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Arthralgia

MedGen UID:
13917
Concept ID:
C0003862
Sign or Symptom
Synonyms: Arthralgias; pain in joint
SNOMED CT: Articular pain (57676002); Joint pain (57676002); Arthralgia (57676002); Painful joint (57676002)
 
HPO: HP:0002829

Definition

Joint pain. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Lipomatosis dolorosa
MedGen UID:
1757
Concept ID:
C0001529
Disease or Syndrome
Adiposis dolorosa, also known as Dercum disease, is characterized by generalized obesity and pronounced, disabling, and chronic pain in the adipose tissue of the proximal extremities, trunk, pelvic area, and buttocks; the face and hands are usually spared. There are a number of associated symptoms, including multiple lipomas, generalized weakness, fatigue, sleep disturbances, constipation, and psychiatric abnormalities. It is 5 to 30 times more common in women than men, and usually presents between 35 and 50 years of age (summary by Campen et al., 2001; review by Hansson et al., 2012). Based on a review of the literature and studies of 111 patients, Hansson et al. (2012) proposed a classification of Dercum disease into 4 types: (I) generalized diffuse form without clear lipomas, (II) generalized nodular form with multiple lipomas, (III) localized nodular form, and (IV) juxtaarticular form with solitary fatty deposits near joints.
Alkaptonuria
MedGen UID:
1413
Concept ID:
C0002066
Disease or Syndrome
Alkaptonuria is caused by deficiency of homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, an enzyme that converts homogentisic acid (HGA) to maleylacetoacetic acid in the tyrosine degradation pathway. The three major features of alkaptonuria are dark urine or urine that turns dark on standing, ochronosis (bluish-black pigmentation in connective tissue), and arthritis of the spine and larger joints. Ochronosis generally occurs after age 30 years; arthritis often begins in the third decade. Other manifestations can include pigment in the sclera, ear cartilage, and skin of the hands; aortic or mitral valve calcification or regurgitation and occasionally aortic dilatation; renal stones; prostate stones; and hypothyroidism.
Rheumatoid arthritis
MedGen UID:
2078
Concept ID:
C0003873
Disease or Syndrome
Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory disease, primarily of the joints, with autoimmune features and a complex genetic component.
Langer-Giedion syndrome
MedGen UID:
6009
Concept ID:
C0023003
Disease or Syndrome
Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome (TRPS) comprises TRPS I (caused by a heterozygous pathogenic variant in TRPS1) and TRPS II (caused by contiguous gene deletion of TRPS1, RAD21, and EXT1). Both types of TRPS are characterized by distinctive facial features; ectodermal features (fine, sparse, depigmented, and slow growing hair; dystrophic nails; and small breasts); and skeletal findings (short stature; short feet; brachydactyly with ulnar or radial deviation of the fingers; and early, marked hip dysplasia). TRPS II is characterized by multiple osteochondromas (typically first observed clinically on the scapulae and around the elbows and knees between ages 1 month and 6 years) and an increased risk of mild-to-moderate intellectual disability.
Chilblain lupus 1
MedGen UID:
9822
Concept ID:
C0024145
Disease or Syndrome
Chilblain lupus is a cutaneous form of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; 152700) characterized by the appearance of painful bluish-red papular or nodular lesions of the skin in acral locations (including the dorsal aspects of fingers and toes, heels, nose, cheeks, ears, and, in some cases, knees) precipitated by cold and wet exposure (summary by Lee-Kirsch et al., 2006). Genetic Heterogeneity of Chilblain Lupus See also CHBL2 (614415), caused by mutation in the SAMHD1 gene (606754) on chromosome 20q11. Mutations in the TREX1 and SAMHD1 genes also cause Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS1, 225750 and AGS5, 612952, respectively).
Mucopolysaccharidosis type 6
MedGen UID:
44514
Concept ID:
C0026709
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (MPS6) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from a deficiency of arylsulfatase B. Clinical features and severity are variable, but usually include short stature, hepatosplenomegaly, dysostosis multiplex, stiff joints, corneal clouding, cardiac abnormalities, and facial dysmorphism. Intelligence is usually normal (Azevedo et al., 2004).
Familial Mediterranean fever
MedGen UID:
45811
Concept ID:
C0031069
Disease or Syndrome
Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is divided into two phenotypes: type 1 and type 2. FMF type 1 is characterized by recurrent short episodes of inflammation and serositis including fever, peritonitis, synovitis, pleuritis, and, rarely, pericarditis and meningitis. The symptoms and severity vary among affected individuals, sometimes even among members of the same family. Amyloidosis, which can lead to renal failure, is the most severe complication, if untreated. FMF type 2 is characterized by amyloidosis as the first clinical manifestation of FMF in an otherwise asymptomatic individual.
Protein-losing enteropathy
MedGen UID:
19522
Concept ID:
C0033680
Disease or Syndrome
Complement hyperactivation, angiopathic thrombosis, and protein-losing enteropathy (CHAPLE) is characterized by abdominal pain and diarrhea, primary intestinal lymphangiectasia, hypoproteinemic edema, and malabsorption. Some patients also exhibit bowel inflammation, recurrent infections associated with hypogammaglobulinemia, and/or angiopathic thromboembolic disease. Patient T lymphocytes show increased complement activation, causing surface deposition of complement and generating soluble C5a (Ozen et al., 2017).
Acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis
MedGen UID:
43097
Concept ID:
C0085077
Disease or Syndrome
Acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis (AFND) is an autosomal dominant autoinflammatory disorder characterized by onset of recurrent fever and dermatologic abnormalities in childhood. Laboratory studies show elevated acute-phase reactants and activation of the inflammatory response, particularly IL1B (147720). Additional more variable features may include myalgia and arthralgia (summary by Masters et al., 2016).
Freeman-Sheldon syndrome
MedGen UID:
120516
Concept ID:
C0265224
Disease or Syndrome
Freeman-Sheldon syndrome (FSS), or DA2A, is phenotypically similar to DA1. In addition to contractures of the hands and feet, FSS is characterized by oropharyngeal abnormalities, scoliosis, and a distinctive face that includes a very small oral orifice (often only a few millimeters in diameter at birth), puckered lips, and an H-shaped dimple of the chin; hence, FSS has been called 'whistling face syndrome.' The limb phenotypes of DA1 and FSS may be so similar that they can only be distinguished by the differences in facial morphology (summary by Bamshad et al., 2009). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of distal arthrogryposis, see DA1 (108120).
Pyle metaphyseal dysplasia
MedGen UID:
82704
Concept ID:
C0265294
Disease or Syndrome
Pyle disease is characterized by long bones with wide and expanded trabecular metaphyses, thin cortical bone, and bone fragility. Fractures are common in Pyle disease, and fracture lines usually go through the abnormally wide metaphyses, revealing their fragility (summary by Kiper et al., 2016).
Niemann-Pick disease, type B
MedGen UID:
78651
Concept ID:
C0268243
Disease or Syndrome
The phenotype of acid sphingomyelinase deficiency (ASMD) occurs along a continuum. Individuals with the severe early-onset form, infantile neurovisceral ASMD, were historically diagnosed with Niemann-Pick disease type A (NPD-A). The later-onset, chronic visceral form of ASMD is also referred to as Niemann-Pick disease type B (NPD-B). A phenotype with intermediate severity is also known as chronic neurovisceral ASMD (NPD-A/B). The most common presenting symptom in NPD-A is hepatosplenomegaly, usually detectable by age three months; over time the liver and spleen become massive in size. Psychomotor development progresses no further than the 12-month level, after which neurologic deterioration is relentless. Failure to thrive typically becomes evident by the second year of life. A classic cherry-red spot of the macula of the retina, which may not be present in the first few months, is eventually present in all affected children. Interstitial lung disease caused by storage of sphingomyelin in pulmonary macrophages results in frequent respiratory infections and often respiratory failure. Most children succumb before the third year of life. NPD-B generally presents later than NPD-A, and the manifestations are less severe. NPD-B is characterized by progressive hepatosplenomegaly, gradual deterioration in liver and pulmonary function, osteopenia, and atherogenic lipid profile. No central nervous system (CNS) manifestations occur. Individuals with NPD-A/B have symptoms that are intermediate between NPD-A and NPD-B. The presentation in individuals with NPD-A/B varies greatly, although all are characterized by the presence of some CNS manifestations. Survival to adulthood can occur in individuals with NPD-B and NPD-A/B.
Farber lipogranulomatosis
MedGen UID:
78654
Concept ID:
C0268255
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of ASAH1-related disorders ranges from Farber disease (FD) to spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMA-PME). Classic FD is characterized by onset in the first weeks of life of painful, progressive deformity of the major joints; palpable subcutaneous nodules of joints and mechanical pressure points; and a hoarse cry resulting from granulomas of the larynx and epiglottis. Life expectancy is usually less than two years. In the other less common types of FD, onset, severity, and primary manifestations vary. SMA-PME is characterized by early-childhood-onset progressive lower motor neuron disease manifest typically between ages three and seven years as proximal lower-extremity weakness, followed by progressive myoclonic and atonic seizures, tremulousness/tremor, and sensorineural hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy typically begins in late childhood after the onset of weakness and can include jerking of the upper limbs, action myoclonus, myoclonic status, and eyelid myoclonus. Other findings include generalized tremor, and cognitive decline. The time from disease onset to death from respiratory complications is usually five to 15 years.
Familial amyloid nephropathy with urticaria AND deafness
MedGen UID:
120634
Concept ID:
C0268390
Disease or Syndrome
Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) is characterized by episodic skin rash, arthralgias, and fever associated with late-onset sensorineural deafness and renal amyloidosis (Dode et al., 2002).
Familial hypokalemia-hypomagnesemia
MedGen UID:
75681
Concept ID:
C0268450
Disease or Syndrome
Gitelman syndrome (GTLMNS) is an autosomal recessive renal tubular salt-wasting disorder characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis with hypomagnesemia and hypocalciuria. It is the most common renal tubular disorder among Caucasians (prevalence of 1 in 40,000). Most patients have onset of symptoms as adults, but some present in childhood. Clinical features include transient periods of muscle weakness and tetany, abdominal pains, and chondrocalcinosis (summary by Glaudemans et al., 2012). Gitelman syndrome is sometimes referred to as a mild variant of classic Bartter syndrome (607364). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bartter syndrome, see 607364.
Hyperimmunoglobulin D with periodic fever
MedGen UID:
140768
Concept ID:
C0398691
Disease or Syndrome
Mevalonate kinase deficiency is a condition characterized by recurrent episodes of fever, which typically begin during infancy. Each episode of fever lasts about 3 to 6 days, and the frequency of the episodes varies among affected individuals. In childhood the fevers seem to be more frequent, occurring as often as 25 times a year, but as the individual gets older the episodes occur less often.\n\nMevalonate kinase deficiency has additional signs and symptoms, and the severity depends on the type of the condition. There are two types of mevalonate kinase deficiency: a less severe type called hyperimmunoglobulinemia D syndrome (HIDS) and a more severe type called mevalonic aciduria (MVA).\n\nDuring episodes of fever, people with HIDS typically have enlargement of the lymph nodes (lymphadenopathy), abdominal pain, joint pain, diarrhea, skin rashes, and headache. Occasionally they will have painful sores called aphthous ulcers around their mouth. In females, these may also occur around the vagina. Rarely, people with HIDS develop a buildup of protein deposits (amyloidosis) in the kidneys that can lead to kidney failure. Fever episodes in individuals with HIDS can be triggered by vaccinations, surgery, injury, or stress. Most people with HIDS have abnormally high levels of immune system proteins called immunoglobulin D (IgD) and immunoglobulin A (IgA) in the blood. It is unclear why some people with HIDS have high levels of IgD and IgA and some do not. Elevated levels of these immunoglobulins do not appear to cause any signs or symptoms. Individuals with HIDS do not have any signs and symptoms of the condition between fever episodes and typically have a normal life expectancy.\n\nPeople with MVA have signs and symptoms of the condition at all times, not just during episodes of fever. Affected children have developmental delay, problems with movement and balance (ataxia), recurrent seizures (epilepsy), progressive problems with vision, and failure to gain weight and grow at the expected rate (failure to thrive). Individuals with MVA typically have an unusually small, elongated head. In childhood or adolescence, affected individuals may develop eye problems such as inflammation of the eye (uveitis), a blue tint in the white part of the eye (blue sclera), an eye disorder called retinitis pigmentosa that causes vision loss, or clouding of the lens of the eye (cataracts). Affected adults may have short stature and may develop muscle weakness (myopathy) later in life. During fever episodes, people with MVA may have an enlarged liver and spleen (hepatosplenomegaly), lymphadenopathy, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and skin rashes. Children with MVA who are severely affected with multiple problems may live only into early childhood; mildly affected individuals may have a normal life expectancy.
Pseudoachondroplastic spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia syndrome
MedGen UID:
98378
Concept ID:
C0410538
Congenital Abnormality
Pseudoachondroplasia is characterized by normal length at birth and normal facies. Often the presenting feature is a waddling gait, recognized at the onset of walking. Typically, the growth rate falls below the standard growth curve by approximately age two years, leading to a moderately severe form of disproportionate short-limb short stature. Joint pain during childhood, particularly in the large joints of the lower extremities, is common. Degenerative joint disease is progressive; approximately 50% of individuals with pseudoachondroplasia eventually require hip replacement surgery.
Autosomal recessive spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia
MedGen UID:
98476
Concept ID:
C0432213
Disease or Syndrome
Syndrome with characteristics of disproportionate short-trunked short stature, pectus carinatum, short arms, short and broad hands, short metatarsals, flat and broad feet, coxa vara, genu valgum, osteoarthritis, arthrosis and moderate-to-serious gait impairment. The syndrome has been described among Venezuelan Indians of the Yukpa (Irapa) tribe and three siblings from a Mexican mestizo family. Autosomal recessive inheritance has been suggested, but the causative gene has not yet been identified.
Namaqualand hip dysplasia
MedGen UID:
609409
Concept ID:
C0432214
Disease or Syndrome
Mild spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia due to COL2A1 mutation with early-onset osteoarthritis is a type 2 collagen-related bone disorder characterized by precocious, generalized osteoarthritis (with onset as early as childhood) and mild, dysplastic spinal changes (flattening of vertebrae, irregular endplates and wedge-shaped deformities) resulting in a mildly short trunk.
Trichorhinophalangeal dysplasia type I
MedGen UID:
140929
Concept ID:
C0432233
Disease or Syndrome
Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome (TRPS) comprises TRPS I (caused by a heterozygous pathogenic variant in TRPS1) and TRPS II (caused by contiguous gene deletion of TRPS1, RAD21, and EXT1). Both types of TRPS are characterized by distinctive facial features; ectodermal features (fine, sparse, depigmented, and slow growing hair; dystrophic nails; and small breasts); and skeletal findings (short stature; short feet; brachydactyly with ulnar or radial deviation of the fingers; and early, marked hip dysplasia). TRPS II is characterized by multiple osteochondromas (typically first observed clinically on the scapulae and around the elbows and knees between ages 1 month and 6 years) and an increased risk of mild-to-moderate intellectual disability.
Familial X-linked hypophosphatemic vitamin D refractory rickets
MedGen UID:
196551
Concept ID:
C0733682
Disease or Syndrome
The phenotypic spectrum of X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH) ranges from isolated hypophosphatemia to severe lower-extremity bowing. XLH frequently manifests in the first two years of life when lower-extremity bowing becomes evident with the onset of weight bearing; however, it sometimes is not manifest until adulthood, as previously unevaluated short stature. In adults, enthesopathy (calcification of the tendons, ligaments, and joint capsules) associated with joint pain and impaired mobility may be the initial presenting complaint. Persons with XLH are prone to spontaneous dental abscesses; sensorineural hearing loss has also been reported.
Reynolds syndrome
MedGen UID:
450547
Concept ID:
C0748397
Disease or Syndrome
An autoimmune disorder characterized by the association of primary biliary cirrhosis with limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis. Onset occurs between 30-65 years. Occurs sporadically, but rare familial cases with an unknown inheritance pattern have been observed. There is no cure and management is mainly supportive.
TNF receptor-associated periodic fever syndrome (TRAPS)
MedGen UID:
226899
Concept ID:
C1275126
Disease or Syndrome
Familial periodic fever (FPF) is an autoinflammatory disorder characterized by recurrent fever with localized myalgia and painful erythema. Febrile attacks may last 1 or 2 days but often last longer than 1 week. Arthralgia of large joints, abdominal pain, conjunctivitis, and periorbital edema are common features. During attacks, painless cutaneous lesions may develop on the trunk or extremities and may migrate distally (review by Drenth and van der Meer, 2001).
Necrotizing encephalomyelopathy, subacute, of Leigh, adult
MedGen UID:
331718
Concept ID:
C1834340
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-associated Leigh syndrome and NARP (neurogenic muscle weakness, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa) are part of a continuum of progressive neurodegenerative disorders caused by abnormalities of mitochondrial energy generation. Leigh syndrome (or subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy) is characterized by onset of symptoms typically between ages three and 12 months, often following a viral infection. Decompensation (often with elevated lactate levels in blood and/or CSF) during an intercurrent illness is typically associated with psychomotor retardation or regression. Neurologic features include hypotonia, spasticity, movement disorders (including chorea), cerebellar ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. Extraneurologic manifestations may include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. About 50% of affected individuals die by age three years, most often as a result of respiratory or cardiac failure. NARP is characterized by proximal neurogenic muscle weakness with sensory neuropathy, ataxia, and pigmentary retinopathy. Onset of symptoms, particularly ataxia and learning difficulties, is often in early childhood. Individuals with NARP can be relatively stable for many years, but may suffer episodic deterioration, often in association with viral illnesses.
Leri pleonosteosis
MedGen UID:
331978
Concept ID:
C1835450
Disease or Syndrome
Leri pleonosteosis is an autosomal dominant skeletal disorder characterized by flexion contractures of the interphalangeal joints, limited movement of multiple joints, and short, broad metacarpals, metatarsals, and phalanges. Additional features may include chronic joint pain, short stature, bony overgrowths, spinal cord compression, scleroderma-like skin changes, and blepharophimosis. The clinical features overlap with several other musculoskeletal conditions, including Myhre syndrome (MYHRS; 139210) and geleophysic dysplasia (GPHYSD1; 231050) (summary by Banka et al., 2015).
Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, with severe proximal femoral dysplasia
MedGen UID:
324484
Concept ID:
C1836315
Congenital Abnormality
A rare primary bone dysplasia characterised by severe early-onset dysplasia of the proximal femurs, with almost complete absence of the secondary ossification centres and abnormal development of the femoral necks (short and broad with irregular metaphyses). It is associated with gait abnormality, mild short stature, arthralgia, and joint stiffness with limited mobility of the hips and irregular acetabula, and hip and knee pain. Coxa vara and mild spinal changes are also associated.
Czech dysplasia, metatarsal type
MedGen UID:
324580
Concept ID:
C1836683
Congenital Abnormality
Czech dysplasia is an autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasia characterized by early-onset, progressive pseudorheumatoid arthritis, platyspondyly, and short third and fourth toes (Marik et al., 2004; Kozlowski et al., 2004).
Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia with congenital joint dislocations
MedGen UID:
373381
Concept ID:
C1837657
Disease or Syndrome
CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia is characterized by short stature of prenatal onset, joint dislocations (knees, hips, radial heads), clubfeet, and limitation of range of motion that can involve all large joints. Kyphosis and occasionally scoliosis with slight shortening of the trunk develop in childhood. Minor heart valve dysplasia has been described in several persons. Intellect and vision are normal.
Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia type 5
MedGen UID:
335542
Concept ID:
C1846843
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) presents in early childhood, usually with pain in the hips and/or knees after exercise. Affected children complain of fatigue with long-distance walking. Waddling gait may be present. Adult height is either in the lower range of normal or mildly shortened. The limbs are relatively short in comparison to the trunk. Pain and joint deformity progress, resulting in early-onset osteoarthritis, particularly of the large weight-bearing joints.
Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia type 4
MedGen UID:
376164
Concept ID:
C1847593
Disease or Syndrome
Recessive multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (EDM4/rMED) is characterized by joint pain (usually in the hips or knees); malformations of hands, feet, and knees; and scoliosis. Approximately 50% of affected individuals have an abnormal finding at birth, e.g., clubfoot, clinodactyly, or (rarely) cystic ear swelling. Onset of articular pain is variable but usually occurs in late childhood. Stature is usually within the normal range prior to puberty; in adulthood, stature is only slightly diminished and ranges from 150 to 180 cm. Functional disability is mild.
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome due to tenascin-X deficiency
MedGen UID:
336244
Concept ID:
C1848029
Disease or Syndrome
The clinical features of TNXB-related classical-like Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (clEDS) strongly resemble those seen in classic EDS (cEDS). Affected individuals have generalized joint hypermobility, hyperextensible skin, and easy bruising, but do not have atrophic scarring, as is seen in cEDS. There are also several other distinguishing clinical findings including anomalies of feet and hands, edema in the legs in the absence of cardiac failure, mild proximal and distal muscle weakness, and axonal polyneuropathy. Vaginal, uterine, and/or rectal prolapse can also occur. Tissue fragility with resulting rupture of the trachea, esophagus, and small and large bowel has been reported. Vascular fragility causing a major event occurs in a minority of individuals. Significant variability in the severity of musculoskeletal symptoms and their effect on day-to-day function between unrelated affected individuals as well as among affected individuals in the same family has been reported. Fatigue has been reported in more than half of affected individuals. The severity of symptoms in middle-aged individuals can range from joint hypermobility without complications to being wheelchair-bound as a result of severe and painful foot deformities and fatigue.
Otospondylomegaepiphyseal dysplasia, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
341234
Concept ID:
C1848488
Disease or Syndrome
Stickler syndrome is a connective tissue disorder that can include ocular findings of myopia, cataract, and retinal detachment; hearing loss that is both conductive and sensorineural; midfacial underdevelopment and cleft palate (either alone or as part of the Robin sequence); and mild spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and/or precocious arthritis. Variable phenotypic expression of Stickler syndrome occurs both within and among families; interfamilial variability is in part explained by locus and allelic heterogeneity.
Multicentric osteolysis nodulosis arthropathy spectrum
MedGen UID:
342428
Concept ID:
C1850155
Disease or Syndrome
Multicentric osteolysis nodulosis and arthropathy (MONA) is a skeletal dysplasia characterized by progressive osteolysis (particularly of the carpal and tarsal bones), osteoporosis, subcutaneous nodules on the palms and soles, and progressive arthropathy (joint contractures, pain, swelling, and stiffness). Other manifestations include coarse facies, pigmented skin lesions, cardiac defects, and corneal opacities. Onset is usually between ages six months and six years (range: birth to 11 years).
Familial Mediterranean fever, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
341987
Concept ID:
C1851347
Disease or Syndrome
Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is divided into two phenotypes: type 1 and type 2. FMF type 1 is characterized by recurrent short episodes of inflammation and serositis including fever, peritonitis, synovitis, pleuritis, and, rarely, pericarditis and meningitis. The symptoms and severity vary among affected individuals, sometimes even among members of the same family. Amyloidosis, which can lead to renal failure, is the most severe complication, if untreated. FMF type 2 is characterized by amyloidosis as the first clinical manifestation of FMF in an otherwise asymptomatic individual.
Hemochromatosis type 4
MedGen UID:
340044
Concept ID:
C1853733
Disease or Syndrome
Hemochromatosis type 4 (HFE4) is a dominantly inherited iron overload disorder with heterogeneous phenotypic manifestations that can be classified into 2 groups. One group is characterized by an early rise in ferritin (see 134790) levels with low to normal transferrin (190000) saturation and iron accumulation predominantly in macrophages. The other group is similar to classical hemochromatosis, with high transferrin saturation and prominent parenchymal iron loading (summary by De Domenico et al., 2005). For general background information and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of hereditary hemochromatosis, see 235200.
GNPTG-mucolipidosis
MedGen UID:
340743
Concept ID:
C1854896
Disease or Syndrome
Mucolipidosis III gamma (ML III?) is a slowly progressive inborn error of metabolism mainly affecting skeletal, joint, and connective tissues. Clinical onset is in early childhood; the progressive course results in severe functional impairment and significant morbidity from chronic pain. Cardiorespiratory complications (restrictive lung disease from thoracic involvement, and thickening and insufficiency of the mitral and aortic valves) are rarely clinically significant. A few (probably <10%) affected individuals display mild cognitive impairment.
Celiac disease, susceptibility to, 1
MedGen UID:
395227
Concept ID:
C1859310
Finding
Celiac disease is a systemic autoimmune disease that can be associated with gastrointestinal findings (diarrhea, malabsorption, abdominal pain and distension, bloating, vomiting, and weight loss) and/or highly variable non-gastrointestinal findings (dermatitis herpetiformis, chronic fatigue, joint pain/inflammation, iron deficiency anemia, migraines, depression, attention-deficit disorder, epilepsy, osteoporosis/osteopenia, infertility and/or recurrent fetal loss, vitamin deficiencies, short stature, failure to thrive, delayed puberty, dental enamel defects, and autoimmune disorders). Classic celiac disease, characterized by mild to severe gastrointestinal symptoms, is less common than non-classic celiac disease, characterized by absence of gastrointestinal symptoms.
Upington disease
MedGen UID:
348145
Concept ID:
C1860596
Disease or Syndrome
Upington disease has characteristics of Perthes-like pelvic anomalies (premature closure of the capital femoral epiphyses and widened femoral necks with flattened femoral heads), enchondromata and ecchondromata. It has been described in siblings from three generations of one family. Transmission is autosomal dominant.
Synovial chondromatosis, familial, with dwarfism
MedGen UID:
348836
Concept ID:
C1861304
Disease or Syndrome
Majeed syndrome
MedGen UID:
351273
Concept ID:
C1864997
Disease or Syndrome
Majeed syndrome (MJDS) is an autosomal recessive pediatric multisystem autoinflammatory disorder characterized by chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) and congenital dyserythropoietic anemia; some patients may also develop neutrophilic dermatosis. Additional features may include fever, failure to thrive, and neutropenia. Laboratory studies show elevated inflammatory markers consistent with activation of the proinflammatory IL1 (147760) pathway (summary by Ferguson and El-Shanti, 2021). Genetic Heterogeneity of Chronic Recurrent Multifocal Osteomyelitis See also CRMO2 (612852), caused by mutation in the IL1RN gene (147679) on chromosome 2q14; and CRMO3 (259680), caused by mutation in the IL1R1 gene (147810) on chromosome 2q12.
Mevalonic aciduria
MedGen UID:
368373
Concept ID:
C1959626
Disease or Syndrome
Mevalonic aciduria (MEVA), the first recognized defect in the biosynthesis of cholesterol and isoprenoids, is a consequence of a deficiency of mevalonate kinase (ATP:mevalonate 5-phosphotransferase; EC 2.7.1.36). Mevalonic acid accumulates because of failure of conversion to 5-phosphomevalonic acid, which is catalyzed by mevalonate kinase. Mevalonic acid is synthesized from 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA, a reaction catalyzed by HMG-CoA reductase (142910). Mevalonic aciduria is characterized by dysmorphology, psychomotor retardation, progressive cerebellar ataxia, and recurrent febrile crises, usually manifesting in early infancy, accompanied by hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, arthralgia, and skin rash. The febrile crises are similar to those observed in hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and to periodic fever syndrome (HIDS; 260920), which is also caused by mutation in the MVK gene (summary by Prietsch et al., 2003).
Stickler syndrome type 1
MedGen UID:
810955
Concept ID:
C2020284
Disease or Syndrome
Stickler syndrome is a connective tissue disorder that can include ocular findings of myopia, cataract, and retinal detachment; hearing loss that is both conductive and sensorineural; midfacial underdevelopment and cleft palate (either alone or as part of the Robin sequence); and mild spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and/or precocious arthritis. Variable phenotypic expression of Stickler syndrome occurs both within and among families; interfamilial variability is in part explained by locus and allelic heterogeneity.
Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
435869
Concept ID:
C2673198
Disease or Syndrome
Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome-2 (FCAS2) is an autosomal dominant autoinflammatory disorder characterized by episodic and recurrent rash, urticaria, arthralgia, myalgia, and headache. In most patients, these episodes are accompanied by fever and serologic evidence of inflammation. Most, but not all, patients report exposure to cold as a trigger for the episodes. Additional features may include abdominal pain, thoracic pain, and sensorineural deafness. The age at onset is variable, ranging from the first year of life to middle age, and the severity and clinical manifestations are heterogeneous (summary by Shen et al., 2017). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome, see FCAS1 (120100).
Multicentric carpo-tarsal osteolysis with or without nephropathy
MedGen UID:
436237
Concept ID:
C2674705
Disease or Syndrome
Multicentric carpotarsal osteolysis syndrome is a rare skeletal disorder, usually presenting in early childhood with a clinical picture mimicking juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Progressive destruction of the carpal and tarsal bone usually occurs and other bones may also be involved. Chronic renal failure is a frequent component of the syndrome. Mental retardation and minor facial anomalies have been noted in some patients. Autosomal dominant inheritance has been documented in many families (Pai and Macpherson, 1988). See also Torg-Winchester syndrome (259600), an autosomal recessive multicentric osteolysis syndrome.
Osteoarthritis susceptibility 3
MedGen UID:
382650
Concept ID:
C2675609
Finding
Any osteoarthritis in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the ASPN gene.
Epiphyseal dysplasia, multiple, 6
MedGen UID:
436517
Concept ID:
C2675767
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) presents in early childhood, usually with pain in the hips and/or knees after exercise. Affected children complain of fatigue with long-distance walking. Waddling gait may be present. Adult height is either in the lower range of normal or mildly shortened. The limbs are relatively short in comparison to the trunk. Pain and joint deformity progress, resulting in early-onset osteoarthritis, particularly of the large weight-bearing joints.
Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome
MedGen UID:
411197
Concept ID:
C2745948
Disease or Syndrome
Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome (HFS) is characterized by hyaline deposits in the papillary dermis and other tissues. It can present at birth or in infancy with severe pain with movement, progressive joint contractures, and often with severe motor disability, thickened skin, and hyperpigmented macules/patches over bony prominences of the joints. Gingival hypertrophy, skin nodules, pearly papules of the face and neck, and perianal masses are common. Complications of protein-losing enteropathy and failure to thrive can be life threatening. Cognitive development is normal. Many children with the severe form (previously called infantile systemic hyalinosis) have a significant risk of morbidity or mortality in early childhood; some with a milder phenotype (previously called juvenile hyaline fibromatosis) survive into adulthood.
Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita
MedGen UID:
412530
Concept ID:
C2745959
Congenital Abnormality
Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC) is an autosomal dominant chondrodysplasia characterized by disproportionate short stature (short trunk), abnormal epiphyses, and flattened vertebral bodies. Skeletal features are manifested at birth and evolve with time. Other features include myopia and/or retinal degeneration with retinal detachment and cleft palate (summary by Anderson et al., 1990).
Sterile multifocal osteomyelitis with periostitis and pustulosis
MedGen UID:
411230
Concept ID:
C2748507
Disease or Syndrome
Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis-2 with periostitis and pustulosis (CRMO2) is an autosomal recessive multisystemic autoinflammatory disorder characterized by onset of symptoms in early infancy. Affected individuals present with joint swelling and pain, pustular rash, oral mucosal lesions, and fetal distress. The disorder progresses in severity to generalized severe pustulosis or ichthyosiform lesions and diffuse bone lesions. Radiographic studies show widening of the anterior rib ends, periosteal elevation along multiple long bones, multifocal osteolytic lesions, heterotopic ossification, and metaphyseal erosions of the long bones. Laboratory studies show elevation of inflammatory markers. The disorder results from unopposed activation of the IL1 inflammatory signaling pathway. Treatment with the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist anakinra may result in clinical improvement (Aksentijevich et al., 2009). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CRMO, see 609628.
Sitosterolemia 1
MedGen UID:
440869
Concept ID:
C2749759
Disease or Syndrome
Sitosterolemia is characterized by: Hypercholesterolemia (especially in children) which (1) shows an unexpected significant lowering of plasma cholesterol level in response to low-fat diet modification or to bile acid sequestrant therapy; or (2) does not respond to statin therapy; Tendon xanthomas or tuberous (i.e., planar) xanthomas that can occur in childhood and in unusual locations (heels, knees, elbows, and buttocks); Premature atherosclerosis, which can lead to angina, aortic valve involvement, myocardial infarction, and sudden death; Hemolytic anemia, abnormally shaped erythrocytes (stomatocytes), and large platelets (macrothrombocytopenia). On occasion, the abnormal hematologic findings may be the initial presentation or the only clinical feature of this disorder. Arthritis, arthralgias, and splenomegaly may sometimes be seen and one study has concluded that "idiopathic" liver disease could be undiagnosed sitosterolemia. The clinical spectrum of sitosterolemia is probably not fully appreciated due to underdiagnosis and the fact that the phenotype in infants is likely to be highly dependent on diet.
Complement component C1r/C1s deficiency
MedGen UID:
461624
Concept ID:
C3150274
Disease or Syndrome
Lack of production of either functional C1r or C1s protein, due to a genetic defect. Approximately 60% of patients with a C1r/C1s deficiency will develop a severe systemic lupus erythematosus at an early age. Patients also present with frequent sinopulmonary infections often with Streptococcus pneumoniae.
Immunodeficiency, common variable, 6
MedGen UID:
462091
Concept ID:
C3150741
Disease or Syndrome
Any common variable immunodeficiency in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the CD81 gene.
IgA nephropathy, susceptibility to, 2
MedGen UID:
462728
Concept ID:
C3151378
Finding
IgA nephropathy, susceptibility to, 1
MedGen UID:
463619
Concept ID:
C3160719
Finding
Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda, X-linked
MedGen UID:
762085
Concept ID:
C3541456
Congenital Abnormality
X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda is a condition that impairs bone growth and occurs almost exclusively in males. The name of the condition indicates that it affects the bones of the spine (spondylo-) and the ends of long bones (epiphyses) in the arms and legs. "Tarda" indicates that signs and symptoms of this condition are not present at birth, but appear later in childhood, typically between ages 6 and 10.\n\nMales with X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda have skeletal abnormalities and short stature. Affected boys grow steadily until late childhood, when their growth slows. Their adult height ranges from 4 feet 6 inches (137 cm) to 5 feet 4 inches (163 cm). Impaired growth of the spinal bones (vertebrae) primarily causes the short stature. Spinal abnormalities include flattened vertebrae (platyspondyly) with hump-shaped bulges, progressive thinning of the discs between vertebrae, and an abnormal curvature of the spine (scoliosis or kyphosis). These spinal problems also cause back pain in people with this condition. Individuals with X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda have a short torso and neck, and their arms are disproportionately long compared to their height.\n\nOther skeletal features of X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda include an abnormality of the hip joint that causes the upper leg bones to turn inward (coxa vara); multiple abnormalities of the epiphyses, including a short upper end of the thigh bone (femoral neck); and a broad, barrel-shaped chest. A painful joint condition called osteoarthritis that typically occurs in older adults often develops in early adulthood in people with X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda and worsens over time, most often affecting the hips, knees, and shoulders.
Autoinflammation-PLCG2-associated antibody deficiency-immune dysregulation
MedGen UID:
766875
Concept ID:
C3553961
Disease or Syndrome
Autoinflammation, antibody deficiency, and immune dysregulation (APLAID) is an autosomal dominant systemic disorder characterized by recurrent blistering skin lesions with a dense inflammatory infiltrate and variable involvement of other tissues, including joints, the eye, and the gastrointestinal tract. Affected individuals have a mild humoral immune deficiency associated with recurrent sinopulmonary infections, but no evidence of circulating autoantibodies (summary by Zhou et al., 2012).
Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria 2
MedGen UID:
815699
Concept ID:
C3809369
Disease or Syndrome
Any paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the PIGT gene.
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, musculocontractural type 2
MedGen UID:
816175
Concept ID:
C3809845
Disease or Syndrome
The musculocontractural type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is characterized by progressive multisystem fragility-related manifestations, including joint dislocations and deformities; skin hyperextensibility, bruisability, and fragility, with recurrent large subcutaneous hematomas; cardiac valvular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and ophthalmologic complications; and myopathy, featuring muscle hypoplasia, muscle weakness, and an abnormal muscle fiber pattern in histology in adulthood, resulting in gross motor developmental delay (summary by Muller et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of the musculocontractural type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, see EDSMC1 (601776).
Vasculitis due to ADA2 deficiency
MedGen UID:
854497
Concept ID:
C3887654
Disease or Syndrome
Adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency (DADA2) is a complex systemic autoinflammatory disorder in which vasculopathy/vasculitis, dysregulated immune function, and/or hematologic abnormalities may predominate. Inflammatory features include intermittent fevers, rash (often livedo racemosa/reticularis), and musculoskeletal involvement (myalgia/arthralgia, arthritis, myositis). Vasculitis, which usually begins before age ten years, may manifest as early-onset ischemic (lacunar) and/or hemorrhagic strokes, or as cutaneous or systemic polyarteritis nodosa. Hypertension and hepatosplenomegaly are often found. More severe involvement may lead to progressive central neurologic deficits (dysarthria, ataxia, cranial nerve palsies, cognitive impairment) or to ischemic injury to the kidney, intestine, and/or digits. Dysregulation of immune function can lead to immunodeficiency or autoimmunity of varying severity; lymphadenopathy may be present and some affected individuals have had lymphoproliferative disease. Hematologic disorders may begin early in life or in late adulthood, and can include lymphopenia, neutropenia, pure red cell aplasia, thrombocytopenia, or pancytopenia. Of note, both interfamilial and intrafamilial phenotypic variability (e.g., in age of onset, frequency and severity of manifestations) can be observed; also, individuals with biallelic ADA2 pathogenic variants may remain asymptomatic until adulthood or may never develop clinical manifestations of DADA2.
X-linked acrogigantism due to Xq26 microduplication
MedGen UID:
856021
Concept ID:
C3891556
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked acrogigantism is the occurrence of pituitary gigantism in an individual heterozygous or hemizygous for a germline or somatic duplication of GPR101. X-linked acrogigantism is characterized by acceleration of linear growth in early childhood – in most cases during the first two years of life – due to growth hormone (GH) excess. Most individuals with X-linked acrogigantism present with associated hyperprolactinemia due to a mixed GH- and prolactin-secreting pituitary adenoma with or without associated hyperplasia; less commonly they develop diffuse hyperplasia of the GH- and prolactin-secreting pituitary cells without a pituitary adenoma. Most affected individuals are females. Growth acceleration is the main presenting feature; other frequently observed clinical features include enlargement of hands and feet, coarsening of the facial features, and increased appetite. Neurologic signs or symptoms are rarely present. Untreated X-linked acrogigantism can lead to markedly increased stature, with obvious severe physical and psychological sequelae.
STING-associated vasculopathy with onset in infancy
MedGen UID:
863159
Concept ID:
C4014722
Disease or Syndrome
STING-associated vasculopathy with onset in infancy is an autoinflammatory vasculopathy causing severe skin lesions, particularly affecting the face, ears, nose, and digits, and resulting in ulceration, eschar formation, necrosis, and, in some cases, amputation. Many patients have interstitial lung disease. Tissue biopsy and laboratory findings show a hyperinflammatory state, with evidence of increased beta-interferon (IFNB1; 147640) signaling (summary by Liu et al., 2014).
Periodic fever-infantile enterocolitis-autoinflammatory syndrome
MedGen UID:
863504
Concept ID:
C4015067
Disease or Syndrome
Autoinflammation with infantile enterocolitis is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by onset of recurrent flares of autoinflammation in early infancy. Affected individuals tend to have poor overall growth and gastrointestinal symptoms in infancy associated with laboratory evidence of activated inflammation. This initial presentation is followed by recurrent febrile episodes with splenomegaly and sometimes hematologic disturbances, arthralgias, or myalgias. The disorder results from overactivation of an arm of the immune response system (Romberg et al., 2014; Canna et al., 2014).
Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
863713
Concept ID:
C4015276
Disease or Syndrome
A rare hereditary periodic fever syndrome with characteristics of infantile or childhood onset of episodes of fever and cold-induced urticaria-like rash and arthralgia. Ocular features such as conjunctivitis and uveitis may also be present. Presentation is typically mild and symptoms resolve without treatment in most cases.
Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, Stanescu type
MedGen UID:
905084
Concept ID:
C4225273
Disease or Syndrome
Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia with accumulation of glycoprotein in chondrocytes has been designated the 'Stanescu type.' Clinical hallmarks include progressive joint contracture with premature degenerative joint disease, particularly in the knee, hip, and finger joints. Interphalangeal joints of the hands are swollen due to osseous distention of the metaphyseal ends of the phalanges. Affected individuals may be relatively tall despite the presence of a short trunk. Radiologically, there is generalized platyspondyly with mild modification of the endplates, hypoplastic pelvis, epiphyseal flattening with metaphyseal splaying of the long bones, and enlarged phalangeal epimetaphyses of the hands. In addition, the proximal femora are characteristically broad and elongated with striking coxa valga (summary by Nishimura et al., 1998).
Infantile-onset periodic fever-panniculitis-dermatosis syndrome
MedGen UID:
934581
Concept ID:
C4310614
Disease or Syndrome
Autoinflammation, panniculitis, and dermatosis syndrome (AIPDS) is an autosomal recessive autoinflammatory disease characterized by neonatal onset of recurrent fever, erythematous rash with painful nodules, painful joints, and lipodystrophy. Additional features may include diarrhea, increased serum C-reactive protein (CRP), leukocytosis, and neutrophilia in the absence of any infection. Patients exhibit no overt primary immunodeficiency (Damgaard et al., 2016 and Zhou et al., 2016).
Yao syndrome
MedGen UID:
934587
Concept ID:
C4310620
Disease or Syndrome
Yao syndrome (YAOS) is an autoinflammatory disease characterized by periodic fever, dermatitis, arthritis, and swelling of the distal extremities, as well as gastrointestinal and sicca-like symptoms. The disorder is associated with specific NOD2 variants (and Shen, 2017).
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, periodontal type 2
MedGen UID:
934648
Concept ID:
C4310681
Disease or Syndrome
Periodontal Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (pEDS) is characterized by distinct oral manifestations. Periodontal tissue breakdown beginning in the teens results in premature loss of teeth. Lack of attached gingiva and thin and fragile gums lead to gingival recession. Connective tissue abnormalities of pEDS typically include easy bruising, pretibial plaques, distal joint hypermobility, hoarse voice, and less commonly manifestations such as organ or vessel rupture. Since the first descriptions of pEDS in the 1970s, 148 individuals have been reported in the literature; however, future in-depth descriptions of non-oral manifestations in newly diagnosed individuals with a molecularly confirmed diagnosis of pEDS will be important to further define the clinical features.
Hearing loss, autosomal dominant 34, with or without inflammation
MedGen UID:
1626346
Concept ID:
C4521680
Disease or Syndrome
DFNA34 is an autosomal dominant form of postlingual, slowly progressive sensorineural hearing loss with variable severity and variable additional features. Some patients have pure hearing loss without significant additional features, whereas some patients have features of an autoinflammatory disorder with systemic manifestations, including periodic fevers, arthralgias, and episodic urticaria. The disorder results from abnormally increased activation of the inflammatory pathway, and treatment with an IL1 receptor antagonist (see 147679) may be effective if started early (summary by Nakanishi et al., 2017).
Sclerosteosis 1
MedGen UID:
1642815
Concept ID:
C4551483
Disease or Syndrome
SOST-related sclerosing bone dysplasias include sclerosteosis and van Buchem disease, both disorders of progressive bone overgrowth due to increased bone formation. The major clinical features of sclerosteosis are progressive skeletal overgrowth, most pronounced in the skull and mandible, and variable syndactyly, usually of the second (index) and third (middle) fingers. Affected individuals appear normal at birth except for syndactyly. Facial distortion due to bossing of the forehead and mandibular overgrowth is seen in nearly all individuals and becomes apparent in early childhood with progression into adulthood. Hyperostosis of the skull results in narrowing of the foramina, causing entrapment of the seventh cranial nerve (leading to facial palsy) with other, less common nerve entrapment syndromes including visual loss (2nd cranial nerve), neuralgia or anosmia (5th cranial nerve), and sensory hearing loss (8th cranial nerve). In sclerosteosis, hyperostosis of the calvarium reduces intracranial volume, increasing the risk for potentially lethal elevation of intracranial pressure. Survival of individuals with sclerosteosis into old age is unusual, but not unprecedented. The manifestations of van Buchem disease are generally milder than sclerosteosis and syndactyly is absent; life span appears to be normal.
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, periodontal type 1
MedGen UID:
1642148
Concept ID:
C4551499
Disease or Syndrome
Periodontal Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (pEDS) is characterized by distinct oral manifestations. Periodontal tissue breakdown beginning in the teens results in premature loss of teeth. Lack of attached gingiva and thin and fragile gums lead to gingival recession. Connective tissue abnormalities of pEDS typically include easy bruising, pretibial plaques, distal joint hypermobility, hoarse voice, and less commonly manifestations such as organ or vessel rupture. Since the first descriptions of pEDS in the 1970s, 148 individuals have been reported in the literature; however, future in-depth descriptions of non-oral manifestations in newly diagnosed individuals with a molecularly confirmed diagnosis of pEDS will be important to further define the clinical features.
Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, primary, autosomal recessive, 1
MedGen UID:
1641972
Concept ID:
C4551679
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy-1 (PHOAR1) is a rare familial disorder characterized by digital clubbing, osteoarthropathy, and acroosteolysis, with variable features of pachydermia, delayed closure of the fontanels, and congenital heart disease (summary by Uppal et al., 2008; Radhakrishnan et al., 2020). Secondary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, or pulmonary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, is a different disorder characterized by digital clubbing secondary to acquired diseases, most commonly intrathoracic neoplasm (Uppal et al., 2008). Touraine et al. (1935) recognized pachydermoperiostosis as a familial disorder with 3 clinical presentations or forms: a complete form characterized by periostosis and pachydermia; an incomplete form with bone changes but without pachydermia; and a 'forme fruste' with pachydermia and minimal skeletal changes. Genetic Heterogeneity PHOAR2 (614441) is caused by mutation in the SLCO2A1 gene (601460) on chromosome 3q22. Families with an autosomal dominant form of primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy have also been reported (PHOAD; 167100).
Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1647324
Concept ID:
C4551895
Disease or Syndrome
Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) are a group of conditions that have overlapping signs and symptoms and the same genetic cause. The group includes three conditions known as familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome type 1 (FCAS1), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disorder (NOMID). These conditions were once thought to be distinct disorders but are now considered to be part of the same condition spectrum. FCAS1 is the least severe form of CAPS, MWS is intermediate in severity, and NOMID is the most severe form.\n\nThe signs and symptoms of CAPS affect multiple body systems. Generally, CAPS are characterized by periodic episodes of skin rash, fever, and joint pain. These episodes can be triggered by exposure to cold temperatures, fatigue, other stressors, or they may arise spontaneously. Episodes can last from a few hours to several days. These episodes typically begin in infancy or early childhood and persist throughout life.\n\nWhile the CAPS spectrum shares similar signs and symptoms, the individual conditions tend to have distinct patterns of features. People with FCAS1 are particularly sensitive to the cold, and exposure to cold temperatures can trigger a painful or burning rash. The rash usually affects the torso and limbs but may spread to the rest of the body. In addition to fever and joint pain, other possible symptoms include muscle aches, chills, drowsiness, eye redness, headache, and nausea.\n\nIn people with NOMID, the signs and symptoms of the condition are usually present from birth and persists throughout life. In addition to skin rash and fever, affected individuals may have joint inflammation, swelling, and joint deformities called contractures that may restrict movement. People with NOMID typically have headaches, seizures, and cognitive impairment resulting from chronic meningitis, which is inflammation of the tissue that covers and protects the brain and spinal cord (meninges). Other features of NOMID include eye problems, short stature, distinctive facial features, and kidney damage caused by amyloidosis.\n\nIndividuals with MWS develop the typical periodic episodes of skin rash, fever, and joint pain after cold exposure, although episodes may occur spontaneously or all the time. Additionally, they can develop progressive hearing loss in their teenage years. Other features of MWS include skin lesions or kidney damage from abnormal deposits of a protein called amyloid (amyloidosis).
Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, di rocco type
MedGen UID:
1646454
Concept ID:
C4693799
Disease or Syndrome
Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia of the Di Rocco type (SEMDDR) is characterized by short stature, joint pain, and genu varum, as well as SEMD involving primarily the hips but also affecting the wrists, hands, knees, and ankles. Patients also exhibit variable degrees of metaphyseal and spine involvement (Di Rocco et al., 2018).
Proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1648310
Concept ID:
C4746851
Disease or Syndrome
This autosomal recessive systemic autoinflammatory disorder is characterized by early childhood onset of annular erythematous plaques on the face and extremities with subsequent development of partial lipodystrophy and laboratory evidence of immune dysregulation. More variable features include recurrent fever, severe joint contractures, muscle weakness and atrophy, hepatosplenomegaly, basal ganglia calcifications, and microcytic anemia (summary by Agarwal et al., 2010; Kitamura et al., 2011; Arima et al., 2011). This disorder encompasses Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome (NKJO); joint contractures, muscular atrophy, microcytic anemia, and panniculitis-induced lipodystrophy (JMP syndrome); and chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature syndrome (CANDLE). Among Japanese patients, this disorder is best described as Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome, since both Nakajo (1939) and Nishimura et al. (1950) contributed to the original phenotypic descriptions. Genetic Heterogeneity of Proteasome-Associated Autoinflammatory Syndrome See also PRAAS2 (618048), caused by mutation in the POMP gene (613386) on chromosome 13q12; PRAAS3 (617591), caused by mutation in the PSMB4 gene (602177) on chromosome 1q21; PRAAS4 (619183), caused by mutation in the PSMG2 gene (609702) on chromosome 18p11; and PRAAS5 (619175), caused by mutation in the PSMB10 gene (176847) on chromosome 16q22.
Proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
1648456
Concept ID:
C4747850
Disease or Syndrome
Proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome-3 is an autosomal recessive syndrome with onset in early infancy. Affected individuals present with nodular dermatitis, recurrent fever, myositis, panniculitis-induced lipodystrophy, lymphadenopathy, and dysregulation of the immune response, particularly associated with abnormal type I interferon-induced gene expression patterns. Additional features are highly variable, but may include joint contractures, hepatosplenomegaly, anemia, thrombocytopenia, recurrent infections, autoantibodies, and hypergammaglobulinemia. Some patients may have intracranial calcifications (summary by Brehm et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PRAAS, see PRAAS1 (256040).
Proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
1648482
Concept ID:
C4747989
Disease or Syndrome
Proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome-2 (PRAAS2) is an autosomal dominant disorder with onset in early infancy. Affected individuals develop severe inflammatory neutrophilic dermatitis, autoimmunity, and variable immunodeficiency (summary by Poli et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PRAAS, see PRAAS1 (256040).
Osteochondrodysplasia, brachydactyly, and overlapping malformed digits
MedGen UID:
1648332
Concept ID:
C4748496
Disease or Syndrome
Osteochondrodysplasia, brachydactyly, and overlapping malformed digits (OCBMD) is characterized by bilateral symmetric skeletal defects that primarily affect the limbs. Affected individuals have mild short stature due to shortening of the lower leg bones, as well as hand and foot malformations, predominantly brachydactyly and overlapping digits. Other skeletal defects include scoliosis, dislocated patellae and fibulae, and pectus excavatum (Shabbir et al., 2018).
Polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy 2
MedGen UID:
1648374
Concept ID:
C4748657
Disease or Syndrome
Polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy-2 (PLOSL2), or Nasu-Hakola disease, is a recessively inherited presenile frontal dementia with leukoencephalopathy and basal ganglia calcification. In most cases the disorder first manifests in early adulthood as pain and swelling in ankles and feet, followed by bone fractures. Neurologic symptoms manifest in the fourth decade of life as a frontal lobe syndrome with loss of judgment, euphoria, and disinhibition. Progressive decline in other cognitive domains begins to develop at about the same time. The disorder culminates in a profound dementia and death by age 50 years (summary by Klunemann et al., 2005). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy, see 221770.
Autoimmune interstitial lung disease-arthritis syndrome
MedGen UID:
1800821
Concept ID:
C5243948
Disease or Syndrome
Autoimmune interstitial lung, joint, and kidney disease is an autosomal dominant systemic autoimmune disorder characterized by interstitial lung disease, inflammatory arthritis, and immune complex-mediated renal disease. Laboratory studies show high-titer autoantibodies. Symptoms appear in the first 2 decades of life, but there is incomplete penetrance (summary by Watkin et al., 2015).
Rhizomelic limb shortening with dysmorphic features
MedGen UID:
1720321
Concept ID:
C5394173
Disease or Syndrome
Rhizomelic limb shortening with dysmorphic features (RLSDF) is characterized by rhizomelic shortening of the extremities, predominantly of the upper limbs, and variable dysmorphic features, including macrocephaly, prominent forehead, hypertelorism, depressed or broad nasal bridge, and micrognathia. Hearing loss has also been observed (Sajan et al., 2019; Pagnamenta et al., 2023).
VEXAS syndrome
MedGen UID:
1765785
Concept ID:
C5435753
Disease or Syndrome
VEXAS (vacuoles, E1 enzyme, X-linked, autoinflammatory, somatic syndrome) is an adult-onset inflammatory disease that primarily affects males and is caused by somatic, not germline, mutations. The disorder is characterized by adult onset of rheumatologic symptoms at a mean age of 64 years. Features include recurrent fevers, pulmonary and dermatologic inflammatory manifestations, vasculitis, deep vein thrombosis, arthralgias, and ear and nose chondritis. Laboratory studies indicate hematologic abnormalities, including macrocytic anemia, as well as increased levels of acute-phase reactants; about half of patients have positive autoantibodies. Bone marrow biopsy shows degenerative vacuolization restricted to myeloid and erythroid precursor cells, as well as variable hematopoietic dyspoiesis and dysplasias. The condition does not respond to rheumatologic medications and the features may result in premature death (summary by Beck et al., 2020).
Otospondylomegaepiphyseal dysplasia, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
1790497
Concept ID:
C5551484
Disease or Syndrome
Otospondylomegaepiphyseal dysplasia (OSMED) is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, enlarged epiphyses, disproportionate shortness of the limbs, abnormalities in vertebral bodies, and typical facial features (summary by Harel et al., 2005).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia and dysmorphic facies
MedGen UID:
1794184
Concept ID:
C5561974
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia and dysmorphic facies (NEDHYDF) is characterized by global developmental delay and hypotonia apparent from birth. Affected individuals have variably impaired intellectual development, often with speech delay and delayed walking. Seizures are generally not observed, although some patients may have single seizures or late-onset epilepsy. Most patients have prominent dysmorphic facial features. Additional features may include congenital cardiac defects (without arrhythmia), nonspecific renal anomalies, joint contractures or joint hyperextensibility, dry skin, and cryptorchidism. There is significant phenotypic variability in both the neurologic and extraneurologic manifestations (summary by Tan et al., 2022).
Loeys-Dietz syndrome 6
MedGen UID:
1794251
Concept ID:
C5562041
Disease or Syndrome
Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is characterized by vascular findings (cerebral, thoracic, and abdominal arterial aneurysms and/or dissections), skeletal manifestations (pectus excavatum or pectus carinatum, scoliosis, joint laxity, arachnodactyly, talipes equinovarus, cervical spine malformation and/or instability), craniofacial features (widely spaced eyes, strabismus, bifid uvula / cleft palate, and craniosynostosis that can involve any sutures), and cutaneous findings (velvety and translucent skin, easy bruising, and dystrophic scars). Individuals with LDS are predisposed to widespread and aggressive arterial aneurysms and pregnancy-related complications including uterine rupture and death. Individuals with LDS can show a strong predisposition for allergic/inflammatory disease including asthma, eczema, and reactions to food or environmental allergens. There is also an increased incidence of gastrointestinal inflammation including eosinophilic esophagitis and gastritis or inflammatory bowel disease. Wide variation in the distribution and severity of clinical features can be seen in individuals with LDS, even among affected individuals within a family who have the same pathogenic variant.
Microcephaly-congenital cataract-psoriasiform dermatitis syndrome
MedGen UID:
1798933
Concept ID:
C5567510
Disease or Syndrome
Microcephaly, congenital cataract, and psoriasiform dermatitis (MCCPD) represents an inborn error of cholesterol metabolism that is characterized by accumulation of a large amount of methylsterols, particularly dimethylsterols, in affected patients. The associated features of immune dysregulation, skin disease, and growth delay can be at least partially corrected with cholesterol and statin supplements (He et al., 2014).
Systemic lupus erythematosus 17
MedGen UID:
1804329
Concept ID:
C5676884
Disease or Syndrome
Systemic lupus erythematosus-17 (SLE17) is an X-linked dominant autoimmune disorder characterized by onset of systemic autoinflammatory symptoms in the first decades of life. Only affected females have been reported. Features may include classic features of SLE, such as malar rash and arthralgias, or can include less common entities such as hemiplegia and neuromyelitis optica (NMO). Laboratory studies show the presence of autoantibodies and enhanced NFKB (164011) signaling, the latter being consistent with a gain-of-function effect (Brown et al., 2022). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), see 152700.
Iron overload, susceptibility to
MedGen UID:
1814970
Concept ID:
C5703292
Finding
Iron overload (IO) is characterized by the onset of increased systemic iron levels apparent in mid-adulthood. Laboratory studies show increased serum ferritin, normal or high transferrin saturation, increased liver iron content, and inappropriately low or normal levels of hepcidin. Presence of a BMP6 mutation confers susceptibility to the disorder, but additional factors, including alcohol consumption, increased body weight, and possibly HFE gene (613609) variants, may contribute to the severity of the manifestations (Daher et al., 2016; Piubelli et al., 2017).
C1q deficiency 2
MedGen UID:
1841058
Concept ID:
C5830422
Disease or Syndrome
C1q deficiency (C1QD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by recurrent skin lesions, chronic infections, and an increased risk of autoimmune diseases, particularly systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; see 152700) or SLE-like diseases. It has also been associated with chronic glomerulonephritis and renal failure. C1q deficiency presents in 2 different forms, absent C1q protein or presence of a dysfunctional molecule (summary by Topaloglu et al., 1996 and Vassallo et al., 2007). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of C1q deficiency, see 613652.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Ferrillo M, Giudice A, Marotta N, Fortunato F, Di Venere D, Ammendolia A, Fiore P, de Sire A
Int J Mol Sci 2022 Oct 12;23(20) doi: 10.3390/ijms232012164. PMID: 36293017Free PMC Article
Efthimiou P, Kontzias A, Hur P, Rodha K, Ramakrishna GS, Nakasato P
Semin Arthritis Rheum 2021 Aug;51(4):858-874. Epub 2021 Jun 13 doi: 10.1016/j.semarthrit.2021.06.004. PMID: 34175791
Abramoff B, Caldera FE
Med Clin North Am 2020 Mar;104(2):293-311. Epub 2019 Dec 18 doi: 10.1016/j.mcna.2019.10.007. PMID: 32035570

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Petrovská N, Prajzlerová K, Vencovský J, Šenolt L, Filková M
Autoimmun Rev 2021 May;20(5):102797. Epub 2021 Mar 18 doi: 10.1016/j.autrev.2021.102797. PMID: 33746022
van der Woude D, van der Helm-van Mil AHM
Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol 2018 Apr;32(2):174-187. Epub 2018 Nov 16 doi: 10.1016/j.berh.2018.10.005. PMID: 30527425
Watt FE
Post Reprod Health 2018 Mar;24(1):34-43. Epub 2018 Feb 7 doi: 10.1177/2053369118757537. PMID: 29412042
Neogi T
Osteoarthritis Cartilage 2013 Sep;21(9):1145-53. doi: 10.1016/j.joca.2013.03.018. PMID: 23973124Free PMC Article
Sinusas K
Am Fam Physician 2012 Jan 1;85(1):49-56. PMID: 22230308

Diagnosis

Abramoff B, Caldera FE
Med Clin North Am 2020 Mar;104(2):293-311. Epub 2019 Dec 18 doi: 10.1016/j.mcna.2019.10.007. PMID: 32035570
Watt FE
Post Reprod Health 2018 Mar;24(1):34-43. Epub 2018 Feb 7 doi: 10.1177/2053369118757537. PMID: 29412042
Redmond JM, Chen AW, Domb BG
J Am Acad Orthop Surg 2016 Apr;24(4):231-40. doi: 10.5435/JAAOS-D-14-00406. PMID: 26990713
Rashbaum RF, Ohnmeiss DD, Lindley EM, Kitchel SH, Patel VV
Clin Spine Surg 2016 Mar;29(2):42-8. doi: 10.1097/BSD.0000000000000359. PMID: 26889985
Sinusas K
Am Fam Physician 2012 Jan 1;85(1):49-56. PMID: 22230308

Therapy

Nie T, Blair HA
CNS Drugs 2022 Oct;36(10):1133-1141. Epub 2022 Sep 7 doi: 10.1007/s40263-022-00949-7. PMID: 36070074Free PMC Article
Schönenberger KA, Schüpfer AC, Gloy VL, Hasler P, Stanga Z, Kaegi-Braun N, Reber E
Nutrients 2021 Nov 24;13(12) doi: 10.3390/nu13124221. PMID: 34959772Free PMC Article
Akbarialiabad H, Taghrir MH, Abdollahi A, Ghahramani N, Kumar M, Paydar S, Razani B, Mwangi J, Asadi-Pooya AA, Malekmakan L, Bastani B
Infection 2021 Dec;49(6):1163-1186. Epub 2021 Jul 28 doi: 10.1007/s15010-021-01666-x. PMID: 34319569Free PMC Article
García-Coronado JM, Martínez-Olvera L, Elizondo-Omaña RE, Acosta-Olivo CA, Vilchez-Cavazos F, Simental-Mendía LE, Simental-Mendía M
Int Orthop 2019 Mar;43(3):531-538. Epub 2018 Oct 27 doi: 10.1007/s00264-018-4211-5. PMID: 30368550
Alcalde GE, Fonseca AC, Bôscoa TF, Gonçalves MR, Bernardo GC, Pianna B, Carnavale BF, Gimenes C, Barrile SR, Arca EA
Trials 2017 Jul 11;18(1):317. doi: 10.1186/s13063-017-2061-x. PMID: 28697785Free PMC Article

Prognosis

Carfì A, Bernabei R, Landi F; Gemelli Against COVID-19 Post-Acute Care Study Group
JAMA 2020 Aug 11;324(6):603-605. doi: 10.1001/jama.2020.12603. PMID: 32644129Free PMC Article
Zheng R, Xie S, Lu X, Sun L, Zhou Y, Zhang Y, Wang K
Biomed Res Int 2018;2018:5712920. Epub 2018 Apr 22 doi: 10.1155/2018/5712920. PMID: 29850535Free PMC Article
Sharma SK, Jain S
Int J Rheum Dis 2018 Mar;21(3):584-601. Epub 2018 Feb 12 doi: 10.1111/1756-185X.13273. PMID: 29431292
Smith BE, Selfe J, Thacker D, Hendrick P, Bateman M, Moffatt F, Rathleff MS, Smith TO, Logan P
PLoS One 2018;13(1):e0190892. Epub 2018 Jan 11 doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0190892. PMID: 29324820Free PMC Article
Black AK
J Dermatol 2001 Nov;28(11):632-4. doi: 10.1111/j.1346-8138.2001.tb00050.x. PMID: 11770721

Clinical prediction guides

Bhagat M, Neelapala YVR, Gangavelli R
Physiother Res Int 2020 Jan;25(1):e1812. Epub 2019 Sep 10 doi: 10.1002/pri.1812. PMID: 31502354
Longo UG, Ciuffreda M, Candela V, Berton A, Maffulli N, Denaro V
Br Med Bull 2019 Sep 19;131(1):81-96. doi: 10.1093/bmb/ldz026. PMID: 31436810
Sit RWS, Chan KKW, Zou D, Chan DCC, Yip BHK, Zhang DD, Chan YH, Chung VCH, Reeves KD, Wong SYS
Ann Fam Med 2018 Nov;16(6):521-529. doi: 10.1370/afm.2320. PMID: 30420367Free PMC Article
Sharma SK, Jain S
Int J Rheum Dis 2018 Mar;21(3):584-601. Epub 2018 Feb 12 doi: 10.1111/1756-185X.13273. PMID: 29431292
Salaffi F, Stancati A, Silvestri CA, Ciapetti A, Grassi W
Eur J Pain 2004 Aug;8(4):283-91. doi: 10.1016/j.ejpain.2003.09.004. PMID: 15207508

Recent systematic reviews

Schönenberger KA, Schüpfer AC, Gloy VL, Hasler P, Stanga Z, Kaegi-Braun N, Reber E
Nutrients 2021 Nov 24;13(12) doi: 10.3390/nu13124221. PMID: 34959772Free PMC Article
Anaya JM, Rojas M, Salinas ML, Rodríguez Y, Roa G, Lozano M, Rodríguez-Jiménez M, Montoya N, Zapata E; Post-COVID study group, Monsalve DM, Acosta-Ampudia Y, Ramírez-Santana C
Autoimmun Rev 2021 Nov;20(11):102947. Epub 2021 Sep 10 doi: 10.1016/j.autrev.2021.102947. PMID: 34509649Free PMC Article
Akbarialiabad H, Taghrir MH, Abdollahi A, Ghahramani N, Kumar M, Paydar S, Razani B, Mwangi J, Asadi-Pooya AA, Malekmakan L, Bastani B
Infection 2021 Dec;49(6):1163-1186. Epub 2021 Jul 28 doi: 10.1007/s15010-021-01666-x. PMID: 34319569Free PMC Article
Valesan LF, Da-Cas CD, Réus JC, Denardin ACS, Garanhani RR, Bonotto D, Januzzi E, de Souza BDM
Clin Oral Investig 2021 Feb;25(2):441-453. Epub 2021 Jan 6 doi: 10.1007/s00784-020-03710-w. PMID: 33409693
Smith BE, Selfe J, Thacker D, Hendrick P, Bateman M, Moffatt F, Rathleff MS, Smith TO, Logan P
PLoS One 2018;13(1):e0190892. Epub 2018 Jan 11 doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0190892. PMID: 29324820Free PMC Article

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