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Proximal muscle weakness

MedGen UID:
113169
Concept ID:
C0221629
Finding
Synonyms: Muscle weakness, proximal; Proximal limb muscle weakness; Proximal limb weakness
SNOMED CT: Proximal muscle weakness (249939004)
 
HPO: HP:0003701

Definition

A lack of strength of the proximal muscles. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Dejerine-Sottas disease
MedGen UID:
3710
Concept ID:
C0011195
Disease or Syndrome
Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy is a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy with onset in infancy. It can show autosomal dominant or recessive inheritance. Affected individuals have delayed motor development due to severe distal motor and sensory impairment, resulting in difficulties in gait. Some patients have generalized hypotonia in infancy. Other features may include pes cavus, scoliosis, and sensory ataxia. Nerve conduction velocities are severely decreased (sometimes less than 10 m/s), and sural nerve biopsy shows severe loss of myelinated fibers (summary by Baets et al., 2011).
Glycogen storage disease, type II
MedGen UID:
5340
Concept ID:
C0017921
Disease or Syndrome
Pompe disease is classified by age of onset, organ involvement, severity, and rate of progression. Infantile-onset Pompe disease (IOPD; individuals with onset before age 12 months with cardiomyopathy) may be apparent in utero but more typically onset is at the median age of four months with hypotonia, generalized muscle weakness, feeding difficulties, failure to thrive, respiratory distress, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Without treatment by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), IOPD commonly results in death by age two years from progressive left ventricular outflow obstruction and respiratory insufficiency. Late-onset Pompe disease (LOPD; including: (a) individuals with onset before age 12 months without cardiomyopathy; and (b) all individuals with onset after age 12 months) is characterized by proximal muscle weakness and respiratory insufficiency; clinically significant cardiac involvement is uncommon.
Ornithine aminotransferase deficiency
MedGen UID:
6695
Concept ID:
C0018425
Disease or Syndrome
Gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina (GACR) due to deficiency of ornithine aminotransferase is clinically characterized by a triad of progressive chorioretinal degeneration, early cataract formation, and type II muscle fiber atrophy. Characteristic chorioretinal atrophy with progressive constriction of the visual fields leads to blindness at the latest during the sixth decade of life. Patients generally have normal intelligence (summary by Peltola et al., 2002). See 238970 for another hyperornithinemia syndrome.
Myasthenia gravis
MedGen UID:
7764
Concept ID:
C0026896
Disease or Syndrome
Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease in which antibodies bind to acetylcholine receptors or to functionally related molecules in the postsynaptic membrane at the neuromuscular junction. The antibodies induce weakness of skeletal muscles, which is the sole disease manifestation. The weakness can be generalized or localized, is more proximal than distal, and nearly always includes eye muscles, with diplopia and ptosis. The pattern of involvement is usually symmetric, apart from the eye involvement, which is often markedly asymmetric and involves several eye muscles. The weakness typically increases with exercise and repetitive muscle use (fatigue) and varies over the course of a day and from day to day, often with nearly normal muscle strength in the morning (summary by Gilhus, 2016).
Kugelberg-Welander disease
MedGen UID:
101816
Concept ID:
C0152109
Disease or Syndrome
Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy resulting from progressive degeneration and irreversible loss of the anterior horn cells in the spinal cord (i.e., lower motor neurons) and the brain stem nuclei. The onset of weakness ranges from before birth to adulthood. The weakness is symmetric, proximal > distal, and progressive. Before the genetic basis of SMA was understood, it was classified into clinical subtypes based on maximum motor function achieved; however, it is now apparent that the phenotype of SMN1-associated SMA spans a continuum without clear delineation of subtypes. With supportive care only, poor weight gain with growth failure, restrictive lung disease, scoliosis, and joint contractures are common complications; however, newly available targeted treatment options are changing the natural history of this disease.
Inclusion body myositis
MedGen UID:
68659
Concept ID:
C0238190
Disease or Syndrome
Sporadic inclusion body myositis (IBM) is the most common age-related muscle disease in the elderly that results in severe disability. Although traditionally considered an inflammatory myopathy, it is now considered to be more consistent with a myodegenerative disease (Sugarman et al., 2002; Askanas and Engel, 2006).
Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy
MedGen UID:
75730
Concept ID:
C0270952
Disease or Syndrome
Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is characterized by ptosis and dysphagia due to selective involvement of the muscles of the eyelids and pharynx, respectively. For the vast majority of individuals with typical OPMD, the mean age of onset of ptosis is usually 48 years and of dysphagia 50 years; in 5%-10% of individuals with severe OPMD, onset of ptosis and dysphagia occur before age 45 years and is associated with lower limb girdle weakness starting around age 60 years. Swallowing difficulties, which determine prognosis, increase the risk for potentially life-threatening aspiration pneumonia and poor nutrition. Other manifestations as the disease progresses can include limitation of upward gaze, tongue atrophy and weakness, chewing difficulties, wet voice, facial muscle weakness, axial muscle weakness, and proximal limb girdle weakness predominantly in lower limbs. Some individuals with severe involvement will eventually need a wheelchair. Neuropsychological tests have shown altered scores in executive functions in some.
Sarcotubular myopathy
MedGen UID:
78750
Concept ID:
C0270968
Congenital Abnormality
A mild subtype of autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy characterized by slowly progressive proximal muscle weakness and wasting of the pelvic and shoulder girdles with onset that usually occurs during the second or third decade of life. Clinical presentation is variable and can include calf psuedohypertrophy, joint contractures, scapular winging, muscle cramping and/or facial and respiratory muscle involvement.
Autosomal dominant optic atrophy classic form
MedGen UID:
137902
Concept ID:
C0338508
Disease or Syndrome
Optic atrophy type 1 (OPA1, or Kjer type optic atrophy) is characterized by bilateral and symmetric optic nerve pallor associated with insidious decrease in visual acuity (usually between ages 4 and 6 years), visual field defects, and color vision defects. Visual impairment is usually moderate (6/10 to 2/10), but ranges from mild or even insignificant to severe (legal blindness with acuity <1/20). The visual field defect is typically centrocecal, central, or paracentral; it is often large in those with severe disease. The color vision defect is often described as acquired blue-yellow loss (tritanopia). Other findings can include auditory neuropathy resulting in sensorineural hearing loss that ranges from severe and congenital to subclinical (i.e., identified by specific audiologic testing only). Visual evoked potentials are typically absent or delayed; pattern electroretinogram shows an abnormal N95:P50 ratio. Tritanopia is the classic feature of color vision defect, but more diffuse nonspecific dyschromatopsia is not uncommon. Ophthalmoscopic examination discloses temporal or diffuse pallor of the optic discs, sometimes associated with optic disc excavation. The neuroretinal rim shows some pallor in most cases, sometimes associated with a temporal pigmentary gray crescent.
Renal carnitine transport defect
MedGen UID:
90999
Concept ID:
C0342788
Disease or Syndrome
Systemic primary carnitine deficiency (CDSP) is a disorder of the carnitine cycle that results in defective fatty acid oxidation. It encompasses a broad clinical spectrum including the following: Metabolic decompensation in infancy typically presenting between age three months and two years with episodes of hypoketotic hypoglycemia, poor feeding, irritability, lethargy, hepatomegaly, elevated liver transaminases, and hyperammonemia triggered by fasting or common illnesses such as upper respiratory tract infection or gastroenteritis. Childhood myopathy involving heart and skeletal muscle with onset between age two and four years. Pregnancy-related decreased stamina or exacerbation of cardiac arrhythmia. Fatigability in adulthood. Absence of symptoms. The latter two categories often include mothers diagnosed with CDSP after newborn screening has identified low carnitine levels in their infants.
Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with optic atrophy
MedGen UID:
140747
Concept ID:
C0393807
Disease or Syndrome
MFN2 hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (MFN2-HMSN) is a classic axonal peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy, inherited in either an autosomal dominant (AD) manner (~90%) or an autosomal recessive (AR) manner (~10%). MFN2-HMSN is characterized by more severe involvement of the lower extremities than the upper extremities, distal upper-extremity involvement as the neuropathy progresses, more prominent motor deficits than sensory deficits, and normal (>42 m/s) or only slightly decreased nerve conduction velocities (NCVs). Postural tremor is common. Median onset is age 12 years in the AD form and age eight years in the AR form. The prevalence of optic atrophy is approximately 7% in the AD form and approximately 20% in the AR form.
Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy 1A
MedGen UID:
98046
Concept ID:
C0410179
Disease or Syndrome
Collagen VI-related dystrophies (COL6-RDs) represent a continuum of overlapping clinical phenotypes with Bethlem muscular dystrophy at the milder end, Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) at the more severe end, and a phenotype in between UCMD and Bethlem muscular dystrophy, referred to as intermediate COL6-RD. Bethlem muscular dystrophy is characterized by a combination of proximal muscle weakness and joint contractures. Hypotonia and delayed motor milestones occur in early childhood; mild hypotonia and weakness may be present congenitally. By adulthood, there is evidence of proximal weakness and contractures of the elbows, Achilles tendons, and long finger flexors. The progression of weakness is slow, and more than two thirds of affected individuals older than age 50 years remain independently ambulatory indoors, while relying on supportive means for mobility outdoors. Respiratory involvement is not a consistent feature. UCMD is characterized by congenital weakness, hypotonia, proximal joint contractures, and striking hyperlaxity of distal joints. Decreased fetal movements are frequently reported. Some affected children acquire the ability to walk independently; however, progression of the disease results in a loss of ambulation by age ten to eleven years. Early and severe respiratory insufficiency occurs in all individuals, resulting in the need for nocturnal noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in the form of bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) by age 11 years. Intermediate COL6-RD is characterized by independent ambulation past age 11 years and respiratory insufficiency that is later in onset than in UCMD and results in the need for NIV in the form of BiPAP by the late teens to early 20s. In contrast to individuals with Bethlem muscular dystrophy, those with intermediate COL6-RD typically do not achieve the ability to run, jump, or climb stairs without use of a railing.
Myopathy, centronuclear, 2
MedGen UID:
98049
Concept ID:
C0410204
Disease or Syndrome
Any centronuclear myopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the BIN1 gene.
Congenital myopathy with fiber type disproportion
MedGen UID:
108177
Concept ID:
C0546264
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital fiber-type disproportion is a condition that primarily affects skeletal muscles, which are muscles used for movement. People with this condition typically experience muscle weakness (myopathy), particularly in the muscles of the shoulders, upper arms, hips, and thighs. Weakness can also affect the muscles of the face and muscles that control eye movement (ophthalmoplegia), sometimes causing droopy eyelids (ptosis). Individuals with congenital fiber-type disproportion generally have a long face, a high arch in the roof of the mouth (high-arched palate), and crowded teeth.\n\nIndividuals with congenital fiber-type disproportion may have joint deformities (contractures) and an abnormally curved lower back (lordosis) or a spine that curves to the side (scoliosis). Approximately 30 percent of people with this disorder experience mild to severe breathing problems related to weakness of muscles needed for breathing. Some people who experience these breathing problems require use of a machine to help regulate their breathing at night (noninvasive mechanical ventilation), and occasionally during the day as well. About 30 percent of affected individuals have difficulty swallowing due to muscle weakness in the throat. Rarely, people with this condition have a weakened and enlarged heart muscle (dilated cardiomyopathy).\n\nThe severity of congenital fiber-type disproportion varies widely. It is estimated that up to 25 percent of affected individuals experience severe muscle weakness at birth and die in infancy or childhood. Others have only mild muscle weakness that becomes apparent in adulthood. Most often, the signs and symptoms of this condition appear by age 1. The first signs of this condition are usually decreased muscle tone (hypotonia) and muscle weakness. In most cases, muscle weakness does not worsen over time, and in some instances it may improve. Although motor skills such as standing and walking may be delayed, many affected children eventually learn to walk. These individuals often have less stamina than their peers, but they remain active. Rarely, people with this condition have a progressive decline in muscle strength over time. These individuals may lose the ability to walk and require wheelchair assistance.
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1
MedGen UID:
155703
Concept ID:
C0752120
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria, and eventual deterioration of bulbar functions. Early in the disease, affected individuals may have gait disturbance, slurred speech, difficulty with balance, brisk deep tendon reflexes, hypermetric saccades, nystagmus, and mild dysphagia. Later signs include slowing of saccadic velocity, development of up-gaze palsy, dysmetria, dysdiadochokinesia, and hypotonia. In advanced stages, muscle atrophy, decreased deep tendon reflexes, loss of proprioception, cognitive impairment (e.g., frontal executive dysfunction, impaired verbal memory), chorea, dystonia, and bulbar dysfunction are seen. Onset is typically in the third or fourth decade, although childhood onset and late-adult onset have been reported. Those with onset after age 60 years may manifest a pure cerebellar phenotype. Interval from onset to death varies from ten to 30 years; individuals with juvenile onset show more rapid progression and more severe disease. Anticipation is observed. An axonal sensory neuropathy detected by electrophysiologic testing is common; brain imaging typically shows cerebellar and brain stem atrophy.
Brown-Vialetto-van Laere syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
163239
Concept ID:
C0796274
Disease or Syndrome
Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and a variety of cranial nerve palsies, usually involving the motor components of the seventh and ninth to twelfth (more rarely the third, fifth, and sixth) cranial nerves. Spinal motor nerves and, less commonly, upper motor neurons are sometimes affected, giving a picture resembling amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; 105400). The onset of the disease is usually in the second decade, but earlier and later onset have been reported. Hearing loss tends to precede the onset of neurologic signs, mostly progressive muscle weakness causing respiratory compromise. However, patients with very early onset may present with bulbar palsy and may not develop hearing loss until later. The symptoms, severity, and disease duration are variable (summary by Green et al., 2010). Genetic Heterogeneity of Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere Syndrome See also BVVLS2 (614707), caused by mutation in the SLC52A2 gene (607882) on chromosome 8q.
Danon disease
MedGen UID:
209235
Concept ID:
C0878677
Disease or Syndrome
Danon disease is a multisystem condition with predominant involvement of the heart, skeletal muscles, and retina, with overlying cognitive dysfunction. Males are typically more severely affected than females. Males usually present with childhood onset concentric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy that is progressive and often requires heart transplantation. Rarely, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can evolve to resemble dilated cardiomyopathy. Most affected males also have cardiac conduction abnormalities. Skeletal muscle weakness may lead to delayed acquisition of motor milestones. Learning disability and intellectual disability, most often in the mild range, are common. Additionally, affected males can develop retinopathy with subsequent visual impairment. The clinical features in females are broader and more variable. Females are more likely to have dilated cardiomyopathy, with a smaller proportion requiring heart transplantation compared to affected males. Cardiac conduction abnormalities, skeletal muscle weakness, mild cognitive impairment, and pigmentary retinopathy are variably seen in affected females.
NARP syndrome
MedGen UID:
231285
Concept ID:
C1328349
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-associated Leigh syndrome and NARP (neurogenic muscle weakness, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa) are part of a continuum of progressive neurodegenerative disorders caused by abnormalities of mitochondrial energy generation. Leigh syndrome (or subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy) is characterized by onset of symptoms typically between ages three and 12 months, often following a viral infection. Decompensation (often with elevated lactate levels in blood and/or CSF) during an intercurrent illness is typically associated with psychomotor retardation or regression. Neurologic features include hypotonia, spasticity, movement disorders (including chorea), cerebellar ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. Extraneurologic manifestations may include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. About 50% of affected individuals die by age three years, most often as a result of respiratory or cardiac failure. NARP is characterized by proximal neurogenic muscle weakness with sensory neuropathy, ataxia, and pigmentary retinopathy. Onset of symptoms, particularly ataxia and learning difficulties, is often in early childhood. Individuals with NARP can be relatively stable for many years, but may suffer episodic deterioration, often in association with viral illnesses.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4D
MedGen UID:
371304
Concept ID:
C1832334
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4D (CMT4D) is an autosomal recessive disorder of the peripheral nervous system characterized by early-onset distal muscle weakness and atrophy, foot deformities, and sensory loss affecting all modalities. Affected individuals develop deafness by the third decade of life (summary by Okamoto et al., 2014). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, see CMT4A (214400).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4B1
MedGen UID:
321947
Concept ID:
C1832399
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, type 4B1 (CMT4B1) is a severe early-onset demyelinating CMT peripheral sensorimotor polyneuropathy. It was initially described in an Italian family and around 10 additional families have been described so far. Onset occurs during early childhood with distal and proximal muscular weakness starting in the lower extremities, sensory loss and cranial nerve involvement. Foot deformities are frequent and diaphragmatic and facial involvement has been reported. CMT4B1 is caused by mutations in the gene encoding myotubularin-related protein 2 (MTMR2; 11q22), involved in polyphosphoinositide signaling. Transmitted in an autosomal recessive manner.
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2F
MedGen UID:
331308
Concept ID:
C1832525
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-6 (LGMDR6) is a very rare and severe neuromuscular disorder with onset in most patients in the first decade of life. Generalized muscle weakness affecting predominantly proximal and distal muscles of the limbs is progressive, and patients require walking aids or become wheelchair-bound. Some patients have cardiomyopathy or heart rhythm abnormalities, or require ventilatory support (Alonso-Perez et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, see LGMDR1 (253600).
Rippling muscle disease 2
MedGen UID:
371357
Concept ID:
C1832560
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary rippling muscle disease is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by mechanically triggered contractions of skeletal muscle. In rippling muscle disease, mechanical stimulation leads to electrically silent muscle contractions that spread to neighboring fibers that cause visible ripples to move over the muscle. RMD is usually inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, but autosomal recessive inheritance has also been reported (Kubisch et al., 2005). Genetic Heterogeneity of Rippling Muscle Disease Another locus for RMD, designated RMD1 (600332), maps to chromosome 1q41.
Epiphyseal dysplasia, multiple, 3
MedGen UID:
322091
Concept ID:
C1832998
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) presents in early childhood, usually with pain in the hips and/or knees after exercise. Affected children complain of fatigue with long-distance walking. Waddling gait may be present. Adult height is either in the lower range of normal or mildly shortened. The limbs are relatively short in comparison to the trunk. Pain and joint deformity progress, resulting in early-onset osteoarthritis, particularly of the large weight-bearing joints.
Proximal myopathy with focal depletion of mitochondria
MedGen UID:
318881
Concept ID:
C1833453
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic neuromuscular disease with characteristics of late onset of mild, progressive proximal muscle weakness, severe myalgia during and after exercise, and susceptibility to rhabdomyolysis. Intellectual disability is mild or absent. There are no abnormalities of the skin. Muscle biopsy shows focal depletion of mitochondria especially at the centre of muscle fibres, surrounded by enlarged mitochondria at the periphery.
Neuropathy, congenital, with arthrogryposis multiplex
MedGen UID:
320286
Concept ID:
C1834206
Disease or Syndrome
Spinal muscular atrophy-progressive myoclonic epilepsy syndrome
MedGen UID:
371854
Concept ID:
C1834569
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of ASAH1-related disorders ranges from Farber disease (FD) to spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMA-PME). Classic FD is characterized by onset in the first weeks of life of painful, progressive deformity of the major joints; palpable subcutaneous nodules of joints and mechanical pressure points; and a hoarse cry resulting from granulomas of the larynx and epiglottis. Life expectancy is usually less than two years. In the other less common types of FD, onset, severity, and primary manifestations vary. SMA-PME is characterized by early-childhood-onset progressive lower motor neuron disease manifest typically between ages three and seven years as proximal lower-extremity weakness, followed by progressive myoclonic and atonic seizures, tremulousness/tremor, and sensorineural hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy typically begins in late childhood after the onset of weakness and can include jerking of the upper limbs, action myoclonus, myoclonic status, and eyelid myoclonus. Other findings include generalized tremor, and cognitive decline. The time from disease onset to death from respiratory complications is usually five to 15 years.
Bethlem myopathy
MedGen UID:
331805
Concept ID:
C1834674
Disease or Syndrome
Bethlem myopathy-1 (BTHLM1) is a congenital muscular dystrophy characterized by distal joint laxity and a combination of distal and proximal joint contractures. Weakness usually begins in mid-childhood or adolescence, but progression is slow and ambulation is retained into adulthood (summary by Butterfield et al., 2013). Genetic Heterogeneity of Bethlem Myopathy See Bethlem myopathy-1B (BTHLM1B; 620725), caused by mutation in the COL6A2 gene (120240) on chromosome 21q22; Bethlem myopathy-1C (620726), caused by mutation the COL6A3 gene (120250) on chromosome 2q37; and Bethlem myopathy-2 (BTHLM2; 616471), caused by mutation in the COL12A1 gene (120320) on chromosome 6q13-q14.
Myofibrillar myopathy 5
MedGen UID:
372186
Concept ID:
C1836050
Disease or Syndrome
Other signs and symptoms of myofibrillar myopathy can include a weakened heart muscle (cardiomyopathy), muscle pain (myalgia), loss of sensation and weakness in the limbs (peripheral neuropathy), and respiratory failure. Individuals with this condition may have skeletal problems including joint stiffness (contractures) and abnormal side-to-side curvature of the spine (scoliosis). Rarely, people with this condition develop clouding of the lens of the eyes (cataracts).\n\nThe signs and symptoms of myofibrillar myopathy vary widely among affected individuals, typically depending on the condition's genetic cause. Most people with this disorder begin to develop muscle weakness (myopathy) in mid-adulthood. However, features of this condition can appear anytime between infancy and late adulthood. Muscle weakness most often begins in the hands and feet (distal muscles), but some people first experience weakness in the muscles near the center of the body (proximal muscles). Other affected individuals develop muscle weakness throughout their body. Facial muscle weakness can cause swallowing and speech difficulties. Muscle weakness worsens over time.\n\nMyofibrillar myopathy is part of a group of disorders called muscular dystrophies that affect muscle function and cause weakness. Myofibrillar myopathy primarily affects skeletal muscles, which are muscles that the body uses for movement. In some cases, the heart (cardiac) muscle is also affected.
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal dominant 3
MedGen UID:
373087
Concept ID:
C1836439
Disease or Syndrome
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia is characterized by multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions in skeletal muscle. The most common clinical features include adult onset of weakness of the external eye muscles and exercise intolerance. Patients with C10ORF2-linked adPEO may have other clinical features including proximal muscle weakness, ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, cardiomyopathy, cataracts, depression, and endocrine abnormalities (summary by Fratter et al., 2010). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia, see PEOA1 (157640). PEO caused by mutations in the POLG gene (174763) are associated with more complicated phenotypes than those forms caused by mutations in the SLC25A4 (103220) or C10ORF2 genes (Lamantea et al., 2002).
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type B6
MedGen UID:
373284
Concept ID:
C1837229
Disease or Syndrome
MDDGB6 is an autosomal recessive congenital muscular dystrophy with impaired intellectual development and structural brain abnormalities (Longman et al., 2003). It is part of a group of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Mercuri et al., 2009). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type B, see MDDGB1 (613155).
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2J
MedGen UID:
324741
Concept ID:
C1837342
Disease or Syndrome
A form of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy that usually has a childhood onset (but can range from the first to third decade of life) of severe progressive proximal weakness, eventually involving the distal muscles. Some patients may remain ambulatory but most are wheelchair dependant 20 years after onset. Caused by homozygous mutation in the titin gene (TTN).
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis type 8
MedGen UID:
325237
Concept ID:
C1837728
Disease or Syndrome
A neurodegenerative disease with characteristics of progressive muscular paralysis reflecting degeneration of motor neurons in the primary motor cortex, corticospinal tracts, brainstem and spinal cord. Caused by heterozygous mutation in the VAPB gene on chromosome 20q13.
Spinal muscular atrophy, type IV
MedGen UID:
325364
Concept ID:
C1838230
Disease or Syndrome
Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy resulting from progressive degeneration and irreversible loss of the anterior horn cells in the spinal cord (i.e., lower motor neurons) and the brain stem nuclei. The onset of weakness ranges from before birth to adulthood. The weakness is symmetric, proximal > distal, and progressive. Before the genetic basis of SMA was understood, it was classified into clinical subtypes based on maximum motor function achieved; however, it is now apparent that the phenotype of SMN1-associated SMA spans a continuum without clear delineation of subtypes. With supportive care only, poor weight gain with growth failure, restrictive lung disease, scoliosis, and joint contractures are common complications; however, newly available targeted treatment options are changing the natural history of this disease.
Mitochondrial myopathy with diabetes
MedGen UID:
333236
Concept ID:
C1839028
Disease or Syndrome
A rare, genetic, mitochondrial DNA-related mitochondrial myopathy disorder characterized by slowly progressive muscular weakness (proximal greater than distal), predominantly involving the facial muscles and scapular girdle, associated with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Neurological involvement and congenital myopathy may be variably observed.
King Denborough syndrome
MedGen UID:
327082
Concept ID:
C1840365
Disease or Syndrome
King-Denborough syndrome (KDS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the triad of congenital myopathy, dysmorphic features, and susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia (summary by Dowling et al., 2011).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2K
MedGen UID:
375064
Concept ID:
C1842983
Disease or Syndrome
A severe early-onset form of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth peripheral sensorimotor polyneuropathy. Onset occurs in the neonatal period or early infancy with a clinical picture including hypotonia, scoliosis, a hoarse voice, vocal cord paralysis and respiratory insufficiency. However, nerve conduction velocities and pathological findings from sural nerve biopsies are indicative of a predominantly axonal neuropathy with some demyelinating features. Caused by mutations in the GDAP1 gene (8q13.3), encoding a protein required for mitochondrial fission.
Sensory ataxic neuropathy, dysarthria, and ophthalmoparesis
MedGen UID:
375302
Concept ID:
C1843851
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life and about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called "chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus," or "CPEO+").
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I
MedGen UID:
339580
Concept ID:
C1846672
Disease or Syndrome
MDGDC5 is an autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy characterized by variable age at onset, normal cognition, and no structural brain changes (Brockington et al., 2001). It is part of a group of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Mercuri et al., 2006). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type C, see MDDGC1 (609308).
Distal myopathy with anterior tibial onset
MedGen UID:
335706
Concept ID:
C1847532
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic neuromuscular disease with characteristics of a progressive muscle weakness starting in the anterior tibial muscles, later involving lower and upper limb muscles, associated with an increased serum creatine kinase levels and absence of dysferlin on muscle biopsy. There is evidence the disease is caused by homozygous mutation in the gene encoding dysferlin (DYSF) on chromosome 2p13. Patients become wheelchair dependent.
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type B5
MedGen UID:
335764
Concept ID:
C1847759
Disease or Syndrome
MDDGB5 is an autosomal recessive congenital muscular dystrophy with impaired intellectual development and structural brain abnormalities (Brockington et al., 2001). It is part of a group of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Mercuri et al., 2006). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type B, see MDDGB1 (613155).
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome due to tenascin-X deficiency
MedGen UID:
336244
Concept ID:
C1848029
Disease or Syndrome
The clinical features of TNXB-related classical-like Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (clEDS) strongly resemble those seen in classic EDS (cEDS). Affected individuals have generalized joint hypermobility, hyperextensible skin, and easy bruising, but do not have atrophic scarring, as is seen in cEDS. There are also several other distinguishing clinical findings including anomalies of feet and hands, edema in the legs in the absence of cardiac failure, mild proximal and distal muscle weakness, and axonal polyneuropathy. Vaginal, uterine, and/or rectal prolapse can also occur. Tissue fragility with resulting rupture of the trachea, esophagus, and small and large bowel has been reported. Vascular fragility causing a major event occurs in a minority of individuals. Significant variability in the severity of musculoskeletal symptoms and their effect on day-to-day function between unrelated affected individuals as well as among affected individuals in the same family has been reported. Fatigue has been reported in more than half of affected individuals. The severity of symptoms in middle-aged individuals can range from joint hypermobility without complications to being wheelchair-bound as a result of severe and painful foot deformities and fatigue.
Giant axonal neuropathy 1
MedGen UID:
376775
Concept ID:
C1850386
Disease or Syndrome
GAN-related neurodegeneration comprises a phenotypic continuum ranging from severe (sometimes called classic giant axonal neuropathy) to milder pure early-onset peripheral motor and sensory neuropathies. The classic giant axonal neuropathy phenotype typically manifests as an infantile-onset neurodegenerative disorder, starting as a severe peripheral motor and sensory neuropathy and evolving into central nervous system impairment (intellectual disability, seizures, cerebellar signs, and pyramidal tract signs). Most affected individuals become wheelchair dependent in the second decade of life and eventually bedridden with severe polyneuropathy, ataxia, and dementia. Death usually occurs in the third decade. At the milder end of the spectrum are predominantly motor and sensory neuropathies (with little to no CNS involvement) that overlap with the axonal form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies.
Nemaline myopathy 2
MedGen UID:
342534
Concept ID:
C1850569
Disease or Syndrome
Nemaline myopathy-2 (NEM2) is an autosomal recessive skeletal muscle disorder with a wide range of severity. The most common clinical presentation is early-onset (in infancy or childhood) muscle weakness predominantly affecting proximal limb muscles. Muscle biopsy shows accumulation of Z-disc and thin filament proteins into aggregates named 'nemaline bodies' or 'nemaline rods,' usually accompanied by disorganization of the muscle Z discs. The clinical and histologic spectrum of entities caused by variants in the NEB gene is a continuum, ranging in severity. The distribution of weakness can vary from generalized muscle weakness, more pronounced in proximal limb muscles, to distal-only involvement, although neck flexor weakness appears to be rather consistent. Histologic patterns range from a severe usually nondystrophic disturbance of the myofibrillar pattern to an almost normal pattern, with or without nemaline bodies, sometimes combined with cores (summary by Lehtokari et al., 2014). Genetic Heterogeneity of Nemaline Myopathy See also NEM1 (255310), caused by mutation in the tropomyosin-3 gene (TPM3; 191030) on chromosome 1q22; NEM3 (161800), caused by mutation in the alpha-actin-1 gene (ACTA1; 102610) on chromosome 1q42; NEM4 (609285), caused by mutation in the beta-tropomyosin gene (TPM2; 190990) on chromosome 9p13; NEM5A (605355), also known as Amish nemaline myopathy, NEM5B (620386), and NEM5C (620389), all caused by mutation in the troponin T1 gene (TNNT1; 191041) on chromosome 19q13; NEM6 (609273), caused by mutation in the KBTBD13 gene (613727) on chromosome 15q22; NEM7 (610687), caused by mutation in the cofilin-2 gene (CFL2; 601443) on chromosome 14q13; NEM8 (615348), caused by mutation in the KLHL40 gene (615340), on chromosome 3p22; NEM9 (615731), caused by mutation in the KLHL41 gene (607701) on chromosome 2q31; NEM10 (616165), caused by mutation in the LMOD3 gene (616112) on chromosome 3p14; and NEM11 (617336), caused by mutation in the MYPN gene (608517) on chromosome 10q21. Several of the genes encode components of skeletal muscle sarcomeric thin filaments (Sanoudou and Beggs, 2001). Mutations in the NEB gene are the most common cause of nemaline myopathy (Lehtokari et al., 2006).
Bailey-Bloch congenital myopathy
MedGen UID:
340586
Concept ID:
C1850625
Disease or Syndrome
STAC3 disorder is characterized by congenital myopathy, musculoskeletal involvement of the trunk and extremities, feeding difficulties, and delayed motor milestones. Most affected individuals have weakness with myopathic facies, scoliosis, kyphosis or kyphoscoliosis, and contractures. Other common findings are ptosis, abnormalities of the palate (including cleft palate), and short stature. Risk for malignant hyperthermia susceptibility and restrictive lung disease are increased. Intellect is typically normal. Originally described in individuals from the Lumbee Native American tribe (an admixture of Cheraw Indian, English, and African American ancestry) in the state of North Carolina and reported as Native American myopathy, STAC3 disorder has now been identified in numerous other populations worldwide.
Myosclerosis
MedGen UID:
338098
Concept ID:
C1850671
Disease or Syndrome
Collagen VI-related dystrophies (COL6-RDs) represent a continuum of overlapping clinical phenotypes with Bethlem muscular dystrophy at the milder end, Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) at the more severe end, and a phenotype in between UCMD and Bethlem muscular dystrophy, referred to as intermediate COL6-RD. Bethlem muscular dystrophy is characterized by a combination of proximal muscle weakness and joint contractures. Hypotonia and delayed motor milestones occur in early childhood; mild hypotonia and weakness may be present congenitally. By adulthood, there is evidence of proximal weakness and contractures of the elbows, Achilles tendons, and long finger flexors. The progression of weakness is slow, and more than two thirds of affected individuals older than age 50 years remain independently ambulatory indoors, while relying on supportive means for mobility outdoors. Respiratory involvement is not a consistent feature. UCMD is characterized by congenital weakness, hypotonia, proximal joint contractures, and striking hyperlaxity of distal joints. Decreased fetal movements are frequently reported. Some affected children acquire the ability to walk independently; however, progression of the disease results in a loss of ambulation by age ten to eleven years. Early and severe respiratory insufficiency occurs in all individuals, resulting in the need for nocturnal noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in the form of bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) by age 11 years. Intermediate COL6-RD is characterized by independent ambulation past age 11 years and respiratory insufficiency that is later in onset than in UCMD and results in the need for NIV in the form of BiPAP by the late teens to early 20s. In contrast to individuals with Bethlem muscular dystrophy, those with intermediate COL6-RD typically do not achieve the ability to run, jump, or climb stairs without use of a railing.
Congenital multicore myopathy with external ophthalmoplegia
MedGen UID:
340597
Concept ID:
C1850674
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-1B (CMYP1B) is an autosomal recessive disorder of skeletal muscle characterized by severe hypotonia and generalized muscle weakness apparent soon after birth or in early childhood with delayed motor development, generalized muscle weakness and atrophy, and difficulty walking or running. Affected individuals show proximal muscle weakness with axial and shoulder girdle involvement, external ophthalmoplegia, and bulbar weakness, often resulting in feeding difficulties and respiratory insufficiency. Orthopedic complications such as joint laxity, distal contractures, hip dislocation, cleft palate, and scoliosis are commonly observed. Serum creatine kinase is normal. The phenotype is variable in severity (Jungbluth et al., 2005; Bharucha-Goebel et al., 2013). Some patients show symptoms in utero, including reduced fetal movements, polyhydramnios, and intrauterine growth restriction. The most severely affected patients present in utero with fetal akinesia, arthrogryposis, and lung hypoplasia resulting in fetal or perinatal death (McKie et al., 2014). Skeletal muscle biopsy of patients with recessive RYR1 mutations can show variable features, including multiminicores (Ferreiro and Fardeau, 2002), central cores (Jungbluth et al., 2002), congenital fiber-type disproportion (CFTD) (Monnier et al., 2009), and centronuclear myopathy (Wilmshurst et al., 2010). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Myopathy, myosin storage, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
340603
Concept ID:
C1850709
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive myosin storage congenital myopathy-7B (CMYP7B) is a skeletal muscle disorder characterized by the onset of scapuloperoneal muscle weakness in early childhood or young adulthood. Affected individuals have difficulty walking, steppage gait, and scapular winging due to shoulder girdle involvement. The severity and progression of the disorder is highly variable, even within families. Most patients develop respiratory insufficiency, nocturnal hypoventilation, and restrictive lung disease; some develop hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Additional features include myopathic facies, high-arched palate, scoliosis, and muscle wasting with thin body habitus. Serum creatine kinase may be normal or elevated. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows variable findings, including myosin storage disease, type 1 fiber predominance, centralized nuclei, and multiminicore disease (Onengut et al., 2004; Tajsharghi et al., 2007; Beecroft et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Myasthenia, congenital, refractory to acetylcholinesterase inhibitors
MedGen UID:
338127
Concept ID:
C1850806
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B
MedGen UID:
338149
Concept ID:
C1850889
Disease or Syndrome
Dysferlinopathy includes a spectrum of muscle disease characterized by two major phenotypes: Miyoshi muscular dystrophy (MMD) and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B); and two minor phenotypes: asymptomatic hyperCKemia and distal myopathy with anterior tibial onset (DMAT). MMD (median age of onset 19 years) is characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy, most marked in the distal parts of the legs, especially the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. Over a period of years, the weakness and atrophy spread to the thighs and gluteal muscles. The forearms may become mildly atrophic with decrease in grip strength; the small muscles of the hands are spared. LGMD2B is characterized by early weakness and atrophy of the pelvic and shoulder girdle muscles in adolescence or young adulthood, with slow progression. Other phenotypes in this spectrum are scapuloperoneal syndrome and congenital muscular dystrophy. Asymptomatic hyperCKemia is characterized by marked elevation of serum CK concentration only. DMAT is characterized by early and predominant distal muscle weakness, particularly of the muscles of the anterior compartment of the legs.
Neutral lipid storage myopathy
MedGen UID:
339913
Concept ID:
C1853136
Disease or Syndrome
Neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy (NLSDM) is an autosomal recessive muscle disorder characterized by adult onset of slowly progressive proximal muscle weakness affecting the upper and lower limbs and associated with increased serum creatine kinase; distal muscle weakness may also occur. About half of patients develop cardiomyopathy later in the disease course. Other variable features include diabetes mellitus, hepatic steatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, and possibly sensorineural hearing loss. Leukocytes and muscle cells show cytoplasmic accumulation of triglycerides (summary by Reilich et al., 2011). Neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy belongs to a group of disorders termed neutral lipid storage disorders (NLSDs). These disorders are characterized by the presence of triglyceride-containing cytoplasmic droplets in leukocytes and in other tissues, including bone marrow, skin, and muscle. Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome (CDS; 275630) is defined as NLSD with ichthyosis (NLSDI). Patients with NLSDM present with myopathy but without ichthyosis (summary by Fischer et al., 2007).
Adult-onset proximal spinal muscular atrophy, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
340120
Concept ID:
C1854058
Disease or Syndrome
Spinal muscular atrophy is characterized by degeneration of the anterior horn cells in the spinal cord, leading to symmetric muscle weakness and wasting. See also autosomal recessive adult-onset proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA4; 271150), caused by defect in the SMN1 gene (600354), and autosomal dominant childhood-onset proximal SMA (158600).
Myopathy, proximal, and ophthalmoplegia
MedGen UID:
381340
Concept ID:
C1854106
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-6 with ophthalmoplegia (CMYP6) is a relatively mild muscle disorder characterized by childhood onset of symptoms. The disorder is either slowly progressive or nonprogressive, and affected individuals retain ambulation, although there is variable severity. CMYP6 can show both autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance; the phenotype is similar in both forms (summary by Lossos et al., 2005 and Tajsharghi et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2B1
MedGen UID:
343064
Concept ID:
C1854154
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease constitutes a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies. On the basis of electrophysiologic criteria, CMT is divided into 2 major types: type 1, the demyelinating form, characterized by a motor median nerve conduction velocity less than 38 m/s (see CMT1B; 118200); and type 2, the axonal form, with a normal or slightly reduced nerve conduction velocity. For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT type 2, see CMT2A1 (118210).
Mitochondrial myopathy-lactic acidosis-deafness syndrome
MedGen UID:
343245
Concept ID:
C1855033
Disease or Syndrome
A rare metabolic myopathy presenting during childhood, and characterized clinically by growth failure, severe muscle weakness, and moderate sensorineural deafness and biochemically by metabolic acidosis, elevated serum pyruvate concentration, hyperalaninemia and hyperalaninuria. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1973.
Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, Okinawa type
MedGen UID:
346886
Concept ID:
C1858338
Disease or Syndrome
Okinawa-type hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSNO) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by young adult onset of proximal or distal muscle weakness and atrophy, muscle cramps, and fasciculations, with later onset of distal sensory impairment. The disorder is slowly progressive and clinically resembles amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; see 105400) (summary by Ishiura et al., 2012).
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis type 2, juvenile
MedGen UID:
349246
Concept ID:
C1859807
Disease or Syndrome
ALS2-related disorder involves retrograde degeneration of the upper motor neurons of the pyramidal tracts and comprises a clinical continuum of the following three phenotypes: Infantile ascending hereditary spastic paraplegia (IAHSP), characterized by onset of spasticity with increased reflexes and sustained clonus of the lower limbs within the first two years of life, progressive weakness and spasticity of the upper limbs by age seven to eight years, and wheelchair dependence in the second decade with progression toward severe spastic tetraparesis and a pseudobulbar syndrome caused by progressive cranial nerve involvement. Juvenile primary lateral sclerosis (JPLS), characterized by upper motor neuron findings of pseudobulbar palsy and spastic quadriplegia without dementia or cerebellar, extrapyramidal, or sensory signs. Juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (JALS or ALS2), characterized by onset between ages three and 20 years. All affected individuals show a spastic pseudobulbar syndrome (spasticity of speech and swallowing) together with spastic paraplegia. Some individuals are bedridden by age 12 to 50 years.
Stormorken syndrome
MedGen UID:
350028
Concept ID:
C1861451
Disease or Syndrome
Stormorken syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by mild bleeding tendency due to platelet dysfunction, thrombocytopenia, anemia, asplenia, tubular aggregate myopathy, congenital miosis, and ichthyosis. Additional features may include headache or recurrent stroke-like episodes (summary by Misceo et al., 2014).
Diaphyseal medullary stenosis-bone malignancy syndrome
MedGen UID:
350613
Concept ID:
C1862177
Disease or Syndrome
Diaphyseal medullary stenosis with malignant fibrous histiocytoma is an autosomal dominant bone dysplasia characterized by pathologic fractures due to abnormal cortical growth and diaphyseal medullary stenosis. The fractures heal poorly, and there is progressive bowing of the lower extremities. In 2 families, affected individuals also showed a limb-girdle myopathy, with muscle weakness and atrophy. Approximately 35% of affected individuals develop an aggressive form of bone sarcoma consistent with malignant fibrous histiocytoma or osteosarcoma. Thus, the disorder may be considered a tumor predisposition syndrome (summary by Camacho-Vanegas et al., 2012).
Axial osteomalacia
MedGen UID:
354730
Concept ID:
C1862372
Disease or Syndrome
Myopathy, myofibrillar, 9, with early respiratory failure
MedGen UID:
350930
Concept ID:
C1863599
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure (HMERF) is a slowly progressive myopathy that typically begins in the third to fifth decades of life. The usual presenting findings are gait disturbance relating to distal leg weakness or nocturnal respiratory symptoms due to respiratory muscle weakness. Weakness eventually generalizes and affects both proximal and distal muscles. Most affected individuals require walking aids within a few years of onset; some progress to wheelchair dependence and require nocturnal noninvasive ventilatory support about ten years after onset. The phenotype varies even among individuals within the same family: some remain ambulant until their 70s whereas others may require ventilator support in their 40s.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4C
MedGen UID:
356581
Concept ID:
C1866636
Disease or Syndrome
SH3TC2-related hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (SH3TC2-HMSN) is a demyelinating neuropathy characterized by severe spine deformities (scoliosis or kyphoscoliosis) and foot deformities (pes cavus, pes planus, or pes valgus) that typically present in the first decade of life or early adolescence. Other findings can include cranial nerve involvement (most commonly tongue involvement, facial weakness/paralysis, hearing impairment, dysarthria) and respiratory problems.
Dilated cardiomyopathy 1X
MedGen UID:
370583
Concept ID:
C1969024
Disease or Syndrome
Any familial isolated dilated cardiomyopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the FKTN gene.
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2M
MedGen UID:
370585
Concept ID:
C1969040
Disease or Syndrome
MDDGC4 is an autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy with onset in infancy or early childhood. Cognition and brain structure are usually normal (Godfrey et al., 2006). It is part of a group of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Mercuri et al., 2009).
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2L
MedGen UID:
370102
Concept ID:
C1969785
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of ANO5 muscle disease is a continuum that ranges from asymptomatic hyperCKemia and exercise-induced myalgia to proximal and/or distal muscle weakness. The most typical presentation is limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2L (LGMD2L) with late-onset proximal lower-limb weakness in the fourth or fifth decade (range 15-70 years). Less common is Miyoshi-like disease (Miyoshi muscular dystrophy 3) with early-adult-onset calf distal myopathy (around age 20 years). Incidental hyperCKemia may be present even earlier. Initial symptoms are walking difficulties, reduced sports performance, and difficulties in standing on toes as well as nonspecific exercise myalgia and/or burning sensation in the calf muscles. Muscle weakness and atrophy are frequently asymmetric. Cardiac findings can include cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias and/or left ventricular dysfunction. Bulbar or respiratory symptoms have not been reported. Females have milder disease manifestations than males. Disease progression is slow in both the LGMD and distal forms; ambulation is preserved until very late in the disease course. Life span is normal.
Neuronopathy, distal hereditary motor, autosomal recessive 4
MedGen UID:
369682
Concept ID:
C1970211
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic neuromuscular disease characterized by proximal muscle weakness with an early involvement of foot and hand muscles following normal motor development in early childhood, a rapidly progressive disease course leading to generalized areflexic tetraplegia with contractures, severe scoliosis, hyperlordosis, and progressive respiratory insufficiency leading to assisted ventilation. Cranial nerve functions are normal and tongue wasting and fasciculations are absent. Milder phenotype with a moderate generalized weakness and slower disease progress was reported. There is evidence the disease is caused by homozygous mutation in the gene encoding pleckstrin homology domain-containing protein, family G member 5 (PLEKHG5) on chromosome 1p36.
Autosomal recessive ataxia due to ubiquinone deficiency
MedGen UID:
436985
Concept ID:
C2677589
Disease or Syndrome
Primary coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency is usually associated with multisystem involvement, including neurologic manifestations such as fatal neonatal encephalopathy with hypotonia; a late-onset slowly progressive multiple-system atrophy-like phenotype (neurodegeneration with autonomic failure and various combinations of parkinsonism and cerebellar ataxia, and pyramidal dysfunction); and dystonia, spasticity, seizures, and intellectual disability. Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS), the hallmark renal manifestation, is often the initial manifestation either as isolated renal involvement that progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), or associated with encephalopathy (seizures, stroke-like episodes, severe neurologic impairment) resulting in early death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), retinopathy or optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss can also be seen.
X-linked myopathy with postural muscle atrophy
MedGen UID:
395525
Concept ID:
C2678055
Disease or Syndrome
Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) is characterized by the clinical triad of: joint contractures that begin in early childhood; slowly progressive muscle weakness and wasting initially in a humero-peroneal distribution that later extends to the scapular and pelvic girdle muscles; and cardiac involvement that may manifest as palpitations, presyncope and syncope, poor exercise tolerance, and congestive heart failure along with variable cardiac rhythm disturbances. Age of onset, severity, and progression of muscle and cardiac involvement demonstrate both inter- and intrafamilial variability. Clinical variability ranges from early onset with severe presentation in childhood to late onset with slow progression in adulthood. In general, joint contractures appear during the first two decades, followed by muscle weakness and wasting. Cardiac involvement usually occurs after the second decade and respiratory function may be impaired in some individuals.
X-linked scapuloperoneal muscular dystrophy
MedGen UID:
395530
Concept ID:
C2678061
Disease or Syndrome
A rare, genetic, muscular dystrophy disease characterized by the co-occurrence of late onset scapular and peroneal muscle weakness, principally manifesting with distal lower limb and proximal upper limb weakness and scapular winging.
Combined immunodeficiency due to ORAI1 deficiency
MedGen UID:
440578
Concept ID:
C2748568
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-9 (IMD9) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early onset of recurrent infections due to defective T-cell activation. Affected individuals also have congenital myopathy resulting in muscle weakness as well as features of ectodermal dysplasia, including soft dental enamel (summary by McCarl et al., 2009).
Congenital generalized lipodystrophy type 4
MedGen UID:
412871
Concept ID:
C2750069
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital generalized lipodystrophy type 4 (CGL4) combines the phenotype of classic Berardinelli-Seip lipodystrophy (608594) with muscular dystrophy and cardiac conduction anomalies (Hayashi et al., 2009). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital generalized lipodystrophy, see CGL1 (608594).
Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy 5, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
414111
Concept ID:
C2751805
Disease or Syndrome
Any autosomal dominant Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the SYNE2 gene.
Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy 4, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
414476
Concept ID:
C2751807
Disease or Syndrome
Any autosomal dominant Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the SYNE1 gene.
Myofibrillar myopathy 6
MedGen UID:
414119
Concept ID:
C2751831
Disease or Syndrome
Myofibrillar myopathy-6 is an autosomal dominant severe neuromuscular disorder characterized by onset in the first decade of rapidly progressive generalized and proximal muscle weakness, respiratory insufficiency, cardiomyopathy, and skeletal deformities related to muscle weakness. Muscle biopsy shows fiber-type grouping, disruption of the Z lines, and filamentous inclusions, and sural nerve biopsy shows a neuropathy, often with giant axonal neurons. Most patients are severely affected by the second decade and need cardiac transplant, ventilation, and/or a wheelchair (summary by Jaffer et al., 2012). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of myofibrillar myopathy (MFM), see MFM1 (601419).
DPM3-congenital disorder of glycosylation
MedGen UID:
414534
Concept ID:
C2752007
Disease or Syndrome
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type C15 (MDDGC15) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive proximal muscle weakness, manifest initially as unsteady gait, but later including more distal muscles, and dilated cardiomyopathy. The age at onset varies widely from the first decade to adulthood; those with earlier onset may have delayed motor development. Laboratory studies show increased serum creatine kinase and muscle biopsy shows dystrophic features with decreased alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239). Biochemical studies often show evidence of abnormal N-glycosylation of serum proteins, consistent with a congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG) (summary by Svahn et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy- dystroglycanopathy type C, see MDDGC1 (609308). For a discussion of the classification of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065).
Myotonic dystrophy type 2
MedGen UID:
419137
Concept ID:
C2931689
Disease or Syndrome
Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is characterized by myotonia and muscle dysfunction (proximal and axial weakness, myalgia, and stiffness), and less commonly by posterior subcapsular cataracts, cardiac conduction defects, insulin-insensitive type 2 diabetes mellitus, and other endocrine abnormalities. While myotonia (involuntary muscle contraction with delayed relaxation) has been reported during the first decade, onset is typically in the third to fourth decade, most commonly with fluctuating or episodic muscle pain that can be debilitating and proximal and axial weakness of the neck flexors and the hip flexors. Subsequently, weakness occurs in the elbow extensors and finger flexors. Facial weakness and weakness of the ankle dorsiflexors are less common. Myotonia rarely causes severe symptoms. In a subset of individuals, calf hypertrophy in combination with brisk reflexes is notable.
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2D
MedGen UID:
424706
Concept ID:
C2936332
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-3 (LGMDR3) affects mainly the proximal muscles and results in difficulty walking. Most individuals have onset in childhood; the disorder is progressive. Other features may include scapular winging, calf pseudohypertrophy, and contractures. Cardiomyopathy has rarely been reported (summary by Babameto-Laku et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, see LGMDR1 (253600).
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (congenital with intellectual disability), type B2
MedGen UID:
461766
Concept ID:
C3150416
Disease or Syndrome
MDDGB2 is an autosomal recessive congenital muscular dystrophy associated with impaired intellectual development and mild structural brain abnormalities (Yanagisawa et al., 2007). It is part of a group of similar disorders, collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies,' resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239) (Godfrey et al., 2007). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type B, see MDDGB1 (613155).
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2O
MedGen UID:
461767
Concept ID:
C3150417
Disease or Syndrome
MDDGC3 is a rare form of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy with normal cognition (Clement et al., 2008). It is part of a group of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Godfrey et al., 2007). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type C, see MDDGC1 (609308).
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2N
MedGen UID:
461768
Concept ID:
C3150418
Disease or Syndrome
MDDGC2 is an autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy with onset after ambulation is achieved. Cognition is normal (Biancheri et al., 2007). It is part of a group of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Godfrey et al., 2007). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type C, see MDDGC1 (609308).
Autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1H
MedGen UID:
462136
Concept ID:
C3150786
Disease or Syndrome
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1H (LGMD1H) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by adult onset of progressive proximal muscle weakness affecting both the upper and lower limbs (Bisceglia et al., 2010). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, see LGMDD1 (603511).
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2Q
MedGen UID:
462339
Concept ID:
C3150989
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-17 (LGMDR17) is characterized by early childhood onset of proximal muscle weakness and atrophy without skin involvement. One family has shown rapid progression of the disorder in adolescence (summary by Gundesli et al., 2010). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, see LGMDR1 (253600).
Distal myopathy with posterior leg and anterior hand involvement
MedGen UID:
481352
Concept ID:
C3279722
Disease or Syndrome
Williams distal myopathy is an autosomal dominant slowly progressive muscular disorder characterized by distal muscle weakness and atrophy affecting the upper and lower limbs. Onset occurs around the third to fourth decades of life, and patients remain ambulatory even after long disease duration. Muscle biopsy shows nonspecific changes with no evidence of rods, necrosis, or inflammation (summary by Duff et al., 2011). Mutation in the FLNC gene can also cause myofibrillar myopathy-5 (MFM5; 609524), which shows a different pattern of muscle involvement and different histologic changes.
Congenital myopathy 10b, mild variant
MedGen UID:
762102
Concept ID:
C3541476
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-10B (CMYP10B) is an autosomal recessive skeletal muscle disorder characterized by infantile- or childhood-onset myopathy, areflexia, dysphagia, and respiratory distress that usually requires nocturnal ventilation. Other common features include facial and neck muscle weakness, feeding difficulties, contractures, scoliosis, high-arched palate, hyporeflexia, and difficulties walking. The disorder is slowly progressive and most patients follow a chronic course. Muscle biopsy shows variable findings, including type 1 fiber predominance, minicore lesions, and myofibrillar disorganization (Boyden et al., 2012; Harris et al., 2018). Patients with missense mutations affecting conserved cysteine residues in the EGF-like domain show the mild variant phenotype (CMYP10B) with later onset of respiratory failure and minicores on muscle biopsy, whereas patients with more damaging mutations, including nonsense or frameshift null mutations, show the severe variant phenotype (CMYP10A) (Croci et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Congenital myasthenic syndrome 12
MedGen UID:
765249
Concept ID:
C3552335
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myasthenic syndrome-12 is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized by onset of proximal muscle weakness in the first decade. EMG classically shows a decremental response to repeated nerve stimulation. Affected individuals show a favorable response to acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors (summary by Senderek et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMS, see CMS1A (601462).
Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy 7, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
765974
Concept ID:
C3553060
Disease or Syndrome
Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy is a genetically heterogeneous muscular disease that presents with muscular dystrophy, joint contractures, and cardiomyopathy with conduction defects (summary by Liang et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of EDMD, see 310300.
Congenital myasthenic syndrome 13
MedGen UID:
766559
Concept ID:
C3553645
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myasthenic syndrome-13 (CMS13) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized by onset of proximal muscle weakness in the first decade. EMG classically shows a decremental response to repeated nerve stimulation. Affected individuals show a favorable response to acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors (summary by Belaya et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMS, see CMS1A (601462).
Actin accumulation myopathy
MedGen UID:
777997
Concept ID:
C3711389
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-2A (CMYP2A) is an autosomal dominant disorder of the skeletal muscle characterized by infantile- or childhood-onset myopathy with delayed motor milestones and nonprogressive muscle weakness. Of the patients with congenital myopathy caused by mutation in the ACTA1 gene, about 90% carry heterozygous mutations that are usually de novo and cause the severe infantile phenotype (CMYP2C; 620278). Some patients with de novo mutations have a more typical and milder disease course with delayed motor development and proximal muscle weakness, but are able to achieve independent ambulation. Less frequently, autosomal dominant transmission of the disorder within a family may occur when the ACTA1 mutation produces a phenotype compatible with adult life. Of note, intrafamilial variability has also been reported: a severely affected proband may be identified and then mildly affected or even asymptomatic relatives are found to carry the same mutation. The severity of the disease most likely depends on the detrimental effect of the mutation, although there are probably additional modifying factors (Ryan et al., 2001; Laing et al., 2009; Sanoudou and Beggs, 2001; Agrawal et al., 2004; Nowak et al., 2013; Sewry et al., 2019; Laitila and Wallgren-Pettersson, 2021). The most common histologic finding on muscle biopsy in patients with ACTA1 mutations is the presence of 'nemaline rods,' which represent abnormal thread- or rod-like structures ('nema' is Greek for 'thread'). However, skeletal muscle biopsy from patients with mutations in the ACTA1 gene can show a range of pathologic phenotypes. These include classic rods, intranuclear rods, clumped filaments, cores, or fiber-type disproportion, all of which are nonspecific pathologic findings and not pathognomonic of a specific congenital myopathy. Most patients have clinically severe disease, regardless of the histopathologic phenotype (Nowak et al., 2007; Sewry et al., 2019). ACTA1 mutations are the second most common cause of congenital myopathies classified histologically as 'nemaline myopathy' after mutations in the NEB gene (161650). ACTA1 mutations are overrepresented in the severe phenotype with early death (Laing et al., 2009). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of nemaline myopathy, see NEM2 (256030).
Myofibrillar myopathy 3
MedGen UID:
811509
Concept ID:
C3714934
Disease or Syndrome
Myofibrillar myopathy refers to a genetically heterogeneous group of muscular disorders characterized by a pathologic morphologic pattern of myofibrillar degradation and abnormal accumulation of proteins involved with the sarcomeric Z disc (summary by Foroud et al., 2005). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of myofibrillar myopathy, see MFM1 (601419).
Congenital myasthenic syndrome 8
MedGen UID:
815069
Concept ID:
C3808739
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myasthenic syndromes are genetic disorders of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) that are classified by the site of the transmission defect: presynaptic, synaptic, and postsynaptic. CMS8 is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by prominent defects of both the pre- and postsynaptic regions. Affected individuals have onset of muscle weakness in early childhood; the severity of the weakness and muscles affected is variable (summary by Maselli et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMS, see CMS1A (601462).
Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia 5
MedGen UID:
815866
Concept ID:
C3809536
Disease or Syndrome
Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is characterized by episodic syncope occurring during exercise or acute emotion. The underlying cause of these episodes is the onset of fast ventricular tachycardia (bidirectional or polymorphic). Spontaneous recovery may occur when these arrhythmias self-terminate. In other instances, ventricular tachycardia may degenerate into ventricular fibrillation and cause sudden death if cardiopulmonary resuscitation is not readily available. The mean onset of symptoms (usually a syncopal episode) is between age seven and 12 years; onset as late as the fourth decade of life has been reported. If untreated, CPVT is highly lethal, as approximately 30% of affected individuals experience at least one cardiac arrest and up to 80% have one or more syncopal spells. Sudden death may be the first manifestation of the disease.
Proximal myopathy with extrapyramidal signs
MedGen UID:
816615
Concept ID:
C3810285
Disease or Syndrome
Myopathy with extrapyramidal signs is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early childhood onset of proximal muscle weakness and learning disabilities. While the muscle weakness is static, most patients develop progressive extrapyramidal signs that may become disabling (summary by Logan et al., 2014). Brain MRI in 1 patient showed congenital malformations, including polymicrogyria and cerebellar dysplasia (Wilton et al., 2020).
Neuronopathy, distal hereditary motor, type 2D
MedGen UID:
854832
Concept ID:
C3888271
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant distal hereditary motor neuronopathy-6 (HMND6) is a neurologic disorder characterized by onset of slowly progressive distal lower limb weakness and atrophy between the second and fourth decades of life. Weakness usually begins in the calf muscles and later involves more proximal muscles. The severity is variable, and some patients have difficulty walking or running. Most also have upper limb involvement, particularly of the triceps and intrinsic hand muscles. Some patients may lose independent ambulation later in the disease course. Sensory impairment is typically not present, and cognition and bulbar function are normal (summary by Sumner et al., 2013). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant distal HMN (dHMN), see HMND1 (182960).
Familial idiopathic inflammatory myopathy
MedGen UID:
854861
Concept ID:
C3888318
Disease or Syndrome
An instance of myositis that is caused by an inherited genomic modification in an individual, and has an unknown cause.
Myopathy, tubular aggregate, 1
MedGen UID:
860163
Concept ID:
C4011726
Disease or Syndrome
Tubular aggregates in muscle, first described by Engel (1964), are structures of variable appearance consisting of an outer tubule containing either one or more microtubule-like structures or amorphous material. They are a nonspecific pathologic finding that may occur in a variety of circumstances, including alcohol- and drug-induced myopathies, exercise-induced cramps or muscle weakness, and inherited myopathies. Tubular aggregates are derived from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (Salviati et al., 1985) and are believed to represent an adaptive mechanism aimed at regulating an increased intracellular level of calcium in order to prevent the muscle fibers from hypercontraction and necrosis (Martin et al., 1997; Muller et al., 2001). Genetic Heterogeneity of Tubular Aggregate Myopathy See also TAM2 (615883), caused by mutation in the ORAI1 gene (610277) on chromosome 12q24.
Pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease, primary, 4
MedGen UID:
862862
Concept ID:
C4014425
Disease or Syndrome
Cushing syndrome is a clinical designation for the systemic signs and symptoms arising from excess cortisol production. Affected individuals typically show hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance, central obesity, osteoporosis, and sometimes depression. Corticotropin-independent Cushing syndrome results from autonomous cortisol production by the adrenal glands, often associated with adrenocortical tumors. Adrenocortical tumors are most common in adult females (summary by Cao et al., 2014; Sato et al., 2014).
Myopathy, tubular aggregate, 2
MedGen UID:
862994
Concept ID:
C4014557
Disease or Syndrome
Any tubular aggregate myopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the ORAI1 gene.
Polyglucosan body myopathy type 1
MedGen UID:
863042
Concept ID:
C4014605
Disease or Syndrome
Polyglucosan body myopathy-1 (PGBM1) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by onset in childhood of progressive proximal muscle weakness, resulting in difficulties in ambulation. Most patients also develop progressive dilated cardiomyopathy, which may necessitate cardiac transplant in severe cases. A small subset of patients present with severe immunodeficiency and a hyperinflammatory state in very early childhood (summary by Boisson et al., 2012 and Nilsson et al., 2013). Genetic Heterogeneity of Polyglucosan Body Myopathy See also PGBM2 (616199), caused by mutation in the GYG1 gene (603942) on chromosome 3q24.
Frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2
MedGen UID:
863085
Concept ID:
C4014648
Disease or Syndrome
CHCHD10-related disorders are characterized by a spectrum of adult-onset neurologic phenotypes that can include: Mitochondrial myopathy (may also be early onset): weakness, amyotrophy, exercise intolerance. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS): progressive degeneration of upper motor neurons and lower motor neurons. Frontotemporal dementia (FTD): slowly progressive behavioral changes, language disturbances, cognitive decline, extrapyramidal signs. Late-onset spinal motor neuronopathy (SMA, Jokela type): weakness, cramps, and/or fasciculations; areflexia. Axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy: slowly progressive lower-leg muscle weakness and atrophy, small hand muscle weakness, loss of tendon reflexes, sensory abnormalities. Cerebellar ataxia: gait ataxia, kinetic ataxia (progressive loss of coordination of lower- and upper-limb movements), dysarthria/dysphagia, nystagmus, cerebellar oculomotor disorder. Because of the recent discovery of CHCHD10-related disorders and the limited number of affected individuals reported to date, the natural history of these disorders (except for SMAJ caused by the p.Gly66Val pathogenic variant) is largely unknown.
Myopathy, centronuclear, 5
MedGen UID:
863251
Concept ID:
C4014814
Disease or Syndrome
Centronuclear myopathy-5 (CNM5) is an autosomal recessive congenital myopathy characterized by severe neonatal hypotonia with respiratory insufficiency and difficulty feeding. Some patients die in infancy, and some develop dilated cardiomyopathy. Children show severely delayed motor development (summary by Agrawal et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of centronuclear myopathy, see CNM1 (160150).
LIPE-related familial partial lipodystrophy
MedGen UID:
863306
Concept ID:
C4014869
Disease or Syndrome
Familial partial lipodystrophy type 6 (FPLD6) is characterized by abnormal subcutaneous fat distribution, with variable excess accumulation of fat in the face, neck, shoulders, axillae, back, abdomen, and pubic region, and reduction in subcutaneous fat of the lower extremities. Progressive adult-onset myopathy is seen in some patients, and there is variable association with diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and hepatic steatosis (Zolotov et al., 2017). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD), see 151660.
Congenital myasthenic syndrome 7
MedGen UID:
863475
Concept ID:
C4015038
Disease or Syndrome
Presynaptic congenital myasthenic syndrome-7A with distal motor neuropathy (CMS7A) is an autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorder characterized by onset of foot deformities, delayed motor development, and slowly progressive distal muscle weakness resulting in gait difficulties in early childhood. Other features may include hyporeflexia, muscle atrophy, and upper limb involvement. Electrophysiologic studies show low compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs), consistent with a distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN), as well as a decremental response to repetitive stimulation, indicating presynaptic defects at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), consistent with myasthenic syndrome (summary by Fionda et al., 2021). The complex phenotype of patients with dominant SYT2 mutations likely results from impairment of 2 fundamental functions of SYT2: (1) disturbance of calcium-dependent synchronous presynaptic neurotransmitter release, resulting in a myasthenic disorder, and (2) disruption of exocytosis and endocytosis, causing a degenerative process affecting peripheral motor nerve terminals and resulting in a motor neuropathy (Maselli et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMS, see CMS1A (601462). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of dHMN, see 182960.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2S
MedGen UID:
863786
Concept ID:
C4015349
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2S is a relatively pure form of autosomal recessive axonal neuropathy characterized by onset in the first decade of slowly progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy affecting the lower and upper limbs. Patients have decreased reflexes and variable distal sensory impairment (summary by Cottenie et al., 2014). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT, see CMT2A1 (118210).
Myopathy due to calsequestrin and SERCA1 protein overload
MedGen UID:
864061
Concept ID:
C4015624
Disease or Syndrome
Vacuolar myopathy with CASQ1 aggregates is an autosomal dominant mild muscle disorder characterized by adult onset of muscle cramping and weakness as well as increased levels of serum creatine kinase (CK). The disorder is not progressive, and some patients may be asymptomatic (summary by Rossi et al., 2014).
Combined oxidative phosphorylation defect type 24
MedGen UID:
864080
Concept ID:
C4015643
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-24 (COXPD24) is an autosomal recessive mitochondrial disorder with wide phenotypic variability. Most patients present in infancy with delayed neurodevelopment, refractory seizures, hypotonia, and hearing impairment due to auditory neuropathy. Less common features may include cortical blindness, renal dysfunction, and/or liver involvement, suggestive of Alpers syndrome (MTDPS4A; 203700). Patients with the severe phenotype tend to have brain abnormalities on imaging, including cerebral atrophy and hyperintensities in the basal ganglia and brainstem, consistent with Leigh syndrome. Laboratory values may be normal or show increased lactate and evidence of mitochondrial respiratory chain defects, particularly in muscle. Some patients achieve little developmental milestones and may die in infancy or early childhood. However, some patients have a less severe phenotype manifest only by myopathy (summary by Sofou et al., 2015, Vanlander et al., 2015, and Mizuguchi et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal recessive 1
MedGen UID:
897191
Concept ID:
C4225153
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life and about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called "chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus," or "CPEO+").
Myopathy, reducing body, X-linked, childhood-onset
MedGen UID:
904593
Concept ID:
C4225159
Disease or Syndrome
Reducing-body myopathy (RBM) is a rare myopathy characterized pathologically by the presence of intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies strongly stained by menadione-linked alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (MAG) in the absence of substrate, alpha-glycerophosphate. The term 'reducing body' refers to the reducing activity of the inclusions to nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) in the absence of substrate. This condition is also commonly associated with rimmed vacuoles and cytoplasmic bodies. The clinical features of RBM are variable; a severe form has onset in infancy or early childhood and results in severe disability or early death (RBMX1A; 300717), and a less severe form has onset in late childhood or adulthood (RBMX1B) (summary by Liewluck et al., 2007 and Shalaby et al., 2009).
Congenital myasthenic syndrome 19
MedGen UID:
897962
Concept ID:
C4225235
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myasthenic syndrome-19 (CMS19) is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from a defect in the neuromuscular junction, causing generalized muscle weakness, exercise intolerance, and respiratory insufficiency. Patients present with hypotonia, feeding difficulties, and respiratory problems soon after birth, but the severity of the weakness and disease course is variable (summary by Logan et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMS, see CMS1A (601462).
Bethlem myopathy 2
MedGen UID:
907426
Concept ID:
C4225313
Disease or Syndrome
Bethlem myopathy-2 (BTHLM2) is characterized by congenital hypotonia and myopathy. Motor development is delayed, but muscle strength improves with age, and patients are able to achieve ambulation. Proximal joint contractures that improve over time, as well as joint hyperlaxity, are also present. Muscle biopsy shows mild variability in fiber diameter, without degeneration or regeneration (Zou et al., 2014; Hicks et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bethlem myopathy, see BTHLM1 (158810).
Myopathy, reducing body, X-linked, early-onset, severe
MedGen UID:
906731
Concept ID:
C4225423
Disease or Syndrome
Reducing-body myopathy (RBM) is a rare myopathy characterized pathologically by the presence of intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies strongly stained by menadione-linked alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (MAG) in the absence of substrate, alpha-glycerophosphate. The term 'reducing body' refers to the reducing activity of the inclusions to nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) in the absence of substrate. This condition is also commonly associated with rimmed vacuoles and cytoplasmic bodies. The clinical features of RBM are variable; a severe form has onset in infancy or early childhood and results in severe disability or early death, and a less severe form has onset in late childhood or adulthood (RBMX1B; 300718) (summary by Liewluck et al., 2007 and Shalaby et al., 2009).
Myofibrillar myopathy 8
MedGen UID:
934612
Concept ID:
C4310645
Disease or Syndrome
Myofibrillar myopathy-8 (MFM8) is an autosomal recessive myopathy characterized by slowly progressive proximal muscle weakness and atrophy affecting the upper and lower limbs, resulting in increased falls, gait problems, difficulty running or climbing stairs, and upper limb weakness or scapular winging. Some patients develop distal muscle weakness and atrophy. The phenotype may also be consistent with a clinical diagnosis of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). Age at symptom onset ranges from infancy to adulthood. Ambulation is generally preserved and cardiac involvement is rare, but respiratory compromise with decreased forced vital capacity often occurs. Muscle biopsy shows a mix of myopathic features, including myofibrillar inclusions and sarcomeric disorganization; some patients have been reported to have dystrophic changes on muscle biopsy (O'Grady et al., 2016; Daimaguler et al., 2021). There is significant phenotypic variation, even in patients with the same mutation, which must be taken into account when counseling affecting individuals (Woods et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of myofibrillar myopathy, see MFM1 (601419).
Congenital myasthenic syndrome 20
MedGen UID:
934661
Concept ID:
C4310694
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myasthenic syndrome-20 is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized by severe hypotonia associated with episodic apnea soon after birth. Patients have muscle weakness resulting in delayed walking, ptosis, poor sucking and swallowing, and generalized limb fatigability and weakness. EMG studies usually show a decremental response to repetitive nerve stimulation, and some patients may show a good response to AChE inhibitors (summary by Bauche et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMS, see CMS1A (601462).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, axonal, autosomal recessive, type 2a2b;
MedGen UID:
934692
Concept ID:
C4310725
Disease or Syndrome
MFN2 hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (MFN2-HMSN) is a classic axonal peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy, inherited in either an autosomal dominant (AD) manner (~90%) or an autosomal recessive (AR) manner (~10%). MFN2-HMSN is characterized by more severe involvement of the lower extremities than the upper extremities, distal upper-extremity involvement as the neuropathy progresses, more prominent motor deficits than sensory deficits, and normal (>42 m/s) or only slightly decreased nerve conduction velocities (NCVs). Postural tremor is common. Median onset is age 12 years in the AD form and age eight years in the AR form. The prevalence of optic atrophy is approximately 7% in the AD form and approximately 20% in the AR form.
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal recessive 4
MedGen UID:
934700
Concept ID:
C4310733
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions-4 (PEOB4) is characterized by adult onset of eye muscle weakness and proximal limb muscle weakness associated with deletions of mtDNA on skeletal muscle biopsy, which results from defective mtDNA replication in post-mitotic muscle tissue. Additional features are more variable (summary by Ronchi et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive PEO, see PEOB1 (258450).
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal recessive 3
MedGen UID:
934701
Concept ID:
C4310734
Disease or Syndrome
Any autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the TK2 gene.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2CC
MedGen UID:
934757
Concept ID:
C4310790
Disease or Syndrome
Axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2CC is an autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy that predominantly affects the lower limbs, resulting in muscle weakness and atrophy and gait impairment. Other features include distal sensory impairment and less severe involvement of the upper limbs. The age at onset and severity are variable (summary by Rebelo et al., 2016). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT type 2, see CMT2A (118210).
Myopathy with abnormal lipid metabolism
MedGen UID:
934789
Concept ID:
C4310822
Disease or Syndrome
Lipid storage myopathy due to FLAD1 deficiency is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism that includes variable mitochondrial dysfunction. The phenotype is extremely heterogeneous: some patients have a severe disorder with onset in infancy and cardiac and respiratory insufficiency resulting in early death, whereas others have a milder course with onset of muscle weakness in adulthood. Some patients show significant improvement with riboflavin treatment (summary by Olsen et al., 2016).
Myasthenic syndrome, congenital, 22
MedGen UID:
1393545
Concept ID:
C4479088
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy with cataracts and intellectual disability
MedGen UID:
1382291
Concept ID:
C4479410
Disease or Syndrome
MDCCAID is an autosomal recessive form of muscular dystrophy with onset of progressive muscle weakness in early childhood. Almost all patients also have early-onset cataracts, most have intellectual disability of varying severity, and some have seizures (summary by Wiessner et al., 2017 and Osborn et al., 2017).
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type R18
MedGen UID:
1385598
Concept ID:
C4517996
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-18 (LGMD18) is characterized by childhood-onset of proximal muscle weakness resulting in gait abnormalities and scapular winging. Serum creatine kinase is increased. A subset of patients may show a hyperkinetic movement disorder with chorea, ataxia, or dystonia and global developmental delay (summary by Bogershausen et al., 2013). Additional more variable features include alacrima, achalasia, cataracts, or hepatic steatosis (Liang et al., 2015; Koehler et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, see LGMDR1 (253600).
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2T
MedGen UID:
1377325
Concept ID:
C4518000
Disease or Syndrome
MDDGC14 is an autosomal recessive form of muscular dystrophy characterized by onset in early childhood of mild proximal muscle weakness. Some patients may have additional features, such as mild intellectual disability or seizures. It is part of a group of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (summary by Carss et al., 2013). Some patients with GMPPB mutations may show features consistent with a congenital myasthenic syndrome (see, e.g., CMS1A; 601462), such as fatigability and decremental compound muscle action potential response to repetitive nerve stimulation; these patients may show a positive therapeutic response to treatment with pyridostigmine (Belaya et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type C, see MDDGC1 (609308).
Myopathy, centronuclear, 6, with fiber-type disproportion
MedGen UID:
1627492
Concept ID:
C4540345
Disease or Syndrome
Centronuclear myopathy-6 with fiber-type disproportion (CNM6) is an autosomal recessive, slowly progressive congenital myopathy with onset in infancy or early childhood. Patients may be hypotonic at birth, but all show delayed motor development and walking difficulties due to muscle weakness mainly affecting the proximal lower and upper limbs. Other features include scapular winging, scoliosis, and mildly decreased respiratory vital capacity. The phenotype and muscle biopsy abnormalities are variable, although centralized nuclei and fiber-type disproportion appear to be a common finding on muscle biopsy (summary by Vasli et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of centronuclear myopathy, see CNM1 (160150).
Intellectual disability, autosomal recessive 61
MedGen UID:
1622296
Concept ID:
C4540424
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
MRT61 is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, moderate to severe intellectual disability, and variable dysmorphic facial features. More severely affected patients may develop refractory seizures and have brain abnormalities, including hypoplasia of the corpus callosum (summary by Alwadei et al., 2016).
Inclusion body myopathy with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia type 1
MedGen UID:
1641069
Concept ID:
C4551951
Disease or Syndrome
Inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone (PDB) and/or frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD) is characterized by adult-onset proximal and distal muscle weakness (clinically resembling a limb-girdle muscular dystrophy syndrome), early-onset PDB, and premature frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Muscle weakness progresses to involve other limb and respiratory muscles. PDB involves focal areas of increased bone turnover that typically lead to spine and/or hip pain and localized enlargement and deformity of the long bones; pathologic fractures occur on occasion. Early stages of FTD are characterized by dysnomia, dyscalculia, comprehension deficits, and paraphasic errors, with minimal impairment of episodic memory; later stages are characterized by inability to speak, auditory comprehension deficits for even one-step commands, alexia, and agraphia. Mean age at diagnosis for muscle disease and PDB is 42 years; for FTD, 56 years. Dilated cardiomyopathy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Parkinson disease are now known to be part of the spectrum of findings associated with IBMPFD.
Autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy
MedGen UID:
1645741
Concept ID:
C4551952
Disease or Syndrome
Centronuclear myopathy-1 (CNM1) is an autosomal dominant congenital myopathy characterized by slowly progressive muscular weakness and wasting. The disorder involves mainly limb girdle, trunk, and neck muscles but may also affect distal muscles. Weakness may be present during childhood or adolescence or may not become evident until the third decade of life, and some affected individuals become wheelchair-bound in their fifties. Ptosis and limitation of eye movements occur frequently. The most prominent histopathologic features include high frequency of centrally located nuclei in a large number of extrafusal muscle fibers (which is the basis of the name of the disorder), radial arrangement of sarcoplasmic strands around the central nuclei, and predominance and hypotrophy of type 1 fibers (summary by Bitoun et al., 2005). Genetic Heterogeneity of Centronuclear Myopathy Centronuclear myopathy is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. See also X-linked CNM (CNMX; 310400), caused by mutation in the MTM1 gene (300415) on chromosome Xq28; CNM2 (255200), caused by mutation in the BIN1 gene (601248) on chromosome 2q14; CNM4 (614807), caused by mutation in the CCDC78 gene (614666) on chromosome 16p13; CNM5 (615959), caused by mutation in the SPEG gene (615950) on chromosome 2q35; and CNM6 (617760), caused by mutation in the ZAK gene (609479) on chromosome 2q31. The mutation in the MYF6 gene that was reported to cause a form of CNM, formerly designated CNM3, has been reclassified as a variant of unknown significance; see 159991.0001. Some patients with mutation in the RYR1 gene (180901) have findings of centronuclear myopathy on skeletal muscle biopsy (see 255320).
MYH7-related skeletal myopathy
MedGen UID:
1647391
Concept ID:
C4552004
Disease or Syndrome
Laing distal myopathy is characterized by early-onset weakness (usually before age 5 years) that initially involves the dorsiflexors of the ankles and great toes and then the finger extensors, especially those of the third and fourth fingers. Weakness of the neck flexors is seen in most affected individuals and mild facial weakness is often present. After distal weakness has been present for more than ten years, mild proximal weakness may be observed. Life expectancy is normal.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, dominant intermediate G
MedGen UID:
1642893
Concept ID:
C4693509
Disease or Syndrome
CMTDIG is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder with a highly variable phenotype. Most affected individuals have onset in the first or second decades of slowly progressive distal motor weakness and atrophy, resulting in gait instability and distal upper limb impairment, as well as distal sensory impairment. More severely affected individuals may have pes cavus and claw hands and become wheelchair-bound, whereas other affected individuals have later onset with a milder disease course. Electrophysiologic studies tend to show median motor nerve conduction velocities (NCV) in the 'intermediate' range, between 25 and 45 m/s (summary by Berciano et al., 2017). In a review of intermediate CMT, Berciano et al. (2017) noted that advanced axonal degeneration may induce secondary demyelinating changes resulting in decreased NCV and attenuated compound muscle action potential (CMAP) in median nerve conduction studies. They thus suggested that testing the upper arm, axilla to elbow, may provide more accurate assessment of NCV and CMAP and reveal an intermediate phenotype (review by Berciano et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMTDI, see 606482.
Mitochondrial complex 1 deficiency, nuclear type 12
MedGen UID:
1648278
Concept ID:
C4746984
Disease or Syndrome
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal recessive 5
MedGen UID:
1648331
Concept ID:
C4748184
Disease or Syndrome
Muscular dystrophy, limb-girdle, autosomal dominant 4
MedGen UID:
1648316
Concept ID:
C4748295
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-4 (LGMDD4) is characterized by onset of proximal muscle weakness in young adulthood. Affected individuals often have gait difficulties; some may have upper limb involvement. Other features include variably increased serum creatine kinase, myalgia, and back pain. The severity and expressivity of the disorder is highly variable, even within families (summary by Vissing et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, see 603511.
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (limb-girdle), type C, 8
MedGen UID:
1648468
Concept ID:
C4748320
Disease or Syndrome
MDDGC8 is an autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy with onset in childhood. The phenotype is highly variable: some patients may have gait difficulties and impaired intellectual development, whereas others may be clinically asymptomatic. Common features include calf hypertrophy and increased serum creatine kinase, and muscle biopsy often shows dystrophic features (summary by Endo et al., 2015). The disorder is part of a group of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Godfrey et al., 2007). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy- dystroglycanopathy type C, see MDDGC1 (609308).
Mitochondrial complex 1 deficiency, nuclear type 29
MedGen UID:
1648451
Concept ID:
C4748830
Disease or Syndrome
Intellectual developmental disorder, X-linked 108
MedGen UID:
1680544
Concept ID:
C5193009
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked intellectual developmental disorder-108 (MRX108) is characterized by early hypotonia, global developmental delay, and moderately to severely impaired intellectual development. Brisk tendon reflexes, variable facial dysmorphism, and fifth finger clinodactyly may be present (Khayat et al., 2019).
Congenital myopathy with reduced type 2 muscle fibers
MedGen UID:
1672638
Concept ID:
C5193081
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-14 (CMYP14) is an autosomal recessive skeletal muscle disorder characterized by onset of severe muscle weakness apparent at birth and sometimes in utero. Affected infants have difficulty breathing independently and usually require mechanical ventilation for variable lengths of time. Other features include delayed motor development with delayed walking, hypo- or areflexia, and high-arched palate. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows variation in fiber size with specific atrophy of the fast-twitch type II fibers. Cardiac muscle is not affected (summary by Ravenscroft et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Metabolic crises, recurrent, with variable encephalomyopathic features and neurologic regression
MedGen UID:
1681269
Concept ID:
C5193083
Disease or Syndrome
Recurrent metabolic crises with variable encephalomyopathic features and neurologic regression (MECREN) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder with a highly variable phenotype. Most affected individuals present in the first years of life with episodic lactic acidosis associated with illness or stress, resulting in transient or permanent neurologic dysfunction. Some patients may recover, whereas others show subsequent variable developmental regression of motor and cognitive skills. Other features may include dystonia, hypotonia with inability to sit or walk, seizures, and abnormal signals in the basal ganglia. There is significant phenotypic heterogeneity, even among patients with the same mutation (summary by Almannai et al., 2018).
Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita 3, myogenic type
MedGen UID:
1680655
Concept ID:
C5193121
Disease or Syndrome
Myogenic-type arthrogryposis multiplex congenita-3 (AMC3) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by decreased fetal movements, hypotonia, variable skeletal defects, including clubfoot and scoliosis, and delayed motor milestones with difficulty walking (summary by Baumann et al., 2017).
Mitochondrial myopathy, episodic, with optic atrophy and reversible leukoencephalopathy
MedGen UID:
1679560
Concept ID:
C5193223
Disease or Syndrome
Episodic mitochondrial myopathy with or without optic atrophy and reversible leukoencephalopathy (MEOAL) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized mainly by childhood onset of progressive muscle weakness and exercise intolerance. Patients have episodic exacerbation, which may be associated with increased serum creatine kinase or lactic acid. Additional more variable features may include optic atrophy, reversible leukoencephalopathy, and later onset of a sensorimotor polyneuropathy. The disorder results from impaired formation of Fe-S clusters, which are essential cofactors for proper mitochondrial function (summary by Gurgel-Giannetti et al., 2018)
Myopathy, distal, 6, adult-onset, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1684760
Concept ID:
C5203349
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant adult-onset distal myopathy-6 (MPD6) is a muscle disorder characterized by slowly progressive distal muscle weakness, primarily affecting the lower limbs and resulting in gait difficulties. Some patients develop involvement of proximal and upper limb muscles (summary by Savarese et al., 2019)
Oculopharyngodistal myopathy 1
MedGen UID:
1684682
Concept ID:
C5231388
Disease or Syndrome
Oculopharyngodistal myopathy-1 (OPDM1) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by adult-onset ptosis, external ophthalmoplegia, facial muscle weakness, distal limb muscle weakness and atrophy, and pharyngeal involvement, resulting in dysphagia and dysarthria. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows myopathic changes with rimmed vacuoles. There are variable manifestations of the disorder regarding muscle involvement and severity (summary by Ishiura et al., 2019). Genetic Heterogeneity of Oculopharyngodistal Myopathy See also OPDM2 (618940), caused by trinucleotide repeat expansion in the GIPC1 gene (605072) on chromosome 19p13; OPDM3 (619473), caused by trinucleotide repeat expansion in the NOTCH2NLC gene (618025) on chromosome 1q21; and OPDM4 (619790), caused by trinucleotide repeat expansion in the RILPL1 gene (614092) on chromosome 12q24. Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD; 164300) is a similar disorder with overlapping features. It is caused by a similar heterozygous trinucleotide repeat expansion in the PABPN1 gene (602279) (summary by Durmus et al., 2011).
Myopathy, congenital, with tremor
MedGen UID:
1684886
Concept ID:
C5231401
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-16 (CMYP16) is an autosomal dominant muscle disorder characterized by onset of hypotonia and tremor in infancy. Patients have mildly delayed walking, unsteady gait, proximal muscle weakness, and a high-frequency tremor of the limbs. Some may develop secondary mild contractures or spinal deformities. Cognition is normal and the disease course tends to stabilize after adolescence (summary by Stavusis et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Oculopharyngeal myopathy with leukoencephalopathy 1
MedGen UID:
1684701
Concept ID:
C5231436
Disease or Syndrome
Myopathy, congenital, with structured cores and z-line abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1684705
Concept ID:
C5231445
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-8 (CMYP8) is an autosomal dominant disorder of the skeletal muscle characterized by hypotonia and delayed motor development apparent from infancy or childhood, resulting in difficulties walking or loss of ambulation within the first few decades. Affected individuals show respiratory insufficiency, high-arched palate, and scoliosis; external ophthalmoplegia may also be present. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows cores and myofibrillar disorganization (Lornage et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 18
MedGen UID:
1713890
Concept ID:
C5394140
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome-18 (MTDPS18) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized by early-onset progressive weakness and atrophy of the distal limb muscles, resulting in loss of ambulation as well as atrophy of the intrinsic hand muscles with clawed hands. Affected individuals may also develop scoliosis and have hypo- or hyperreflexia and decreased pulmonary vital capacity. Examination of skeletal muscle shows neurogenic atrophy and combined mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation deficiency associated with mtDNA depletion. The clinical phenotype is reminiscent of spinal muscular atrophy (see SMA, 253300) and the metabolic profile is reminiscent of 2-aminoadipic 2-oxoadipic aciduria (AMOXAD; 204750), which is caused by mutation in the DHTKD1 gene (614984) (summary by Boczonadi et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive mtDNA depletion syndromes, see MTDPS1 (603041).
Myopathy, congenital proximal, with minicore lesions
MedGen UID:
1717569
Concept ID:
C5394193
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-9B (CMYP9B) is an autosomal recessive early-onset skeletal muscle disorder mainly affecting proximal muscles. Affected individuals have neonatal hypotonia followed by mildly delayed walking in childhood. Muscle weakness is slowly progressive, resulting in positive Gowers sign and difficulty running or climbing, but most patients remain ambulatory. Some patients develop respiratory involvement requiring ventilatory support, whereas cardiac function is unaffected. Muscle biopsy shows type 1 fiber predominance with disorganized Z-lines and multiminicore myopathy (Estan et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Muscular dystrophy, limb-girdle, autosomal recessive 26
MedGen UID:
1718449
Concept ID:
C5394268
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-26 (LGMDR26) is a muscle disorder characterized by adult-onset weakness that primarily affects the proximal muscles of the lower limbs. The disorder is slowly progressive, with later involvement of the upper limbs and fatty replacement of muscle tissue apparent on MRI. Some patients may have calf hypertrophy. Serum creatine kinase is significantly elevated, and skeletal muscle biopsy shows typical dystrophic features with normal ultrastructural findings. There is no cardiac or respiratory involvement (summary by Vissing et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, see LGMDR1 (253600).
Retinal dystrophy with leukodystrophy
MedGen UID:
1715138
Concept ID:
C5394315
Disease or Syndrome
Retinal dystrophy and leukodystrophy (RDLKD) is a peroxisomal enzyme deficiency caused by impaired very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) metabolism. Patients exhibit ataxia and spastic paraparesis as well as developmental delay, and may show facial dysmorphism (Ferdinandusse et al., 2017).
Developmental delay, impaired growth, dysmorphic facies, and axonal neuropathy
MedGen UID:
1765507
Concept ID:
C5436781
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental delay, impaired growth, dysmorphic facies, and axonal neuropathy (DIGFAN) is a complex neurologic disorder characterized by impaired motor and intellectual development, hypotonia, poor overall growth, usually with short stature and microcephaly, and subtly dysmorphic facial features. Affected individuals have distal muscle weakness and muscle atrophy resulting in delayed acquisition of motor skills and persistent gait abnormalities. Although many patients have clinical and/or electrophysiologic features consistent with an axonal sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy, such as hyporeflexia, impaired sensation, foot drop, and pes cavus, the signs and severity are highly variable. Additional features may include hearing loss, pigmentary retinopathy, and abnormalities on brain imaging, including cerebral or cerebellar atrophy, hypomyelination, and lesions in the basal ganglia or brainstem. In some instances, the same mutation may result in different phenotypic manifestations (CMT2Z or DIGFAN syndrome), which highlights the expanding clinical spectrum associated with MORC2 mutations and may render classification of patients into one or the other disorder challenging (summary by Guillen Sacoto et al., 2020).
Myofibrillar myopathy 11
MedGen UID:
1782465
Concept ID:
C5543038
Disease or Syndrome
Myofibrillar myopathy-11 (MFM11) is an autosomal recessive skeletal muscle disorder characterized by onset of slowly progressive proximal muscle weakness in the first decade of life. Some patients may present at birth with hypotonia and feeding difficulties, whereas others present later in mid-childhood. Although most patients show delayed walking at 2 to 3 years, all remain ambulatory into adulthood. More variable features may include decreased respiratory forced vital capacity, variable cardiac features, and calf hypertrophy. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows myopathic changes with variation in fiber size, type 1 fiber predominance, centralized nuclei, eccentrically placed core-like lesions, and distortion of the myofibrillary pattern with Z-line streaming and abnormal myofibrillar aggregates or inclusions (summary by Donkervoort et al., 2020). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of myofibrillar myopathy, see MFM1 (601419).
Short stature, oligodontia, dysmorphic facies, and motor delay
MedGen UID:
1787876
Concept ID:
C5543206
Disease or Syndrome
SOFM is characterized by marked short stature, oligodontia, mild facial dysmorphism, and motor delay. Endosteal hyperostosis has also been observed, and patients may exhibit some features of progeria (Terhal et al., 2020; Beauregard-Lacroix et al., 2020).
Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy 3, digenic
MedGen UID:
1794169
Concept ID:
C5561959
Disease or Syndrome
Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy-3 (FSHD3) is a digenic muscle disorder characterized by adult onset of proximal muscle weakness affecting the face, neck, scapular muscles, and upper and lower limbs. Muscle involvement is usually asymmetric, and other muscle groups may become involved with progression of the disease (summary by Hamanaka et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of FSHD, see FSHD1 (158900).
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2X
MedGen UID:
1799561
Concept ID:
C5568138
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-25 (LGMDR25) is characterized by slowly progressive onset of proximal lower limb weakness in adulthood. Affected individuals also develop cardiac arrhythmias resulting in syncopal episodes as young adults or later in life (summary by Schindler et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD), see LGMDR1 (253600).
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 73
MedGen UID:
1800404
Concept ID:
C5568981
Disease or Syndrome
A pure form of hereditary spastic paraplegia with characteristics of adult onset of crural spastic paraparesis, hyperreflexia, extensor plantar responses, proximal muscle weakness, mild muscle atrophy, decreased vibration sensation at ankles and mild urinary dysfunction. Foot deformities have been reported to eventually occur in some patients. No abnormalities are noted on brain magnetic resonance imaging and peripheral nerve conduction velocity studies.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2Z
MedGen UID:
1800448
Concept ID:
C5569025
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2Z (CMT2Z) is an autosomal dominant axonal peripheral neuropathy characterized by onset, usually in the first decade, of distal lower limb muscle weakness and sensory impairment. The disorder is progressive, and affected individuals tend to develop upper limb and proximal muscle involvement in an asymmetric pattern, resulting in severe disability late in adulthood. Rare occurrence of global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development or learning difficulties has been observed. In some instances, the same mutation may result in different phenotypic manifestations (CMT2Z or DIGFAN), which highlights the clinical spectrum associated with MORC2 mutations and may render the classification of patients into one or the other disorder challenging (summary by Sevilla et al., 2016, Ando et al., 2017, Guillen Sacoto et al., 2020). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT, see CMT2A1 (118210).
Carey-Fineman-Ziter syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1804638
Concept ID:
C5676876
Disease or Syndrome
Carey-Fineman-Ziter syndrome-1 (CFZS1) is a multisystem congenital disorder characterized by hypotonia, Moebius sequence (bilateral congenital facial palsy with impairment of ocular abduction), Pierre Robin complex (micrognathia, glossoptosis, and high-arched or cleft palate), delayed motor milestones, and failure to thrive. More variable features include dysmorphic facial features, brain abnormalities, and intellectual disability. It has been postulated that many clinical features in CFZS1 may be secondary effects of muscle weakness during development or brainstem anomalies (summary by Pasetti et al., 2016). Di Gioia et al. (2017) determined that CFZS1 represents a slowly progressive congenital myopathy resulting from a defect in myoblast fusion. Genetic Heterogeneity of Carey-Fineman-Ziter Syndrome Carey-Fineman-Ziter syndrome-2 (CFZS2) is caused by mutation in the MYMX gene (619912) on chromosome 6p21.
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 55
MedGen UID:
1806598
Concept ID:
C5676915
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-55 (COXPD55) is characterized by global developmental delay, hypotonia, short stature, and impaired intellectual development with speech disabilities in childhood. Indolent progressive external ophthalmoplegia phenotype has been described in 1 patient (summary by Olahova et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Myopathy with myalgia, increased serum creatine kinase, and with or without episodic rhabdomyolysis
MedGen UID:
1824033
Concept ID:
C5774260
Disease or Syndrome
Myopathy with myalgia, increased serum creatine kinase, and with or without episodic rhabdomyolysis (MMCKR) is an autosomal recessive disorder of skeletal muscle characterized by the onset of muscle cramping and stiffness on exertion in infancy or early childhood, although later (even adult) onset has also been reported. The features remit with rest, but some individuals develop mild proximal or distal muscle weakness. Rare affected individuals may demonstrate cardiac involvement, including left ventricular dysfunction or rhythm abnormalities. Laboratory studies show increased baseline serum creatine kinase levels with episodic spikes that may coincide with rhabdomyolysis. EMG shows myopathic changes, and muscle biopsy shows nonspecific myopathic or degenerative features (Lopes Abath Neto et al., 2021; Salzer-Sheelo et al., 2022).
Muscular dystrophy, congenital, with or without seizures
MedGen UID:
1824047
Concept ID:
C5774274
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy with or without seizures (MYOS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe muscle hypotonia apparent from birth, as well as developmental delay. Laboratory studies show increased serum creatine kinase and muscle biopsy shows nonspecific dystrophic features. Most patients develop seizures or have abnormal epileptiform findings on EEG studies; other variable findings may include feeding difficulties, nystagmus, myopathic facies, areflexia, and brain atrophy on MRI (summary by Larson et al., 2018 and Henige et al., 2021).
Congenital myopathy 4B, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
1840525
Concept ID:
C5829889
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-4B (CMYP4B) is an autosomal recessive disorder of the skeletal muscle characterized by the onset of muscle weakness in infancy or early childhood. The severity and pattern of muscle weakness varies, but most affected individuals show congenital contractures, delayed motor development, hypotonia, generalized muscle weakness, and weakness of the proximal limb muscles and neck muscles, resulting in difficulty walking or inability to walk. Affected individuals have respiratory insufficiency due to muscle weakness, which may be life-threatening. Other common features include myopathic facies, chest deformities, distal joint laxity, and scoliosis. Variable histologic findings on skeletal muscle biopsy are observed, including nemaline rods, type 1 fiber predomination, and centralized nuclei (Tan et al., 1999; Lehtokari et al., 2008). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Congenital myopathy 20
MedGen UID:
1841029
Concept ID:
C5830393
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-20 (CMYP20) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder that shows wide phenotypic variability. Some patients present in early childhood with proximal muscle weakness affecting the lower and upper limbs resulting in difficulties running and climbing, whereas others present soon after birth with congenital limb or distal contractures. Additional features may include dysmorphic facial features and global developmental delay. Skeletal muscle biopsy may show nemaline rods (Nilipour et al., 2018; Pehlivan et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Nemaline myopathy 5B, autosomal recessive, childhood-onset
MedGen UID:
1841181
Concept ID:
C5830545
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive childhood-onset nemaline myopathy-5B (NEM5B) is a skeletal muscle disorder in which patients usually present with proximal muscle weakness of the lower and upper limbs in a limb-girdle distribution, resulting in gait abnormalities; however, most remain ambulatory even into late adulthood. Some affected individuals show delayed motor development. There is axial weakness and atrophy of the paraspinal muscles, along with kyphosis, scoliosis, and rigid spine, as well as variable limitations of the large joints. Most patients develop restrictive respiratory insufficiency with decreased forced vital capacity; some need noninvasive ventilation. Serum creatine kinase may be elevated. Muscle biopsy can show variable features, including nemaline rods, multiminicore lesions, endomysial fibrosis, and myofibrillar changes (Pellerin et al., 2020; Lee et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of nemaline myopathy, see NEM2 (256030).
Nemaline myopathy 5C, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1841185
Concept ID:
C5830549
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant nemaline myopathy-5C (NEM5C) is a relatively mild skeletal muscle disorder with wide clinical variability, even within families. Affected individuals develop symptoms of muscle weakness in the first or second decades; those with earlier onset tend to have a more severe disease course. Features include difficulty walking on the heels, waddling gait, proximal muscle weakness affecting the upper and lower limbs, and Gowers sign. Additional features may include myopathic facies, high-arched palate, scoliosis or kyphosis, and ankle weakness. Patients remain ambulatory into late adulthood. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows hypotrophy of type 1 fibers, hypertrophy of type 2 fibers, fiber size variation, and myofibrillar disorganization. Nemaline rods in type 1 fibers are often observed, but are not always present (Konersman et al., 2017; Holling et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of nemaline myopathy, see NEM2 (256030).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Ozyilmaz B, Kirbiyik O, Ozdemir TR, Ozer OK, Kutbay YB, Erdogan KM, Guvenc MS, Arıkan Ş, Turk TS, Kale MY, Uludag IF, Baydan F, Sertpoyraz F, Gencpinar P, Diniz G
Neurogenetics 2022 Apr;23(2):103-114. Epub 2022 Feb 14 doi: 10.1007/s10048-022-00687-4. PMID: 35157181
Leung AKC, Lam JM, Alobaida S, Leong KF, Wong AHC
Curr Pediatr Rev 2021;17(4):273-287. doi: 10.2174/1573396317666210426105045. PMID: 33902423
Fauroux B, Griffon L, Amaddeo A, Stremler N, Mazenq J, Khirani S, Baravalle-Einaudi M
Arch Pediatr 2020 Dec;27(7S):7S29-7S34. doi: 10.1016/S0929-693X(20)30274-8. PMID: 33357594

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Pechmann A, Behrens M, Dörnbrack K, Tassoni A, Stein S, Vogt S, Zöller D, Bernert G, Hagenacker T, Schara-Schmidt U, Schwersenz I, Walter MC, Baumann M, Baumgartner M, Deschauer M, Eisenkölbl A, Flotats-Bastardas M, Hahn A, Horber V, Husain RA, Illsinger S, Johannsen J, Köhler C, Kölbel H, Müller M, von Moers A, Schlachter K, Schreiber G, Schwartz O, Smitka M, Steiner E, Stögmann E, Trollmann R, Vill K, Weiß C, Wiegand G, Ziegler A, Lochmüller H, Kirschner J; SMArtCARE study group
Brain 2023 Feb 13;146(2):668-677. doi: 10.1093/brain/awac252. PMID: 35857854
Xu L, You H, Wang L, Lv C, Yuan F, Li J, Wu M, Da Z, Wei H, Yan W, Zhou L, Yin S, Zhou D, Wu J, Lu Y, Su D, Liu Z, Liu L, Ma L, Xu X, Zang Y, Liu H, Ren T, Wang F, Du Y, Xue J, Zhang M, Tan W
Arthritis Rheumatol 2023 Apr;75(4):609-619. Epub 2023 Mar 17 doi: 10.1002/art.42308. PMID: 35849805
Leung AKC, Lam JM, Alobaida S, Leong KF, Wong AHC
Curr Pediatr Rev 2021;17(4):273-287. doi: 10.2174/1573396317666210426105045. PMID: 33902423
Mammen A
Handb Clin Neurol 2016;133:467-84. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-444-63432-0.00025-6. PMID: 27112692
D'Amico A, Mercuri E, Tiziano FD, Bertini E
Orphanet J Rare Dis 2011 Nov 2;6:71. doi: 10.1186/1750-1172-6-71. PMID: 22047105Free PMC Article

Diagnosis

Leung AKC, Lam JM, Alobaida S, Leong KF, Wong AHC
Curr Pediatr Rev 2021;17(4):273-287. doi: 10.2174/1573396317666210426105045. PMID: 33902423
Fauroux B, Griffon L, Amaddeo A, Stremler N, Mazenq J, Khirani S, Baravalle-Einaudi M
Arch Pediatr 2020 Dec;27(7S):7S29-7S34. doi: 10.1016/S0929-693X(20)30274-8. PMID: 33357594
Nieman LK
Eur J Endocrinol 2015 Oct;173(4):M33-8. Epub 2015 Jul 8 doi: 10.1530/EJE-15-0464. PMID: 26156970Free PMC Article
Findlay AR, Goyal NA, Mozaffar T
Muscle Nerve 2015 May;51(5):638-56. doi: 10.1002/mus.24566. PMID: 25641317
Callen JP, Wortmann RL
Clin Dermatol 2006 Sep-Oct;24(5):363-73. doi: 10.1016/j.clindermatol.2006.07.001. PMID: 16966018

Therapy

Pechmann A, Behrens M, Dörnbrack K, Tassoni A, Stein S, Vogt S, Zöller D, Bernert G, Hagenacker T, Schara-Schmidt U, Schwersenz I, Walter MC, Baumann M, Baumgartner M, Deschauer M, Eisenkölbl A, Flotats-Bastardas M, Hahn A, Horber V, Husain RA, Illsinger S, Johannsen J, Köhler C, Kölbel H, Müller M, von Moers A, Schlachter K, Schreiber G, Schwartz O, Smitka M, Steiner E, Stögmann E, Trollmann R, Vill K, Weiß C, Wiegand G, Ziegler A, Lochmüller H, Kirschner J; SMArtCARE study group
Brain 2023 Feb 13;146(2):668-677. doi: 10.1093/brain/awac252. PMID: 35857854
Paik JJ, Lubin G, Gromatzky A, Mudd PN Jr, Ponda MP, Christopher-Stine L
Clin Exp Rheumatol 2023 Mar;41(2):348-358. Epub 2022 Jun 28 doi: 10.55563/clinexprheumatol/hxin6o. PMID: 35766013Free PMC Article
Leung AKC, Lam JM, Alobaida S, Leong KF, Wong AHC
Curr Pediatr Rev 2021;17(4):273-287. doi: 10.2174/1573396317666210426105045. PMID: 33902423
Findlay AR, Goyal NA, Mozaffar T
Muscle Nerve 2015 May;51(5):638-56. doi: 10.1002/mus.24566. PMID: 25641317
Callen JP, Wortmann RL
Clin Dermatol 2006 Sep-Oct;24(5):363-73. doi: 10.1016/j.clindermatol.2006.07.001. PMID: 16966018

Prognosis

Fauroux B, Griffon L, Amaddeo A, Stremler N, Mazenq J, Khirani S, Baravalle-Einaudi M
Arch Pediatr 2020 Dec;27(7S):7S29-7S34. doi: 10.1016/S0929-693X(20)30274-8. PMID: 33357594
Mammen A
Handb Clin Neurol 2016;133:467-84. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-444-63432-0.00025-6. PMID: 27112692
Findlay AR, Goyal NA, Mozaffar T
Muscle Nerve 2015 May;51(5):638-56. doi: 10.1002/mus.24566. PMID: 25641317
D'Amico A, Mercuri E, Tiziano FD, Bertini E
Orphanet J Rare Dis 2011 Nov 2;6:71. doi: 10.1186/1750-1172-6-71. PMID: 22047105Free PMC Article
Callen JP, Wortmann RL
Clin Dermatol 2006 Sep-Oct;24(5):363-73. doi: 10.1016/j.clindermatol.2006.07.001. PMID: 16966018

Clinical prediction guides

Lipka AF, Verschuuren JJGM
Handb Clin Neurol 2024;200:307-325. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-12-823912-4.00012-8. PMID: 38494285
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