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Areflexia

MedGen UID:
115943
Concept ID:
C0234146
Finding
Synonyms: Absent Reflex; Reflex, Absent
SNOMED CT: Absent reflex (37280007); Absence of reflex (37280007); Areflexia (37280007)
 
HPO: HP:0001284

Definition

Absence of neurologic reflexes such as the knee-jerk reaction. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

Conditions with this feature

Dejerine-Sottas disease
MedGen UID:
3710
Concept ID:
C0011195
Disease or Syndrome
Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy is a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy with onset in infancy. It can show autosomal dominant or recessive inheritance. Affected individuals have delayed motor development due to severe distal motor and sensory impairment, resulting in difficulties in gait. Some patients have generalized hypotonia in infancy. Other features may include pes cavus, scoliosis, and sensory ataxia. Nerve conduction velocities are severely decreased (sometimes less than 10 m/s), and sural nerve biopsy shows severe loss of myelinated fibers (summary by Baets et al., 2011).
Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome
MedGen UID:
4886
Concept ID:
C0017495
Disease or Syndrome
Genetic prion disease generally manifests with cognitive difficulties, ataxia, and myoclonus (abrupt jerking movements of muscle groups and/or entire limbs). The order of appearance and/or predominance of these features and other associated neurologic and psychiatric findings vary. The three major phenotypes of genetic prion disease are genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (gCJD), fatal familial insomnia (FFI), and Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS) syndrome. Although these phenotypes display overlapping clinical and pathologic features, recognition of these phenotypes can be useful when providing affected individuals and their families with information about the expected clinical course. The age at onset typically ranges from 50 to 60 years. The disease course ranges from a few months in gCJD and FFI to a few (up to 4, and in rare cases up to 10) years in GSS syndrome.
Glycogen storage disease, type II
MedGen UID:
5340
Concept ID:
C0017921
Disease or Syndrome
Pompe disease is classified by age of onset, organ involvement, severity, and rate of progression. Infantile-onset Pompe disease (IOPD; individuals with onset before age 12 months with cardiomyopathy) may be apparent in utero but more typically onset is at the median age of four months with hypotonia, generalized muscle weakness, feeding difficulties, failure to thrive, respiratory distress, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Without treatment by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), IOPD commonly results in death by age two years from progressive left ventricular outflow obstruction and respiratory insufficiency. Late-onset Pompe disease (LOPD; including: (a) individuals with onset before age 12 months without cardiomyopathy; and (b) all individuals with onset after age 12 months) is characterized by proximal muscle weakness and respiratory insufficiency; clinically significant cardiac involvement is uncommon.
Multiple symmetric lipomatosis
MedGen UID:
7349
Concept ID:
C0023804
Disease or Syndrome
Multiple symmetric lipomatosis (MSL) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by the growth of unencapsulated masses of adipose tissue with predilection for the cervical and thoracic regions. The lipoma growth is striking and disfiguring, and growth around the neck may cause difficulty swallowing or breathing. The age at onset ranges from childhood to young adulthood. Most, but not all, patients develop axonal peripheral neuropathy, which can appear at any age and varies in severity. Laboratory studies in MSL show low leptin (164160), low adiponectin (605441), variably increased lactate, and increased FGF21 (609436). Some patients may have insulin resistance. The disorder is exclusively associated with a particular MFN2 mutation (R707W; 608507.0013), usually in the homozygous state, but sometimes in the compound heterozygous state (Rocha et al., 2017; Capel et al., 2018).
Lowe syndrome
MedGen UID:
18145
Concept ID:
C0028860
Disease or Syndrome
Lowe syndrome (oculocerebrorenal syndrome) is characterized by involvement of the eyes, central nervous system, and kidneys. Dense congenital cataracts are found in all affected boys and infantile glaucoma in approximately 50%. All boys have impaired vision; corrected acuity is rarely better than 20/100. Generalized hypotonia is noted at birth and is of central (brain) origin. Deep tendon reflexes are usually absent. Hypotonia may slowly improve with age, but normal motor tone and strength are never achieved. Motor milestones are delayed. Almost all affected males have some degree of intellectual disability; 10%-25% function in the low-normal or borderline range, approximately 25% in the mild-to-moderate range, and 50%-65% in the severe-to-profound range of intellectual disability. Affected males have varying degrees of proximal renal tubular dysfunction of the Fanconi type, including low molecular-weight (LMW) proteinuria, aminoaciduria, bicarbonate wasting and renal tubular acidosis, phosphaturia with hypophosphatemia and renal rickets, hypercalciuria, sodium and potassium wasting, and polyuria. The features of symptomatic Fanconi syndrome do not usually become manifest until after the first few months of life, except for LMW proteinuria. Glomerulosclerosis associated with chronic tubular injury usually results in slowly progressive chronic renal failure and end-stage renal disease between the second and fourth decades of life.
Werdnig-Hoffmann disease
MedGen UID:
21913
Concept ID:
C0043116
Disease or Syndrome
Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy resulting from progressive degeneration and irreversible loss of the anterior horn cells in the spinal cord (i.e., lower motor neurons) and the brain stem nuclei. The onset of weakness ranges from before birth to adulthood. The weakness is symmetric, proximal > distal, and progressive. Before the genetic basis of SMA was understood, it was classified into clinical subtypes based on maximum motor function achieved; however, it is now apparent that the phenotype of SMN1-associated SMA spans a continuum without clear delineation of subtypes. With supportive care only, poor weight gain with growth failure, restrictive lung disease, scoliosis, and joint contractures are common complications; however, newly available targeted treatment options are changing the natural history of this disease.
Roussy-Lévy syndrome
MedGen UID:
64430
Concept ID:
C0205713
Disease or Syndrome
Roussy-Levy syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by early onset of prominent ataxia followed by late onset of mild motor involvement. Symptoms progress very slowly, and affected individuals may remain ambulatory throughout life (Auer-Grumbach et al., 1998; Plante-Bordeneuve et al., 1999).
DE SANCTIS-CACCHIONE SYNDROME
MedGen UID:
75550
Concept ID:
C0265201
Disease or Syndrome
A rare autosomal recessive inherited syndrome. It is characterized by xeroderma pigmentosum, mental retardation, dwarfism, hypogonadism, and neurologic abnormalities.
Infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy
MedGen UID:
82852
Concept ID:
C0270724
Disease or Syndrome
PLA2G6-associated neurodegeneration (PLAN) comprises a continuum of three phenotypes with overlapping clinical and radiologic features: Infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (INAD). Atypical neuroaxonal dystrophy (atypical NAD). PLA2G6-related dystonia-parkinsonism. INAD usually begins between ages six months and three years with psychomotor regression or delay, hypotonia, and progressive spastic tetraparesis. Many affected children never learn to walk or lose the ability shortly after attaining it. Strabismus, nystagmus, and optic atrophy are common. Disease progression is rapid, resulting in severe spasticity, progressive cognitive decline, and visual impairment. Many affected children do not survive beyond their first decade. Atypical NAD shows more phenotypic variability than INAD. In general, onset is in early childhood but can be as late as the end of the second decade. The presenting signs may be gait instability, ataxia, or speech delay and autistic features, which are sometimes the only evidence of disease for a year or more. Strabismus, nystagmus, and optic atrophy are common. Neuropsychiatric disturbances including impulsivity, poor attention span, hyperactivity, and emotional lability are also common. The course is fairly stable during early childhood and resembles static encephalopathy but is followed by neurologic deterioration between ages seven and 12 years. PLA2G6-related dystonia-parkinsonism has a variable age of onset, but most individuals present in early adulthood with gait disturbance or neuropsychiatric changes. Affected individuals consistently develop dystonia and parkinsonism (which may be accompanied by rapid cognitive decline) in their late teens to early twenties. Dystonia is most common in the hands and feet but may be more generalized. The most common features of parkinsonism in these individuals are bradykinesia, resting tremor, rigidity, and postural instability.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, type IA
MedGen UID:
75727
Concept ID:
C0270911
Disease or Syndrome
For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1, see CMT1B (118200). CMT1A is the most common form of CMT. The average age of onset of clinical symptoms is 12.2 +/- 7.3 years. Slow nerve conduction velocity (NCV) less than 38 m/s is highly diagnostic and is a 100% penetrant phenotype independent of age (Lupski et al., 1991, 1992).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B
MedGen UID:
124377
Concept ID:
C0270912
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is a sensorineural peripheral polyneuropathy. Affecting approximately 1 in 2,500 individuals, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is the most common inherited disorder of the peripheral nervous system (Skre, 1974). Autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked forms have been recognized. Classification On the basis of electrophysiologic properties and histopathology, CMT has been divided into primary peripheral demyelinating (type 1, or HMSNI) and primary peripheral axonal (type 2, or HMSNII) neuropathies. The demyelinating neuropathies classified as CMT type 1 are characterized by severely reduced motor NCVs (less than 38 m/s) and segmental demyelination and remyelination with onion bulb formations on nerve biopsy. The axonal neuropathies classified as CMT type 2 are characterized by normal or mildly reduced NCVs and chronic axonal degeneration and regeneration on nerve biopsy (see CMT2A1; 118210). Distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN) (see 158590), or spinal CMT, is characterized by exclusive motor involvement and sparing of sensory nerves (Pareyson, 1999). McAlpine (1989) proposed that the forms of CMT with very slow nerve conduction be given the gene symbol CMT1A (118220) and CMT1B, CMT1A being the gene on chromosome 17 and CMT1B being the gene on chromosome 1. CMT2 was the proposed symbol for the autosomal locus responsible for the moderately slow nerve conduction form of the disease (axonal). For a phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of the various subtypes of CMT, see CMTX1 (302800), CMT2A1 (118210), CMT3 (DSS; 145900), CMT4A (214400), and CMTDIB (606482). Genetic Heterogeneity of Autosomal Dominant Demyelinating CMT1 Autosomal dominant demyelinating CMT1 is a genetically heterogeneous disorder and can be caused by mutations in different genes; see CMT1A (118220), CMT1C (601098), CMT1D (607678), CMT1E (607734), CMT1F (607734), CMT1G (618279), CMT1H (619764), CMT1I (619742), and CMT1J (620111). See also 608236 for a related phenotype characterized by isolated slowed nerve conduction velocities (NCVs).
Sarcotubular myopathy
MedGen UID:
78750
Concept ID:
C0270968
Congenital Abnormality
A mild subtype of autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy characterized by slowly progressive proximal muscle weakness and wasting of the pelvic and shoulder girdles with onset that usually occurs during the second or third decade of life. Clinical presentation is variable and can include calf psuedohypertrophy, joint contractures, scapular winging, muscle cramping and/or facial and respiratory muscle involvement.
PMM2-congenital disorder of glycosylation
MedGen UID:
138111
Concept ID:
C0349653
Disease or Syndrome
PMM2-CDG, the most common of a group of disorders of abnormal glycosylation of N-linked oligosaccharides, is divided into three clinical stages: infantile multisystem, late-infantile and childhood ataxia–intellectual disability, and adult stable disability. The clinical manifestations and course are highly variable, ranging from infants who die in the first year of life to mildly affected adults. Clinical findings tend to be similar in sibs. In the infantile multisystem presentation, infants show axial hypotonia, hyporeflexia, esotropia, and developmental delay. Feeding problems, vomiting, faltering growth, and developmental delay are frequently seen. Subcutaneous fat may be excessive over the buttocks and suprapubic region. Two distinct clinical courses are observed: (1) a nonfatal neurologic course with faltering growth, strabismus, developmental delay, cerebellar hypoplasia, and hepatopathy in infancy followed by neuropathy and retinitis pigmentosa in the first or second decade; and (2) a more severe neurologic-multivisceral course with approximately 20% mortality in the first year of life. The late-infantile and childhood ataxia–intellectual disability stage, which begins between ages three and ten years, is characterized by hypotonia, ataxia, severely delayed language and motor development, inability to walk, and IQ of 40 to 70; other findings include seizures, stroke-like episodes or transient unilateral loss of function, coagulopathy, retinitis pigmentosa, joint contractures, and skeletal deformities. In the adult stable disability stage, intellectual ability is stable; peripheral neuropathy is variable, progressive retinitis pigmentosa and myopia are seen, thoracic and spinal deformities with osteoporosis worsen, and premature aging is observed; females may lack secondary sexual development and males may exhibit decreased testicular volume. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and coagulopathy may occur. The risk for deep venous thrombosis is increased.
Chorea-acanthocytosis
MedGen UID:
98277
Concept ID:
C0393576
Disease or Syndrome
Chorea-acanthocytosis (ChAc) is characterized by a progressive movement disorder, cognitive and behavior changes, a myopathy that can be subclinical, and chronic hyperCKemia in serum. Although the disorder is named for acanthocytosis of the red blood cells, this feature is variable. The movement disorder is mostly limb chorea, but some individuals present with parkinsonism. Dystonia is common and affects the oral region and especially the tongue, causing dysarthria and serious dysphagia with resultant weight loss. Habitual tongue and lip biting are characteristic, as well as tongue protrusion dystonia. Progressive cognitive and behavioral changes resemble those in a frontal lobe syndrome. Seizures are observed in almost half of affected individuals and can be the initial manifestation. Myopathy results in progressive distal muscle wasting and weakness. Mean age of onset in ChAc is about 30 years, although ChAc can develop as early as the first decade or as late as the seventh decade. It runs a chronic progressive course and may lead to major disability within a few years. Life expectancy is reduced, with age of death ranging from 28 to 61 years.
Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with optic atrophy
MedGen UID:
140747
Concept ID:
C0393807
Disease or Syndrome
MFN2 hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (MFN2-HMSN) is a classic axonal peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy, inherited in either an autosomal dominant (AD) manner (~90%) or an autosomal recessive (AR) manner (~10%). MFN2-HMSN is characterized by more severe involvement of the lower extremities than the upper extremities, distal upper-extremity involvement as the neuropathy progresses, more prominent motor deficits than sensory deficits, and normal (>42 m/s) or only slightly decreased nerve conduction velocities (NCVs). Postural tremor is common. Median onset is age 12 years in the AD form and age eight years in the AR form. The prevalence of optic atrophy is approximately 7% in the AD form and approximately 20% in the AR form.
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (congenital with brain and eye anomalies), type A, 4
MedGen UID:
140820
Concept ID:
C0410174
Disease or Syndrome
Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) is characterized by hypotonia, symmetric generalized muscle weakness, and CNS migration disturbances that result in changes consistent with cobblestone lissencephaly with cerebral and cerebellar cortical dysplasia. Mild, typical, and severe phenotypes are recognized. Onset typically occurs in early infancy with poor suck, weak cry, and floppiness. Affected individuals have contractures of the hips, knees, and interphalangeal joints. Later features include myopathic facial appearance, pseudohypertrophy of the calves and forearms, motor and speech delays, intellectual disability, seizures, ophthalmologic abnormalities including visual impairment and retinal dysplasia, and progressive cardiac involvement after age ten years. Swallowing disturbance occurs in individuals with severe FCMD and in individuals older than age ten years, leading to recurrent aspiration pneumonia and death.
Severe X-linked myotubular myopathy
MedGen UID:
98374
Concept ID:
C0410203
Congenital Abnormality
X-linked myotubular myopathy (X-MTM), also known as myotubular myopathy (MTM), is characterized by muscle weakness that ranges from severe to mild. Approximately 80% of affected males present with severe (classic) X-MTM characterized by polyhydramnios, decreased fetal movement, and neonatal weakness, hypotonia, and respiratory failure. Motor milestones are significantly delayed and most individuals fail to achieve independent ambulation. Weakness is profound and often involves facial and extraocular muscles. Respiratory failure is nearly uniform, with most individuals requiring 24-hour ventilatory assistance. It is estimated that at least 25% of boys with severe X-MTM die in the first year of life, and those who survive rarely live into adulthood. Males with mild or moderate X-MTM (~20%) achieve motor milestones more quickly than males with the severe form; many ambulate independently, and may live into adulthood. Most require gastrostomy tubes and/or ventilator support. In all subtypes of X-MTM, the muscle disease is not obviously progressive. Female carriers of X-MTM are generally asymptomatic, although manifesting heterozygotes are increasingly being identified. In affected females, symptoms range from severe, generalized weakness presenting in childhood, with infantile onset similar to affected male patients, to mild (often asymmetric) weakness manifesting in adulthood. Affected adult females may experience progressive respiratory decline and ultimately require ventilatory support.
Myopathy, centronuclear, 2
MedGen UID:
98049
Concept ID:
C0410204
Disease or Syndrome
Any centronuclear myopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the BIN1 gene.
Scapuloperoneal spinal muscular atrophy
MedGen UID:
148283
Concept ID:
C0751335
Disease or Syndrome
The autosomal dominant TRPV4 disorders (previously considered to be clinically distinct phenotypes before their molecular basis was discovered) are now grouped into neuromuscular disorders and skeletal dysplasias; however, the overlap within each group is considerable. Affected individuals typically have either neuromuscular or skeletal manifestations alone, and in only rare instances an overlap syndrome has been reported. The three autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorders (mildest to most severe) are: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2C. Scapuloperoneal spinal muscular atrophy. Congenital distal spinal muscular atrophy. The autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorders are characterized by a congenital-onset, static, or later-onset progressive peripheral neuropathy with variable combinations of laryngeal dysfunction (i.e., vocal fold paresis), respiratory dysfunction, and joint contractures. The six autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasias (mildest to most severe) are: Familial digital arthropathy-brachydactyly. Autosomal dominant brachyolmia. Spondylometaphyseal dysplasia, Kozlowski type. Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, Maroteaux type. Parastremmatic dysplasia. Metatropic dysplasia. The skeletal dysplasia is characterized by brachydactyly (in all 6); the five that are more severe have short stature that varies from mild to severe with progressive spinal deformity and involvement of the long bones and pelvis. In the mildest of the autosomal dominant TRPV4 disorders life span is normal; in the most severe it is shortened. Bilateral progressive sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) can occur with both autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorders and skeletal dysplasias.
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1
MedGen UID:
155703
Concept ID:
C0752120
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria, and eventual deterioration of bulbar functions. Early in the disease, affected individuals may have gait disturbance, slurred speech, difficulty with balance, brisk deep tendon reflexes, hypermetric saccades, nystagmus, and mild dysphagia. Later signs include slowing of saccadic velocity, development of up-gaze palsy, dysmetria, dysdiadochokinesia, and hypotonia. In advanced stages, muscle atrophy, decreased deep tendon reflexes, loss of proprioception, cognitive impairment (e.g., frontal executive dysfunction, impaired verbal memory), chorea, dystonia, and bulbar dysfunction are seen. Onset is typically in the third or fourth decade, although childhood onset and late-adult onset have been reported. Those with onset after age 60 years may manifest a pure cerebellar phenotype. Interval from onset to death varies from ten to 30 years; individuals with juvenile onset show more rapid progression and more severe disease. Anticipation is observed. An axonal sensory neuropathy detected by electrophysiologic testing is common; brain imaging typically shows cerebellar and brain stem atrophy.
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 4
MedGen UID:
199815
Concept ID:
C0752122
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia-4 (SCA4) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by the onset of balance disturbances and gait and limb ataxia usually in the fourth decade, although earlier onset in the teens or twenties has been reported. There is evidence of genetic anticipation within families. The disorder is slowly progressive, and most patients eventually become wheelchair-bound. Additional features include hypometric or slow saccades, sensory or sensorimotor axonal peripheral neuropathy, dysarthria, and autonomic dysfunction, including orthostatic hypotension and problems with bowel or bladder control. More severely affected individuals have dysphagia and significant unintended weight loss, which may contribute to premature death. Brain imaging shows cerebellar atrophy (Wallenius et al., 2024). For a discussion of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia, see SCA1 (164400).
Smith-Magenis syndrome
MedGen UID:
162881
Concept ID:
C0795864
Disease or Syndrome
Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is characterized by distinctive physical features (particularly coarse facial features that progress with age), developmental delay, cognitive impairment, behavioral abnormalities, sleep disturbance, and childhood-onset abdominal obesity. Infants have feeding difficulties, failure to thrive, hypotonia, hyporeflexia, prolonged napping or need to be awakened for feeds, and generalized lethargy. The majority of individuals function in the mild-to-moderate range of intellectual disability. The behavioral phenotype, including significant sleep disturbance, stereotypies, and maladaptive and self-injurious behaviors, is generally not recognized until age 18 months or older and continues to change until adulthood. Sensory issues are frequently noted; these may include avoidant behavior, as well as repetitive seeking of textures, sounds, and experiences. Toileting difficulties are common. Significant anxiety is common as are problems with executive functioning, including inattention, distractibility, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. Maladaptive behaviors include frequent outbursts / temper tantrums, attention-seeking behaviors, opposition, aggression, and self-injurious behaviors including self-hitting, self-biting, skin picking, inserting foreign objects into body orifices (polyembolokoilamania), and yanking fingernails and/or toenails (onychotillomania). Among the stereotypic behaviors described, the spasmodic upper-body squeeze or "self-hug" seems to be highly associated with SMS. An underlying developmental asynchrony, specifically emotional maturity delayed beyond intellectual functioning, may also contribute to maladaptive behaviors in people with SMS.
Agenesis of the corpus callosum with peripheral neuropathy
MedGen UID:
162893
Concept ID:
C0795950
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with agenesis of the corpus callosum (HMSN/ACC), a neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by severe progressive sensorimotor neuropathy with resulting hypotonia, areflexia, and amyotrophy, and by variable degrees of dysgenesis of the corpus callosum. Mild-to-severe intellectual disability and "psychotic episodes" during adolescence are observed. Sensory modalities are moderately to severely affected beginning in infancy. The average age of onset of walking is 3.8 years; the average age of loss of walking is 13.8 years; the average age of death is 33 years.
Arts syndrome
MedGen UID:
163205
Concept ID:
C0796028
Disease or Syndrome
Arts syndrome, which is part of the spectrum of PRPS1-related disorders, is characterized by profound congenital sensorineural hearing impairment, early-onset hypotonia, delayed motor development, mild to moderate intellectual disability, ataxia, and increased risk of infection, all of which – with the exception of optic atrophy – present before age two years. Signs of peripheral neuropathy develop during early childhood. Twelve of 15 boys from the two Dutch families reported with Arts syndrome died before age six years of complications of infection. Carrier females can show late-onset (age >20 years) hearing impairment and other findings.
Cataract-ataxia-deafness syndrome
MedGen UID:
163216
Concept ID:
C0796123
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic disease characterized by mild intellectual deficit, congenital cataract, progressive sensorineural hearing impairment, ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, and short stature. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1991.
Wieacker-Wolff syndrome
MedGen UID:
163227
Concept ID:
C0796200
Disease or Syndrome
Wieacker-Wolff syndrome (WRWF) is a severe X-linked recessive neurodevelopmental disorder affecting the central and peripheral nervous systems. It is characterized by onset of muscle weakness in utero (fetal akinesia), which results in arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) apparent at birth. Affected boys are born with severe contractures, show delayed motor development, facial and bulbar weakness, characteristic dysmorphic facial features, and skeletal abnormalities, such as hip dislocation, scoliosis, and foot deformities. Additional features include global developmental delay with poor or absent speech and impaired intellectual development, feeding difficulties and poor growth, hypotonia, hypogenitalism, and spasticity. Carrier females may be unaffected or have mild features of the disorder (summary by Hirata et al., 2013 and Frints et al., 2019).
Merosin deficient congenital muscular dystrophy
MedGen UID:
224728
Concept ID:
C1263858
Disease or Syndrome
Merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy is an autosomal recessive form of muscular dystrophy characterized by muscle weakness apparent at birth or in the first 6 months of life. Patients show hypotonia, poor suck and cry, and delayed motor development; most never achieve independent ambulation. Most patients also have periventricular white matter abnormalities on brain imaging, but mental retardation and/or seizures occur only rarely (summary by Xiong et al., 2015).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4D
MedGen UID:
371304
Concept ID:
C1832334
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4D (CMT4D) is an autosomal recessive disorder of the peripheral nervous system characterized by early-onset distal muscle weakness and atrophy, foot deformities, and sensory loss affecting all modalities. Affected individuals develop deafness by the third decade of life (summary by Okamoto et al., 2014). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, see CMT4A (214400).
Cerebellar ataxia-areflexia-pes cavus-optic atrophy-sensorineural hearing loss syndrome
MedGen UID:
318633
Concept ID:
C1832466
Disease or Syndrome
ATP1A3-related neurologic disorders represent a clinical continuum in which at least three distinct phenotypes have been delineated: rapid-onset dystonia-parkinsonism (RDP); alternating hemiplegia of childhood (ACH); and cerebellar ataxia, areflexia, pes cavus, optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss (CAPOS). However, some affected individuals have intermediate phenotypes or only a few features that do not fit well into one of these major phenotypes. RDP has been characterized by: abrupt onset of dystonia over days to weeks with parkinsonism (primarily bradykinesia and postural instability); common bulbar involvement; and absence or minimal response to an adequate trial of L-dopa therapy, with few exceptions. Often fever, physiologic stress, or alcoholic binges trigger the onset of symptoms. After their initial appearance, symptoms often stabilize with little improvement; occasionally second episodes occur with abrupt worsening of symptoms. Rarely, affected individuals have reported a more gradual onset of symptoms over weeks to months. Anxiety, depression, and seizures have been reported. Age of onset ranges from four to 55 years, although a childhood variation of RDP with onset between ages nine and 14 months has been reported. AHC is a complex neurodevelopmental syndrome most frequently manifesting in infancy or early childhood with paroxysmal episodic neurologic dysfunction including alternating hemiparesis or dystonia, quadriparesis, seizure-like episodes, and oculomotor abnormalities. Episodes can last for minutes, hours, days, or even weeks. Remission of symptoms occurs with sleep and immediately after awakening. Over time, persistent neurologic deficits including oculomotor apraxia, ataxia, choreoathetosis, dystonia, parkinsonism, and cognitive and behavioral dysfunction develop in the majority of those affected; more than 50% develop epilepsy in addition to their episodic movement disorder phenotype. CAPOS (cerebellar ataxia, areflexia, pes cavus, optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss) syndrome is characterized by episodes of ataxic encephalopathy and/or weakness during and after a febrile illness. Onset is between ages six months and four years. Some acute symptoms resolve; progression of sensory losses and severity vary.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2B
MedGen UID:
371512
Concept ID:
C1833219
Disease or Syndrome
A severe form of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, a peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy. Onset in the second or third decade has manifestations of ulceration and infection of the feet. Symmetric and distal weakness develops mostly in the legs together with a severe symmetric distal sensory loss. Tendon reflexes are only reduced at ankles and foot deformities including pes cavus or planus and hammer toes, appear in childhood.
Spinal muscular atrophy-progressive myoclonic epilepsy syndrome
MedGen UID:
371854
Concept ID:
C1834569
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of ASAH1-related disorders ranges from Farber disease (FD) to spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMA-PME). Classic FD is characterized by onset in the first weeks of life of painful, progressive deformity of the major joints; palpable subcutaneous nodules of joints and mechanical pressure points; and a hoarse cry resulting from granulomas of the larynx and epiglottis. Life expectancy is usually less than two years. In the other less common types of FD, onset, severity, and primary manifestations vary. SMA-PME is characterized by early-childhood-onset progressive lower motor neuron disease manifest typically between ages three and seven years as proximal lower-extremity weakness, followed by progressive myoclonic and atonic seizures, tremulousness/tremor, and sensorineural hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy typically begins in late childhood after the onset of weakness and can include jerking of the upper limbs, action myoclonus, myoclonic status, and eyelid myoclonus. Other findings include generalized tremor, and cognitive decline. The time from disease onset to death from respiratory complications is usually five to 15 years.
CEDNIK syndrome
MedGen UID:
332113
Concept ID:
C1836033
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebral dysgenesis, neuropathy, ichthyosis, and keratoderma syndrome (CEDNIK) refers to a unique constellation of clinical manifestations including global developmental delay with hypotonia, roving eye movements or nystagmus, poor motor skills, and impaired intellectual development with speech delay. More variable features include microcephaly, feeding difficulties, seizures, ocular anomalies, hearing loss, and nonspecific dysmorphic facial features. Palmoplantar keratoderma and ichthyosis or neuropathy develop in some patients. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows varying degrees of cerebral dysgenesis, including absence of the corpus callosum and cortical dysplasia, as well as hypomyelination, white matter loss, and white matter signal anomalies suggestive of a leukodystrophy. Some patients may show developmental regression; many die in childhood (Fuchs-Telem et al., 2011; Mah-Som et al., 2021). With more patients being reported, several authors (Diggle et al., 2017; Llaci et al., 2019; Mah-Som et al., 2021) have observed that the dermatologic features and peripheral neuropathy show reduced penetrance and are more variable manifestations of this disorder, as they are not observed in all patients with biallelic SNAP29 mutations.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4H
MedGen UID:
324487
Concept ID:
C1836336
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, type 4H (CMT4H) is a demyelinating CMT peripheral sensorimotor polyneuropathy. It has been described in 10 individuals from two large consanguineous families from Lebanon and Algeria. Onset occurs within the first two years of life with slowly progressive muscle weakness in the distal extremities. Other common features include delayed walking, an abnormal gait, scoliosis and pes equines with toe retraction. CMT4H is caused by mutations in the FGD4 gene (12p11.1). Transmitted in an autosomal recessive manner.
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal dominant 3
MedGen UID:
373087
Concept ID:
C1836439
Disease or Syndrome
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia is characterized by multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions in skeletal muscle. The most common clinical features include adult onset of weakness of the external eye muscles and exercise intolerance. Patients with C10ORF2-linked adPEO may have other clinical features including proximal muscle weakness, ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, cardiomyopathy, cataracts, depression, and endocrine abnormalities (summary by Fratter et al., 2010). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia, see PEOA1 (157640). PEO caused by mutations in the POLG gene (174763) are associated with more complicated phenotypes than those forms caused by mutations in the SLC25A4 (103220) or C10ORF2 genes (Lamantea et al., 2002).
PCWH syndrome
MedGen UID:
373160
Concept ID:
C1836727
Disease or Syndrome
PCWH syndrome is a complex neurocristopathy that includes features of 4 distinct syndromes: peripheral demyelinating neuropathy (see 118200), central dysmyelination, Waardenburg syndrome, and Hirschsprung disease (see 142623) (Inoue et al., 2004). Inoue et al. (2004) proposed the acronym PCWH for this disorder.
Pierson syndrome
MedGen UID:
373199
Concept ID:
C1836876
Disease or Syndrome
Pierson syndrome (PIERS) is an autosomal recessive disorder comprising congenital nephrotic syndrome with diffuse mesangial sclerosis and distinct ocular abnormalities, including microcoria and hypoplasia of the ciliary and pupillary muscles, as well as other anomalies. Many patients die early, and those who survive tend to show neurodevelopmental delay and visual loss (summary by Zenker et al., 2004). Mutations in the LAMB2 gene also cause nephrotic syndrome type 5 with or without mild ocular anomalies (NPHS5; 614199).
Posterior column ataxia-retinitis pigmentosa syndrome
MedGen UID:
324636
Concept ID:
C1836916
Disease or Syndrome
Posterior column ataxia with retinitis pigmentosa (AXPC1) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by childhood-onset retinitis pigmentosa and later onset of gait ataxia due to sensory loss (summary by Ishiura et al., 2011).
Autosomal dominant sensory ataxia 1
MedGen UID:
332346
Concept ID:
C1837015
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant sensory ataxia-1 (SNAX1) is a peripheral neuropathy resulting from the degeneration of dorsal root ganglia that affects both central and peripheral neurites of sensory neurons. Affected individuals show adult onset of slowly progressive clumsiness, gait ataxia, walking difficulties, and distal sensory loss which may be associated with abnormal sensory nerve conduction values. Some patients have vestibular ocular dysfunction. Muscle weakness and atrophy are not observed, and brain imaging is normal (summary by Cortese et al., 2020).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2L
MedGen UID:
324826
Concept ID:
C1837552
Disease or Syndrome
A form of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, a peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy. In the single family reported to date, CMT2L onset is between 15 and 33 years. Patients present with a symmetric distal weakness of legs and occasionally of the hands, absent or reduced tendon reflexes, distal legs sensory loss and frequently a pes cavus. Progression is slow.
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis type 8
MedGen UID:
325237
Concept ID:
C1837728
Disease or Syndrome
A neurodegenerative disease with characteristics of progressive muscular paralysis reflecting degeneration of motor neurons in the primary motor cortex, corticospinal tracts, brainstem and spinal cord. Caused by heterozygous mutation in the VAPB gene on chromosome 20q13.
Neuronopathy, distal hereditary motor, autosomal dominant 8
MedGen UID:
373984
Concept ID:
C1838492
Disease or Syndrome
The autosomal dominant TRPV4 disorders (previously considered to be clinically distinct phenotypes before their molecular basis was discovered) are now grouped into neuromuscular disorders and skeletal dysplasias; however, the overlap within each group is considerable. Affected individuals typically have either neuromuscular or skeletal manifestations alone, and in only rare instances an overlap syndrome has been reported. The three autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorders (mildest to most severe) are: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2C. Scapuloperoneal spinal muscular atrophy. Congenital distal spinal muscular atrophy. The autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorders are characterized by a congenital-onset, static, or later-onset progressive peripheral neuropathy with variable combinations of laryngeal dysfunction (i.e., vocal fold paresis), respiratory dysfunction, and joint contractures. The six autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasias (mildest to most severe) are: Familial digital arthropathy-brachydactyly. Autosomal dominant brachyolmia. Spondylometaphyseal dysplasia, Kozlowski type. Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, Maroteaux type. Parastremmatic dysplasia. Metatropic dysplasia. The skeletal dysplasia is characterized by brachydactyly (in all 6); the five that are more severe have short stature that varies from mild to severe with progressive spinal deformity and involvement of the long bones and pelvis. In the mildest of the autosomal dominant TRPV4 disorders life span is normal; in the most severe it is shortened. Bilateral progressive sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) can occur with both autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorders and skeletal dysplasias.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease recessive intermediate A
MedGen UID:
334012
Concept ID:
C1842197
Disease or Syndrome
GDAP1-related hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (GDAP1-HMSN) is a peripheral neuropathy (also known as a subtype of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease) that typically affects the lower extremities earlier and more severely than the upper extremities. As the neuropathy progresses, the distal upper extremities also become severely affected. Proximal muscles can also become weak. Age at onset ranges from infancy to early childhood. In most cases, disease progression causes disabilities within the first or second decade of life. At the end of the second decade, most individuals are wheelchair bound. Disease progression varies considerably even within the same family. The neuropathy can be either of the demyelinating type with reduced nerve conduction velocities or the axonal type with normal nerve conduction velocities. Vocal cord paresis is common. Intelligence is normal. Life expectancy is usually normal, but on occasion may be reduced because of secondary complications.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease dominant intermediate C
MedGen UID:
334023
Concept ID:
C1842237
Disease or Syndrome
A rare hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy characterized by intermediate motor median nerve conduction velocities (usually between 25 and 60 m/s). It presents with moderately severe, slowly progressive usual clinical features of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (muscle weakness and atrophy of the distal extremities, distal sensory loss, reduced or absent deep tendon reflexes, feet deformities, extensor digitorum brevis atrophy). Findings in nerve biopsies include age-dependent axonal degeneration, reduced number of large myelinated fibers, segmental remyelination, and no onion bulbs.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2K
MedGen UID:
375064
Concept ID:
C1842983
Disease or Syndrome
A severe early-onset form of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth peripheral sensorimotor polyneuropathy. Onset occurs in the neonatal period or early infancy with a clinical picture including hypotonia, scoliosis, a hoarse voice, vocal cord paralysis and respiratory insufficiency. However, nerve conduction velocities and pathological findings from sural nerve biopsies are indicative of a predominantly axonal neuropathy with some demyelinating features. Caused by mutations in the GDAP1 gene (8q13.3), encoding a protein required for mitochondrial fission.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease dominant intermediate D
MedGen UID:
334318
Concept ID:
C1843075
Disease or Syndrome
A rare hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with characteristics of intermediate motor median nerve conduction velocities (usually between 25 and 45 m/s) and signs of both axonal degeneration and demyelination without onion bulbs in nerve biopsies. It presents with usual Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease clinical features of variable severity (progressive muscle weakness and atrophy of the distal extremities, distal sensory loss, reduced or absent deep tendon reflexes, and feet deformities). Other findings in some of the families include debilitating neuropathic pain and mild postural/kinetic upper limb tremor.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2J
MedGen UID:
375107
Concept ID:
C1843153
Disease or Syndrome
For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT, see CMT2A1 (118210).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1F
MedGen UID:
334337
Concept ID:
C1843164
Disease or Syndrome
A form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1, with a variable clinical presentation that can range from severe impairment with onset in childhood to mild impairment appearing during adulthood. The disease has characteristics of progressive peripheral motor and sensory neuropathy with distal paresis in the lower limbs that varies from mild weakness to complete paralysis of the distal muscle groups, absent tendon reflexes and reduced nerve conduction. Caused by mutations in the NEFL gene (8p21.2).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, axonal, with vocal cord paresis, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
375113
Concept ID:
C1843183
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2E
MedGen UID:
375127
Concept ID:
C1843225
Disease or Syndrome
A form of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease a peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy. Onset is in the first to sixth decade with a gait anomaly and a leg weakness that reaches the arms secondarily. Tendon reflexes are reduced or absent and after years all patients have a pes cavus. Other signs may be present including hearing loss and postural tremor.
Sensory ataxic neuropathy, dysarthria, and ophthalmoparesis
MedGen UID:
375302
Concept ID:
C1843851
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life and about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called "chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus," or "CPEO+").
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 18
MedGen UID:
336066
Concept ID:
C1843884
Disease or Syndrome
Disease with characteristics of sensory neuropathy and cerebellar ataxia. Prevalence is unknown. Only 26 cases in a 5-generation American family of Irish ancestry have been reported to date. Onset is in the second and third decades of life with symptomatic onset ranging from 13 to 27 years. Patients initially present with axonal sensory neuropathy, while cerebellar ataxia and motor neuron dysfunction develop later. Linked to chromosome 7q22-q23 but the responsible gene mutation has not yet been identified.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease X-linked recessive 3
MedGen UID:
375530
Concept ID:
C1844865
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy with an X-linked recessive inheritance pattern and the childhood to adolescent-onset of progressive, distal muscle weakness and atrophy (beginning in the lower extremities and then affecting the upper extremities), as well as distal, pan sensory loss in the upper and lower extremities, pes cavus, and absent or reduced distal tendon reflexes. Pain and paraesthesia are frequently the initial sensory symptoms. Spastic paraparesis (manifested by clasp-knife sign, hyperactive deep-tendon reflexes, and Babinski sign) has also been reported.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease X-linked recessive 2
MedGen UID:
336803
Concept ID:
C1844873
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy with an X-linked recessive inheritance pattern and the infantile to childhood-onset of progressive, distal muscle weakness and atrophy (more prominent in the lower extremities than in the upper extremities), pes cavus, and absent tendon reflexes. Sensory impairment and intellectual disability has been reported in some individuals.
Infantile-onset X-linked spinal muscular atrophy
MedGen UID:
337123
Concept ID:
C1844934
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked infantile spinal muscular atrophy (XL-SMA) is characterized by congenital hypotonia, areflexia, and evidence of degeneration and loss of anterior horn cells (i.e., lower motor neurons) in the spinal cord and brain stem. Often congenital contractures and/or fractures are present. Intellect is normal. Life span is significantly shortened because of progressive ventilatory insufficiency resulting from chest muscle involvement.
Deafness, X-linked 5
MedGen UID:
335096
Concept ID:
C1845095
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked deafness-5 is a neurologic disorder characterized by childhood onset of auditory neuropathy and later onset of distal sensory impairment affecting the peripheral nervous system (summary by Zong et al., 2015).
Cardioneuromyopathy with hyaline masses and nemaline rods
MedGen UID:
339747
Concept ID:
C1847387
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, dominant intermediate A
MedGen UID:
376235
Concept ID:
C1847896
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, dominant intermediate-A (CMTDIA) is an autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy characterized by onset of symptoms in the first or second decades of life. Affected individuals have difficulty walking with muscle cramps of the lower limbs; the motor symptoms may be worsened by cold. The disorder is slowly progressive, eventually involving all 4 limbs, but patients remain ambulatory. After age 40, patients develop more severe features, including distal muscle weakness and atrophy, pes cavus, areflexia, and distal sensory loss. Electrophysiologic studies yield nerve conduction velocities with 'intermediate' values between demyelinating and axonal neuropathy (see below). One such family has been reported (Rossi et al., 1985).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease dominant intermediate B
MedGen UID:
338346
Concept ID:
C1847902
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder of the peripheral nervous system, characterized by progressive weakness and atrophy, initially of the peroneal muscles and later of the distal muscles of the arms. Classification CMT neuropathy is subdivided into CMT1 (see 118200) and CMT2 (see 118210) types on the basis of electrophysiologic and neuropathologic criteria. CMT1, or hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type I (HMSN I), is a demyelinating neuropathy, whereas CMT2, or HMSN II, is an axonal neuropathy. Most patients with CMT are classified as having CMT1 or CMT2 by use of a cut-off value of 38 m/s for the motor median nerve conduction velocity (NCV). However, in some families with CMT, patients have motor median NCVs ranging from 25 to 45 m/s. Families of this type were reported by Salisachs (1974) and Davis et al. (1978). Davis et al. (1978) proposed that this form be designated 'intermediate' CMT. Claeys et al. (2009) stated that some CMT families may have an even broader range of NCV than 25 to 45 m/s, with the lowest levels around 25 and the highest levels within the normal range (50+ m/s). They also suggested that the term 'intermediate' should not be used to describe a single NCV value, but rather the CMT subtype at the level of the family (e.g., in families with a range or combinations of NCV values). Berciano et al. (2017) provided a detailed review of the different forms of intermediate CMT, noting that diagnoses may be controversial because of variable classification issues. The authors presented an algorithm for the interpretation of electrophysiologic studies in CMT, and suggested that nerve conduction studies should be conducted on the upper arm (axilla to elbow). They noted that distal axonal degeneration can result in secondary myelination defects, which may cause significantly decreased motor NCV and CMAP values that may be misinterpreted. Genetic Heterogeneity of Autosomal Dominant Intermediate CMT In addition to CMTDIB, which is caused by mutation in the DNM2 gene, other forms of dominant intermediate CMT include CMTDIA (620378), mapped to chromosome 10q24-q25; CMTDIC (608323), caused by mutation in the YARS gene (603623) on chromosome 1p35; CMTDID (607791), caused by mutation in the MPZ gene (159440) on chromosome 1q22; CMTDIE with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (CMTDIE; 614455), caused by mutation in the INF2 gene (610982) on chromosome 14q32; CMTDIF (615185), caused by mutation in the GNB4 gene (610863) on chromosome 3q26; and CMTDIG (617882), caused by mutation in the NEFL gene (162280) on chromosome 8p21.
Familial isolated deficiency of vitamin E
MedGen UID:
341248
Concept ID:
C1848533
Disease or Syndrome
Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED) generally manifests in late childhood or early teens between ages five and 15 years. The first symptoms include progressive ataxia, clumsiness of the hands, loss of proprioception, and areflexia. Other features often observed are dysdiadochokinesia, dysarthria, positive Romberg sign, head titubation, decreased visual acuity, and positive Babinski sign. The phenotype and disease severity vary widely among families with different pathogenic variants; age of onset and disease course are more uniform within a given family, but symptoms and disease severity can vary even among sibs.
Infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia
MedGen UID:
338613
Concept ID:
C1849096
Disease or Syndrome
Infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia (IOSCA) is a severe, progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by normal development until age one year, followed by onset of ataxia, muscle hypotonia, loss of deep-tendon reflexes, and athetosis. Ophthalmoplegia and sensorineural deafness develop by age seven years. By adolescence, affected individuals are profoundly deaf and no longer ambulatory; sensory axonal neuropathy, optic atrophy, autonomic nervous system dysfunction, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism in females become evident. Epilepsy can develop into a serious and often fatal encephalopathy: myoclonic jerks or focal clonic seizures that progress to epilepsia partialis continua followed by status epilepticus with loss of consciousness.
Myoglobinuria, acute recurrent, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
340308
Concept ID:
C1849386
Disease or Syndrome
Recurrent myoglobinuria is characterized by recurrent attacks of rhabdomyolysis associated with muscle pain and weakness and followed by excretion of myoglobin in the urine. Renal failure may occasionally occur. Onset is usually in early childhood under the age of 5 years. Unlike the exercise-induced rhabdomyolyses such as McArdle syndrome (232600), carnitine palmitoyltransferase deficiency (see 255110), and the Creteil variety of phosphoglycerate kinase deficiency (311800), the attacks in recurrent myoglobinuria no relation to exercise, but are triggered by intercurrent illnesses, commonly upper respiratory tract infections (Ramesh and Gardner-Medwin, 1992). See 160010 for discussion of a possible autosomal dominant form of myoglobinuria. Severe rhabdomyolysis is a major clinical feature of anesthetic-induced malignant hyperthermia (145600), an autosomal dominant disorder.
Radiculoneuropathy, fatal neonatal
MedGen UID:
376592
Concept ID:
C1849471
Disease or Syndrome
Giant axonal neuropathy 1
MedGen UID:
376775
Concept ID:
C1850386
Disease or Syndrome
GAN-related neurodegeneration comprises a phenotypic continuum ranging from severe (sometimes called classic giant axonal neuropathy) to milder pure early-onset peripheral motor and sensory neuropathies. The classic giant axonal neuropathy phenotype typically manifests as an infantile-onset neurodegenerative disorder, starting as a severe peripheral motor and sensory neuropathy and evolving into central nervous system impairment (intellectual disability, seizures, cerebellar signs, and pyramidal tract signs). Most affected individuals become wheelchair dependent in the second decade of life and eventually bedridden with severe polyneuropathy, ataxia, and dementia. Death usually occurs in the third decade. At the milder end of the spectrum are predominantly motor and sensory neuropathies (with little to no CNS involvement) that overlap with the axonal form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies.
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 6 (hepatocerebral type)
MedGen UID:
338045
Concept ID:
C1850406
Disease or Syndrome
MPV17-related mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance defect presents in the vast majority of affected individuals as an early-onset encephalohepatopathic (hepatocerebral) disease that is typically associated with mtDNA depletion, particularly in the liver. A later-onset neuromyopathic disease characterized by myopathy and neuropathy, and associated with multiple mtDNA deletions in muscle, has also rarely been described. MPV17-related mtDNA maintenance defect, encephalohepatopathic form is characterized by: Hepatic manifestations (liver dysfunction that typically progresses to liver failure, cholestasis, hepatomegaly, and steatosis); Neurologic involvement (developmental delay, hypotonia, microcephaly, and motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy); Gastrointestinal manifestations (gastrointestinal dysmotility, feeding difficulties, and failure to thrive); and Metabolic derangements (lactic acidosis and hypoglycemia). Less frequent manifestations include renal tubulopathy, nephrocalcinosis, and hypoparathyroidism. Progressive liver disease often leads to death in infancy or early childhood. Hepatocellular carcinoma has been reported.
Nemaline myopathy 2
MedGen UID:
342534
Concept ID:
C1850569
Disease or Syndrome
Nemaline myopathy-2 (NEM2) is an autosomal recessive skeletal muscle disorder with a wide range of severity. The most common clinical presentation is early-onset (in infancy or childhood) muscle weakness predominantly affecting proximal limb muscles. Muscle biopsy shows accumulation of Z-disc and thin filament proteins into aggregates named 'nemaline bodies' or 'nemaline rods,' usually accompanied by disorganization of the muscle Z discs. The clinical and histologic spectrum of entities caused by variants in the NEB gene is a continuum, ranging in severity. The distribution of weakness can vary from generalized muscle weakness, more pronounced in proximal limb muscles, to distal-only involvement, although neck flexor weakness appears to be rather consistent. Histologic patterns range from a severe usually nondystrophic disturbance of the myofibrillar pattern to an almost normal pattern, with or without nemaline bodies, sometimes combined with cores (summary by Lehtokari et al., 2014). Genetic Heterogeneity of Nemaline Myopathy See also NEM1 (255310), caused by mutation in the tropomyosin-3 gene (TPM3; 191030) on chromosome 1q22; NEM3 (161800), caused by mutation in the alpha-actin-1 gene (ACTA1; 102610) on chromosome 1q42; NEM4 (609285), caused by mutation in the beta-tropomyosin gene (TPM2; 190990) on chromosome 9p13; NEM5A (605355), also known as Amish nemaline myopathy, NEM5B (620386), and NEM5C (620389), all caused by mutation in the troponin T1 gene (TNNT1; 191041) on chromosome 19q13; NEM6 (609273), caused by mutation in the KBTBD13 gene (613727) on chromosome 15q22; NEM7 (610687), caused by mutation in the cofilin-2 gene (CFL2; 601443) on chromosome 14q13; NEM8 (615348), caused by mutation in the KLHL40 gene (615340), on chromosome 3p22; NEM9 (615731), caused by mutation in the KLHL41 gene (607701) on chromosome 2q31; NEM10 (616165), caused by mutation in the LMOD3 gene (616112) on chromosome 3p14; and NEM11 (617336), caused by mutation in the MYPN gene (608517) on chromosome 10q21. Several of the genes encode components of skeletal muscle sarcomeric thin filaments (Sanoudou and Beggs, 2001). Mutations in the NEB gene are the most common cause of nemaline myopathy (Lehtokari et al., 2006).
Bailey-Bloch congenital myopathy
MedGen UID:
340586
Concept ID:
C1850625
Disease or Syndrome
STAC3 disorder is characterized by congenital myopathy, musculoskeletal involvement of the trunk and extremities, feeding difficulties, and delayed motor milestones. Most affected individuals have weakness with myopathic facies, scoliosis, kyphosis or kyphoscoliosis, and contractures. Other common findings are ptosis, abnormalities of the palate (including cleft palate), and short stature. Risk for malignant hyperthermia susceptibility and restrictive lung disease are increased. Intellect is typically normal. Originally described in individuals from the Lumbee Native American tribe (an admixture of Cheraw Indian, English, and African American ancestry) in the state of North Carolina and reported as Native American myopathy, STAC3 disorder has now been identified in numerous other populations worldwide.
Congenital multicore myopathy with external ophthalmoplegia
MedGen UID:
340597
Concept ID:
C1850674
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-1B (CMYP1B) is an autosomal recessive disorder of skeletal muscle characterized by severe hypotonia and generalized muscle weakness apparent soon after birth or in early childhood with delayed motor development, generalized muscle weakness and atrophy, and difficulty walking or running. Affected individuals show proximal muscle weakness with axial and shoulder girdle involvement, external ophthalmoplegia, and bulbar weakness, often resulting in feeding difficulties and respiratory insufficiency. Orthopedic complications such as joint laxity, distal contractures, hip dislocation, cleft palate, and scoliosis are commonly observed. Serum creatine kinase is normal. The phenotype is variable in severity (Jungbluth et al., 2005; Bharucha-Goebel et al., 2013). Some patients show symptoms in utero, including reduced fetal movements, polyhydramnios, and intrauterine growth restriction. The most severely affected patients present in utero with fetal akinesia, arthrogryposis, and lung hypoplasia resulting in fetal or perinatal death (McKie et al., 2014). Skeletal muscle biopsy of patients with recessive RYR1 mutations can show variable features, including multiminicores (Ferreiro and Fardeau, 2002), central cores (Jungbluth et al., 2002), congenital fiber-type disproportion (CFTD) (Monnier et al., 2009), and centronuclear myopathy (Wilmshurst et al., 2010). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Hereditary myopathy with lactic acidosis due to ISCU deficiency
MedGen UID:
342573
Concept ID:
C1850718
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary myopathy with lactic acidosis (HML) is an autosomal recessive muscular disorder characterized by childhood onset of exercise intolerance with muscle tenderness, cramping, dyspnea, and palpitations. Biochemical features include lactic acidosis and, rarely, rhabdomyolysis. It is a chronic disorder with remission and exacerbation of the muscle phenotype (summary by Sanaker et al., 2010).
Neutral lipid storage myopathy
MedGen UID:
339913
Concept ID:
C1853136
Disease or Syndrome
Neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy (NLSDM) is an autosomal recessive muscle disorder characterized by adult onset of slowly progressive proximal muscle weakness affecting the upper and lower limbs and associated with increased serum creatine kinase; distal muscle weakness may also occur. About half of patients develop cardiomyopathy later in the disease course. Other variable features include diabetes mellitus, hepatic steatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, and possibly sensorineural hearing loss. Leukocytes and muscle cells show cytoplasmic accumulation of triglycerides (summary by Reilich et al., 2011). Neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy belongs to a group of disorders termed neutral lipid storage disorders (NLSDs). These disorders are characterized by the presence of triglyceride-containing cytoplasmic droplets in leukocytes and in other tissues, including bone marrow, skin, and muscle. Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome (CDS; 275630) is defined as NLSD with ichthyosis (NLSDI). Patients with NLSDM present with myopathy but without ichthyosis (summary by Fischer et al., 2007).
Nemaline myopathy 7
MedGen UID:
343979
Concept ID:
C1853154
Disease or Syndrome
Nemaline myopathy-7 is an autosomal recessive congenital myopathy characterized by very early onset of hypotonia and delayed motor development. Affected individuals have difficulty walking and running due to proximal muscle weakness. The disorder is slowly progressive, and patients may lose independent ambulation. Muscle biopsy shows nemaline rods and may later show minicores, abnormal protein aggregates, and dystrophic changes (summary by Ockeloen et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of nemaline myopathy, see 161800.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2C
MedGen UID:
342947
Concept ID:
C1853710
Disease or Syndrome
The autosomal dominant TRPV4 disorders (previously considered to be clinically distinct phenotypes before their molecular basis was discovered) are now grouped into neuromuscular disorders and skeletal dysplasias; however, the overlap within each group is considerable. Affected individuals typically have either neuromuscular or skeletal manifestations alone, and in only rare instances an overlap syndrome has been reported. The three autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorders (mildest to most severe) are: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2C. Scapuloperoneal spinal muscular atrophy. Congenital distal spinal muscular atrophy. The autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorders are characterized by a congenital-onset, static, or later-onset progressive peripheral neuropathy with variable combinations of laryngeal dysfunction (i.e., vocal fold paresis), respiratory dysfunction, and joint contractures. The six autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasias (mildest to most severe) are: Familial digital arthropathy-brachydactyly. Autosomal dominant brachyolmia. Spondylometaphyseal dysplasia, Kozlowski type. Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, Maroteaux type. Parastremmatic dysplasia. Metatropic dysplasia. The skeletal dysplasia is characterized by brachydactyly (in all 6); the five that are more severe have short stature that varies from mild to severe with progressive spinal deformity and involvement of the long bones and pelvis. In the mildest of the autosomal dominant TRPV4 disorders life span is normal; in the most severe it is shortened. Bilateral progressive sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) can occur with both autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorders and skeletal dysplasias.
Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive, with axonal neuropathy 2
MedGen UID:
340052
Concept ID:
C1853761
Disease or Syndrome
Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2) is characterized by onset of ataxia between age three and 30 years after initial normal development, axonal sensorimotor neuropathy, oculomotor apraxia, cerebellar atrophy, and elevated serum concentration of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2B2
MedGen UID:
381352
Concept ID:
C1854150
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2B2 (CMT2B2) is an autosomal recessive sensorineural axonal peripheral neuropathy manifest as distal muscle weakness and atrophy and distal sensory impairment. The disorder predominantly affects the lower limbs, resulting in gait impairment, although upper limb and hand involvement also occurs. The age at onset and severity is variable: most have onset in the third decade, although earlier onset has been reported. The disorder is slowly progressive, and some patients may lose independent ambulation later in life. More variable features may include ataxia, dysarthria, cerebellar atrophy, and eye movement abnormalities (summary by Leal et al., 2018). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT type 2, see CMT2A1 (118210).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2B1
MedGen UID:
343064
Concept ID:
C1854154
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease constitutes a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies. On the basis of electrophysiologic criteria, CMT is divided into 2 major types: type 1, the demyelinating form, characterized by a motor median nerve conduction velocity less than 38 m/s (see CMT1B; 118200); and type 2, the axonal form, with a normal or slightly reduced nerve conduction velocity. For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT type 2, see CMT2A1 (118210).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4G
MedGen UID:
343122
Concept ID:
C1854449
Disease or Syndrome
HMSNR is an autosomal recessive progressive complex peripheral neuropathy characterized by onset in the first decade of distal lower limb weakness and muscle atrophy resulting in walking difficulties. Distal impairment of the upper limbs usually occurs later, as does proximal lower limb weakness. There is distal sensory impairment, with pes cavus and areflexia. Laboratory studies suggest that it is a myelinopathy resulting in reduced nerve conduction velocities in the demyelinating range as well as a length-dependent axonopathy (summary by Sevilla et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, also known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, see CMT4A (214400).
3-methylglutaconic aciduria type 4
MedGen UID:
344425
Concept ID:
C1855126
Disease or Syndrome
The category of 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type IV (MGCA4) represents a heterogeneous unclassified group of patients who share mild or intermittent urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid. MGCA excretion is a nonspecific finding observed in many other disorders caused by defects in mitochondrial energy metabolism (Gunay-Aygun, 2005). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, see MGCA1 (250950)
Visceral neuropathy, familial, 1, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
340946
Concept ID:
C1855733
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive familial visceral neuropathy-1 (VSCN1) is characterized by a broad spectrum of developmental anomalies associating neural crest and extraneural crest features, including intestinal dysmotility due to aganglionosis (Hirschsprung disease), hypoganglionosis, and/or chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction. Some patients develop progressive peripheral neuropathy, and arthrogryposis has been observed. Hypoplasia or aplasia of the olfactory bulb and of the external auditory canals, as well as microtia or anotia, have been reported. Patients also exhibit facial dysmorphisms, including microretrognathia in most; other variable features include structural cardiac anomalies and arthrogryposis with multiple pterygia (Le et al., 2021). Genetic Heterogeneity of Familial Visceral Neuropathy Autosomal recessive familial visceral neuropathy-2 (VSCN2; 619465) is caused by mutation in the ERBB2 gene (164870) on chromosome 17q12. Also see VSCN3 (609629) for an autosomal dominant form of the disorder.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4B2
MedGen UID:
346869
Concept ID:
C1858278
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4B2 (CMT4B2) is a demyelinating hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy characterized by abnormal folding of myelin sheaths. CMT4B1 (601382) is a clinically similar disorder caused by mutation in the MTMR2 gene (603557) on 11q22. For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive demyelinating CMT, see CMT4A (214400).
Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, Okinawa type
MedGen UID:
346886
Concept ID:
C1858338
Disease or Syndrome
Okinawa-type hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSNO) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by young adult onset of proximal or distal muscle weakness and atrophy, muscle cramps, and fasciculations, with later onset of distal sensory impairment. The disorder is slowly progressive and clinically resembles amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; see 105400) (summary by Ishiura et al., 2012).
Ataxia-hypogonadism-choroidal dystrophy syndrome
MedGen UID:
347798
Concept ID:
C1859093
Disease or Syndrome
PNPLA6 disorders span a phenotypic continuum characterized by variable combinations of cerebellar ataxia; upper motor neuron involvement manifesting as spasticity and/or brisk reflexes; chorioretinal dystrophy associated with variable degrees of reduced visual function; and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (delayed puberty and lack of secondary sex characteristics). The hypogonadotropic hypogonadism occurs either in isolation or as part of anterior hypopituitarism (growth hormone, thyroid hormone, or gonadotropin deficiencies). Common but less frequent features are peripheral neuropathy (usually of axonal type manifesting as reduced distal reflexes, diminished vibratory sensation, and/or distal muscle wasting); hair anomalies (long eyelashes, bushy eyebrows, or scalp alopecia); short stature; and impaired cognitive functioning (learning disabilities in children; deficits in attention, visuospatial abilities, and recall in adults). Some of these features can occur in distinct clusters on the phenotypic continuum: Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome (cerebellar ataxia, chorioretinal dystrophy, and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism); Gordon Holmes syndrome (cerebellar ataxia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and – to a variable degree – brisk reflexes); Oliver-McFarlane syndrome (trichomegaly, chorioretinal dystrophy, short stature, intellectual disability, and hypopituitarism); Laurence-Moon syndrome; and spastic paraplegia type 39 (SPG39) (upper motor neuron involvement, peripheral neuropathy, and sometimes reduced cognitive functioning and/or cerebellar ataxia).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4A
MedGen UID:
347821
Concept ID:
C1859198
Disease or Syndrome
GDAP1-related hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (GDAP1-HMSN) is a peripheral neuropathy (also known as a subtype of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease) that typically affects the lower extremities earlier and more severely than the upper extremities. As the neuropathy progresses, the distal upper extremities also become severely affected. Proximal muscles can also become weak. Age at onset ranges from infancy to early childhood. In most cases, disease progression causes disabilities within the first or second decade of life. At the end of the second decade, most individuals are wheelchair bound. Disease progression varies considerably even within the same family. The neuropathy can be either of the demyelinating type with reduced nerve conduction velocities or the axonal type with normal nerve conduction velocities. Vocal cord paresis is common. Intelligence is normal. Life expectancy is usually normal, but on occasion may be reduced because of secondary complications.
Ataxia, early-onset, with oculomotor apraxia and hypoalbuminemia
MedGen UID:
395301
Concept ID:
C1859598
Disease or Syndrome
Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 1 (AOA1) is characterized by childhood onset of slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia, followed by oculomotor apraxia and a severe primary motor peripheral axonal motor neuropathy. The first manifestation is progressive gait imbalance (mean age of onset: 4.3 years; range: 2-10 years), followed by dysarthria, then upper-limb dysmetria with mild intention tremor. Oculomotor apraxia, usually noticed a few years after the onset of ataxia, progresses to external ophthalmoplegia. All affected individuals have generalized areflexia followed by a peripheral neuropathy and quadriplegia with loss of ambulation about seven to ten years after onset. Hands and feet are short and atrophic. Chorea and upper-limb dystonia are common. Intellect remains normal in some individuals; in others, different degrees of cognitive impairment have been observed.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A1
MedGen UID:
350076
Concept ID:
C1861678
Disease or Syndrome
MFN2 hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (MFN2-HMSN) is a classic axonal peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy, inherited in either an autosomal dominant (AD) manner (~90%) or an autosomal recessive (AR) manner (~10%). MFN2-HMSN is characterized by more severe involvement of the lower extremities than the upper extremities, distal upper-extremity involvement as the neuropathy progresses, more prominent motor deficits than sensory deficits, and normal (>42 m/s) or only slightly decreased nerve conduction velocities (NCVs). Postural tremor is common. Median onset is age 12 years in the AD form and age eight years in the AR form. The prevalence of optic atrophy is approximately 7% in the AD form and approximately 20% in the AR form.
Giant axonal neuropathy 2
MedGen UID:
400593
Concept ID:
C1864695
Disease or Syndrome
Giant axonal neuropathy-2 is an autosomal dominant peripheral axonal neuropathy characterized by onset of distal sensory impairment and lower extremity muscle weakness and atrophy after the second decade. Foot deformities may be present in childhood. More severely affected individuals may develop cardiomyopathy. Sural nerve biopsy shows giant axonal swelling with neurofilament accumulation (summary by Klein et al., 2014).
Usher syndrome type 1E
MedGen UID:
400865
Concept ID:
C1865865
Disease or Syndrome
Usher syndrome type I (USH1) is characterized by congenital, bilateral, profound sensorineural hearing loss, vestibular areflexia, and adolescent-onset retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Unless fitted with a cochlear implant, individuals do not typically develop speech. RP, a progressive, bilateral, symmetric degeneration of rod and cone functions of the retina, develops in adolescence, resulting in progressively constricted visual fields and impaired visual acuity.
Alagille syndrome due to a JAG1 point mutation
MedGen UID:
365434
Concept ID:
C1956125
Disease or Syndrome
Alagille syndrome (ALGS) is a multisystem disorder with a wide spectrum of clinical variability; this variability is seen even among individuals from the same family. The major clinical manifestations of ALGS are bile duct paucity on liver biopsy, cholestasis, congenital cardiac defects (primarily involving the pulmonary arteries), butterfly vertebrae, ophthalmologic abnormalities (most commonly posterior embryotoxon), and characteristic facial features. Renal abnormalities, growth failure, developmental delays, splenomegaly, and vascular abnormalities may also occur.
Mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency
MedGen UID:
370665
Concept ID:
C1969443
Disease or Syndrome
Long-chain hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) deficiency and trifunctional protein (TFP) deficiency are caused by impairment of mitochondrial TFP. TFP has three enzymatic activities – long-chain enoyl-CoA hydratase, long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, and long-chain 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase. In individuals with LCHAD deficiency, there is isolated deficiency of long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, while deficiency of all three enzymes occurs in individuals with TFP deficiency. Individuals with TFP deficiency can present with a severe-to-mild phenotype, while individuals with LCHAD deficiency typically present with a severe-to-intermediate phenotype. Neonates with the severe phenotype present within a few days of birth with hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, encephalopathy, and often cardiomyopathy. The intermediate phenotype is characterized by hypoketotic hypoglycemia precipitated by infection or fasting in infancy. The mild (late-onset) phenotype is characterized by myopathy and/or neuropathy. Long-term complications include peripheral neuropathy and retinopathy.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4J
MedGen UID:
370808
Concept ID:
C1970011
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4J is an autosomal recessive progressive neurologic disorder with a highly variable phenotype and onset ranging from early childhood to adulthood. Most patients have both proximal and distal asymmetric muscle weakness of the upper and lower limbs. There is significant motor dysfunction, followed by variably progressive sensory loss, which may be mild. Nerve conduction studies and nerve biopsies indicate demyelination as well as axonal loss (summary by Nicholson et al., 2011). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, see CMT4A (214400).
Neuronopathy, distal hereditary motor, autosomal recessive 4
MedGen UID:
369682
Concept ID:
C1970211
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic neuromuscular disease characterized by proximal muscle weakness with an early involvement of foot and hand muscles following normal motor development in early childhood, a rapidly progressive disease course leading to generalized areflexic tetraplegia with contractures, severe scoliosis, hyperlordosis, and progressive respiratory insufficiency leading to assisted ventilation. Cranial nerve functions are normal and tongue wasting and fasciculations are absent. Milder phenotype with a moderate generalized weakness and slower disease progress was reported. There is evidence the disease is caused by homozygous mutation in the gene encoding pleckstrin homology domain-containing protein, family G member 5 (PLEKHG5) on chromosome 1p36.
Compton-North congenital myopathy
MedGen UID:
393406
Concept ID:
C2675527
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-12 (CMYP12) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe neonatal hypotonia resulting in feeding difficulties and respiratory failure within the first months of life. There is evidence of the disorder in utero, with decreased fetal movements and polyhydramnios. Additional features may include high-arched palate and contractures. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows myopathic changes with disrupted sarcomeres and minicore-like structures (Compton et al., 2008). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Primary CD59 deficiency
MedGen UID:
393582
Concept ID:
C2676767
Disease or Syndrome
CD59-mediated hemolytic anemia with immune-mediated polyneuropathy is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by infantile onset of a relapsing-remitting polyneuropathy, often exacerbated by infection, and manifest as hypotonia, limb muscle weakness, and hyporeflexia. Immunosuppressive treatment may result in some clinical improvement (summary by Nevo et al., 2013).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2N
MedGen UID:
413754
Concept ID:
C2750090
Disease or Syndrome
A mild form of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, a peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy, with characteristics of distal legs sensory loss and weakness that can be asymmetric. Tendon reflexes are reduced in the knees and absent in ankles. Progression is slow.
Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis, susceptibility to, 2
MedGen UID:
413851
Concept ID:
C2750473
Finding
Any thyrotoxic periodic paralysis in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the KCNJ18 gene.
Neuropathy, hereditary sensory and autonomic, type 2B
MedGen UID:
413474
Concept ID:
C2751092
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II (HSAN2) is characterized by progressively reduced sensation to pain, temperature, and touch. Onset can be at birth and is often before puberty. The sensory deficit is predominantly distal with the lower limbs more severely affected than the upper limbs. Over time sensory function becomes severely reduced. Unnoticed injuries and neuropathic skin promote ulcerations and infections that result in spontaneous amputation of digits or the need for surgical amputation. Osteomyelitis is common. Painless fractures can complicate the disease. Autonomic disturbances are variable and can include hyperhidrosis, tonic pupils, and urinary incontinence in those with more advanced disease.
Neuropathy, hereditary sensory and autonomic, type 2A
MedGen UID:
416701
Concept ID:
C2752089
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II (HSAN2) is characterized by progressively reduced sensation to pain, temperature, and touch. Onset can be at birth and is often before puberty. The sensory deficit is predominantly distal with the lower limbs more severely affected than the upper limbs. Over time sensory function becomes severely reduced. Unnoticed injuries and neuropathic skin promote ulcerations and infections that result in spontaneous amputation of digits or the need for surgical amputation. Osteomyelitis is common. Painless fractures can complicate the disease. Autonomic disturbances are variable and can include hyperhidrosis, tonic pupils, and urinary incontinence in those with more advanced disease.
ALG6-congenital disorder of glycosylation 1C
MedGen UID:
443952
Concept ID:
C2930997
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital disorders of glycosylation, previously called carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndromes (CDGSs), are caused by defects in mannose addition during N-linked oligosaccharide assembly. CDGs can be divided into 2 types, depending on whether they impair lipid-linked oligosaccharide (LLO) assembly and transfer (CDG I), or affect trimming of the protein-bound oligosaccharide or the addition of sugars to it (CDG II) (Orlean, 2000). CDG Ic is characterized by psychomotor retardation with delayed walking and speech, hypotonia, seizures, and sometimes protein-losing enteropathy. It is the second largest subtype of CDG (summary by Sun et al., 2005). For a discussion of the classification of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065). Freeze and Aebi (1999) reviewed CDG Ib (602579) and CDG Ic.
ALG1-congenital disorder of glycosylation
MedGen UID:
419308
Concept ID:
C2931005
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) comprise a group of multisystem diseases with mostly severe psychomotor and mental retardation. Type I CDG comprises those disorders in which there are defects that affect biosynthesis of dolichol-linked oligosaccharides in the cytosol or the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), as well as defects involving the transfer of oligosaccharides onto nascent glycoproteins. Type II CDG comprises all defects of further trimming and elongation of N-linked oligosaccharides in the ER and Golgi (Schwarz et al., 2004). CDG1K is a type I CDG characterized by predominant neurologic involvement. Survival ranges from the second day of life to adulthood. The liver is affected in a minority of patients and shows hepatomegaly, edema, ascites, cholestatic jaundice, portal hypertension, and Budd-Chiari syndrome (summary by Marques-da-Silva et al., 2017). For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065).
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (congenital with brain and eye anomalies), type A6
MedGen UID:
461764
Concept ID:
C3150414
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies (type A), which includes both the more severe Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) and the slightly less severe muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB), is an autosomal recessive disorder with characteristic brain and eye malformations, profound mental retardation, congenital muscular dystrophy, and death usually in the first years of life. It represents the most severe end of a phenotypic spectrum of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of DAG1 (128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Godfrey et al., 2007). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type A, see MDDGA1 (236670).
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (congenital with intellectual disability), type B2
MedGen UID:
461766
Concept ID:
C3150416
Disease or Syndrome
MDDGB2 is an autosomal recessive congenital muscular dystrophy associated with impaired intellectual development and mild structural brain abnormalities (Yanagisawa et al., 2007). It is part of a group of similar disorders, collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies,' resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239) (Godfrey et al., 2007). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type B, see MDDGB1 (613155).
Combined oxidative phosphorylation defect type 7
MedGen UID:
462151
Concept ID:
C3150801
Disease or Syndrome
A rare mitochondrial disease due to a defect in mitochondrial protein synthesis with a variable phenotype that includes onset in infancy or early childhood of failure to thrive and psychomotor regression (after initial normal development), as well as ocular manifestations (such as ptosis, nystagmus, optic atrophy, ophthalmoplegia and reduced vision). Additional manifestations include bulbar paresis with facial weakness, hypotonia, difficulty chewing, dysphagia, mild dysarthria, ataxia, global muscle atrophy, and areflexia. It has a relatively slow disease progression with patients often living into the third decade of life.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease recessive intermediate B
MedGen UID:
462247
Concept ID:
C3150897
Disease or Syndrome
An extremely rare subtype of autosomal recessive intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease characterized by a CMT neuropathy associated with developmental delay, self-abusive behavior, dysmorphic features and vestibular Schwannoma. Motor nerve conduction velocities demonstrate features of both demyelinating and axonal pathology.
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 9
MedGen UID:
462826
Concept ID:
C3151476
Disease or Syndrome
SUCLG1-related mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome, encephalomyopathic form with methylmalonic aciduria is characterized in the majority of affected newborns by hypotonia, muscle atrophy, feeding difficulties, and lactic acidosis. Affected infants commonly manifest developmental delay / cognitive impairment, growth retardation / failure to thrive, hepatopathy, sensorineural hearing impairment, dystonia, and hypertonia. Notable findings in some affected individuals include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, epilepsy, myoclonus, microcephaly, sleep disturbance, rhabdomyolysis, contractures, hypothermia, and/or hypoglycemia. Life span is shortened, with median survival of 20 months.
Congenital myopathy 11
MedGen UID:
462881
Concept ID:
C3151531
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-11 (CMYP11) is an autosomal recessive skeletal muscle disorder characterized clinically by severe hypotonia apparent at birth, resulting in early feeding problems, motor delay, and walking difficulties. However, the course of the disease is nonprogressive: most affected individuals achieve independent ambulation and tend to show improvement of muscle weakness throughout childhood and early adulthood. There is no respiratory or cardiac involvement; cognitive development is normal. Muscle biopsy may show rare centralized nuclei, type 1 fiber hypotrophy, and type 1 fiber predominance, suggestive of a pathologic diagnosis of congenital fiber-type disproportion (CFTD). However, the findings on skeletal muscle biopsy may be nonspecific (Muhammad et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Severe X-linked mitochondrial encephalomyopathy
MedGen UID:
463103
Concept ID:
C3151753
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-6 (COXPD6) is an X-linked recessive severe encephalomyopathic disorder with onset in utero or in infancy. Affected patients have hypotonia and severely impaired psychomotor development associated with variably decreased enzymatic activity of mitochondrial respiratory complexes in skeletal muscle or fibroblasts. More variable features may include sensorimotor neuropathy, seizures, severe muscle weakness, abnormal signals in the basal ganglia, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, deafness, swallowing difficulties, and respiratory insufficiency. Death in childhood may occur (summary by Berger et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Mitochondrial myopathy with reversible cytochrome C oxidase deficiency
MedGen UID:
463248
Concept ID:
C3151898
Disease or Syndrome
Infantile mitochondrial myopathy due to reversible COX deficiency is a rare mitochondrial disorder characterized by onset in infancy of severe hypotonia and generalized muscle weakness associated with lactic acidosis, but is distinguished from other mitochondrial disorders in that affected individuals recover spontaneously after 1 year of age (summary by Mimaki et al., 2010). See also transient infantile liver failure (LFIT; 613070), which is a similar disorder.
Encephalopathy, lethal, due to defective mitochondrial peroxisomal fission 1
MedGen UID:
482290
Concept ID:
C3280660
Disease or Syndrome
Encephalopathy due to defective mitochondrial and peroxisomal fission-1 (EMPF1) is characterized by delayed psychomotor development and hypotonia that may lead to death in childhood. Many patients develop refractory seizures, consistent with an epileptic encephalopathy, and thereafter show neurologic decline. The age at onset, features, and severity are variable, and some patients may not have clinical evidence of mitochondrial or peroxisomal dysfunction (summary by Sheffer et al., 2016; Fahrner et al., 2016). Genetic Heterogeneity of Encephalopathy Due to Defective Mitochondrial And Peroxisomal Fission See also EMPF2 (617086), caused by mutation in the MFF gene (614785) on chromosome 2q36.
MEGF10-related myopathy
MedGen UID:
482309
Concept ID:
C3280679
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-10A (CMYP10A) is a severe autosomal recessive skeletal muscle disorder characterized by generalized hypotonia, respiratory insufficiency, and poor feeding apparent from birth. Decreased fetal movements may be observed. More variable features include high-arched palate, distal joint contractures, foot deformities, scoliosis, areflexia, and dysphagia. Many patients show eventration of the diaphragm. Affected individuals become ventilator-dependent in the first months or years of life and never achieve walking; many die in childhood (Logan et al., 2011). Patients with more damaging mutations in the MEGF10 gene, including nonsense or frameshift null mutations, show the more severe phenotype (CMYP10A), whereas those with missense mutations affecting conserved cysteine residues in the EGF-like domain show the less severe phenotype with later onset of respiratory failure and minicores on muscle biopsy (CMYP10B) (Croci et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2P
MedGen UID:
482427
Concept ID:
C3280797
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic axonal hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy disorder with characteristics of adulthood-onset of slowly progressive, occasionally asymmetrical, distal muscle weakness and atrophy (predominantly in the lower limbs), pan-modal sensory loss, muscle cramping in extremities and/or trunk, pes cavus and absent or reduced deep tendon reflexes. Gait anomalies and variable autonomic disturbances, such as erectile dysfunction and urinary urgency, may be associated. The disease can be caused by homozygous or heterozygous mutation in the LRSAM1 gene on chromosome 9q33.
Infantile cerebellar-retinal degeneration
MedGen UID:
482822
Concept ID:
C3281192
Disease or Syndrome
Infantile cerebellar-retinal degeneration (ICRD) is a severe autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by onset between ages 2 and 6 months of truncal hypotonia, athetosis, seizures, and ophthalmologic abnormalities, particularly optic atrophy and retinal degeneration. Affected individuals show profound psychomotor retardation, with only some achieving rolling, sitting, or recognition of family. Brain MRI shows progressive cerebral and cerebellar degeneration (summary by Spiegel et al., 2012). A subset of patients may have a milder phenotype with variable features, including ataxia, developmental delay, and behavioral abnormalities (Blackburn et al., 2020). Mutation in the ACO2 gene also causes isolated optic atrophy (OPA9; 616289).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1E
MedGen UID:
501212
Concept ID:
C3495591
Disease or Syndrome
A rare subtype of CMT1 characterized by a variable clinical presentation. Onset within the first two years of life with a delay in walking is not uncommon; however, onset may occur later. CMT1E is caused by point mutations in the <i>PMP22</i> (17p12) gene. The disease severity depends on the particular <i>PMP22</i> mutation, with some cases being very mild and even resembling hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies, while others having an earlier onset with a more severe phenotype (reminiscent of Dejerine-Sottas syndrome) than that seen in CMT1A, caused by gene duplication. These severe cases may also report deafness and much slower motor nerve conduction velocities compared to CMT1A patients.
Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 6
MedGen UID:
761278
Concept ID:
C3539003
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type VI (HSAN6) is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by neonatal hypotonia, respiratory and feeding difficulties, lack of psychomotor development, and autonomic abnormalities including labile cardiovascular function, lack of corneal reflexes leading to corneal scarring, areflexia, and absent axonal flare response after intradermal histamine injection (summary by Edvardson et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy, see HSAN1 (162400).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4F
MedGen UID:
761704
Concept ID:
C3540453
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4F is an autosomal recessive demyelinating neuropathy characterized by distal sensory impairment and distal muscle weakness and atrophy affecting the lower more than the upper limbs. Nerve conduction velocities are decreased and sural nerve biopsy shows loss of myelinated fibers. The age at onset is variable and can range from childhood to adult years. When the onset is in infancy, the phenotype is characterized as Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS; 145900). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, see CMT4A (214400).
Congenital myopathy 10b, mild variant
MedGen UID:
762102
Concept ID:
C3541476
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-10B (CMYP10B) is an autosomal recessive skeletal muscle disorder characterized by infantile- or childhood-onset myopathy, areflexia, dysphagia, and respiratory distress that usually requires nocturnal ventilation. Other common features include facial and neck muscle weakness, feeding difficulties, contractures, scoliosis, high-arched palate, hyporeflexia, and difficulties walking. The disorder is slowly progressive and most patients follow a chronic course. Muscle biopsy shows variable findings, including type 1 fiber predominance, minicore lesions, and myofibrillar disorganization (Boyden et al., 2012; Harris et al., 2018). Patients with missense mutations affecting conserved cysteine residues in the EGF-like domain show the mild variant phenotype (CMYP10B) with later onset of respiratory failure and minicores on muscle biopsy, whereas patients with more damaging mutations, including nonsense or frameshift null mutations, show the severe variant phenotype (CMYP10A) (Croci et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 49
MedGen UID:
762260
Concept ID:
C3542549
Disease or Syndrome
TECPR2-related hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy with intellectual disability (TECPR2-HSAN with ID) is characterized by developmental delay and subsequent intellectual disability, behavioral abnormalities, neurologic manifestations (muscular hypotonia, sensory neuropathy with lower-limb hypo- or areflexia and ataxic gait), and autonomic dysfunction (including central hypoventilation and apnea, gastrointestinal dysmotility, dysphagia, and gastroesophageal reflux disease with recurrent aspiration). To date, more than 30 individuals with TECPR2-HSAN with ID have been identified.
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 2A (Zellweger)
MedGen UID:
763187
Concept ID:
C3550273
Disease or Syndrome
The peroxisome biogenesis disorder (PBD) Zellweger syndrome (ZS) is an autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly syndrome. Affected children present in the newborn period with profound hypotonia, seizures, and inability to feed. Characteristic craniofacial anomalies, eye abnormalities, neuronal migration defects, hepatomegaly, and chondrodysplasia punctata are present. Children with this condition do not show any significant development and usually die in the first year of life (summary by Steinberg et al., 2006). For a complete phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Zellweger syndrome, see 214100. Individuals with PBDs of complementation group 2 (CG2) have mutations in the PEX5 gene. For information on the history of PBD complementation groups, see 214100.
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder type 3B
MedGen UID:
763607
Concept ID:
C3550693
Disease or Syndrome
Zellweger spectrum disorder (ZSD) is a phenotypic continuum ranging from severe to mild. While individual phenotypes (e.g., Zellweger syndrome [ZS], neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy [NALD], and infantile Refsum disease [IRD]) were described in the past before the biochemical and molecular bases of this spectrum were fully determined, the term "ZSD" is now used to refer to all individuals with a defect in one of the ZSD-PEX genes regardless of phenotype. Individuals with ZSD usually come to clinical attention in the newborn period or later in childhood. Affected newborns are hypotonic and feed poorly. They have distinctive facies, congenital malformations (neuronal migration defects associated with neonatal-onset seizures, renal cysts, and bony stippling [chondrodysplasia punctata] of the patella[e] and the long bones), and liver disease that can be severe. Infants with severe ZSD are significantly impaired and typically die during the first year of life, usually having made no developmental progress. Individuals with intermediate/milder ZSD do not have congenital malformations, but rather progressive peroxisome dysfunction variably manifest as sensory loss (secondary to retinal dystrophy and sensorineural hearing loss), neurologic involvement (ataxia, polyneuropathy, and leukodystrophy), liver dysfunction, adrenal insufficiency, and renal oxalate stones. While hypotonia and developmental delays are typical, intellect can be normal. Some have osteopenia; almost all have ameleogenesis imperfecta in the secondary teeth.
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (congenital with brain and eye anomalies), type A, 7
MedGen UID:
766244
Concept ID:
C3553330
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies (type A), which includes both the more severe Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) and the slightly less severe muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB), is an autosomal recessive disorder with characteristic brain and eye malformations, profound mental retardation, congenital muscular dystrophy, and death usually in the first years of life. It represents the most severe end of a phenotypic spectrum of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (summary by Roscioli et al., 2012). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type A, see MDDGA1 (236670).
Deafness-encephaloneuropathy-obesity-valvulopathy syndrome
MedGen UID:
766268
Concept ID:
C3553354
Disease or Syndrome
Primary coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency is usually associated with multisystem involvement, including neurologic manifestations such as fatal neonatal encephalopathy with hypotonia; a late-onset slowly progressive multiple-system atrophy-like phenotype (neurodegeneration with autonomic failure and various combinations of parkinsonism and cerebellar ataxia, and pyramidal dysfunction); and dystonia, spasticity, seizures, and intellectual disability. Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS), the hallmark renal manifestation, is often the initial manifestation either as isolated renal involvement that progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), or associated with encephalopathy (seizures, stroke-like episodes, severe neurologic impairment) resulting in early death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), retinopathy or optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss can also be seen.
Brown-Vialetto-van Laere syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
766452
Concept ID:
C3553538
Disease or Syndrome
Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome-2 (BVVLS2) is an autosomal recessive progressive neurologic disorder characterized by early childhood onset of sensorineural deafness, bulbar dysfunction, and severe diffuse muscle weakness and wasting of the upper and lower limbs and axial muscles, resulting in respiratory insufficiency. Some patients may lose independent ambulation. Because it results from a defect in riboflavin metabolism, some patients may benefit from high-dose riboflavin supplementation (summary by Johnson et al., 2012; Foley et al., 2014). For discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome, see BVVLS1 (211530).
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 3A (Zellweger)
MedGen UID:
766843
Concept ID:
C3553929
Disease or Syndrome
The peroxisomal biogenesis disorder (PBD) Zellweger syndrome (ZS) is an autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly syndrome resulting from disordered peroxisome biogenesis. Affected children present in the newborn period with profound hypotonia, seizures, and inability to feed. Characteristic craniofacial anomalies, eye abnormalities, neuronal migration defects, hepatomegaly, and chondrodysplasia punctata are present. Children with this condition do not show any significant development and usually die in the first year of life (summary by Steinberg et al., 2006). For a complete phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Zellweger syndrome, see 214100. Individuals with PBDs of complementation group 3 (CG3) have mutations in the PEX12 gene. For information on the history of PBD complementation groups, see 214100.
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 5A (Zellweger)
MedGen UID:
766854
Concept ID:
C3553940
Disease or Syndrome
The peroxisomal biogenesis disorder (PBD) Zellweger syndrome (ZS) is an autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly syndrome. Affected children present in the newborn period with profound hypotonia, seizures, and inability to feed. Characteristic craniofacial anomalies, eye abnormalities, neuronal migration defects, hepatomegaly, and chondrodysplasia punctata are present. Children with this condition do not show any significant development and usually die in the first year of life (summary by Steinberg et al., 2006). For a complete phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Zellweger syndrome, see 214100. Individuals with PBDs of complementation group 5 (CG5, equivalent to CG10 and CGF) have mutations in the PEX2 gene. For information on the history of PBD complementation groups, see 214100.
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 6B
MedGen UID:
766862
Concept ID:
C3553948
Disease or Syndrome
The overlapping phenotypes of neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD) and infantile Refsum disease (IRD) represent the milder manifestations of the Zellweger syndrome spectrum (ZSS) of peroxisome biogenesis disorders. The clinical course of patients with the NALD and IRD presentation is variable and may include developmental delay, hypotonia, liver dysfunction, sensorineural hearing loss, retinal dystrophy, and visual impairment. Children with the NALD presentation may reach their teens, and those with the IRD presentation may reach adulthood. Some patients with PEX10 mutations have a milder disorder characterized by childhood-onset cerebellar ataxia and neuropathy without mental retardation (summary by Waterham and Ebberink, 2012). For a complete phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PBD(NALD/IRD), see 601539. Individuals with mutations in the PEX10 gene have cells of complementation group 7 (CG7, equivalent to CGB). For information on the history of PBD complementation groups, see 214100.
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 10A (Zellweger)
MedGen UID:
766913
Concept ID:
C3553999
Disease or Syndrome
Zellweger syndrome (ZS) is an autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly syndrome resulting from disordered peroxisome biogenesis. Affected children present in the newborn period with profound hypotonia, seizures, and inability to feed. Characteristic craniofacial anomalies, eye abnormalities, neuronal migration defects, hepatomegaly, and chondrodysplasia punctata are present. Children with this condition do not show any significant development and usually die in the first year of life (summary by Steinberg et al., 2006). For a complete phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Zellweger syndrome, see 214100. Individuals with PBDs of complementation group 12 (CG12, equivalent to CGG) have mutations in the PEX3 gene. For information on the history of PBD complementation groups, see 214100.
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 13A (Zellweger)
MedGen UID:
766918
Concept ID:
C3554004
Disease or Syndrome
Zellweger syndrome (ZS) is an autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly syndrome resulting from disordered peroxisome biogenesis. Affected children present in the newborn period with profound hypotonia, seizures, and inability to feed. Characteristic craniofacial anomalies, eye abnormalities, neuronal migration defects, hepatomegaly, and chondrodysplasia punctata are present. Children with this condition do not show any significant development and usually die in the first year of life (summary by Steinberg et al., 2006). For a complete phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Zellweger syndrome, see 214100. Individuals with PBDs of complementation group K (CGK) have mutations in the PEX14 gene. For information on the history of PBD complementation groups, see 214100.
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 14B
MedGen UID:
766969
Concept ID:
C3554055
Disease or Syndrome
PBD14B is an autosomal recessive peroxisome biogenesis disorder characterized clinically by mild intellectual disability, congenital cataracts, progressive hearing loss, and polyneuropathy (Ebberink et al., 2012), all of which had been observed in patients with mild peroxisomal biogenesis disorders (e.g., Kelley et al., 1986; Poll-The et al., 1987). Additionally, recurrent migraine-like episodes following mental stress or physical exertion, not a common feature in peroxisome disorders, was reported. Thoms and Gartner (2012) classified the disorder described by Ebberink et al. (2012) in their patient as a mild 'Zellweger syndrome (214100) spectrum' (ZSS) disorder. See PBD1B (601539) for a phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of less severe phenotypes on the Zellweger syndrome spectrum. See PBD9B (614879) for another atypical peroxisome biogenesis disorder.
Lower motor neuron syndrome with late-adult onset
MedGen UID:
767312
Concept ID:
C3554398
Disease or Syndrome
CHCHD10-related disorders are characterized by a spectrum of adult-onset neurologic phenotypes that can include: Mitochondrial myopathy (may also be early onset): weakness, amyotrophy, exercise intolerance. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS): progressive degeneration of upper motor neurons and lower motor neurons. Frontotemporal dementia (FTD): slowly progressive behavioral changes, language disturbances, cognitive decline, extrapyramidal signs. Late-onset spinal motor neuronopathy (SMA, Jokela type): weakness, cramps, and/or fasciculations; areflexia. Axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy: slowly progressive lower-leg muscle weakness and atrophy, small hand muscle weakness, loss of tendon reflexes, sensory abnormalities. Cerebellar ataxia: gait ataxia, kinetic ataxia (progressive loss of coordination of lower- and upper-limb movements), dysarthria/dysphagia, nystagmus, cerebellar oculomotor disorder. Because of the recent discovery of CHCHD10-related disorders and the limited number of affected individuals reported to date, the natural history of these disorders (except for SMAJ caused by the p.Gly66Val pathogenic variant) is largely unknown.
Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 3
MedGen UID:
767604
Concept ID:
C3554690
Disease or Syndrome
AOA3 is an autosomal recessive progressive neurologic disorder with onset in the second decade of life (Al Tassan et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of ataxia-oculomotor apraxia, see AOA1 (208920).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4B3
MedGen UID:
811329
Concept ID:
C3695063
Disease or Syndrome
A subtype of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 4 with characteristics of childhood onset of slowly progressing, demyelinating sensorimotor neuropathy, focally folded myelin sheaths in nerve biopsy, reduced nerve conduction velocities and the typical Charcot-Marie-Tooth phenotype (i.e. distal muscle weakness and atrophy, and sensory loss). There is evidence this disease is caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutation in the SBF1 gene on chromosome 22q.
Actin accumulation myopathy
MedGen UID:
777997
Concept ID:
C3711389
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-2A (CMYP2A) is an autosomal dominant disorder of the skeletal muscle characterized by infantile- or childhood-onset myopathy with delayed motor milestones and nonprogressive muscle weakness. Of the patients with congenital myopathy caused by mutation in the ACTA1 gene, about 90% carry heterozygous mutations that are usually de novo and cause the severe infantile phenotype (CMYP2C; 620278). Some patients with de novo mutations have a more typical and milder disease course with delayed motor development and proximal muscle weakness, but are able to achieve independent ambulation. Less frequently, autosomal dominant transmission of the disorder within a family may occur when the ACTA1 mutation produces a phenotype compatible with adult life. Of note, intrafamilial variability has also been reported: a severely affected proband may be identified and then mildly affected or even asymptomatic relatives are found to carry the same mutation. The severity of the disease most likely depends on the detrimental effect of the mutation, although there are probably additional modifying factors (Ryan et al., 2001; Laing et al., 2009; Sanoudou and Beggs, 2001; Agrawal et al., 2004; Nowak et al., 2013; Sewry et al., 2019; Laitila and Wallgren-Pettersson, 2021). The most common histologic finding on muscle biopsy in patients with ACTA1 mutations is the presence of 'nemaline rods,' which represent abnormal thread- or rod-like structures ('nema' is Greek for 'thread'). However, skeletal muscle biopsy from patients with mutations in the ACTA1 gene can show a range of pathologic phenotypes. These include classic rods, intranuclear rods, clumped filaments, cores, or fiber-type disproportion, all of which are nonspecific pathologic findings and not pathognomonic of a specific congenital myopathy. Most patients have clinically severe disease, regardless of the histopathologic phenotype (Nowak et al., 2007; Sewry et al., 2019). ACTA1 mutations are the second most common cause of congenital myopathies classified histologically as 'nemaline myopathy' after mutations in the NEB gene (161650). ACTA1 mutations are overrepresented in the severe phenotype with early death (Laing et al., 2009). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of nemaline myopathy, see NEM2 (256030).
Muscle AMP deaminase deficiency
MedGen UID:
811508
Concept ID:
C3714933
Disease or Syndrome
Myoadenylate deaminase deficiency (MMDD) is an autosomal recessive condition that can manifest as exercise-induced muscle pain, occasionally associated with rhabdomyolysis and/or increased serum creatine kinase, or even infantile hypotonia. However, the finding of homozygous mutations among asymptomatic individuals have suggested to some (e.g., Verzijl et al., 1998) that AMPD1 deficiency may be a harmless entity (summary by Castro-Gago et al., 2011). Genetta et al. (2001) stated that AMPD1 deficiency is the most prevalent genetic disease in humans, the number of people heterozygous approaching 10% of Caucasians and individuals of African descent (Sabina et al., 1989). A small percentage of homozygous-deficient individuals, approximately 1.8% of the population, display symptoms of chronic fatigue and lost productivity as well as a predisposition to stress-related ailments, including heart disease and stroke, according to Genetta et al. (2001).
Myofibrillar myopathy 3
MedGen UID:
811509
Concept ID:
C3714934
Disease or Syndrome
Myofibrillar myopathy refers to a genetically heterogeneous group of muscular disorders characterized by a pathologic morphologic pattern of myofibrillar degradation and abnormal accumulation of proteins involved with the sarcomeric Z disc (summary by Foroud et al., 2005). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of myofibrillar myopathy, see MFM1 (601419).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease recessive intermediate C
MedGen UID:
815639
Concept ID:
C3809309
Disease or Syndrome
CMTRIC is an autosomal recessive peripheral neuropathy characterized by distal sensory impairment predominantly affecting the lower limbs and resulting in walking difficulties due to muscle weakness and atrophy. The upper limbs may also be affected. Electrophysiologic studies and sural nerve biopsy show mixed features of demyelinating and axonal neuropathy. The age at onset and the severity of the disease are variable (summary by Azzedine et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive intermediate CMT, see CMTRIA (608340).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2R
MedGen UID:
815985
Concept ID:
C3809655
Disease or Syndrome
A rare subtype of axonal hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy characterised by early-onset axial hypotonia, generalised muscle weakness, absent deep tendon reflexes and decreased muscle mass. Electromyography reveals decreased motor nerve conduction velocities with markedly reduced sensory and motor amplitudes. There is evidence the disease is caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutation in the TRIM2 gene on chromosome 4q.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2I
MedGen UID:
854756
Concept ID:
C3888087
Disease or Syndrome
A form of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease a peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy. A late onset with severe sensory loss associated with distal weakness mainly of the legs and absent or reduced deep tendon reflexes.
Frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2
MedGen UID:
863085
Concept ID:
C4014648
Disease or Syndrome
CHCHD10-related disorders are characterized by a spectrum of adult-onset neurologic phenotypes that can include: Mitochondrial myopathy (may also be early onset): weakness, amyotrophy, exercise intolerance. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS): progressive degeneration of upper motor neurons and lower motor neurons. Frontotemporal dementia (FTD): slowly progressive behavioral changes, language disturbances, cognitive decline, extrapyramidal signs. Late-onset spinal motor neuronopathy (SMA, Jokela type): weakness, cramps, and/or fasciculations; areflexia. Axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy: slowly progressive lower-leg muscle weakness and atrophy, small hand muscle weakness, loss of tendon reflexes, sensory abnormalities. Cerebellar ataxia: gait ataxia, kinetic ataxia (progressive loss of coordination of lower- and upper-limb movements), dysarthria/dysphagia, nystagmus, cerebellar oculomotor disorder. Because of the recent discovery of CHCHD10-related disorders and the limited number of affected individuals reported to date, the natural history of these disorders (except for SMAJ caused by the p.Gly66Val pathogenic variant) is largely unknown.
Myopathy, centronuclear, 5
MedGen UID:
863251
Concept ID:
C4014814
Disease or Syndrome
Centronuclear myopathy-5 (CNM5) is an autosomal recessive congenital myopathy characterized by severe neonatal hypotonia with respiratory insufficiency and difficulty feeding. Some patients die in infancy, and some develop dilated cardiomyopathy. Children show severely delayed motor development (summary by Agrawal et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of centronuclear myopathy, see CNM1 (160150).
Congenital myasthenic syndrome 7
MedGen UID:
863475
Concept ID:
C4015038
Disease or Syndrome
Presynaptic congenital myasthenic syndrome-7A with distal motor neuropathy (CMS7A) is an autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorder characterized by onset of foot deformities, delayed motor development, and slowly progressive distal muscle weakness resulting in gait difficulties in early childhood. Other features may include hyporeflexia, muscle atrophy, and upper limb involvement. Electrophysiologic studies show low compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs), consistent with a distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN), as well as a decremental response to repetitive stimulation, indicating presynaptic defects at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), consistent with myasthenic syndrome (summary by Fionda et al., 2021). The complex phenotype of patients with dominant SYT2 mutations likely results from impairment of 2 fundamental functions of SYT2: (1) disturbance of calcium-dependent synchronous presynaptic neurotransmitter release, resulting in a myasthenic disorder, and (2) disruption of exocytosis and endocytosis, causing a degenerative process affecting peripheral motor nerve terminals and resulting in a motor neuropathy (Maselli et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMS, see CMS1A (601462). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of dHMN, see 182960.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2T
MedGen UID:
864072
Concept ID:
C4015635
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2T (CMT2T) is a slowly progressive autosomal recessive sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy with onset in middle age (Higuchi et al., 2016). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT, see CMT2A1 (118210).
Combined oxidative phosphorylation defect type 24
MedGen UID:
864080
Concept ID:
C4015643
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-24 (COXPD24) is an autosomal recessive mitochondrial disorder with wide phenotypic variability. Most patients present in infancy with delayed neurodevelopment, refractory seizures, hypotonia, and hearing impairment due to auditory neuropathy. Less common features may include cortical blindness, renal dysfunction, and/or liver involvement, suggestive of Alpers syndrome (MTDPS4A; 203700). Patients with the severe phenotype tend to have brain abnormalities on imaging, including cerebral atrophy and hyperintensities in the basal ganglia and brainstem, consistent with Leigh syndrome. Laboratory values may be normal or show increased lactate and evidence of mitochondrial respiratory chain defects, particularly in muscle. Some patients achieve little developmental milestones and may die in infancy or early childhood. However, some patients have a less severe phenotype manifest only by myopathy (summary by Sofou et al., 2015, Vanlander et al., 2015, and Mizuguchi et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2U
MedGen UID:
906504
Concept ID:
C4084821
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2U (CMT2U) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by late-adult onset of distal sensory impairment resulting in distal muscle weakness and atrophy affecting the upper and lower limbs. The disorder is slowly progressive (summary by Gonzalez et al., 2013). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT, see CMT2A1 (118210).
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal recessive 1
MedGen UID:
897191
Concept ID:
C4225153
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life and about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called "chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus," or "CPEO+").
Spinal muscular atrophy with congenital bone fractures 2
MedGen UID:
907910
Concept ID:
C4225176
Disease or Syndrome
Spinal muscular atrophy with congenital bone fractures is an autosomal recessive severe neuromuscular disorder characterized by onset of severe hypotonia with fetal hypokinesia in utero. This results in congenital contractures, consistent with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, and increased incidence of prenatal fracture of the long bones. Affected infants have difficulty breathing and feeding and often die in the first days or months of life (summary by Knierim et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of spinal muscular atrophy with congenital bone fractures, see SMABF1 (616866).
Spinal muscular atrophy with congenital bone fractures 1
MedGen UID:
896011
Concept ID:
C4225177
Disease or Syndrome
Spinal muscular atrophy with congenital bone fractures is an autosomal recessive severe neuromuscular disorder characterized by onset of severe hypotonia with fetal hypokinesia in utero. This results in congenital contractures, consistent with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, and increased incidence of prenatal fracture of the long bones. Affected infants have difficulty breathing and feeding and often die in the first days or months of life (summary by Knierim et al., 2016). Genetic Heterogeneity of Spinal Muscular Atrophy With Congenital Bone Fractures See also SMABF2 (616867), caused by mutation in the ASCC1 gene (614215) on chromosome 10q22.
Progressive scapulohumeroperoneal distal myopathy
MedGen UID:
905125
Concept ID:
C4225181
Disease or Syndrome
Scapulohumeroperoneal myopathy is an autosomal dominant muscle disorder characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy affecting both proximal and distal muscles of the upper and lower limbs. Onset is usually in the first decade and can be as early as infancy, although some patients do not notice symptoms until young adulthood. There is marked variability in severity (summary by Zukosky et al., 2015).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4K
MedGen UID:
895560
Concept ID:
C4225246
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4K is an autosomal recessive demyelinating peripheral neuropathy characterized by onset in the first decade of distal muscle weakness and atrophy associated with impaired distal sensation. Both upper and lower limbs are affected. Affected individuals may also have nystagmus and late-onset cerebellar ataxia. Laboratory studies show increased serum lactate and isolated mitochondrial complex IV deficiency (summary by Echaniz-Laguna et al., 2013). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, see CMT4A (214400).
PMP22-RAI1 contiguous gene duplication syndrome
MedGen UID:
894862
Concept ID:
C4225255
Disease or Syndrome
Yuan-Harel-Lupski syndrome is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay and early-onset peripheral neuropathy. The disorder comprises features of both demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A; 118220), which results from duplication of the PMP22 gene on 17p12, and Potocki-Lupski syndrome (PTLS; 610883), which results from duplication of a slightly proximal region on 17p11.2 that includes the RAI1 gene. These 2 loci are about 2.5 Mb apart. The resultant YUHAL phenotype may be more severe in comparison to the individual contributions of each gene, with particularly early onset of peripheral neuropathy and features of both central and peripheral nervous system involvement (summary by Yuan et al., 2015).
Neuropathy, hereditary motor and sensory, type 6B
MedGen UID:
895482
Concept ID:
C4225302
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type VIB is an autosomal recessive complex progressive neurologic disorder characterized mainly by early-onset optic atrophy resulting in progressive visual loss and peripheral axonal sensorimotor neuropathy with highly variable age at onset and severity. Affected individuals may also have cerebellar or pontocerebellar atrophy on brain imaging, and they may show abnormal movements such as ataxia, dysmetria, and myoclonus (summary by Abrams et al., 2015). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HMSN6, see HMSN6A (601152).
Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy 2
MedGen UID:
899150
Concept ID:
C4225314
Disease or Syndrome
Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy-2 (UCMD2) is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by joint hypermobility, proximal contractures, and muscle weakness precluding ambulation (summary by Zou et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy, see UCMD1A (254090).
Lissencephaly 7 with cerebellar hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
895680
Concept ID:
C4225359
Disease or Syndrome
Lissencephaly-7 with cerebellar hypoplasia (LIS7) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by lack of psychomotor development, facial dysmorphism, arthrogryposis, and early-onset intractable seizures resulting in death in infancy (Magen et al., 2015). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lissencephaly, see LIS1 (607432).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 29
MedGen UID:
908570
Concept ID:
C4225361
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-29 (DEE29) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by the onset of refractory myoclonic seizures in the first months of life. Affected individuals have poor overall growth, congenital microcephaly with cerebral atrophy and impaired myelination on brain imaging, spasticity with abnormal movements, peripheral neuropathy, and poor visual fixation (summary by Simons et al., 2015). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Congenital myasthenic syndrome 18
MedGen UID:
906793
Concept ID:
C4225364
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myasthenic syndrome-18 (CMS18) is an autosomal dominant presynaptic neuromuscular disorder characterized by early-onset muscle weakness and easy fatigability associated with delayed psychomotor development and ataxia (summary by Shen et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMS, see CMS1A (601462).
Lethal congenital contracture syndrome 8
MedGen UID:
896058
Concept ID:
C4225385
Disease or Syndrome
Lethal congenital contracture syndrome-8 (LCCS8), an axoglial form of arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, is characterized by congenital distal joint contractures, reduced fetal movements, and severe motor paralysis leading to death early in the neonatal period (Laquerriere et al., 2014). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lethal congenital contracture syndrome, see LCCS1 (253310).
Lethal congenital contracture syndrome 7
MedGen UID:
894160
Concept ID:
C4225386
Disease or Syndrome
Lethal congenital contracture syndrome-7, an axoglial form of arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC), is characterized by congenital distal joint contractures, polyhydramnios, reduced fetal movements, and severe motor paralysis leading to death early in the neonatal period (Laquerriere et al., 2014). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lethal congenital contracture syndrome, see LCCS1 (253310).
Ataxia - oculomotor apraxia type 4
MedGen UID:
902323
Concept ID:
C4225397
Disease or Syndrome
Ataxia-oculomotor apraxia-4 (AOA4) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by onset of dystonia and ataxia in the first decade. Additional features include oculomotor apraxia and peripheral neuropathy. Some patients may show cognitive impairment. The disorder is progressive, and most patients become wheelchair-bound in the second or third decade (summary by Bras et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of ataxia-oculomotor apraxia, see AOA1 (208920).
Myopathy, reducing body, X-linked, early-onset, severe
MedGen UID:
906731
Concept ID:
C4225423
Disease or Syndrome
Reducing-body myopathy (RBM) is a rare myopathy characterized pathologically by the presence of intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies strongly stained by menadione-linked alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (MAG) in the absence of substrate, alpha-glycerophosphate. The term 'reducing body' refers to the reducing activity of the inclusions to nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) in the absence of substrate. This condition is also commonly associated with rimmed vacuoles and cytoplasmic bodies. The clinical features of RBM are variable; a severe form has onset in infancy or early childhood and results in severe disability or early death, and a less severe form has onset in late childhood or adulthood (RBMX1B; 300718) (summary by Liewluck et al., 2007 and Shalaby et al., 2009).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease dominant intermediate E
MedGen UID:
928336
Concept ID:
C4302667
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease E with focal segmental glomerulonephritis is characterized by the neurologic features of CMT, including distal muscle weakness and atrophy and distal sensory loss, and the features of FSGS, including proteinuria, progression to end-stage renal disease, and a characteristic histologic pattern on renal biopsy (summary by Boyer et al., 2011). Isolated focal segmental glomerulosclerosis-5 (FSGS5; 613237) is also caused by heterozygous mutation in the INF2 gene. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMTDI, see 606482.
Myofibrillar myopathy 8
MedGen UID:
934612
Concept ID:
C4310645
Disease or Syndrome
Myofibrillar myopathy-8 (MFM8) is an autosomal recessive myopathy characterized by slowly progressive proximal muscle weakness and atrophy affecting the upper and lower limbs, resulting in increased falls, gait problems, difficulty running or climbing stairs, and upper limb weakness or scapular winging. Some patients develop distal muscle weakness and atrophy. The phenotype may also be consistent with a clinical diagnosis of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). Age at symptom onset ranges from infancy to adulthood. Ambulation is generally preserved and cardiac involvement is rare, but respiratory compromise with decreased forced vital capacity often occurs. Muscle biopsy shows a mix of myopathic features, including myofibrillar inclusions and sarcomeric disorganization; some patients have been reported to have dystrophic changes on muscle biopsy (O'Grady et al., 2016; Daimaguler et al., 2021). There is significant phenotypic variation, even in patients with the same mutation, which must be taken into account when counseling affecting individuals (Woods et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of myofibrillar myopathy, see MFM1 (601419).
Arthrogryposis, distal, with impaired proprioception and touch
MedGen UID:
934659
Concept ID:
C4310692
Disease or Syndrome
Distal arthrogryposis with impaired proprioception and touch is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by loss of certain mechanosensation modalities resulting in ataxia, difficulty walking, dysmetria, muscle weakness and atrophy, and progressive skeletal contractures. Patients have onset of symptoms in early childhood (summary by Chesler et al., 2016 and Delle Vedove et al., 2016).
Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita 1, neurogenic, with myelin defect
MedGen UID:
1373185
Concept ID:
C4479539
Disease or Syndrome
AMC1 is an autosomal recessive severe neurologic disorder with onset in utero. Most affected individuals die in utero or are subject to pregnancy termination because of lack of fetal movements and prenatal evidence of contractures of virtually all joints. Those who survive have generalized contractures and hypotonia. The disorder is caused by a neurogenic defect and poor or absent myelin formation around peripheral nerves rather than by a muscular defect (summary by Xue et al., 2017). <Genetic Heterogeneity of Arthrogryposis Multiplex Congenita Also see AMC2 (208100), caused by mutation in the ERGIC1 gene (617946); AMC3 (618484), caused by mutation in the SYNE1 gene (608441); AMC4 (618776), caused by mutation in the SCYL2 gene (616365); AMC5 (618947), caused by mutation in the TOR1A gene (605204), and AMC6 (619334), caused by mutation in the NEB gene (161650)
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia, neuropathy, and deafness
MedGen UID:
1382171
Concept ID:
C4479603
Disease or Syndrome
SPTBN4 disorder is typically characterized by severe-to-profound developmental delay and/or intellectual disability, although two individuals in one family had a milder phenotype, including one individual with normal cognitive development. Speech and language skills are often severely limited. Affected individuals rarely achieve head control. Most are unable to sit, stand, or walk. Affected individuals typically have congenital hypotonia that may transition to hypertonia. Axonal motor neuropathy leads to hyporeflexia/areflexia and weakness, which can result in respiratory difficulties requiring ventilatory support. Most affected individuals require tube feeding for nutrition. Half of affected individuals develop seizures. Cortical visual impairment and auditory neuropathy have also been reported.
Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 26
MedGen UID:
1617917
Concept ID:
C4539948
Disease or Syndrome
3-methylglutaconic aciduria type 9
MedGen UID:
1622927
Concept ID:
C4540171
Disease or Syndrome
3-Methylglutaconic aciduria type IX (MGCA9) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early-onset seizures, severely delayed psychomotor development and intellectual disability. Patients have hypotonia or spasticity, and laboratory investigations show increased serum lactate and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, suggestive of a mitochondrial defect (summary by Shahrour et al., 2017). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, see MGCA type I (250950).
Alkaline ceramidase 3 deficiency
MedGen UID:
1622324
Concept ID:
C4540358
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic disorder with characteristics of infantile onset of stagnation and regression of motor and language development resulting in complete lack of communication and purposeful movement. Further neurological manifestations include truncal hypotonia, appendicular spasticity, dystonia, optic disc pallor, peripheral neuropathy and neurogenic bladder. Patients also present multiple contractures, late-onset relative macrocephaly, short stature and facial dysmorphism (including coarse facial features, sloping forehead, thick eyebrows, low-set ears, prominent nose, flat philtrum, and prominent lower lip). Brain imaging at advanced stages shows diffuse abnormal white matter signal and severe atrophy. Sural nerve biopsy reveals decreased myelination.
Perrault syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1640257
Concept ID:
C4551721
Disease or Syndrome
Perrault syndrome is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in males and females and ovarian dysfunction in females. SNHL is bilateral and ranges from profound with prelingual (congenital) onset to moderate with early-childhood onset. When onset is in early childhood, hearing loss can be progressive. Ovarian dysfunction ranges from gonadal dysgenesis (absent or streak gonads) manifesting as primary amenorrhea to primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) defined as cessation of menses before age 40 years. Fertility in affected males is reported as normal (although the number of reported males is limited). Neurologic features described in some individuals with Perrault syndrome include learning difficulties and developmental delay, cerebellar ataxia, and motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy.
Autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy
MedGen UID:
1645741
Concept ID:
C4551952
Disease or Syndrome
Centronuclear myopathy-1 (CNM1) is an autosomal dominant congenital myopathy characterized by slowly progressive muscular weakness and wasting. The disorder involves mainly limb girdle, trunk, and neck muscles but may also affect distal muscles. Weakness may be present during childhood or adolescence or may not become evident until the third decade of life, and some affected individuals become wheelchair-bound in their fifties. Ptosis and limitation of eye movements occur frequently. The most prominent histopathologic features include high frequency of centrally located nuclei in a large number of extrafusal muscle fibers (which is the basis of the name of the disorder), radial arrangement of sarcoplasmic strands around the central nuclei, and predominance and hypotrophy of type 1 fibers (summary by Bitoun et al., 2005). Genetic Heterogeneity of Centronuclear Myopathy Centronuclear myopathy is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. See also X-linked CNM (CNMX; 310400), caused by mutation in the MTM1 gene (300415) on chromosome Xq28; CNM2 (255200), caused by mutation in the BIN1 gene (601248) on chromosome 2q14; CNM4 (614807), caused by mutation in the CCDC78 gene (614666) on chromosome 16p13; CNM5 (615959), caused by mutation in the SPEG gene (615950) on chromosome 2q35; and CNM6 (617760), caused by mutation in the ZAK gene (609479) on chromosome 2q31. The mutation in the MYF6 gene that was reported to cause a form of CNM, formerly designated CNM3, has been reclassified as a variant of unknown significance; see 159991.0001. Some patients with mutation in the RYR1 gene (180901) have findings of centronuclear myopathy on skeletal muscle biopsy (see 255320).
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1631838
Concept ID:
C4551995
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy (MNGIE) disease is characterized by progressive gastrointestinal dysmotility (manifesting as early satiety, nausea, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux, postprandial emesis, episodic abdominal pain and/or distention, and diarrhea); cachexia; ptosis/ophthalmoplegia or ophthalmoparesis; leukoencephalopathy; and demyelinating peripheral neuropathy (manifesting as paresthesias (tingling, numbness, and pain) and symmetric and distal weakness more prominently affecting the lower extremities). The order in which manifestations appear is unpredictable. Onset is usually between the first and fifth decades; in about 60% of individuals, symptoms begin before age 20 years.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, dominant intermediate G
MedGen UID:
1642893
Concept ID:
C4693509
Disease or Syndrome
CMTDIG is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder with a highly variable phenotype. Most affected individuals have onset in the first or second decades of slowly progressive distal motor weakness and atrophy, resulting in gait instability and distal upper limb impairment, as well as distal sensory impairment. More severely affected individuals may have pes cavus and claw hands and become wheelchair-bound, whereas other affected individuals have later onset with a milder disease course. Electrophysiologic studies tend to show median motor nerve conduction velocities (NCV) in the 'intermediate' range, between 25 and 45 m/s (summary by Berciano et al., 2017). In a review of intermediate CMT, Berciano et al. (2017) noted that advanced axonal degeneration may induce secondary demyelinating changes resulting in decreased NCV and attenuated compound muscle action potential (CMAP) in median nerve conduction studies. They thus suggested that testing the upper arm, axilla to elbow, may provide more accurate assessment of NCV and CMAP and reveal an intermediate phenotype (review by Berciano et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMTDI, see 606482.
Fetal akinesia-cerebral and retinal hemorrhage syndrome
MedGen UID:
1631944
Concept ID:
C4706410
Disease or Syndrome
A rare lethal congenital myopathy syndrome characterized by decreased fetal movements and polyhydramnios in utero and the presence of akinesia, severe hypotonia with respiratory insufficiency, absent reflexes, joint contractures, skeletal abnormalities with thin ribs and bones, intracranial and retinal hemorrhages and decreased birth weight in the neonate.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4E
MedGen UID:
1648303
Concept ID:
C4721436
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy (CHN) is characterized clinically by onset of hypotonia at birth, areflexia, distal muscle weakness, and very slow nerve conduction velocities (often less than 10 m/s). Warner et al. (1997, 1998) noted that pathologic findings on sural nerve biopsies show hypomyelination of most or all fibers. Based on these findings, CHN is considered to be a result of congenital impairment in myelin formation. There has been some controversy and difficulty in differentiating congenital hypomyelination from Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS; 145900) because there is considerable overlap in clinical presentation. Based on pathologic findings of sural nerve biopsies (the absence of active myelin breakdown and the paucity of the onion bulbs in CHN and the presence of demyelination/remyelination and an abundance of well-organized onion bulbs in DSS; see Balestrini et al., 1991), CHN is considered to result from a congenital impairment in myelin formation, whereas DSS is thought to be due to aberrant demyelination and subsequent remyelination of the peripheral nerve. There is also variation in the prognosis of patients diagnosed with CHN. In patients with CHN, Harati and Butler (1985) showed correlation of morbidity and mortality with the presence/absence of onion bulbs: patients with few onion bulbs died in early infancy, usually because of difficulty in swallowing and respiration after birth. Patients with atypical onion bulbs survived but were affected with severe motor and sensory impairment. These differences in outcome may represent genetic heterogeneity such that mutations in essential early myelin gene(s) cause a severe phenotype, whereas mutations in other, possibly later acting gene(s), such as MPZ, lead to a less severe outcome. Genetic Heterogeneity of Congenital Hypomyelinating Neuropathy See also CHN2 (618184), caused by mutation in the MPZ gene (159440) on chromosome 1q23; and CHN3 (618186), caused by mutation in the CNTNAP1 gene (602346) on chromosome 17q21.
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 1A (Zellweger)
MedGen UID:
1648474
Concept ID:
C4721541
Disease or Syndrome
Zellweger spectrum disorder (ZSD) is a phenotypic continuum ranging from severe to mild. While individual phenotypes (e.g., Zellweger syndrome [ZS], neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy [NALD], and infantile Refsum disease [IRD]) were described in the past before the biochemical and molecular bases of this spectrum were fully determined, the term "ZSD" is now used to refer to all individuals with a defect in one of the ZSD-PEX genes regardless of phenotype. Individuals with ZSD usually come to clinical attention in the newborn period or later in childhood. Affected newborns are hypotonic and feed poorly. They have distinctive facies, congenital malformations (neuronal migration defects associated with neonatal-onset seizures, renal cysts, and bony stippling [chondrodysplasia punctata] of the patella[e] and the long bones), and liver disease that can be severe. Infants with severe ZSD are significantly impaired and typically die during the first year of life, usually having made no developmental progress. Individuals with intermediate/milder ZSD do not have congenital malformations, but rather progressive peroxisome dysfunction variably manifest as sensory loss (secondary to retinal dystrophy and sensorineural hearing loss), neurologic involvement (ataxia, polyneuropathy, and leukodystrophy), liver dysfunction, adrenal insufficiency, and renal oxalate stones. While hypotonia and developmental delays are typical, intellect can be normal. Some have osteopenia; almost all have ameleogenesis imperfecta in the secondary teeth.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A2
MedGen UID:
1648317
Concept ID:
C4721887
Disease or Syndrome
MFN2 hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (MFN2-HMSN) is a classic axonal peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy, inherited in either an autosomal dominant (AD) manner (~90%) or an autosomal recessive (AR) manner (~10%). MFN2-HMSN is characterized by more severe involvement of the lower extremities than the upper extremities, distal upper-extremity involvement as the neuropathy progresses, more prominent motor deficits than sensory deficits, and normal (>42 m/s) or only slightly decreased nerve conduction velocities (NCVs). Postural tremor is common. Median onset is age 12 years in the AD form and age eight years in the AR form. The prevalence of optic atrophy is approximately 7% in the AD form and approximately 20% in the AR form.
Neuropathy, congenital hypomyelinating, 2
MedGen UID:
1648446
Concept ID:
C4722277
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy-2 is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by early-onset hypotonia, severely delayed motor development, muscle weakness with areflexia, and severely decreased nerve conduction velocities (NCV) resulting from improper myelination of axons. The severity is variable: some patients may present at birth with contractures and respiratory insufficiency, whereas others may achieve walking (summary by Warner et al., 1996). CHN shows significant phenotypic overlap with Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS; 145900), which is also a neuropathy with early onset. Some classify the disorders differently, noting that CHN is characterized by hypo- or amyelination resulting from a congenital defect in myelin formation, whereas DSS has features of continuous myelin breakdown, with demyelination and remyelination (summary by Smit et al., 2008). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CHN, see CHN1 (605253).
Autosomal dominant childhood-onset proximal spinal muscular atrophy with contractures
MedGen UID:
1669929
Concept ID:
C4747715
Disease or Syndrome
SMALED2A is an autosomal dominant form of spinal muscular atrophy characterized by early childhood onset of muscle weakness and atrophy predominantly affecting the proximal and distal muscles of the lower extremity, although some patients may show upper extremity involvement. The disorder results in delayed walking, waddling gait, difficulty walking, and loss of distal reflexes. Some patients may have foot deformities or hyperlordosis, and some show mild upper motor signs, such as spasticity. Sensation, bulbar function, and cognitive function are preserved. The disorder shows very slow progression throughout life (summary by Oates et al., 2013). For discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lower extremity-predominant spinal muscular atrophy, see SMALED1 (158600).
Charcot-marie-tooth disease, axonal, type 2DD
MedGen UID:
1648475
Concept ID:
C4747974
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2DD is an autosomal dominant peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy mainly affecting the lower limbs. Affected individuals have gait impairment due to distal muscle weakness and atrophy. Some patients may also have involvement of the distal upper limbs, resulting in atrophy of the intrinsic hand muscles. The age at onset and severity of the disorder is highly variable, even within families, and those with earlier onset in late childhood or the teenage years tend to have a more severe disease course. Patients remain ambulatory even late in the disease, although some may require orthotic devices (summary by Lassuthova et al., 2018). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT type 2, see CMT2A (118210).
Muscular dystrophy, limb-girdle, autosomal recessive 23
MedGen UID:
1648462
Concept ID:
C4748327
Disease or Syndrome
The clinical manifestations of LAMA2 muscular dystrophy (LAMA2-MD) comprise a continuous spectrum ranging from severe congenital muscular dystrophy type 1A (MDC1A) to milder late-onset LAMA2-MD. MDC1A is typically characterized by neonatal profound hypotonia, poor spontaneous movements, and respiratory failure. Failure to thrive, gastroesophageal reflux, aspiration, and recurrent chest infections necessitating frequent hospitalizations are common. As disease progresses, facial muscle weakness, temporomandibular joint contractures, and macroglossia may further impair feeding and can affect speech. In late-onset LAMA2-MD onset of manifestations range from early childhood to adulthood. Affected individuals may show muscle hypertrophy and develop a rigid spine syndrome with joint contractures, usually most prominent in the elbows. Progressive respiratory insufficiency, scoliosis, and cardiomyopathy can occur.
Neuropathy, congenital hypomyelinating, 3
MedGen UID:
1648417
Concept ID:
C4748608
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy-3 is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by onset of neurogenic muscle impairment in utero. Affected individuals present at birth with severe hypotonia, often causing respiratory insufficiency or failure and inability to swallow or feed properly. They have profoundly impaired psychomotor development and may die in infancy or early childhood. Those that survive are unable to sit or walk. Sural nerve biopsy shows hypomyelination of the nerve fibers, and brain imaging often shows impaired myelination and cerebral and cerebellar atrophy. Nerve conduction velocities are severely decreased (about 10 m/s) or absent due to improper myelination (summary by Vallat et al., 2016 and Low et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CHN, see CHN1 (605253).
Mitochondrial complex 1 deficiency, nuclear type 10
MedGen UID:
1648426
Concept ID:
C4748768
Disease or Syndrome
Neuronopathy, distal hereditary motor, autosomal recessive 5
MedGen UID:
1667915
Concept ID:
C4749918
Disease or Syndrome
HMNR5 is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by young adult onset of slowly progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy resulting in gait impairment and loss of reflexes due to impaired function of motor nerves. Sensation and cognition are not impaired (summary by Blumen et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive HMN, see HMNR1 (604320).
Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive, with axonal neuropathy 1
MedGen UID:
1683470
Concept ID:
C4759870
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy type 1 (SCAN1) is characterized by late-childhood-onset slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia and distal sensorimotor axonal neuropathy. Gaze nystagmus and dysarthria usually develop after the onset of ataxic gait. As the disease advances, pain and touch sensation in the hands and feet become impaired; vibration sense is lost in hands and lower thighs. Individuals with advanced disease develop a steppage gait and pes cavus and eventually become wheelchair dependent. Cognitive dysfunction – present in some – manifests as mild intellectual disability and poor executive function. To date only seven affected individuals have been described from three apparently unrelated consanguineous families (one from Saudi Arabia and two from Oman); therefore, it is likely that the full phenotypic spectrum of this disorder is not yet known.
Progressive myoclonic epilepsy type 6
MedGen UID:
1681379
Concept ID:
C5190805
Disease or Syndrome
Progressive myoclonic epilepsy-6 (EPM6) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by onset of ataxia in the first years of life, followed by action myoclonus and seizures later in childhood, and loss of independent ambulation in the second decade. Cognition is not usually affected, although mild memory difficulties may occur in the third decade (summary by Corbett et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of progressive myoclonic epilepsy, see EPM1A (254800).
Combined oxidative phosphorylation defect type 11
MedGen UID:
1682397
Concept ID:
C5190991
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-21 (COXPD11) is a severe multisystemic autosomal recessive disorder characterized by neonatal hypotonia and lactic acidosis. Affected individuals may have respiratory insufficiency, foot deformities, or seizures, and all reported patients have died in infancy. Biochemical studies show deficiencies of multiple mitochondrial respiratory enzymes (summary by Garcia-Diaz et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Myasthenic syndrome, congenital, 25, presynaptic
MedGen UID:
1683288
Concept ID:
C5193027
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myasthenic syndrome-25 (CMS25) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized by hypotonia and generalized muscle weakness apparent from birth. Affected individuals have feeding difficulties and delayed motor development, usually never achieving independent ambulation. Additional variable features include eye movement abnormalities, joint contractures, and rigid spine. Pyridostigmine treatment may be partially effective (summary by Shen et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMS, see CMS1A (601462).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, axonal, type 2EE
MedGen UID:
1677426
Concept ID:
C5193076
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2EE (CMT2EE) is an autosomal recessive sensorimotor peripheral axonal neuropathy with onset in the first or second decades of life. The disorder primarily affects the lower limbs and is slowly progressive, sometimes resulting in loss of ambulation, with later onset of upper limb involvement. There is significant distal muscle weakness and atrophy, usually with foot or hand deformities. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows findings of disturbed mitochondrial maintenance. Cognition is unaffected, and chronic liver disease is absent (summary by Baumann et al., 2019). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT type 2, see CMT2A (118210).
Congenital myopathy with reduced type 2 muscle fibers
MedGen UID:
1672638
Concept ID:
C5193081
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-14 (CMYP14) is an autosomal recessive skeletal muscle disorder characterized by onset of severe muscle weakness apparent at birth and sometimes in utero. Affected infants have difficulty breathing independently and usually require mechanical ventilation for variable lengths of time. Other features include delayed motor development with delayed walking, hypo- or areflexia, and high-arched palate. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows variation in fiber size with specific atrophy of the fast-twitch type II fibers. Cardiac muscle is not affected (summary by Ravenscroft et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita 3, myogenic type
MedGen UID:
1680655
Concept ID:
C5193121
Disease or Syndrome
Myogenic-type arthrogryposis multiplex congenita-3 (AMC3) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by decreased fetal movements, hypotonia, variable skeletal defects, including clubfoot and scoliosis, and delayed motor milestones with difficulty walking (summary by Baumann et al., 2017).
Neuropathy, hereditary motor and sensory, type VIc, with optic atrophy
MedGen UID:
1680245
Concept ID:
C5193137
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type VIC with optic atrophy (HMSN6C) is an autosomal recessive axonal sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy characterized by progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy primarily affecting the lower limbs. Onset of neuropathy is in the first decade, manifest by difficulty walking and running and followed by similar involvement of the upper limbs and hands. The disorder is associated with distal sensory impairment, particularly of position and vibration sense, as well as areflexia; individuals usually have pes cavus, hammertoes, and atrophy of the intrinsic hand muscles. In addition, progressive optic atrophy and visual impairment occur during adulthood. Treatment with pyridoxal 5-prime phosphate supplementation (vitamin B6) may result in amelioration of symptoms and slow progression of the disease (summary by Chelban et al., 2019). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HMSN6, see HMSN6A (601152).
Oculopharyngodistal myopathy 1
MedGen UID:
1684682
Concept ID:
C5231388
Disease or Syndrome
Oculopharyngodistal myopathy-1 (OPDM1) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by adult-onset ptosis, external ophthalmoplegia, facial muscle weakness, distal limb muscle weakness and atrophy, and pharyngeal involvement, resulting in dysphagia and dysarthria. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows myopathic changes with rimmed vacuoles. There are variable manifestations of the disorder regarding muscle involvement and severity (summary by Ishiura et al., 2019). Genetic Heterogeneity of Oculopharyngodistal Myopathy See also OPDM2 (618940), caused by trinucleotide repeat expansion in the GIPC1 gene (605072) on chromosome 19p13; OPDM3 (619473), caused by trinucleotide repeat expansion in the NOTCH2NLC gene (618025) on chromosome 1q21; and OPDM4 (619790), caused by trinucleotide repeat expansion in the RILPL1 gene (614092) on chromosome 12q24. Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD; 164300) is a similar disorder with overlapping features. It is caused by a similar heterozygous trinucleotide repeat expansion in the PABPN1 gene (602279) (summary by Durmus et al., 2011).
Myopathy, congenital, progressive, with scoliosis
MedGen UID:
1684769
Concept ID:
C5231417
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-19 (CMYP19) is an autosomal recessive skeletal muscle disorder characterized by infantile-onset of progressive muscle weakness and atrophy associated with scoliosis, variably impaired walking, and dysmorphic facial features (Feichtinger et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 80
MedGen UID:
1684779
Concept ID:
C5231418
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-80 (DEE80) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by the onset of refractory seizures in the first year of life. Patients have severe global developmental delay and may have additional variable features, including dysmorphic or coarse facial features, distal skeletal abnormalities, and impaired hearing or vision. At the cellular level, the disorder is caused by a defect in the synthesis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI), and thus affects the expression of GPI-anchored proteins at the cell surface (summary by Murakami et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293).
Neuromuscular disease and ocular or auditory anomalies with or without seizures
MedGen UID:
1684689
Concept ID:
C5231483
Disease or Syndrome
Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita 4, neurogenic, with agenesis of the corpus callosum
MedGen UID:
1684706
Concept ID:
C5231494
Disease or Syndrome
Neurogenic arthrogryposis multiplex congenita-4 with agenesis of the corpus callosum (AMC4) is a severe neurologic disorder with onset in utero. Affected individuals show little or no fetal movements and are born with significant contractures affecting the upper and lower limbs, as well as dysmorphic facial features. Other abnormalities include globally impaired development, optic atrophy, agenesis of the corpus callosum, seizures, and peripheral neuropathy. Many patients die in early childhood (summary by Seidahmed et al., 2020).
Neuropathy, hereditary sensory and autonomic, type 1A
MedGen UID:
1716450
Concept ID:
C5235211
Disease or Syndrome
SPTLC1-related hereditary sensory neuropathy (HSN) is an axonal form of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy distinguished by prominent early sensory loss and later positive sensory phenomena including dysesthesia and characteristic "lightning" or "shooting" pains. Loss of sensation can lead to painless injuries, which, if unrecognized, result in slow wound healing and subsequent osteomyelitis requiring distal amputations. Motor involvement is present in all advanced cases and can be severe. After age 20 years, the distal wasting and weakness may involve proximal muscles, possibly leading to wheelchair dependency by the seventh or eighth decade. Sensorineural hearing loss is variable.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 84
MedGen UID:
1720141
Concept ID:
C5394081
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-84 (DEE84) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by onset of refractory seizures in the first months or years of life. Affected individuals have severely impaired global development with impaired intellectual development, absent speech, and inability to walk. Other features include axial hypotonia, peripheral spasticity, feeding difficulties that sometimes necessitate tube feeding, and mild dysmorphic facial features. Brain imaging may show nonspecific findings such as cerebral/cerebellar atrophy and/or hypomyelination. The severity of the disorder is variable (summary by Hengel et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 18
MedGen UID:
1713890
Concept ID:
C5394140
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome-18 (MTDPS18) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized by early-onset progressive weakness and atrophy of the distal limb muscles, resulting in loss of ambulation as well as atrophy of the intrinsic hand muscles with clawed hands. Affected individuals may also develop scoliosis and have hypo- or hyperreflexia and decreased pulmonary vital capacity. Examination of skeletal muscle shows neurogenic atrophy and combined mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation deficiency associated with mtDNA depletion. The clinical phenotype is reminiscent of spinal muscular atrophy (see SMA, 253300) and the metabolic profile is reminiscent of 2-aminoadipic 2-oxoadipic aciduria (AMOXAD; 204750), which is caused by mutation in the DHTKD1 gene (614984) (summary by Boczonadi et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive mtDNA depletion syndromes, see MTDPS1 (603041).
Myopathy, congenital, with respiratory insufficiency and bone fractures
MedGen UID:
1718097
Concept ID:
C5394189
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-9A (CMYP9A) is an autosomal recessive early-onset severe muscular disorder resulting in early death. Affected individuals present at birth with neonatal hypotonia, poor feeding, fractures of the long bones, and respiratory insufficiency. Laboratory investigations are consistent with a defect in early muscle development (summary by Estan et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Myopathy, congenital proximal, with minicore lesions
MedGen UID:
1717569
Concept ID:
C5394193
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-9B (CMYP9B) is an autosomal recessive early-onset skeletal muscle disorder mainly affecting proximal muscles. Affected individuals have neonatal hypotonia followed by mildly delayed walking in childhood. Muscle weakness is slowly progressive, resulting in positive Gowers sign and difficulty running or climbing, but most patients remain ambulatory. Some patients develop respiratory involvement requiring ventilatory support, whereas cardiac function is unaffected. Muscle biopsy shows type 1 fiber predominance with disorganized Z-lines and multiminicore myopathy (Estan et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Spinal muscular atrophy, infantile, James type
MedGen UID:
1764556
Concept ID:
C5436669
Disease or Syndrome
The phenotypic spectrum of GARS1-associated axonal neuropathy ranges from GARS1 infantile-onset SMA (GARS1-iSMA) to GARS1 adolescent- or early adult-onset hereditary motor/sensory neuropathy (GARS1-HMSN). GARS1-iSMA. Age of onset ranges from the neonatal period to the toddler years. Initial manifestations are typically respiratory distress, poor feeding, and muscle weakness (distal greater than proximal). Weakness is slowly progressive, ultimately requiring mechanical ventilation and feeding via gastrostomy tube. GARS1-HMSN. Age of onset is most commonly during the second decade (range eight to 36 years). Initial manifestations are typically muscle weakness in the hands sometimes with sensory deficits. Lower limb involvement (seen in ~50% of individuals) ranges from weakness and atrophy of the extensor digitorum brevis and weakness of toe dorsiflexors to classic peroneal muscular atrophy with foot drop and a high steppage gait.
Developmental delay, impaired growth, dysmorphic facies, and axonal neuropathy
MedGen UID:
1765507
Concept ID:
C5436781
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental delay, impaired growth, dysmorphic facies, and axonal neuropathy (DIGFAN) is a complex neurologic disorder characterized by impaired motor and intellectual development, hypotonia, poor overall growth, usually with short stature and microcephaly, and subtly dysmorphic facial features. Affected individuals have distal muscle weakness and muscle atrophy resulting in delayed acquisition of motor skills and persistent gait abnormalities. Although many patients have clinical and/or electrophysiologic features consistent with an axonal sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy, such as hyporeflexia, impaired sensation, foot drop, and pes cavus, the signs and severity are highly variable. Additional features may include hearing loss, pigmentary retinopathy, and abnormalities on brain imaging, including cerebral or cerebellar atrophy, hypomyelination, and lesions in the basal ganglia or brainstem. In some instances, the same mutation may result in different phenotypic manifestations (CMT2Z or DIGFAN syndrome), which highlights the expanding clinical spectrum associated with MORC2 mutations and may render classification of patients into one or the other disorder challenging (summary by Guillen Sacoto et al., 2020).
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia, type 1E
MedGen UID:
1788285
Concept ID:
C5543328
Disease or Syndrome
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1E (PCH1E) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by severe hypotonia and respiratory insufficiency apparent soon after birth. Virtually all patients die in the first days or weeks of life. Postmortem examination and brain imaging show pontocerebellar atrophy and loss of anterior motor neurons in the spinal cord. Additional more variable features may include optic atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, dysmorphic features, congenital contracture or foot deformities, and seizures (summary by Braunisch et al., 2018). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PCH, see PCH1A (607596).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with cerebellar atrophy and motor dysfunction
MedGen UID:
1781936
Concept ID:
C5543427
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with cerebellar atrophy and motor dysfunction (NEDCAM) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by global developmental delay with prominent motor abnormalities, mainly axial hypotonia, gait ataxia, and appendicular spasticity. Affected individuals have cognitive impairment and speech delay; brain imaging shows cerebellar atrophy. The severity is variable (summary by Kour et al., 2021).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia, facial dysmorphism, and brain abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1780615
Concept ID:
C5543591
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia, facial dysmorphism, and brain abnormalities (NEDHFBA) is an autosomal recessive neurologic syndrome characterized by global developmental delay with severely impaired intellectual development, hypotonia and muscle weakness, often resulting in the inability to walk or sit, and characteristic coarse facial features. Additional features include feeding difficulties, respiratory distress, scoliosis, poor visual function, and rotary nystagmus. Brain imaging shows variable abnormalities, including enlarged ventricles, decreased white matter volume, white matter changes, thin corpus callosum, and cerebellar hypoplasia (summary by Loddo et al., 2020).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease, axonal, type 2GG
MedGen UID:
1794143
Concept ID:
C5561933
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2GG (CMT2GG) is an autosomal dominant axonal peripheral neuropathy characterized by slowly progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy primarily affecting the lower limbs and causing difficulty walking. The onset is usually in adulthood, although rare patients may have mild symptoms from childhood. Some individuals may also have involvement of the hands. Although most patients have hypo- or areflexia at the ankles, distal sensory impairment is not always present, indicating a spectrum of disease encompassing both distal hereditary neuropathy and axonal CMT. Electrophysiologic studies are consistent with a axonal process (summary by Mendoza-Ferreira et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT, see CMT2A1 (118210).
Myasthenic syndrome, congenital, 7B, presynaptic, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
1794157
Concept ID:
C5561947
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive presynaptic congenital myasthenic syndrome-7B (CMS7B) is characterized by severe generalized muscle weakness apparent from birth; decreased fetal movements may be apparent in utero. Affected infants have generalized hypotonia with poor cry and feeding, head lag, and facial muscle weakness with ptosis. Some patients may have respiratory involvement. Electrophysiologic studies show decreased compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) and a decremental response to repetitive nerve stimulation. Treatment with 3,4-diaminopyridine and pyridostigmine may result in clinical improvement (summary by Bauche et al., 2020).
Central hypoventilation syndrome, congenital, 2, and autonomic dysfunction
MedGen UID:
1794173
Concept ID:
C5561963
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome-2 and autonomic dysfunction (CCHS2) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by shallow breathing and apneic spells apparent in the neonatal period. Affected infants require mechanical ventilation due to impaired ventilatory response to hypercapnia, as well as tube feeding due to poor swallowing, aspiration, and gastrointestinal dysmotility. Some patients have other features of autonomic dysfunction, including bladder dysfunction, sinus bradycardia, and temperature dysregulation. Although mild global developmental delay with learning difficulties and seizures were present in the single family reported, it was unclear if these features were related to the hypoventilation phenotype (Spielmann et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CCHS, see CCHS1 (209880).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, axonal, type 2FF
MedGen UID:
1794191
Concept ID:
C5561981
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2FF (CMT2FF) is an autosomal dominant progressive axonal sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy characterized by early-childhood onset of difficulties walking or running due to atrophy and weakness of the lower limbs. Most patients have foot and ankle deformities, requiring surgery or walking aids. Some patients lose independent ambulation. There is also prominent involvement of the upper limbs, with weakness and atrophy of the forearm, wrist, and intrinsic hand muscles. Proximal muscle function is preserved. Affected individuals have variable distal sensory impairment. Most patients have hyporeflexia, although brisk reflexes, suggesting upper motor involvement, have been described in 1 family. Sural nerve biopsy showed abnormal myelination (Rebelo et al., 2021). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT type 2, see CMT2A (118210).
Trichothiodystrophy 8, nonphotosensitive
MedGen UID:
1794267
Concept ID:
C5562057
Disease or Syndrome
Nonphotosensitive trichothiodystrophy-8 (TTD8) is characterized by brittle hair and nails and scaly skin, accompanied by failure to thrive, microcephaly, and neuromotor developmental delay. Hair analysis shows low sulfur content, and skin fibroblasts demonstrate normal DNA repair efficiency after UV irradiation (Botta et al., 2021). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of trichothiodystrophy, see TTD1 (601675).
Combined oxidative phosphorylation defect type 27
MedGen UID:
1799031
Concept ID:
C5567608
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-27 (COXPD27) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized mainly by neurologic features, including delayed development, seizures, abnormal movements, and neurologic regression. Age at onset, ranging from infancy to late childhood, and severity are variable. Other features include hypotonia, myoclonus, brain imaging abnormalities, and evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle. Liver dysfunction has also been reported (summary by Samanta et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 74
MedGen UID:
1800260
Concept ID:
C5568837
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia-74 (SPG74) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by onset of slowly progressive lower limb spasticity, optic atrophy, and peripheral neuropathy in the first decade (summary by Lossos et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia, see SPG5A (270800).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2Z
MedGen UID:
1800448
Concept ID:
C5569025
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2Z (CMT2Z) is an autosomal dominant axonal peripheral neuropathy characterized by onset, usually in the first decade, of distal lower limb muscle weakness and sensory impairment. The disorder is progressive, and affected individuals tend to develop upper limb and proximal muscle involvement in an asymmetric pattern, resulting in severe disability late in adulthood. Rare occurrence of global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development or learning difficulties has been observed. In some instances, the same mutation may result in different phenotypic manifestations (CMT2Z or DIGFAN), which highlights the clinical spectrum associated with MORC2 mutations and may render the classification of patients into one or the other disorder challenging (summary by Sevilla et al., 2016, Ando et al., 2017, Guillen Sacoto et al., 2020). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT, see CMT2A1 (118210).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease recessive intermediate D
MedGen UID:
1800450
Concept ID:
C5569027
Disease or Syndrome
A rare hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with characteristics of childhood onset of unsteady gait, pes cavus, frequent falls and foot dorsiflexor weakness slowly progressing to distal upper and lower limb muscle weakness and atrophy, distal sensory impairment and reduced tendon reflexes. Additional symptoms may include bilateral sensorineural hearing impairment and neuropathic pain.
Inclusion body myopathy and brain white matter abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1812978
Concept ID:
C5676909
Disease or Syndrome
Inclusion body myopathy and brain white matter abnormalities (IBMWMA) is an autosomal dominant adult-onset disorder characterized predominantly by proximal limb girdle muscle weakness affecting the lower and upper limbs and resulting in gait difficulties and scapular winging. Additional features may include dysarthria, dysphagia, low back pain, and hyporeflexia. EMG is consistent with a myopathic process, although neuropathic findings have also been shown. Muscle biopsy shows fiber type variation, internal nuclei, rimmed vacuoles, and cytoplasmic protein aggregates or inclusions. Serum creatine kinase is usually elevated. Cognitive impairment or frontotemporal dementia occurs in some patients. The disorder is slowly progressive; some patients become wheelchair-bound after many years. Rare patients with this mutation develop ALS; some have both myopathy and ALS. Brain imaging shows white matter abnormalities using diffusion tensor imaging. The disorder is classified as multisystem proteinopathy-6 (MSP6) due to the characteristic disease mechanism of protein misfolding and abnormal tissue deposition (summary by Leoni et al., 2021).
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 54
MedGen UID:
1812715
Concept ID:
C5676912
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-54 (COXPD54) is an autosomal recessive disorder with pleiotropic multisystem presentations resulting from a disruption in mitochondrial transcription and translation. The phenotype is highly variable. Many patients have early-onset sensorineural hearing loss, sometimes in isolation, and sometimes associated with global developmental delay or primary ovarian failure. Other features may include peripheral hypertonia, seizures, muscle weakness, behavioral abnormalities, and leukoencephalopathy on brain imaging. Serum lactate may or may not be elevated (summary by Hochberg et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy 100
MedGen UID:
1809351
Concept ID:
C5676932
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-100 (DEE100) is a severe neurologic disorder characterized by global developmental delay and onset of variable types of seizures in the first months or years of life. Most patients have refractory seizures and show developmental regression after seizure onset. Affected individuals have ataxic gait or inability to walk and severe to profoundly impaired intellectual development, often with absent speech. Additional more variable features may include axial hypotonia, hyperkinetic movements, dysmorphic facial features, and brain imaging abnormalities (summary by Schneider et al., 2021). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Oculopharyngodistal myopathy 4
MedGen UID:
1809981
Concept ID:
C5676941
Disease or Syndrome
Oculopharyngodistal myopathy-4 (OPDM4) is an autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorder characterized by progressive ptosis, ophthalmoparesis, facial and masseter weakness, and muscle weakness of the distal limbs. Initial symptoms of the disorder, ptosis and limited eye movements, most commonly appear in the second or third decades. There is slow progression with development of dysarthria, dysphagia, and distal limb weakness and atrophy associated with absent deep tendon reflexes; sensation is normal. Serum creatine kinase is often increased, and skeletal muscle biopsy typically shows chronic myopathic changes with rimmed vacuoles and filamentous intranuclear inclusions (summary by Yu et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of OPDM, see OPDM1 (164310).
Leukodystrophy, hypomyelinating, 24
MedGen UID:
1805365
Concept ID:
C5676974
Disease or Syndrome
Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy-24 (HLD24) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by global developmental delay and neurologic deterioration (Segawa et al., 2021). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HLD, see 312080.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, axonal, IIa 2II
MedGen UID:
1824000
Concept ID:
C5774227
Disease or Syndrome
Axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2II (CMT2II) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by a slowly progressive sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy affecting mainly the lower limbs, resulting in distal muscle weakness and atrophy and subsequent walking difficulties. Some patients may have upper limb involvement with atrophy of the intrinsic hand muscles. The age at onset is highly variable, ranging from infancy to adulthood. Electrophysiologic studies are usually consistent with an axonal process, although some may show intermediate or even demyelinating values (Park et al., 2020; Ando et al., 2022). One family with possible autosomal recessive inheritance has been reported (Bogdanova-Mihaylova et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT, see CMT2A1 (118210).
Muscular dystrophy, congenital, with or without seizures
MedGen UID:
1824047
Concept ID:
C5774274
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy with or without seizures (MYOS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe muscle hypotonia apparent from birth, as well as developmental delay. Laboratory studies show increased serum creatine kinase and muscle biopsy shows nonspecific dystrophic features. Most patients develop seizures or have abnormal epileptiform findings on EEG studies; other variable findings may include feeding difficulties, nystagmus, myopathic facies, areflexia, and brain atrophy on MRI (summary by Larson et al., 2018 and Henige et al., 2021).
Congenital myopathy 2c, severe infantile, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1840969
Concept ID:
C5830333
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-2C (CMYP2C) is an autosomal dominant disorder of the skeletal muscle characterized by severe congenital weakness usually resulting in death from respiratory failure in the first year or so of life. Patients present at birth with hypotonia, lack of antigravity movements, poor head control, and difficulties feeding or breathing, often requiring tube-feeding and mechanical ventilation. Decreased fetal movements may be observed in some cases. Of the patients with congenital myopathy caused by mutation in the ACTA1 gene, about 90% carry heterozygous mutations that are usually de novo and cause the severe infantile phenotype. Some patients with heterozygous mutations have a more typical and milder disease course with delayed motor development and proximal muscle weakness, but are able to achieve independent ambulation (CMYP2A; 161800). The severity of the disease most likely depends on the detrimental effect of the mutation, although there are probably additional modifying factors (Ryan et al., 2001; Laing et al., 2009; Sanoudou and Beggs, 2001; Agrawal et al., 2004; Nowak et al., 2013; Sewry et al., 2019; Laitila and Wallgren-Pettersson, 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Muscular dystrophy, limb-girdle, autosomal recessive 28
MedGen UID:
1841154
Concept ID:
C5830518
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-28 (LGMDR28) is characterized by progressive muscle weakness affecting the proximal and axial muscles of the upper and lower limbs. The age at onset is highly variable, usually in the first decade, although onset in the fourth decade has also been reported. The disorder can be rapidly progressive or show a slower course. Most patients have limited ambulation or become wheelchair-bound within a few decades, and respiratory insufficiency commonly occurs. Laboratory studies show increased serum creatine kinase and elevated fasting blood glucose levels, although cholesterol is normal. EMG shows a myopathic pattern; muscle biopsy is generally unremarkable, but can show nonspecific myopathic or dystrophic features (Yogev et al., 2023; Morales-Rosado et al., 2023). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, see LGMDR1 (253600).
Nemaline myopathy 5C, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1841185
Concept ID:
C5830549
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant nemaline myopathy-5C (NEM5C) is a relatively mild skeletal muscle disorder with wide clinical variability, even within families. Affected individuals develop symptoms of muscle weakness in the first or second decades; those with earlier onset tend to have a more severe disease course. Features include difficulty walking on the heels, waddling gait, proximal muscle weakness affecting the upper and lower limbs, and Gowers sign. Additional features may include myopathic facies, high-arched palate, scoliosis or kyphosis, and ankle weakness. Patients remain ambulatory into late adulthood. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows hypotrophy of type 1 fibers, hypertrophy of type 2 fibers, fiber size variation, and myofibrillar disorganization. Nemaline rods in type 1 fibers are often observed, but are not always present (Konersman et al., 2017; Holling et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of nemaline myopathy, see NEM2 (256030).
Multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome 7
MedGen UID:
1841222
Concept ID:
C5830586
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome-7 (MMDS7) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a clinical spectrum ranging from neonatal fatal glycine encephalopathy to an attenuated phenotype of developmental delay, behavioral problems, limited epilepsy, and variable movement problems (Arribas-Carreira et al., 2023). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome, see MMDS1 (605711).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Greer DM, Shemie SD, Lewis A, Torrance S, Varelas P, Goldenberg FD, Bernat JL, Souter M, Topcuoglu MA, Alexandrov AW, Baldisseri M, Bleck T, Citerio G, Dawson R, Hoppe A, Jacobe S, Manara A, Nakagawa TA, Pope TM, Silvester W, Thomson D, Al Rahma H, Badenes R, Baker AJ, Cerny V, Chang C, Chang TR, Gnedovskaya E, Han MK, Honeybul S, Jimenez E, Kuroda Y, Liu G, Mallick UK, Marquevich V, Mejia-Mantilla J, Piradov M, Quayyum S, Shrestha GS, Su YY, Timmons SD, Teitelbaum J, Videtta W, Zirpe K, Sung G
JAMA 2020 Sep 15;324(11):1078-1097. doi: 10.1001/jama.2020.11586. PMID: 32761206
Zwergal A, Feil K, Schniepp R, Strupp M
Semin Neurol 2020 Feb;40(1):87-96. Epub 2019 Dec 30 doi: 10.1055/s-0039-3400315. PMID: 31887755
Jasti AK, Selmi C, Sarmiento-Monroy JC, Vega DA, Anaya JM, Gershwin ME
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2016 Nov;12(11):1175-1189. Epub 2016 Jun 21 doi: 10.1080/1744666X.2016.1193006. PMID: 27292311

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Traub R, Chaudhry V
Semin Neurol 2023 Oct;43(5):791-798. Epub 2023 Oct 3 doi: 10.1055/s-0043-1775750. PMID: 37788681
Zwergal A, Feil K, Schniepp R, Strupp M
Semin Neurol 2020 Feb;40(1):87-96. Epub 2019 Dec 30 doi: 10.1055/s-0039-3400315. PMID: 31887755
Hamid R, Averbeck MA, Chiang H, Garcia A, Al Mousa RT, Oh SJ, Patel A, Plata M, Del Popolo G
World J Urol 2018 Oct;36(10):1517-1527. Epub 2018 May 11 doi: 10.1007/s00345-018-2301-z. PMID: 29752515
Kuwabara S, Sekiguchi Y, Misawa S
Clin Neurophysiol 2017 Jan;128(1):215-219. Epub 2016 Nov 20 doi: 10.1016/j.clinph.2016.11.009. PMID: 27923188
Strupp M, Dieterich M, Brandt T
Dtsch Arztebl Int 2013 Jul;110(29-30):505-15; quiz 515-6. Epub 2013 Jul 22 doi: 10.3238/arztebl.2013.0505. PMID: 24000301Free PMC Article

Diagnosis

Cortese A, Curro' R, Vegezzi E, Yau WY, Houlden H, Reilly MM
Pract Neurol 2022 Feb;22(1):14-18. Epub 2021 Aug 13 doi: 10.1136/practneurol-2020-002822. PMID: 34389644
Florian IA, Lupan I, Sur L, Samasca G, Timiș TL
Autoimmun Rev 2021 Dec;20(12):102983. Epub 2021 Oct 28 doi: 10.1016/j.autrev.2021.102983. PMID: 34718164
Al Othman B, Raabe J, Kini A, Lee AG
Curr Opin Ophthalmol 2019 Nov;30(6):462-466. doi: 10.1097/ICU.0000000000000611. PMID: 31567467
Dimachkie MM, Barohn RJ
Neurol Clin 2013 May;31(2):491-510. Epub 2013 Feb 19 doi: 10.1016/j.ncl.2013.01.005. PMID: 23642721Free PMC Article
Teener JW
Semin Neurol 2012 Nov;32(5):512-6. Epub 2013 May 15 doi: 10.1055/s-0033-1334470. PMID: 23677659

Therapy

Crawford TO, Swoboda KJ, De Vivo DC, Bertini E, Hwu WL, Finkel RS, Kirschner J, Kuntz NL, Nazario AN, Parsons JA, Pechmann A, Ryan MM, Butterfield RJ, Topaloglu H, Ben-Omran T, Sansone VA, Jong YJ, Shu F, Zhu C, Raynaud S, Lago TR, Paradis AD, Foster R, Chin R, Berger Z; NURTURE Study Group
Muscle Nerve 2023 Aug;68(2):157-170. Epub 2023 Jul 6 doi: 10.1002/mus.27853. PMID: 37409780
Greer DM, Shemie SD, Lewis A, Torrance S, Varelas P, Goldenberg FD, Bernat JL, Souter M, Topcuoglu MA, Alexandrov AW, Baldisseri M, Bleck T, Citerio G, Dawson R, Hoppe A, Jacobe S, Manara A, Nakagawa TA, Pope TM, Silvester W, Thomson D, Al Rahma H, Badenes R, Baker AJ, Cerny V, Chang C, Chang TR, Gnedovskaya E, Han MK, Honeybul S, Jimenez E, Kuroda Y, Liu G, Mallick UK, Marquevich V, Mejia-Mantilla J, Piradov M, Quayyum S, Shrestha GS, Su YY, Timmons SD, Teitelbaum J, Videtta W, Zirpe K, Sung G
JAMA 2020 Sep 15;324(11):1078-1097. doi: 10.1001/jama.2020.11586. PMID: 32761206
Al Othman B, Raabe J, Kini A, Lee AG
Curr Opin Ophthalmol 2019 Nov;30(6):462-466. doi: 10.1097/ICU.0000000000000611. PMID: 31567467
Dimachkie MM, Barohn RJ
Neurol Clin 2013 May;31(2):491-510. Epub 2013 Feb 19 doi: 10.1016/j.ncl.2013.01.005. PMID: 23642721Free PMC Article
Tjia TL, Yeow YK, Tan CB
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1985 Sep;48(9):853-8. doi: 10.1136/jnnp.48.9.853. PMID: 4045478Free PMC Article

Prognosis

Traub R, Chaudhry V
Semin Neurol 2023 Oct;43(5):791-798. Epub 2023 Oct 3 doi: 10.1055/s-0043-1775750. PMID: 37788681
Florian IA, Lupan I, Sur L, Samasca G, Timiș TL
Autoimmun Rev 2021 Dec;20(12):102983. Epub 2021 Oct 28 doi: 10.1016/j.autrev.2021.102983. PMID: 34718164
Vetro A, Nielsen HN, Holm R, Hevner RF, Parrini E, Powis Z, Møller RS, Bellan C, Simonati A, Lesca G, Helbig KL, Palmer EE, Mei D, Ballardini E, Van Haeringen A, Syrbe S, Leuzzi V, Cioni G, Curry CJ, Costain G, Santucci M, Chong K, Mancini GMS, Clayton-Smith J, Bigoni S, Scheffer IE, Dobyns WB, Vilsen B, Guerrini R; ATP1A2/A3-collaborators
Brain 2021 Jun 22;144(5):1435-1450. doi: 10.1093/brain/awab052. PMID: 33880529
Strupp M, Dieterich M, Brandt T
Dtsch Arztebl Int 2013 Jul;110(29-30):505-15; quiz 515-6. Epub 2013 Jul 22 doi: 10.3238/arztebl.2013.0505. PMID: 24000301Free PMC Article
Teener JW
Semin Neurol 2012 Nov;32(5):512-6. Epub 2013 May 15 doi: 10.1055/s-0033-1334470. PMID: 23677659

Clinical prediction guides

Vezyroglou A, Akilapa R, Barwick K, Koene S, Brownstein CA, Holder-Espinasse M, Fry AE, Németh AH, Tofaris GK, Hay E, Hughes I, Mansour S, Mordekar SR, Splitt M, Turnpenny PD, Demetriou D, Koopmann TT, Ruivenkamp CAL, Agrawal PB, Carr L, Clowes V, Ghali N, Holder SE, Radley J, Male A, Sisodiya SM, Kurian MA, Cross JH, Balasubramanian M
Neurology 2022 Oct 4;99(14):e1511-e1526. Epub 2022 Jul 18 doi: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000200927. PMID: 36192182Free PMC Article
Vetro A, Nielsen HN, Holm R, Hevner RF, Parrini E, Powis Z, Møller RS, Bellan C, Simonati A, Lesca G, Helbig KL, Palmer EE, Mei D, Ballardini E, Van Haeringen A, Syrbe S, Leuzzi V, Cioni G, Curry CJ, Costain G, Santucci M, Chong K, Mancini GMS, Clayton-Smith J, Bigoni S, Scheffer IE, Dobyns WB, Vilsen B, Guerrini R; ATP1A2/A3-collaborators
Brain 2021 Jun 22;144(5):1435-1450. doi: 10.1093/brain/awab052. PMID: 33880529
Dupré M, Hermann R, Froment Tilikete C
Cerebellum 2021 Oct;20(5):687-700. Epub 2020 Oct 4 doi: 10.1007/s12311-020-01192-w. PMID: 33011895Free PMC Article
Greer DM, Shemie SD, Lewis A, Torrance S, Varelas P, Goldenberg FD, Bernat JL, Souter M, Topcuoglu MA, Alexandrov AW, Baldisseri M, Bleck T, Citerio G, Dawson R, Hoppe A, Jacobe S, Manara A, Nakagawa TA, Pope TM, Silvester W, Thomson D, Al Rahma H, Badenes R, Baker AJ, Cerny V, Chang C, Chang TR, Gnedovskaya E, Han MK, Honeybul S, Jimenez E, Kuroda Y, Liu G, Mallick UK, Marquevich V, Mejia-Mantilla J, Piradov M, Quayyum S, Shrestha GS, Su YY, Timmons SD, Teitelbaum J, Videtta W, Zirpe K, Sung G
JAMA 2020 Sep 15;324(11):1078-1097. doi: 10.1001/jama.2020.11586. PMID: 32761206
Jasti AK, Selmi C, Sarmiento-Monroy JC, Vega DA, Anaya JM, Gershwin ME
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2016 Nov;12(11):1175-1189. Epub 2016 Jun 21 doi: 10.1080/1744666X.2016.1193006. PMID: 27292311

Recent systematic reviews

Neophytou P, Artemiadis A, Hadjigeorgiou GM, Zis P
Acta Neurol Belg 2023 Oct;123(5):1693-1701. Epub 2023 Jul 19 doi: 10.1007/s13760-023-02336-5. PMID: 37468803Free PMC Article
Bentley SA, Ahmad S, Kobeissy FH, Toklu HZ
Medicina (Kaunas) 2022 Dec 13;58(12) doi: 10.3390/medicina58121835. PMID: 36557036Free PMC Article
Li Z, Li X, Shen J, Chan MTV, Wu WKK
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