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Results: 1 to 20 of 28

1.

FLCN - folliculin

This gene is located within the Smith-Magenis syndrome region on chromosome 17. Mutations in this gene are associated with Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome, which is characterized by fibrofolliculomas, renal tumors, lung cysts, and pneumothorax. Alternative splicing of this gene results in two transcript variants encoding different isoforms. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008]

Also known as:
BHD, DENND8B, FLCL
Chromosome:
17;
Location:
17p11.2
2.

MLH3 - mutL homolog 3

This gene is a member of the MutL-homolog (MLH) family of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. MLH genes are implicated in maintaining genomic integrity during DNA replication and after meiotic recombination. The protein encoded by this gene functions as a heterodimer with other family members. Somatic mutations in this gene frequently occur in tumors exhibiting microsatellite instability, and germline mutations have been linked to hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer type 7 (HNPCC7). Several alternatively spliced transcript variants have been identified, but the full-length nature of only two transcript variants has been determined. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008]

Also known as:
HNPCC7
Chromosome:
14;
Location:
14q24.3
3.

RAD54B - RAD54 homolog B

The protein encoded by this gene belongs to the DEAD-like helicase superfamily. It shares similarity with Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD54 and RDH54, both of which are involved in homologous recombination and repair of DNA. This protein binds to double-stranded DNA, and displays ATPase activity in the presence of DNA. This gene is highly expressed in testis and spleen, which suggests active roles in meiotic and mitotic recombination. Homozygous mutations of this gene were observed in primary lymphoma and colon cancer. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008]

Also known as:
RDH54
Chromosome:
8;
Location:
8q22.1
4.

CHEK2 - checkpoint kinase 2

In response to DNA damage and replication blocks, cell cycle progression is halted through the control of critical cell cycle regulators. The protein encoded by this gene is a cell cycle checkpoint regulator and putative tumor suppressor. It contains a forkhead-associated protein interaction domain essential for activation in response to DNA damage and is rapidly phosphorylated in response to replication blocks and DNA damage. When activated, the encoded protein is known to inhibit CDC25C phosphatase, preventing entry into mitosis, and has been shown to stabilize the tumor suppressor protein p53, leading to cell cycle arrest in G1. In addition, this protein interacts with and phosphorylates BRCA1, allowing BRCA1 to restore survival after DNA damage. Mutations in this gene have been linked with Li-Fraumeni syndrome, a highly penetrant familial cancer phenotype usually associated with inherited mutations in TP53. Also, mutations in this gene are thought to confer a predisposition to sarcomas, breast cancer, and brain tumors. This nuclear protein is a member of the CDS1 subfamily of serine/threonine protein kinases. Several transcript variants encoding different isoforms have been found for this gene. [provided by RefSeq, Apr 2012]

Also known as:
CDS1, CHK2, HuCds1, LFS2, PP1425, RAD53, hCds1
Chromosome:
22;
Location:
22q12.1
5.

DLC1 - DLC1 Rho GTPase activating protein

This gene encodes a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) that is a member of the rhoGAP family of proteins which play a role in the regulation of small GTP-binding proteins. GAP family proteins participate in signaling pathways that regulate cell processes involved in cytoskeletal changes. This gene functions as a tumor suppressor gene in a number of common cancers, including prostate, lung, colorectal, and breast cancers. Multiple transcript variants due to alternative promoters and alternative splicing have been found for this gene.[provided by RefSeq, Apr 2010]

Also known as:
ARHGAP7, HP, STARD12, p122-RhoGAP
Chromosome:
8;
Location:
8p22
6.

AXIN2 - axin 2

The Axin-related protein, Axin2, presumably plays an important role in the regulation of the stability of beta-catenin in the Wnt signaling pathway, like its rodent homologs, mouse conductin/rat axil. In mouse, conductin organizes a multiprotein complex of APC (adenomatous polyposis of the colon), beta-catenin, glycogen synthase kinase 3-beta, and conductin, which leads to the degradation of beta-catenin. Apparently, the deregulation of beta-catenin is an important event in the genesis of a number of malignancies. The AXIN2 gene has been mapped to 17q23-q24, a region that shows frequent loss of heterozygosity in breast cancer, neuroblastoma, and other tumors. Mutations in this gene have been associated with colorectal cancer with defective mismatch repair. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008]

Also known as:
AXIL, ODCRCS
Chromosome:
17;
Location:
17q24.1
7.

TP53 - tumor protein p53

This gene encodes a tumor suppressor protein containing transcriptional activation, DNA binding, and oligomerization domains. The encoded protein responds to diverse cellular stresses to regulate expression of target genes, thereby inducing cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, senescence, DNA repair, or changes in metabolism. Mutations in this gene are associated with a variety of human cancers, including hereditary cancers such as Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Alternative splicing of this gene and the use of alternate promoters result in multiple transcript variants and isoforms. Additional isoforms have also been shown to result from the use of alternate translation initiation codons from identical transcript variants (PMIDs: 12032546, 20937277). [provided by RefSeq, Dec 2016]

Also known as:
BCC7, BMFS5, LFS1, P53, TRP53
Chromosome:
17;
Location:
17p13.1
8.

TLR2 - toll like receptor 2

The protein encoded by this gene is a member of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family which plays a fundamental role in pathogen recognition and activation of innate immunity. TLRs are highly conserved from Drosophila to humans and share structural and functional similarities. This protein is a cell-surface protein that can form heterodimers with other TLR family members to recognize conserved molecules derived from microorganisms known as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Activation of TLRs by PAMPs leads to an up-regulation of signaling pathways to modulate the host's inflammatory response. This gene is also thought to promote apoptosis in response to bacterial lipoproteins. This gene has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases. Alternative splicing results in multiple transcript variants. [provided by RefSeq, Jan 2016]

Also known as:
CD282, TIL4
Chromosome:
4;
Location:
4q31.3
9.

AURKA - aurora kinase A

The protein encoded by this gene is a cell cycle-regulated kinase that appears to be involved in microtubule formation and/or stabilization at the spindle pole during chromosome segregation. The encoded protein is found at the centrosome in interphase cells and at the spindle poles in mitosis. This gene may play a role in tumor development and progression. A processed pseudogene of this gene has been found on chromosome 1, and an unprocessed pseudogene has been found on chromosome 10. Multiple transcript variants encoding the same protein have been found for this gene. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008]

Also known as:
AIK, ARK1, AURA, BTAK, PPP1R47, STK15, STK6, STK7
Chromosome:
20;
Location:
20q13.2
10.

SRC - SRC proto-oncogene, non-receptor tyrosine kinase

This gene is highly similar to the v-src gene of Rous sarcoma virus. This proto-oncogene may play a role in the regulation of embryonic development and cell growth. The protein encoded by this gene is a tyrosine-protein kinase whose activity can be inhibited by phosphorylation by c-SRC kinase. Mutations in this gene could be involved in the malignant progression of colon cancer. Two transcript variants encoding the same protein have been found for this gene. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008]

Also known as:
ASV, SRC1, THC6, c-SRC, p60-Src
Chromosome:
20;
Location:
20q11.23
11.

PTPRJ - protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type J

The protein encoded by this gene is a member of the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) family. PTPs are known to be signaling molecules that regulate a variety of cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, mitotic cycle, and oncogenic transformation. This PTP possesses an extracellular region containing five fibronectin type III repeats, a single transmembrane region, and a single intracytoplasmic catalytic domain, and thus represents a receptor-type PTP. This protein is present in all hematopoietic lineages, and was shown to negatively regulate T cell receptor signaling possibly through interfering with the phosphorylation of Phospholipase C Gamma 1 and Linker for Activation of T Cells. This protein can also dephosphorylate the PDGF beta receptor, and may be involved in UV-induced signal transduction. Multiple transcript variants encoding different isoforms have been found for this gene. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008]

Also known as:
CD148, DEP1, HPTP eta, HPTPeta, R-PTP-ETA, R-PTP-J, SCC1
Chromosome:
11;
Location:
11p11.2
12.

PTPN12 - protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 12

The protein encoded by this gene is a member of the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) family. PTPs are signaling molecules that regulate a variety of cellular processes including cell growth, differentiation, mitotic cycle, and oncogenic transformation. This PTP contains a C-terminal PEST motif, which serves as a protein-protein interaction domain, and may regulate protein intracellular half-life. This PTP was found to bind and dephosphorylate the product of the oncogene c-ABL and thus may play a role in oncogenesis. This PTP was also shown to interact with, and dephosphorylate, various products related to cytoskeletal structure and cell adhesion, such as p130 (Cas), CAKbeta/PTK2B, PSTPIP1, and paxillin. This suggests it has a regulatory role in controlling cell shape and mobility. Alternative splicing results in multiple transcript variants encoding distinct isoforms. [provided by RefSeq, Oct 2008]

Also known as:
PTP-PEST, PTPG1
Chromosome:
7;
Location:
7q11.23
13.

PLA2G2A - phospholipase A2 group IIA

The protein encoded by this gene is a member of the phospholipase A2 family (PLA2). PLA2s constitute a diverse family of enzymes with respect to sequence, function, localization, and divalent cation requirements. This gene product belongs to group II, which contains secreted form of PLA2, an extracellular enzyme that has a low molecular mass and requires calcium ions for catalysis. It catalyzes the hydrolysis of the sn-2 fatty acid acyl ester bond of phosphoglycerides, releasing free fatty acids and lysophospholipids, and thought to participate in the regulation of the phospholipid metabolism in biomembranes. Several alternatively spliced transcript variants with different 5' UTRs have been found for this gene.[provided by RefSeq, Sep 2009]

Also known as:
MOM1, PLA2, PLA2B, PLA2L, PLA2S, PLAS1, sPLA2
Chromosome:
1;
Location:
1p36.13
14.

PIK3CA - phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha

Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase is composed of an 85 kDa regulatory subunit and a 110 kDa catalytic subunit. The protein encoded by this gene represents the catalytic subunit, which uses ATP to phosphorylate PtdIns, PtdIns4P and PtdIns(4,5)P2. This gene has been found to be oncogenic and has been implicated in cervical cancers. A pseudogene of this gene has been defined on chromosome 22. [provided by RefSeq, Apr 2016]

Also known as:
CCM4, CLAPO, CLOVE, CWS5, MCAP, MCM, MCMTC, PI3K, PI3K-alpha, p110-alpha
Chromosome:
3;
Location:
3q26.32
15.

PDGFRL - platelet derived growth factor receptor like

This gene encodes a protein with significant sequence similarity to the ligand binding domain of platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta. Mutations in this gene, or deletion of a chromosomal segment containing this gene, are associated with sporadic hepatocellular carcinomas, colorectal cancers, and non-small cell lung cancers. This suggests this gene product may function as a tumor suppressor. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008]

Also known as:
PDGRL, PRLTS
Chromosome:
8;
Location:
8p22
16.

NRAS - NRAS proto-oncogene, GTPase

This is an N-ras oncogene encoding a membrane protein that shuttles between the Golgi apparatus and the plasma membrane. This shuttling is regulated through palmitoylation and depalmitoylation by the ZDHHC9-GOLGA7 complex. The encoded protein, which has intrinsic GTPase activity, is activated by a guanine nucleotide-exchange factor and inactivated by a GTPase activating protein. Mutations in this gene have been associated with somatic rectal cancer, follicular thyroid cancer, autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome, Noonan syndrome, and juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia. [provided by RefSeq, Jun 2011]

Also known as:
ALPS4, CMNS, KRAS, N-ras, NCMS, NRAS1, NS6
Chromosome:
1;
Location:
1p13.2
17.

MCC - MCC regulator of WNT signaling pathway

This gene is a candidate colorectal tumor suppressor gene that is thought to negatively regulate cell cycle progression. The orthologous gene in the mouse expresses a phosphoprotein associated with the plasma membrane and membrane organelles, and overexpression of the mouse protein inhibits entry into S phase. Multiple transcript variants encoding different isoforms have been found for this gene. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008]

Also known as:
MCC1
Chromosome:
5;
Location:
5q22.2
18.

FGFR3 - fibroblast growth factor receptor 3

This gene encodes a member of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) family, with its amino acid sequence being highly conserved between members and among divergent species. FGFR family members differ from one another in their ligand affinities and tissue distribution. A full-length representative protein would consist of an extracellular region, composed of three immunoglobulin-like domains, a single hydrophobic membrane-spanning segment and a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase domain. The extracellular portion of the protein interacts with fibroblast growth factors, setting in motion a cascade of downstream signals, ultimately influencing mitogenesis and differentiation. This particular family member binds acidic and basic fibroblast growth hormone and plays a role in bone development and maintenance. Mutations in this gene lead to craniosynostosis and multiple types of skeletal dysplasia. [provided by RefSeq, Aug 2017]

Also known as:
ACH, CD333, CEK2, HSFGFR3EX, JTK4
Chromosome:
4;
Location:
4p16.3
19.

EP300 - E1A binding protein p300

This gene encodes the adenovirus E1A-associated cellular p300 transcriptional co-activator protein. It functions as histone acetyltransferase that regulates transcription via chromatin remodeling and is important in the processes of cell proliferation and differentiation. It mediates cAMP-gene regulation by binding specifically to phosphorylated CREB protein. This gene has also been identified as a co-activator of HIF1A (hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha), and thus plays a role in the stimulation of hypoxia-induced genes such as VEGF. Defects in this gene are a cause of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome and may also play a role in epithelial cancer. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008]

Also known as:
KAT3B, MKHK2, RSTS2, p300
Chromosome:
22;
Location:
22q13.2
20.

DCC - DCC netrin 1 receptor

This gene encodes a netrin 1 receptor. The transmembrane protein is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecules, and mediates axon guidance of neuronal growth cones towards sources of netrin 1 ligand. The cytoplasmic tail interacts with the tyrosine kinases Src and focal adhesion kinase (FAK, also known as PTK2) to mediate axon attraction. The protein partially localizes to lipid rafts, and induces apoptosis in the absence of ligand. The protein functions as a tumor suppressor, and is frequently mutated or downregulated in colorectal cancer and esophageal carcinoma. [provided by RefSeq, Oct 2009]

Also known as:
CRC18, CRCR1, HGPPS2, IGDCC1, MRMV1, NTN1R1
Chromosome:
18;
Location:
18q21.2

Results: 1 to 20 of 28

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