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Ventricular tachycardia

MedGen UID:
12068
Concept ID:
C0042514
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
Synonyms: Tachycardia, Ventricular; Ventricular Tachycardia; Ventricular Tachycardias
SNOMED CT: Ventricular tachycardia (25569003); VT - ventricular tachycardia (25569003)
 
HPO: HP:0004756
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0005477

Definition

A tachycardia originating in the ventricles characterized by rapid heart rate (over 100 beats per minute) and broad QRS complexes (over 120 ms). [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Holt-Oram syndrome
MedGen UID:
120524
Concept ID:
C0265264
Disease or Syndrome
Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS) is characterized by upper-limb defects, congenital heart malformation, and cardiac conduction disease. Upper-limb malformations may be unilateral, bilateral/symmetric, or bilateral/asymmetric and can range from triphalangeal or absent thumb(s) to phocomelia. Other upper-limb malformations can include unequal arm length caused by aplasia or hypoplasia of the radius, fusion or anomalous development of the carpal and thenar bones, abnormal forearm pronation and supination, abnormal opposition of the thumb, sloping shoulders, and restriction of shoulder joint movement. An abnormal carpal bone is present in all affected individuals and may be the only evidence of disease. A congenital heart malformation is present in 75% of individuals with HOS and most commonly involves the septum. Atrial septal defect and ventricular septal defect can vary in number, size, and location. Complex congenital heart malformations can also occur in individuals with HOS. Individuals with HOS with or without a congenital heart malformation are at risk for cardiac conduction disease. While individuals may present at birth with sinus bradycardia and first-degree atrioventricular (AV) block, AV block can progress unpredictably to a higher grade including complete heart block with and without atrial fibrillation.
Familial hypokalemia-hypomagnesemia
MedGen UID:
75681
Concept ID:
C0268450
Disease or Syndrome
Gitelman syndrome (GTLMNS) is an autosomal recessive renal tubular salt-wasting disorder characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis with hypomagnesemia and hypocalciuria. It is the most common renal tubular disorder among Caucasians (prevalence of 1 in 40,000). Most patients have onset of symptoms as adults, but some present in childhood. Clinical features include transient periods of muscle weakness and tetany, abdominal pains, and chondrocalcinosis (summary by Glaudemans et al., 2012). Gitelman syndrome is sometimes referred to as a mild variant of classic Bartter syndrome (607364). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bartter syndrome, see 607364.
Carnitine acylcarnitine translocase deficiency
MedGen UID:
91000
Concept ID:
C0342791
Disease or Syndrome
Carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase (CACT) is a critical component of the carnitine shuttle, which facilitates the transfer of long-chain fatty acylcarnitines across the inner mitochondrial membrane. CACT deficiency causes a defect in mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid ß-oxidation, with variable clinical severity. Severe neonatal-onset disease is most common, with symptoms evident within two days after birth; attenuated cases may present in the first months of life. Hyperammonemia and cardiac arrhythmia are prominent in early-onset disease, with high rates of cardiac arrest. Other clinical features are typical for disorders of long-chain fatty acid oxidation: poor feeding, lethargy, hypoketotic hypoglycemia, hypotonia, transaminitis, liver dysfunction with hepatomegaly, and rhabdomyolysis. Univentricular or biventricular hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, ranging from mild to severe, may respond to appropriate dietary and medical therapies. Hyperammonemia is difficult to treat and is an important determinant of long-term neurocognitive outcome. Affected individuals with early-onset disease typically experience brain injury at presentation, and have recurrent hyperammonemia leading to developmental delay / intellectual disability. Affected individuals with later-onset disease have milder symptoms and are less likely to experience recurrent hyperammonemia, allowing a better developmental outcome. Prompt treatment of the presenting episode to prevent hypoglycemic, hypoxic, or hyperammonemic brain injury may allow normal growth and development.
Danon disease
MedGen UID:
209235
Concept ID:
C0878677
Disease or Syndrome
Danon disease is a multisystem condition with predominant involvement of the heart, skeletal muscles, and retina, with overlying cognitive dysfunction. Males are typically more severely affected than females. Males usually present with childhood onset concentric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy that is progressive and often requires heart transplantation. Rarely, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can evolve to resemble dilated cardiomyopathy. Most affected males also have cardiac conduction abnormalities. Skeletal muscle weakness may lead to delayed acquisition of motor milestones. Learning disability and intellectual disability, most often in the mild range, are common. Additionally, affected males can develop retinopathy with subsequent visual impairment. The clinical features in females are broader and more variable. Females are more likely to have dilated cardiomyopathy, with a smaller proportion requiring heart transplantation compared to affected males. Cardiac conduction abnormalities, skeletal muscle weakness, mild cognitive impairment, and pigmentary retinopathy are variably seen in affected females.
Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia 1
MedGen UID:
351513
Concept ID:
C1631597
Disease or Syndrome
Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is characterized by episodic syncope occurring during exercise or acute emotion. The underlying cause of these episodes is the onset of fast ventricular tachycardia (bidirectional or polymorphic). Spontaneous recovery may occur when these arrhythmias self-terminate. In other instances, ventricular tachycardia may degenerate into ventricular fibrillation and cause sudden death if cardiopulmonary resuscitation is not readily available. The mean onset of symptoms (usually a syncopal episode) is between age seven and 12 years; onset as late as the fourth decade of life has been reported. If untreated, CPVT is highly lethal, as approximately 30% of affected individuals experience at least one cardiac arrest and up to 80% have one or more syncopal spells. Sudden death may be the first manifestation of the disease.
Timothy syndrome
MedGen UID:
331395
Concept ID:
C1832916
Disease or Syndrome
The first identified CACNA1C-related disorder, referred to as Timothy syndrome, consists of the combination of prolonged QT interval, autism, and cardiovascular malformation with syndactyly of the fingers and toes. Infrequent findings also include developmental and speech delay, seizures, and recurrent infections. With increased availability of molecular genetic testing, a wider spectrum of pathogenic variants and clinical findings associated with CACNA1C-related disorders has been recognized. Because CACNA1C is associated with calcium channel function, all individuals with a pathogenic variant in this gene are at risk for cardiac arrhythmia of a specific type. The clinical manifestations of a CACNA1C-related disorder include three phenotypes: Timothy syndrome with or without syndactyly. QT prolongation (QTc >480 ms) and arrhythmias in the absence of other syndromic features. Short QT syndrome (QTc <350 ms) or Brugada syndrome with short QT interval. These three phenotypes can be separated into two broad categories on the basis of the functional consequences of the pathogenic variants in CACNA1C: QT prolongation with or without a Timothy syndrome-associated phenotype associated with pathogenic variants inducing a gain of function at the cellular level (i.e., increased calcium current). Short QT interval with or without Brugada syndrome EKG pattern associated with pathogenic variants causing loss of function (i.e., reduced calcium current).
Carnitine palmitoyl transferase II deficiency, severe infantile form
MedGen UID:
322211
Concept ID:
C1833511
Disease or Syndrome
Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is a disorder of long-chain fatty-acid oxidation. The three clinical presentations are lethal neonatal form, severe infantile hepatocardiomuscular form, and myopathic form (which is usually mild and can manifest from infancy to adulthood). While the former two are severe multisystemic diseases characterized by liver failure with hypoketotic hypoglycemia, cardiomyopathy, seizures, and early death, the latter is characterized by exercise-induced muscle pain and weakness, sometimes associated with myoglobinuria. The myopathic form of CPT II deficiency is the most common disorder of lipid metabolism affecting skeletal muscle and the most frequent cause of hereditary myoglobinuria. Males are more likely to be affected than females.
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 10
MedGen UID:
331754
Concept ID:
C1834460
Disease or Syndrome
Any hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the MYL2 gene.
Dilated cardiomyopathy 1S
MedGen UID:
371831
Concept ID:
C1834481
Disease or Syndrome
Any familial isolated dilated cardiomyopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the MYH7 gene.
Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia 9
MedGen UID:
373205
Concept ID:
C1836906
Disease or Syndrome
Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) – previously referred to as arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) – is characterized by progressive fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium that predisposes to ventricular tachycardia and sudden death in young individuals and athletes. It primarily affects the right ventricle, and it may also involve the left ventricle. The presentation of disease is highly variable even within families, and some affected individuals may not meet established clinical criteria. The mean age at diagnosis is 31 years (±13; range: 4-64 years).
Dilated cardiomyopathy 1O
MedGen UID:
325268
Concept ID:
C1837839
Disease or Syndrome
Any familial isolated dilated cardiomyopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the ABCC9 gene.
Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia 8
MedGen UID:
336069
Concept ID:
C1843896
Disease or Syndrome
Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) – previously referred to as arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) – is characterized by progressive fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium that predisposes to ventricular tachycardia and sudden death in young individuals and athletes. It primarily affects the right ventricle, and it may also involve the left ventricle. The presentation of disease is highly variable even within families, and some affected individuals may not meet established clinical criteria. The mean age at diagnosis is 31 years (±13; range: 4-64 years).
Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy with wooly hair and keratoderma
MedGen UID:
340124
Concept ID:
C1854063
Disease or Syndrome
Dilated cardiomyopathy with woolly hair and keratoderma (DCWHK) is characterized by the presence of woolly or sparse hair from birth. Some patients exhibit fragile skin with blisters/erosions after minor mechanical trauma, with hyperkeratosis and epidermolytic keratoderma developing in early childhood. Cardiomyopathy may become apparent in the first decade of life, and early death due to heart failure has been reported, but patients may remain asymptomatic into the fourth decade of life. Some patients exhibit an arrhythmogenic form of cardiomyopathy, with sudden death in early adulthood (Carvajal-Huerta, 1998; Whittock et al., 2002; Alcalai et al., 2003; Uzumcu et al., 2006). Another syndrome involving cardiomyopathy, woolly hair, and keratoderma (Naxos disease; 601214) is caused by mutation in the plakoglobin gene (JUP; 173325). Also see 610476 for a similar disorder caused by homozygous mutation in the DSC2 gene (125645). Dilated cardiomyopathy with woolly hair, keratoderma, and tooth agenesis (DCWHKTA; 615821) is caused by heterozygous mutation in DSP. An isolated form of striated PPK (PPKS2; 612908) is also caused by heterozygous mutation in DSP. Reviews In a review of cardiocutaneous syndromes and arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy, Sen-Chowdhry and McKenna (2014) stated that although the cardiac component of Carvajal syndrome was originally considered dilated cardiomyopathy, many of its features resemble those of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (see 607450). In addition, they noted that different disease subtypes have been found to coexist within the same kindred, suggesting a role for modifier genes and/or environmental influences.
Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia 10
MedGen UID:
347543
Concept ID:
C1857777
Disease or Syndrome
Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) – previously referred to as arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) – is characterized by progressive fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium that predisposes to ventricular tachycardia and sudden death in young individuals and athletes. It primarily affects the right ventricle, and it may also involve the left ventricle. The presentation of disease is highly variable even within families, and some affected individuals may not meet established clinical criteria. The mean age at diagnosis is 31 years (±13; range: 4-64 years).
Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia 5
MedGen UID:
346805
Concept ID:
C1858379
Disease or Syndrome
Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) – previously referred to as arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) – is characterized by progressive fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium that predisposes to ventricular tachycardia and sudden death in young individuals and athletes. It primarily affects the right ventricle, and it may also involve the left ventricle. The presentation of disease is highly variable even within families, and some affected individuals may not meet established clinical criteria. The mean age at diagnosis is 31 years (±13; range: 4-64 years).
Dilated cardiomyopathy 1G
MedGen UID:
347714
Concept ID:
C1858763
Disease or Syndrome
Dilated cardiomyopathy-1G (CMD1G) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by ventricular dilatation and systolic contractile dysfunction (Siu et al., 1999). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of dilated cardiomyopathy (CMD), see CMD1A (115200).
Long QT syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
349087
Concept ID:
C1859062
Disease or Syndrome
Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiac electrophysiologic disorder, characterized by QT prolongation and T-wave abnormalities on the EKG that are associated with tachyarrhythmias, typically the ventricular tachycardia torsade de pointes (TdP). TdP is usually self-terminating, thus causing a syncopal event, the most common symptom in individuals with LQTS. Such cardiac events typically occur during exercise and emotional stress, less frequently during sleep, and usually without warning. In some instances, TdP degenerates to ventricular fibrillation and causes aborted cardiac arrest (if the individual is defibrillated) or sudden death. Approximately 50% of untreated individuals with a pathogenic variant in one of the genes associated with LQTS have symptoms, usually one to a few syncopal events. While cardiac events may occur from infancy through middle age, they are most common from the preteen years through the 20s. Some types of LQTS are associated with a phenotype extending beyond cardiac arrhythmia. In addition to the prolonged QT interval, associations include muscle weakness and facial dysmorphism in Andersen-Tawil syndrome (LQTS type 7); hand/foot, facial, and neurodevelopmental features in Timothy syndrome (LQTS type 8); and profound sensorineural hearing loss in Jervell and Lange-Nielson syndrome.
Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia 12
MedGen UID:
409749
Concept ID:
C1969081
Disease or Syndrome
Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) – previously referred to as arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) – is characterized by progressive fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium that predisposes to ventricular tachycardia and sudden death in young individuals and athletes. It primarily affects the right ventricle, and it may also involve the left ventricle. The presentation of disease is highly variable even within families, and some affected individuals may not meet established clinical criteria. The mean age at diagnosis is 31 years (±13; range: 4-64 years).
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 12
MedGen UID:
393755
Concept ID:
C2677491
Disease or Syndrome
Any hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the CSRP3 gene.
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 11
MedGen UID:
436962
Concept ID:
C2677506
Disease or Syndrome
An autosomal dominant subtype of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by mutation(s) in the ACTC1 gene, encoding actin, alpha cardiac muscle 1.
Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia 2
MedGen UID:
393837
Concept ID:
C2677794
Disease or Syndrome
Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is characterized by episodic syncope occurring during exercise or acute emotion. The underlying cause of these episodes is the onset of fast ventricular tachycardia (bidirectional or polymorphic). Spontaneous recovery may occur when these arrhythmias self-terminate. In other instances, ventricular tachycardia may degenerate into ventricular fibrillation and cause sudden death if cardiopulmonary resuscitation is not readily available. The mean onset of symptoms (usually a syncopal episode) is between age seven and 12 years; onset as late as the fourth decade of life has been reported. If untreated, CPVT is highly lethal, as approximately 30% of affected individuals experience at least one cardiac arrest and up to 80% have one or more syncopal spells. Sudden death may be the first manifestation of the disease.
Dilated cardiomyopathy 1Y
MedGen UID:
437215
Concept ID:
C2678476
Disease or Syndrome
Dilated cardiomyopathy-1Y (CMD1Y) is characterized by severe progressive cardiac failure, resulting in death in the third to sixth decades of life in some patients. Electron microscopy shows an abnormal sarcomere structure (Olson et al., 2001). In left ventricular noncompaction-9 (LVNC9), patients may present with cardiac failure or may be asymptomatic. Echocardiography shows noncompaction of the apex and midventricular wall of the left ventricle (Probst et al., 2011). Some patients also exhibit Ebstein anomaly of the tricuspid valve (Kelle et al., 2016) and some have mitral valve insufficiency (Nijak et al., 2018).
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 14
MedGen UID:
442484
Concept ID:
C2750467
Disease or Syndrome
An autosomal dominant subtype of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by mutation(s) in the MYH6 gene, encoding myosin-6.
Congenital muscular dystrophy due to LMNA mutation
MedGen UID:
413043
Concept ID:
C2750785
Disease or Syndrome
LMNA-related congenital muscular dystrophy (L-CMD) is a condition that primarily affects muscles used for movement (skeletal muscles). It is part of a group of genetic conditions called congenital muscular dystrophies, which cause weak muscle tone (hypotonia) and muscle wasting (atrophy) beginning very early in life.\n\nIn people with L-CMD, muscle weakness becomes apparent in infancy or early childhood and can worsen quickly. The most severely affected infants develop few motor skills, and they are never able to hold up their heads, roll over, or sit. Less severely affected children may learn to sit, stand, and walk before muscle weakness becomes apparent. First the neck muscles weaken, causing the head to fall forward (dropped-head syndrome). As other skeletal muscles become weaker, these children may ultimately lose the ability to sit, stand, and walk unassisted.\n\nOther features of L-CMD often include spinal rigidity and abnormal curvature of the spine (scoliosis and lordosis); joint deformities (contractures) that restrict movement, particularly in the hips and legs; and an inward-turning foot. People with L-CMD also have an increased risk of heart rhythm abnormalities (arrhythmias).\n\nOver time, muscle weakness causes most infants and children with L-CMD to have trouble eating and breathing. The breathing problems result from restrictive respiratory insufficiency, which occurs when muscles in the chest are weakened and the ribcage becomes increasingly rigid. This problem can be life-threatening, and many affected children require support with a machine to help them breathe (mechanical ventilation).
Brugada syndrome 8
MedGen UID:
413928
Concept ID:
C2751083
Disease or Syndrome
Brugada syndrome is characterized by cardiac conduction abnormalities (ST segment abnormalities in leads V1-V3 on EKG and a high risk for ventricular arrhythmias) that can result in sudden death. Brugada syndrome presents primarily during adulthood, although age at diagnosis may range from infancy to late adulthood. The mean age of sudden death is approximately 40 years. Clinical presentations may also include sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS; death of a child during the first year of life without an identifiable cause) and sudden unexpected nocturnal death syndrome (SUNDS), a typical presentation in individuals from Southeast Asia. Other conduction defects can include first-degree AV block, intraventricular conduction delay, right bundle branch block, and sick sinus syndrome.
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 16
MedGen UID:
462554
Concept ID:
C3151204
Disease or Syndrome
Any hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the MYOZ2 gene.
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 17
MedGen UID:
462614
Concept ID:
C3151264
Disease or Syndrome
An autosomal dominant subtype of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by mutation(s) in the JPH2 gene, encoding junctophilin-2.
Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia 3
MedGen UID:
462813
Concept ID:
C3151463
Disease or Syndrome
Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is characterized by episodic syncope occurring during exercise or acute emotion. The underlying cause of these episodes is the onset of fast ventricular tachycardia (bidirectional or polymorphic). Spontaneous recovery may occur when these arrhythmias self-terminate. In other instances, ventricular tachycardia may degenerate into ventricular fibrillation and cause sudden death if cardiopulmonary resuscitation is not readily available. The mean onset of symptoms (usually a syncopal episode) is between age seven and 12 years; onset as late as the fourth decade of life has been reported. If untreated, CPVT is highly lethal, as approximately 30% of affected individuals experience at least one cardiac arrest and up to 80% have one or more syncopal spells. Sudden death may be the first manifestation of the disease.
Ogden syndrome
MedGen UID:
477078
Concept ID:
C3275447
Disease or Syndrome
Ogden syndrome (OGDNS) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by postnatal growth failure, severely delayed psychomotor development, variable dysmorphic features, and hypotonia. Many patients also have cardiac malformations or arrhythmias (summary by Popp et al., 2015).
Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia 4
MedGen UID:
766961
Concept ID:
C3554047
Disease or Syndrome
Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is characterized by episodic syncope occurring during exercise or acute emotion. The underlying cause of these episodes is the onset of fast ventricular tachycardia (bidirectional or polymorphic). Spontaneous recovery may occur when these arrhythmias self-terminate. In other instances, ventricular tachycardia may degenerate into ventricular fibrillation and cause sudden death if cardiopulmonary resuscitation is not readily available. The mean onset of symptoms (usually a syncopal episode) is between age seven and 12 years; onset as late as the fourth decade of life has been reported. If untreated, CPVT is highly lethal, as approximately 30% of affected individuals experience at least one cardiac arrest and up to 80% have one or more syncopal spells. Sudden death may be the first manifestation of the disease.
Dilated cardiomyopathy 1II
MedGen UID:
767563
Concept ID:
C3554649
Disease or Syndrome
Any familial isolated dilated cardiomyopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the CRYAB gene.
Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia 13
MedGen UID:
816468
Concept ID:
C3810138
Disease or Syndrome
Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia-13 (ARVD13) is characterized by progressive fibrofatty myocardial replacement, primarily of the right ventricle. The main clinical features are structural and functional abnormalities of the ventricles, electrocardiographic depolarization/repolarization changes, reentrant arrhythmias, and sudden death (summary by van Hengel et al., 2013).
Cardiomyopathy, dilated, with wooly hair, keratoderma, and tooth agenesis
MedGen UID:
862830
Concept ID:
C4014393
Disease or Syndrome
Keratoderma with woolly hair is a group of related conditions that affect the skin and hair and in many cases increase the risk of potentially life-threatening heart problems. People with these conditions have hair that is unusually coarse, dry, fine, and tightly curled. In some cases, the hair is also sparse. The woolly hair texture typically affects only scalp hair and is present from birth. Starting early in life, affected individuals also develop palmoplantar keratoderma, a condition that causes skin on the palms of the hands and the soles of the feet to become thick, scaly, and calloused.\n\nKeratoderma with woolly hair comprises several related conditions with overlapping signs and symptoms. Researchers have recently proposed classifying keratoderma with woolly hair into four types, based on the underlying genetic cause. Type I, also known as Naxos disease, is characterized by palmoplantar keratoderma, woolly hair, and a form of cardiomyopathy called arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). Type II, also known as Carvajal syndrome, has hair and skin abnormalities similar to type I but features a different form of cardiomyopathy, called dilated left ventricular cardiomyopathy. Type III also has signs and symptoms similar to those of type I, including ARVC, although the hair and skin abnormalities are often milder. Type IV is characterized by palmoplantar keratoderma and woolly and sparse hair, as well as abnormal fingernails and toenails. Type IV does not appear to cause cardiomyopathy.\n\nCardiomyopathy, which is a disease of the heart muscle, is a life-threatening health problem that can develop in people with keratoderma with woolly hair. Unlike the other features of this condition, signs and symptoms of cardiomyopathy may not appear until adolescence or later. Complications of cardiomyopathy can include an abnormal heartbeat (arrhythmia), heart failure, and sudden death.
Linear skin defects with multiple congenital anomalies 3
MedGen UID:
906997
Concept ID:
C4225421
Disease or Syndrome
Microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome is characterized by unilateral or bilateral microphthalmia and/or anophthalmia and linear skin defects, usually involving the face and neck, which are present at birth and heal with age, leaving minimal residual scarring. Other findings can include a wide variety of other ocular abnormalities (e.g., corneal anomalies, orbital cysts, cataracts), central nervous system involvement (e.g., structural anomalies, developmental delay, infantile seizures), cardiac concerns (e.g., hypertrophic or oncocytic cardiomyopathy, atrial or ventricular septal defects, arrhythmias), short stature, diaphragmatic hernia, nail dystrophy, hearing impairment, and genitourinary malformations. Inter- and intrafamilial variability is described.
Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, familial, 14
MedGen UID:
1712001
Concept ID:
C5394505
Disease or Syndrome
Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia-14 (ARVD14) is characterized by palpitations, chest pain, and presyncope. Electrocardiography shows epsilon waves, T-wave inversion across anterior leads, premature ventricular contractions, ventricular tachycardia, and left bundle branch block. Dilation of the right ventricle with hypokinesia and aneurysmal changes are seen on echocardiography. Cardiac MRI may show fibrofatty infiltration, which has been confirmed by endocardial biopsy in some patients. Sudden death may occur (Mayosi et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of ARVD, see ARVD1 (107970).
Recurrent metabolic encephalomyopathic crises-rhabdomyolysis-cardiac arrhythmia-intellectual disability syndrome
MedGen UID:
1798947
Concept ID:
C5567524
Disease or Syndrome
Individuals with TANGO2-related metabolic encephalopathy and arrhythmias can present in acute metabolic crisis (hypoglycemia, elevated lactate, mild hyperammonemia) or with developmental delay, regression, and/or seizures. The acute presentation varies from profound muscle weakness, ataxia, and/or disorientation to a comatose state. Individuals can present with intermittent acute episodes of rhabdomyolysis. The first episode of myoglobinuria has been known to occur as early as age five months. Acute renal tubular damage due to myoglobinuria can result in acute kidney injury and renal failure. During acute illness, transient electrocardiogram changes can be seen; the most common is QT prolongation. Life-threatening recurrent ventricular tachycardia or torsade de pointes occurs primarily during times of acute illness. Individuals who do not present in metabolic crises may present with gait incoordination, progressively unsteady gait, difficulty with speech, or clumsiness. Intellectual disability of variable severity is observed in almost all individuals. Seizures are observed outside the periods of crises in more than 75% of individuals. Hypothyroidism has been reported in more than one third of individuals.
Cardiomyopathy, dilated, 2F
MedGen UID:
1802616
Concept ID:
C5676917
Disease or Syndrome
Dilated cardiomyopathy-2F (CMD2F) is an autosomal recessive early-onset cardiomyopathy associated with refractory ventricular arrhythmias and severe heart failure requiring placement of a left ventricular assist device (Hakui et al., 2022). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of dilated cardiomyopathy, see 115200.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Whitaker J, Wright MJ, Tedrow U
Clin Med (Lond) 2023 Sep;23(5):442-448. Epub 2023 Sep 29 doi: 10.7861/clinmed.2023-23.5.Cardio3. PMID: 37775174Free PMC Article
Elsokkari I, Sapp JL
Prog Cardiovasc Dis 2021 May-Jun;66:70-79. doi: 10.1016/j.pcad.2021.06.007. PMID: 34332662
Al-Khatib SM, Stevenson WG, Ackerman MJ, Bryant WJ, Callans DJ, Curtis AB, Deal BJ, Dickfeld T, Field ME, Fonarow GC, Gillis AM, Granger CB, Hammill SC, Hlatky MA, Joglar JA, Kay GN, Matlock DD, Myerburg RJ, Page RL
J Am Coll Cardiol 2018 Oct 2;72(14):e91-e220. Epub 2018 Aug 16 doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2017.10.054. PMID: 29097296

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Pérez PR, Hylind RJ, Roston TM, Bezzerides VJ, Abrams DJ
Heart Lung Circ 2023 Jul;32(7):790-797. Epub 2023 Apr 7 doi: 10.1016/j.hlc.2023.01.018. PMID: 37032191
Guandalini GS, Liang JJ, Marchlinski FE
JACC Clin Electrophysiol 2019 Dec;5(12):1363-1383. doi: 10.1016/j.jacep.2019.09.015. PMID: 31857035
AlMahameed ST, Ziv O
Med Clin North Am 2019 Sep;103(5):881-895. doi: 10.1016/j.mcna.2019.05.008. PMID: 31378332
Cuculich PS, Schill MR, Kashani R, Mutic S, Lang A, Cooper D, Faddis M, Gleva M, Noheria A, Smith TW, Hallahan D, Rudy Y, Robinson CG
N Engl J Med 2017 Dec 14;377(24):2325-2336. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1613773. PMID: 29236642Free PMC Article
Hsia HH
Card Electrophysiol Clin 2016 Mar;8(1):75-8. Epub 2016 Jan 16 doi: 10.1016/j.ccep.2015.10.008. PMID: 26920174

Diagnosis

Whitaker J, Wright MJ, Tedrow U
Clin Med (Lond) 2023 Sep;23(5):442-448. Epub 2023 Sep 29 doi: 10.7861/clinmed.2023-23.5.Cardio3. PMID: 37775174Free PMC Article
Alblaihed L, Al-Salamah T
Emerg Med Clin North Am 2022 Nov;40(4):733-753. Epub 2022 Oct 7 doi: 10.1016/j.emc.2022.06.010. PMID: 36396219
Viskin S, Chorin E, Viskin D, Hochstadt A, Schwartz AL, Rosso R
Circulation 2021 Sep 7;144(10):823-839. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.121.055783. PMID: 34491774
Lawrie GM
Methodist Debakey Cardiovasc J 2021 Apr 5;17(1):36-42. Epub 2021 Mar 25 doi: 10.14797/TESU5314. PMID: 34104318Free PMC Article
Kobayashi Y
J Nippon Med Sch 2018;85(2):87-94. doi: 10.1272/jnms.2018_85-14. PMID: 29731502

Therapy

Ismayl M, Abbasi MA, Marar R, Geske JB, Gersh BJ, Anavekar NS
Curr Probl Cardiol 2023 Jan;48(1):101429. Epub 2022 Sep 24 doi: 10.1016/j.cpcardiol.2022.101429. PMID: 36167226
AbdelWahab A, Sapp J
Curr Cardiol Rep 2017 Sep 13;19(11):105. doi: 10.1007/s11886-017-0924-0. PMID: 28900864
Kudenchuk PJ, Brown SP, Daya M, Rea T, Nichol G, Morrison LJ, Leroux B, Vaillancourt C, Wittwer L, Callaway CW, Christenson J, Egan D, Ornato JP, Weisfeldt ML, Stiell IG, Idris AH, Aufderheide TP, Dunford JV, Colella MR, Vilke GM, Brienza AM, Desvigne-Nickens P, Gray PC, Gray R, Seals N, Straight R, Dorian P; Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium Investigators
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