. 2009;180:33–47. [PubMed: 18620877]
  17. Pain and Distress in Fish. ILAR J. 2009;50(4) [PubMed: 19949248]
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Birds

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Cats and Dogs

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Exotic, Wild, and Zoo Animals

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Nonhuman Primates

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Rodents and Rabbits

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  30. Monitoring sentinel mice for Helicobacter hepaticus, H. rodentium, and H. bilis by use of polymerase chain reaction analysis and serological testing. Whary MT, Cline JH, King AE, Hewes KM, Chojnacky D, Salvarrey A, Fox JG. Comp Med. 2000;50:436–443. [PubMed: 11020164]
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DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF ANIMAL FACILITIES

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  13. American Institute of Architects Committee on Architecture for Health. Guidelines for Construction and Equipment of Hospitals and Medical Facilities. 2nd ed. Washington: American Institute of Architects Press; 1987.
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  17. National Research Council. Laboratory Animal Housing. Washington: National Academy of Sciences; 1978.
  18. Grandin T. Livestock behavior and the design of livestock handling facilities. Handbook of Facilities Planning, vol 2: Laboratory Animal Facilities. Ruys T, editor. New York: Van Nostrand; 1991. pp. 96–125.
  19. White WJ. Management and Design: Breeding Facilities. The Mouse in Biomedical Research. Normative Biology, Husbandry, and Models. 2nd ed. Fox JG, Barthold SW, Davisson MT, Newcomer CE, Quimby FW, Smith AL, editors. III. New York: Academic Press; 2007. pp. 235–269.
  20. Hessler J, Lehner N, editors. Planning and Designing Animal Research Facilities. Orlando: Academic Press; 2008.
  21. Lipman NS. Rodent Facilities and Caging Systems. Planning and Designing Animal Research Facilities. Hessler J, Lehner N, editors. Orlando: Academic Press; 2009. pp. 265–288.
  22. Structures and Environment Handbook. 11th ed. Ames: Midwest Plan Service, Iowa State University; 1987. rev.
  23. Warning! Nearby construction can profoundly affect your experiments. Dallman MF, Akana SF, Bell ME, Bhatnagar S, Choi SJ, Chu A, Gomez F, Laugero K, Sorian L, Viau V. Endocrine. 1999;11:111–113. [PubMed: 10709756]
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Copyright © 2011, National Academy of Sciences.
Bookshelf ID: NBK54047

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