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Micromelia

MedGen UID:
10031
Concept ID:
C0025995
Congenital Abnormality
Synonyms: Micromelic dwarf; Micromelus; Nanomelia; Smaller or shorter than typical limbs
SNOMED CT: Micromelia (74370006); Micromelus (74370006); Micromelic dwarf (74370006); Nanomelia (74370006)
 
HPO: HP:0002983

Definition

The presence of abnormally small extremities. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVMicromelia

Conditions with this feature

Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome
MedGen UID:
61231
Concept ID:
C0175694
Disease or Syndrome
Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is a congenital multiple-anomaly / cognitive impairment syndrome caused by an abnormality in cholesterol metabolism resulting from deficiency of the enzyme 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) reductase. It is characterized by prenatal and postnatal growth restriction, microcephaly, moderate-to-severe intellectual disability, and multiple major and minor malformations. The malformations include distinctive facial features, cleft palate, cardiac defects, underdeveloped external genitalia in males, postaxial polydactyly, and 2-3 syndactyly of the toes. The clinical spectrum is wide; individuals with normal development and only minor malformations have been described.
Ruvalcaba syndrome
MedGen UID:
120520
Concept ID:
C0265248
Disease or Syndrome
Ruvalcaba syndrome is an extremely rare malformation syndrome, described in less than 10 patients to date, characterized by microcephaly with characteristic facies (downslanting parpebral fissures, microstomia, beaked nose, narrow maxilla), very short stature, narrow thoracic cage with pectus carinatum, hypoplastic genitalia and skeletal anomalies (i.e. characteristic brachydactyly and osteochondritis of the spine) as well as intellectual and developmental delay.
Achondrogenesis, type IA
MedGen UID:
78546
Concept ID:
C0265273
Congenital Abnormality
The term achondrogenesis has been used to characterize the most severe forms of chondrodysplasia in humans, invariably lethal before or shortly after birth. Achondrogenesis type I is a severe chondrodystrophy characterized radiographically by deficient ossification in the lumbar vertebrae and absent ossification in the sacral, pubic and ischial bones and clinically by stillbirth or early death (Maroteaux and Lamy, 1968; Langer et al., 1969). In addition to severe micromelia, there is a disproportionately large cranium due to marked edema of soft tissues. Classification of Achondrogenesis Achondrogenesis was traditionally divided into 2 types: type I (Parenti-Fraccaro) and type II (Langer-Saldino). Borochowitz et al. (1988) suggested that achondrogenesis type I of Parenti-Fraccaro should be classified into 2 distinct disorders: type IA, corresponding to the cases originally published by Houston et al. (1972) and Harris et al. (1972), and type IB (600972), corresponding to the case originally published by Fraccaro (1952). Analysis of the case reported by Parenti (1936) by Borochowitz et al. (1988) suggested the diagnosis of achondrogenesis type II, i.e., the Langer-Saldino type (200610). Type IA would be classified as lethal achondrogenesis, Houston-Harris type; type IB, lethal achondrogenesis, Fraccaro type; and type II, lethal achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis, Langer-Saldino type. Superti-Furga (1996) suggested that hypochondrogenesis should be considered separately from achondrogenesis type II because the phenotype can be much milder. Genetic Heterogeneity of Achondrogenesis Achondrogenesis type IB (ACG1B; 600972) is caused by mutation in the DTDST gene (606718), and achondrogenesis type II (ACG2; 200610) is caused by mutation in the COL2A1 gene (120140).
Achondrogenesis, type IB
MedGen UID:
78547
Concept ID:
C0265274
Congenital Abnormality
Clinical features of achondrogenesis type 1B (ACG1B) include extremely short limbs with short fingers and toes, hypoplasia of the thorax, protuberant abdomen, and hydropic fetal appearance caused by the abundance of soft tissue relative to the short skeleton. The face is flat, the neck is short, and the soft tissue of the neck may be thickened. Death occurs prenatally or shortly after birth.
Infantile hypophosphatasia
MedGen UID:
75677
Concept ID:
C0268412
Disease or Syndrome
Hypophosphatasia is characterized by defective mineralization of growing or remodeling bone, with or without root-intact tooth loss, in the presence of low activity of serum and bone alkaline phosphatase. Clinical features range from stillbirth without mineralized bone at the severe end to pathologic fractures of the lower extremities in later adulthood at the mild end. While the disease spectrum is a continuum, seven clinical forms of hypophosphatasia are usually recognized based on age at diagnosis and severity of features: Perinatal (severe): characterized by pulmonary insufficiency and hypercalcemia. Perinatal (benign): prenatal skeletal manifestations that slowly resolve into one of the milder forms. Infantile: onset between birth and age six months of clinical features of rickets without elevated serum alkaline phosphatase activity. Severe childhood (juvenile): variable presenting features progressing to rickets. Mild childhood: low bone mineral density for age, increased risk of fracture, and premature loss of primary teeth with intact roots. Adult: characterized by stress fractures and pseudofractures of the lower extremities in middle age, sometimes associated with early loss of adult dentition. Odontohypophosphatasia: characterized by premature exfoliation of primary teeth and/or severe dental caries without skeletal manifestations.
Hamartoma of hypothalamus
MedGen UID:
137970
Concept ID:
C0342418
Finding
Pallister-Hall-like syndrome (PHLS) is a pleiotropic autosomal recessive disorder characterized by phenotypic variability. Patients exhibit postaxial polydactyly as well as hypothalamic hamartoma, cardiac and skeletal anomalies, and craniofacial dysmorphisms. Hirschsprung disease has also been observed (Rubino et al., 2018; Le et al., 2020). Pallister-Hall syndrome (146510) is an autosomal dominant disorder with features overlapping those of PHLS, caused by mutation in the GLI3 gene (165240).
Rolland-Debuqois syndrome
MedGen UID:
98145
Concept ID:
C0432209
Disease or Syndrome
The dyssegmental dysplasias are lethal forms of neonatal short-limbed dwarfism. Handmaker et al. (1977) coined the term 'dyssegmental dysplasia' because of the marked differences in size and shape of the vertebral bodies (anisospondyly), which he attributed to errors in segmentation. Fasanelli et al. (1985) proposed that there are different forms of dyssegmental dwarfism, a lethal Silverman-Handmaker type (224410) and a less severe Rolland-Desbuquois type. The Rolland-Desbuquois form is lethal in about 40% of patients. Although many patients survive beyond the newborn period, all exhibit neonatal distress (summary by Hennekam et al., 2010).
Chondrodysplasia punctata, MT type
MedGen UID:
98147
Concept ID:
C0432224
Congenital Abnormality
A rare, non-rhizomelic, chondrodysplasia punctata syndrome characterized, radiologically, by stippled calcifications and disproportionate, short metacarpals and tibiae (with characteristic overshoot of the proximal fibula), clinically manifesting with severe short stature, bilateral shortening of upper and lower limbs, flat midface and nose, in the absence of cataracts and cutaneous anomalies. Neonatal tachypnea, hydrocephalus and mild developmental delay have been seldomly associated. Additional radiologic features include bowed long bones, platyspondyly and/or vertebral clefts.
Kyphomelic dysplasia
MedGen UID:
140930
Concept ID:
C0432239
Disease or Syndrome
A rare primary bone dysplasia characterized, radiologically, by short, stubby long bones, severely angulated femurs and lesser bowing of other long bones (mild, moderate or no bowing), short and wide iliac wings with horizontal acetabular roofs, platyspondyly and a narrow thorax, clinically manifesting with severe, disproportionate short stature. Regression of femora angulation is observed with advancing age.
C syndrome
MedGen UID:
167105
Concept ID:
C0796095
Disease or Syndrome
The C syndrome, also known as Opitz trigonocephaly syndrome, is a malformation syndrome characterized by trigonocephaly, severe mental retardation, hypotonia, variable cardiac defects, redundant skin, and dysmorphic facial features, including upslanted palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, depressed nasal bridge, and low-set, posteriorly rotated ears (summary by Kaname et al., 2007). C syndrome shows phenotypic overlap with Bohring-Opitz syndrome, or C-like syndrome (605039), a disorder with more severe features than C syndrome, caused by heterozygous mutation in the ASXL1 gene (612990) on chromosome 20q11.
Thanatophoric dysplasia, type 2
MedGen UID:
226975
Concept ID:
C1300257
Disease or Syndrome
Thanatophoric dysplasia (TD) is a short-limb skeletal dysplasia that is usually lethal in the perinatal period. TD is divided into subtypes: TD type I is characterized by micromelia with bowed femurs and, uncommonly, the presence of craniosynostosis of varying severity. TD type II is characterized by micromelia with straight femurs and uniform presence of moderate-to-severe craniosynostosis with cloverleaf skull deformity. Other features common to type I and type II include: short ribs, narrow thorax, relative macrocephaly, distinctive facial features, brachydactyly, hypotonia, and redundant skin folds along the limbs. Most affected infants die of respiratory insufficiency shortly after birth. Rare long-term survivors have been reported.
Micromelic bone dysplasia with cloverleaf skull
MedGen UID:
322531
Concept ID:
C1834928
Disease or Syndrome
Platyspondylic dysplasia, Torrance type
MedGen UID:
331974
Concept ID:
C1835437
Disease or Syndrome
The Torrance type of platyspondylic lethal skeletal dysplasia (PLSDT) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by varying platyspondyly, short ribs with anterior cupping, hypoplasia of the lower ilia with broad ischial and pubic bones, and shortening of the tubular bones with splayed and cupped metaphyses. Histology of the growth plate typically shows focal hypercellularity with slightly enlarged chondrocytes in the resting cartilage and relatively well-preserved columnar formation and ossification at the chondroosseous junction. Though generally lethal in the perinatal period, longer survival has been reported (summary by Zankl et al., 2005).
Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, matrilin-3 type
MedGen UID:
325181
Concept ID:
C1837481
Disease or Syndrome
The Borochowitz-Cormier-Daire type of spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMDBCD) is a rare type of autosomal recessive short-limb short-trunk dwarfism. Affected individuals have significant short stature with pronounced leg bowing, lumbar lordosis, and a waddling gait (summary by Borochowitz et al., 2004 and Shyamasundar et al., 2020).
Mesomelia-synostoses syndrome
MedGen UID:
324959
Concept ID:
C1838162
Disease or Syndrome
The Verloes-David-Pfeiffer mesomelia-synostoses syndrome is an autosomal dominant form of mesomelic dysplasia comprising typical acral synostoses combined with ptosis, hypertelorism, palatal abnormality, congenital heart disease, and ureteral anomalies (summary by Isidor et al., 2009). Mesomelia and synostoses are also cardinal features of the Kantaputra type of mesomelic dysplasia (156232).
Chondrodysplasia-pseudohermaphroditism syndrome
MedGen UID:
333149
Concept ID:
C1838654
Disease or Syndrome
Nivelon-Nivelon-Mabille syndrome (NNMS) is characterized by progressive microcephaly, vermis hypoplasia, and skeletal dysplasia. Variable features include infantile-onset seizures, dwarfism, generalized chondrodysplasia, and micromelia (Abdel-Salam et al., 2019).
Acrocapitofemoral dysplasia
MedGen UID:
334681
Concept ID:
C1843096
Disease or Syndrome
Acrocapitofemoral dysplasia (ACFD) is an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia characterized by postnatal-onset disproportionate short stature, relatively large head, narrow thorax, lumbar lordosis, short limbs, and brachydactyly with small broad nails (Ozyavuz Cubuk and Duz, 2021).
Thanatophoric dysplasia, Glasgow variant
MedGen UID:
376457
Concept ID:
C1848865
Disease or Syndrome
Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia-short limb-abnormal calcification syndrome
MedGen UID:
338595
Concept ID:
C1849011
Disease or Syndrome
Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia-short limb-abnormal calcification syndrome is a rare, genetic primary bone dysplasia disorder characterized by disproportionate short stature with shortening of upper and lower limbs, short and broad fingers with short hands, narrowed chest with rib abnormalities and pectus excavatum, abnormal chondral calcifications (incl. larynx, trachea and costal cartilages) and facial dysmorphism (frontal bossing, hypertelorism, prominent eyes, short flat nose, wide nostrils, high-arched palate, long philtrum). Platyspondyly (esp. of cervical spine) and abnormal epiphyses and metaphyses are observed on radiography. Atlantoaxial instability causing spinal compression and recurrent respiratory disease are potential complications that may result lethal.
Lethal osteosclerotic bone dysplasia
MedGen UID:
342416
Concept ID:
C1850106
Disease or Syndrome
Raine syndrome (RNS) is a neonatal osteosclerotic bone dysplasia of early and aggressive onset that usually results in death within the first few weeks of life, although there have been some reports of survival into childhood. Radiographic studies show a generalized increase in the density of all bones and a marked increase in the ossification of the skull. The increased ossification of the basal structures of the skull and facial bones underlies the characteristic facial features, which include narrow prominent forehead, proptosis, depressed nasal bridge, and midface hypoplasia. Periosteal bone formation is also characteristic of this disorder and differentiates it from osteopetrosis and other known lethal and nonlethal osteosclerotic bone dysplasias. The periosteal bone formation typically extends along the diaphysis of long bones adjacent to areas of cellular soft tissue (summary by Simpson et al., 2009). Some patients survive infancy (Simpson et al., 2009; Fradin et al., 2011).
Atelosteogenesis type II
MedGen UID:
338072
Concept ID:
C1850554
Disease or Syndrome
Clinical features of atelosteogenesis type 2 (AO2) include rhizomelic limb shortening with normal-sized skull, hitchhiker thumbs, small chest, protuberant abdomen, cleft palate, and distinctive facial features (midface retrusion, depressed nasal bridge, epicanthus, micrognathia). Other typical findings are ulnar deviation of the fingers, gap between the first and second toes, and clubfoot. AO2 is usually lethal at birth or shortly thereafter due to pulmonary hypoplasia and tracheobronchomalacia. However, it exists in a continuous phenotypic spectrum with diastrophic dysplasia, and long-term survivors have been reported.
Osteogenesis imperfecta type 7
MedGen UID:
343981
Concept ID:
C1853162
Disease or Syndrome
Osteogenesis imperfecta is a connective tissue disorder characterized by bone fragility and low bone mass. OI type VII is an autosomal recessive form of severe or lethal OI (summary by Barnes et al., 2006).
Microcephaly-micromelia syndrome
MedGen UID:
381553
Concept ID:
C1855079
Disease or Syndrome
Microcephaly-micromelia syndrome (MIMIS) is a severe autosomal recessive disorder that usually results in death in utero or in the perinatal period. Affected individuals have severe growth retardation with microcephaly and variable malformations of the limbs, particularly the upper limbs. Defects include radial ray anomalies, malformed digits, and clubfeet (summary by Evrony et al., 2017).
Lethal Kniest-like syndrome
MedGen UID:
347372
Concept ID:
C1857100
Disease or Syndrome
Silverman-Handmaker dyssegmental dysplasia (DDSH) is a lethal autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia with anisospondyly and micromelia. Individuals with DDSH also have a flat face, micrognathia, cleft palate and reduced joint mobility, and frequently have an encephalocele. The endochondral growth plate is short, the calcospherites (spherical calcium-phosphorus crystals produced by hypertrophic chondrocytes) are unfused, and there is mucoid degeneration of the resting cartilage (summary by Arikawa-Hirasawa et al., 2001).
Chondrodysplasia Blomstrand type
MedGen UID:
395189
Concept ID:
C1859148
Disease or Syndrome
Blomstrand chondrodysplasia is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by short limbs, polyhydramnios, hydrops fetalis, facial anomalies, increased bone density, and advanced skeletal maturation (summary by Loshkajian et al., 1997).
Camptomelic syndrome, long-limb type
MedGen UID:
347129
Concept ID:
C1859354
Disease or Syndrome
Osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism, type 1
MedGen UID:
347149
Concept ID:
C1859452
Congenital Abnormality
Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type I (MOPD1) is a severe autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia characterized by dwarfism, microcephaly, and neurologic abnormalities, including mental retardation, brain malformations, and ocular/auditory sensory deficits. Patients often die in early childhood (summary by Pierce and Morse, 2012).
Congenital brain dysgenesis due to glutamine synthetase deficiency
MedGen UID:
400638
Concept ID:
C1864910
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital glutamine deficiency is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by onset at birth of encephalopathy, lack of normal development, seizures, and hypotonia associated with variable brain abnormalities (summary by Haberle et al., 2011).
Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, Shohat type
MedGen UID:
400703
Concept ID:
C1865185
Disease or Syndrome
Shohat-type spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMDSH) is a chondrodysplasia characterized by vertebral, epiphyseal, and metaphyseal abnormalities, including scoliosis with vertebral compression fractures, flattened vertebral bodies, and hypomineralization of long bones. Affected individuals may exhibit a small trunk, short neck, small limbs, joint laxity, bowlegs, and/or abdominal distention with hepatosplenomegaly (summary by Egunsola et al., 2017).
Endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia syndrome
MedGen UID:
390740
Concept ID:
C2675227
Disease or Syndrome
Endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia (ECO) syndrome is characterized by various anomalies of the endocrine, cerebral, and skeletal systems resulting in neonatal mortality.
Autosomal recessive spondylometaphyseal dysplasia, Megarbane type
MedGen UID:
413221
Concept ID:
C2750075
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spondylometaphyseal dysplasia, Mégarbané type is a rare, primary bone dysplasia characterized by intrauterine growth retardation, pre- and postnatal disproportionate short stature with short, rhizomelic limbs, facial dysmorphism, a short neck and small thorax. Hypotonia, cardiomegaly and global developmental delay have also been associated. Several radiographic findings have been reported, including ribs with cupped ends, platyspondyly, square iliac bones, horizontal and trident acetabula, hypoplastic ischia, and delayed epiphyseal ossification.
Metaphyseal anadysplasia 2
MedGen UID:
414350
Concept ID:
C2751322
Disease or Syndrome
Any metaphyseal anadysplasia in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the MMP9 gene.
Greenberg dysplasia
MedGen UID:
418969
Concept ID:
C2931048
Disease or Syndrome
Greenberg dysplasia (GRBGD), also known as hydrops-ectopic calcification-moth-eaten (HEM) skeletal dysplasia, is a rare autosomal recessive osteochondrodysplasia characterized by gross fetal hydrops, severe shortening of all long bones with a moth-eaten radiographic appearance, platyspondyly, disorganization of chondroosseous calcification, and ectopic ossification centers. It is lethal in utero. Patient fibroblasts show increased levels of cholesta-8,14-dien-3-beta-ol, suggesting a defect of sterol metabolism (summary by Konstantinidou et al., 2008). Herman (2003) reviewed the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway and 6 disorders involving enzyme defects in postsqualene cholesterol biosynthesis: Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS; 270400), desmosterolosis (602398), X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata (CDPX2; 302960), CHILD syndrome (308050), lathosterolosis (607330), and HEM skeletal dysplasia.
Osteogenesis imperfecta type 10
MedGen UID:
462561
Concept ID:
C3151211
Disease or Syndrome
Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) comprises a group of connective tissue disorders characterized by bone fragility and low bone mass. The disorder is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. OI type X is an autosomal recessive form characterized by multiple bone deformities and fractures, generalized osteopenia, dentinogenesis imperfecta, and blue sclera (Christiansen et al., 2010).
Short-rib thoracic dysplasia 7 with or without polydactyly
MedGen UID:
481422
Concept ID:
C3279792
Disease or Syndrome
Short-rib thoracic dysplasia (SRTD) with or without polydactyly refers to a group of autosomal recessive skeletal ciliopathies that are characterized by a constricted thoracic cage, short ribs, shortened tubular bones, and a 'trident' appearance of the acetabular roof. SRTD encompasses Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) and the disorders previously designated as Jeune syndrome or asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD), short rib-polydactyly syndrome (SRPS), and Mainzer-Saldino syndrome (MZSDS). Polydactyly is variably present, and there is phenotypic overlap in the various forms of SRTDs, which differ by visceral malformation and metaphyseal appearance. Nonskeletal involvement can include cleft lip/palate as well as anomalies of major organs such as the brain, eye, heart, kidneys, liver, pancreas, intestines, and genitalia. Some forms of SRTD are lethal in the neonatal period due to respiratory insufficiency secondary to a severely restricted thoracic cage, whereas others are compatible with life (summary by Huber and Cormier-Daire, 2012 and Schmidts et al., 2013). There is phenotypic overlap with the cranioectodermal dysplasias (Sensenbrenner syndrome; see CED1, 218330). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of short-rib thoracic dysplasia, see SRTD1 (208500).
Acrocephalopolydactyly
MedGen UID:
501209
Concept ID:
C3495588
Disease or Syndrome
Acrocephalopolydactylous dysplasia, or Elejalde syndrome, is a lethal multiple congenital disorder characterized by increased birth weight, globular body with thick skin, organomegaly, and fibrosis in multiple tissues (summary by Phadke et al., 2011).
Short stature-optic atrophy-Pelger-HuC+t anomaly syndrome
MedGen UID:
762020
Concept ID:
C3541319
Disease or Syndrome
Among the Yakuts, an Asian population isolate that is located in the northeastern part of Siberia, Maksimova et al. (2010) ascertained an autosomal recessive short stature syndrome involving postnatal growth failure, small hands and feet, loss of visual acuity with abnormalities of color vision, abnormal nuclear shape in neutrophil granulocytes (Pelger-Huet anomaly; see 169400), and normal intelligence.
Short-rib thoracic dysplasia 14 with polydactyly
MedGen UID:
901479
Concept ID:
C4225286
Disease or Syndrome
Short-rib thoracic dysplasia (SRTD) with or without polydactyly refers to a group of autosomal recessive skeletal ciliopathies that are characterized by a constricted thoracic cage, short ribs, shortened tubular bones, and a 'trident' appearance of the acetabular roof. SRTD encompasses Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) and the disorders previously designated as Jeune syndrome or asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD), short rib-polydactyly syndrome (SRPS), and Mainzer-Saldino syndrome (MZSDS). Polydactyly is variably present, and there is phenotypic overlap in the various forms of SRTDs, which differ by visceral malformation and metaphyseal appearance. Nonskeletal involvement can include cleft lip/palate as well as anomalies of major organs such as the brain, eye, heart, kidneys, liver, pancreas, intestines, and genitalia. Some forms of SRTD are lethal in the neonatal period due to respiratory insufficiency secondary to a severely restricted thoracic cage, whereas others are compatible with life (summary by Huber and Cormier-Daire, 2012 and Schmidts et al., 2013). There is phenotypic overlap with the cranioectodermal dysplasias (Sensenbrenner syndrome; see CED1, 218330). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of short-rib thoracic dysplasia with or without polydactyly, see SRTD1 (208500).
Neu-Laxova syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1633287
Concept ID:
C4551478
Disease or Syndrome
Any Neu-Laxova syndrome in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the PHGDH gene.
Schwartz-Jampel syndrome type 1
MedGen UID:
1647990
Concept ID:
C4551479
Disease or Syndrome
Schwartz-Jampel syndrome type 1 (SJS1) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by muscle stiffness (myotonia) and chondrodysplasia. Affected individuals usually present in childhood with permanent muscle stiffness or bone deformities. Common clinical features include mask-like facies (narrow palpebral fissures, blepharospasm, and pursed lips); permanent muscle stiffness with continuous skeletal muscle activity recorded on electromyography; dwarfism; pectus carinatum; kyphoscoliosis; bowing of long bones; and epiphyseal, metaphyseal, and hip dysplasia. The disorder is slowly progressive but does not appear to alter life span (summary by Stum et al., 2006).
Cornelia de Lange syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1645760
Concept ID:
C4551851
Disease or Syndrome
Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) encompasses a spectrum of findings from mild to severe. Severe (classic) CdLS is characterized by distinctive facial features, growth restriction (prenatal onset; <5th centile throughout life), hypertrichosis, and upper-limb reduction defects that range from subtle phalangeal abnormalities to oligodactyly (missing digits). Craniofacial features include synophrys, highly arched and/or thick eyebrows, long eyelashes, short nasal bridge with anteverted nares, small widely spaced teeth, and microcephaly. Individuals with a milder phenotype have less severe growth, cognitive, and limb involvement, but often have facial features consistent with CdLS. Across the CdLS spectrum IQ ranges from below 30 to 102 (mean: 53). Many individuals demonstrate autistic and self-destructive tendencies. Other frequent findings include cardiac septal defects, gastrointestinal dysfunction, hearing loss, myopia, and cryptorchidism or hypoplastic genitalia.
Short-rib thoracic dysplasia 18 with polydactyly
MedGen UID:
1632904
Concept ID:
C4693420
Disease or Syndrome
Short-rib thoracic dysplasia (SRTD) with or without polydactyly refers to a group of autosomal recessive skeletal ciliopathies that are characterized by a constricted thoracic cage, short ribs, shortened tubular bones, and a 'trident' appearance of the acetabular roof. SRTD encompasses Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) and the disorders previously designated as Jeune syndrome or asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD), short rib-polydactyly syndrome (SRPS), and Mainzer-Saldino syndrome (MZSDS). Polydactyly is variably present, and there is phenotypic overlap in the various forms of SRTDs, which differ by visceral malformation and metaphyseal appearance. Nonskeletal involvement can include cleft lip/palate as well as anomalies of major organs such as the brain, eye, heart, kidneys, liver, pancreas, intestines, and genitalia. Some forms of SRTD are lethal in the neonatal period due to respiratory insufficiency secondary to a severely restricted thoracic cage, whereas others are compatible with life (summary by Huber and Cormier-Daire, 2012 and Schmidts et al., 2013). There is phenotypic overlap with the cranioectodermal dysplasias (Sensenbrenner syndrome; see CED1, 218330). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of short-rib thoracic dysplasia with or without polydactyly, see SRTD1 (208500).
Short-rib thoracic dysplasia 19 with or without polydactyly
MedGen UID:
1635837
Concept ID:
C4693524
Disease or Syndrome
Short-rib thoracic dysplasia (SRTD) with or without polydactyly refers to a group of autosomal recessive skeletal ciliopathies that are characterized by a constricted thoracic cage, short ribs, shortened tubular bones, and a 'trident' appearance of the acetabular roof. SRTD encompasses Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) and the disorders previously designated as Jeune syndrome or asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD), short rib-polydactyly syndrome (SRPS), and Mainzer-Saldino syndrome (MZSDS). Polydactyly is variably present, and there is phenotypic overlap in the various forms of SRTDs, which differ by visceral malformation and metaphyseal appearance. Nonskeletal involvement can include cleft lip/palate as well as anomalies of major organs such as the brain, eye, heart, kidneys, liver, pancreas, intestines, and genitalia. Some forms of SRTD are lethal in the neonatal period due to respiratory insufficiency secondary to a severely restricted thoracic cage, whereas others are compatible with life (summary by Huber and Cormier-Daire, 2012 and Schmidts et al., 2013). There is phenotypic overlap with the cranioectodermal dysplasias (Sensenbrenner syndrome; see CED1, 218330). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of short-rib thoracic dysplasia with or without polydactyly, see SRTD1 (208500).
Skeletal dysplasia, mild, with joint laxity and advanced bone age
MedGen UID:
1711043
Concept ID:
C5394341
Disease or Syndrome
CSGALNACT1 deficiency is characterized by mild skeletal dysplasia, joint hypermobility, and advanced bone age. Shortness of long bones is evident prenatally, and patients exhibit short stature and relative macrocephaly. Advanced carpotarsal bone age and monkey-wrench appearance of the femur observed in infancy may disappear with age (Mizumoto et al., 2020).
Odontochondrodysplasia 1
MedGen UID:
1784281
Concept ID:
C5542277
Disease or Syndrome
Odontochondrodysplasia-1 (ODCD1) is characterized by mesomelic shortening of tubular bones, ligamentous laxity, and scoliosis, in association with dentinogenesis imperfecta involving both primary and secondary dentition. Affected individuals show variable severity. Radiologic features include trident pelvis, posteriorly flattened vertebrae, and brachydactyly with cone-shaped epiphyses (Maroteaux et al., 1996). Clinical variability and extraskeletal manifestations have been observed (Wehrle et al., 2019). Genetic Heterogeneity of Odontochondrodysplasia Odontochondrodysplasia-2 with hearing loss and diabetes (ODCD2; 619269) is caused by mutation in the TANGO1 gene (MIA3; 613455) on chromosome 1q41.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Guzmán-Huerta ME, Morales AS, Benavides-Serralde A, Camargo-Marín L, Velázquez-Torres B, Gallardo-Gaona JM, Acevedo-Gallegos S, Martínez-Juárez A, Ramírez-Calvo JA
Rev Invest Clin 2012 Sep-Oct;64(5):429-36. PMID: 23544305
Yeh P, Saeed F, Paramasivam G, Wyatt-Ashmead J, Kumar S
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Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Alessandri JL, Celse T, Spodenkiewicz M, Calaya A, Dumont C, Jacquemont ML, Bertaut-Nativel B, Boumahni B, Rémy M, Ferroul F, Guilly S, Huby T, Irabé M, Laurens T, Munier P, Morel G, Payet F, Randrianaivo H, Doray B, Dospeux J
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Diagnosis

Alessandri JL, Celse T, Spodenkiewicz M, Calaya A, Dumont C, Jacquemont ML, Bertaut-Nativel B, Boumahni B, Rémy M, Ferroul F, Guilly S, Huby T, Irabé M, Laurens T, Munier P, Morel G, Payet F, Randrianaivo H, Doray B, Dospeux J
Eur J Med Genet 2024 Jun;69:104940. Epub 2024 May 3 doi: 10.1016/j.ejmg.2024.104940. PMID: 38705458
Abu-Ghname A, Trost J, Davis MJ, Sutton VR, Zhang C, Guillen DE, Carvalho CMB, Maricevich RS
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Lewis LE, Ramesh Bhat Y, Naik P, Sethi K, Girisha KM
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Prognosis

Anjum F, Daha SK, Shah G
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Am J Med Genet 2001 Winter;106(4):254-7. doi: 10.1002/ajmg.10229. PMID: 11891676
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Clinical prediction guides

Karaca E, Posey JE, Bostwick B, Liu P, Gezdirici A, Yesil G, Coban Akdemir Z, Bayram Y, Harms FL, Meinecke P, Alawi M, Bacino CA, Sutton VR, Kortüm F, Lupski JR
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Yeh P, Saeed F, Paramasivam G, Wyatt-Ashmead J, Kumar S
Prenat Diagn 2011 May;31(5):515-8. Epub 2011 Mar 3 doi: 10.1002/pd.2729. PMID: 21370244
Lewis LE, Ramesh Bhat Y, Naik P, Sethi K, Girisha KM
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Arikawa-Hirasawa E, Wilcox WR, Yamada Y
Am J Med Genet 2001 Winter;106(4):254-7. doi: 10.1002/ajmg.10229. PMID: 11891676
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