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GTR Home > Conditions/Phenotypes > CHARGE association

Summary

Excerpted from the GeneReview: CHD7 Disorder
CHD7 disorder encompasses the entire phenotypic spectrum of heterozygous CHD7 pathogenic variants that includes CHARGE syndrome as well as subsets of features that comprise the CHARGE syndrome phenotype. The mnemonic CHARGE syndrome, introduced in the premolecular era, stands for coloboma, heart defect, choanal atresia, retarded growth and development, genital hypoplasia, ear anomalies (including deafness). Following the identification of the genetic cause of CHD7 disorder, the phenotypic spectrum expanded to include cranial nerve anomalies, vestibular defects, cleft lip and/or palate, hypothyroidism, tracheoesophageal anomalies, brain anomalies, seizures, and renal anomalies. Life expectancy highly depends on the severity of manifestations; mortality can be high in the first few years when severe birth defects (particularly complex heart defects) are present and often complicated by airway and feeding issues. In childhood, adolescence, and adulthood, decreased life expectancy is likely related to a combination of residual heart defects, infections, aspiration or choking, respiratory issues including obstructive and central apnea, and possibly seizures. Despite these complications, the life expectancy for many individuals can be normal.

Genes See tests for all associated and related genes

  • Also known as: CRG, HH5, IS3, KAL5, CHD7
    Summary: chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 7

Clinical features

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Practice guidelines

  • ACMG, 2013
    Clinical genetics evaluation in identifying the etiology of autism spectrum disorders: 2013 guideline revisions.
  • EuroGentest, 2011
    Clinical utility gene card for: CHARGE syndrome.

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