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Results: 1 to 3 of 3

1.

SDHC - succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit C

This gene encodes one of four nuclear-encoded subunits that comprise succinate dehydrogenase, also known as mitochondrial complex II, a key enzyme complex of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and aerobic respiratory chains of mitochondria. The encoded protein is one of two integral membrane proteins that anchor other subunits of the complex, which form the catalytic core, to the inner mitochondrial membrane. There are several related pseudogenes for this gene on different chromosomes. Mutations in this gene have been associated with paragangliomas. Alternatively spliced transcript variants have been described. [provided by RefSeq, May 2013]

Also known as:
CYB560, CYBL, PGL3, QPS1, SDH3
Chromosome:
1;
Location:
1q23.3
2.

SDHB - succinate dehydrogenase complex iron sulfur subunit B

This tumor suppressor gene encodes the iron-sulfur protein subunit of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) enzyme complex which plays a critical role in mitochondria. The SDH enzyme complex is composed of four nuclear-encoded subunits. This enzyme complex converts succinate to fumarate which releases electrons as part of the citric acid cycle, and the enzyme complex additionally provides an attachment site for released electrons to be transferred to the oxidative phosphorylation pathway. The SDH enzyme complex plays a role in oxygen-related gene regulation through its conversion of succinate, which is an oxygen sensor that stabilizes the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) transcription factor. Sporadic and familial mutations in this gene result in paragangliomas, pheochromocytoma, and gastrointestinal stromal tumors, supporting a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and tumorigenesis. Mutations in this gene are also implicated in nuclear type 4 mitochondrial complex II deficiency. [provided by RefSeq, Jun 2022]

Also known as:
CWS2, IP, MC2DN4, PGL4, SDH, SDH1, SDH2, SDHIP
Chromosome:
1;
Location:
1p36.13
3.

KIT - KIT proto-oncogene, receptor tyrosine kinase

This gene encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase. This gene was initially identified as a homolog of the feline sarcoma viral oncogene v-kit and is often referred to as proto-oncogene c-Kit. The canonical form of this glycosylated transmembrane protein has an N-terminal extracellular region with five immunoglobulin-like domains, a transmembrane region, and an intracellular tyrosine kinase domain at the C-terminus. Upon activation by its cytokine ligand, stem cell factor (SCF), this protein phosphorylates multiple intracellular proteins that play a role in in the proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis of many cell types and thereby plays an important role in hematopoiesis, stem cell maintenance, gametogenesis, melanogenesis, and in mast cell development, migration and function. This protein can be a membrane-bound or soluble protein. Mutations in this gene are associated with gastrointestinal stromal tumors, mast cell disease, acute myelogenous leukemia, and piebaldism. Multiple transcript variants encoding different isoforms have been found for this gene. [provided by RefSeq, May 2020]

Also known as:
C-Kit, CD117, MASTC, PBT, SCFR
Chromosome:
4;
Location:
4q12

Results: 1 to 3 of 3

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