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Wide nose

MedGen UID:
140869
Concept ID:
C0426421
Finding
Synonyms: Broad nose; Increased nasal width
SNOMED CT: Wide nose (249321001)
 
HPO: HP:0000445

Definition

Interalar distance more than two standard deviations above the mean for age, i.e., an apparently increased width of the nasal base and alae. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

Conditions with this feature

Fucosidosis
MedGen UID:
5288
Concept ID:
C0016788
Disease or Syndrome
Fucosidosis is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease caused by defective alpha-L-fucosidase with accumulation of fucose in the tissues. Clinical features include angiokeratoma, progressive psychomotor retardation, neurologic signs, coarse facial features, and dysostosis multiplex. Fucosidosis has been classified into 2 major types. Type 1 is characterized by rapid psychomotor regression and severe neurologic deterioration beginning at about 6 months of age, elevated sweat sodium chloride, and death within the first decade of life. Type 2 is characterized by milder psychomotor retardation and neurologic signs, the development of angiokeratoma corporis diffusum, normal sweat salinity, and longer survival (Kousseff et al., 1976).
Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-I-S
MedGen UID:
6453
Concept ID:
C0026708
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a progressive multisystem disorder with features ranging over a continuum of severity. While affected individuals have traditionally been classified as having one of three MPS I syndromes (Hurler syndrome, Hurler-Scheie syndrome, or Scheie syndrome), no easily measurable biochemical differences have been identified and the clinical findings overlap. Affected individuals are best described as having either a phenotype consistent with either severe (Hurler syndrome) or attenuated MPS I, a distinction that influences therapeutic options. Severe MPS I. Infants appear normal at birth. Typical early manifestations are nonspecific (e.g., umbilical or inguinal hernia, frequent upper respiratory tract infections before age 1 year). Coarsening of the facial features may not become apparent until after age one year. Gibbus deformity of the lower spine is common and often noted within the first year. Progressive skeletal dysplasia (dysostosis multiplex) involving all bones is universal, as is progressive arthropathy involving most joints. By age three years, linear growth decreases. Intellectual disability is progressive and profound but may not be readily apparent in the first year of life. Progressive cardiorespiratory involvement, hearing loss, and corneal clouding are common. Without treatment, death (typically from cardiorespiratory failure) usually occurs within the first ten years of life. Attenuated MPS I. Clinical onset is usually between ages three and ten years. The severity and rate of disease progression range from serious life-threatening complications leading to death in the second to third decade, to a normal life span complicated by significant disability from progressive joint manifestations and cardiorespiratory disease. While some individuals have no neurologic involvement and psychomotor development may be normal in early childhood, learning disabilities and psychiatric manifestations can be present later in life. Hearing loss, cardiac valvular disease, respiratory involvement, and corneal clouding are common.
Agnathia-otocephaly complex
MedGen UID:
78541
Concept ID:
C0265242
Congenital Abnormality
Agnathia-otocephaly (AGOTC) is a rare condition characterized by mandibular hypoplasia or agnathia, ventromedial auricular malposition (melotia) and/or auricular fusion (synotia), and microstomia with oroglossal hypoplasia or aglossia. Holoprosencephaly is the most commonly identified association, but skeletal, genitourinary, and cardiovascular anomalies, and situs inversus have been reported. The disorder is almost always lethal (review by Faye-Petersen et al., 2006).
Coffin-Lowry syndrome
MedGen UID:
75556
Concept ID:
C0265252
Disease or Syndrome
Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS) is usually characterized by severe-to-profound intellectual disability in males; less severely impaired individuals have been reported. Neuropsychiatric concerns can include behavioral problems, loss of strength, progressive spasticity or paraplegia, sleep apnea, or stroke. Stimulus-induced drop attacks (SIDAs) in which unexpected tactile or auditory stimuli or excitement triggers a brief collapse but no loss of consciousness are present in approximately 20% of affected individuals. Typically SIDAs begin between mid-childhood and the teens. Characteristic facial features may be more apparent with age. Upper-extremity differences may be subtle and include short, soft, fleshy hands with tapered fingers as well as fleshy forearms. Progressive kyphoscoliosis is one of the most difficult aspects of long-term care. Affected females tend to have intellectual disability in the mild-to-moderate range and may also have the typical facial, hand, and skeletal findings noted in males.
Neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus
MedGen UID:
574999
Concept ID:
C0342394
Disease or Syndrome
Neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus is an autosomal dominant disorder of free water conservation characterized by childhood onset of polyuria and polydipsia. Affected individuals are apparently normal at birth, but characteristically develop symptoms of vasopressin deficiency during childhood (summary by Wahlstrom et al., 2004).
Mulibrey nanism syndrome
MedGen UID:
99347
Concept ID:
C0524582
Disease or Syndrome
Mulibrey nanism (MUL) is a rare autosomal recessive growth disorder with prenatal onset, including occasional progressive cardiomyopathy, characteristic facial features, failure of sexual maturation, insulin resistance with type 2 diabetes, and an increased risk for Wilms tumor (summary by Hamalainen et al., 2006).
Elsahy-Waters syndrome
MedGen UID:
923028
Concept ID:
C0809936
Disease or Syndrome
The core phenotype of Elsahy-Waters syndrome consists of brachycephaly, facial asymmetry, marked hypertelorism, proptosis, blepharochalasis, midface hypoplasia, broad nose with concave nasal ridge, and prognathism; radicular dentin dysplasia with consequent obliterated pulp chambers, apical translucent cysts, recurrent infections, and early loss of teeth; vertebral fusions, particularly at C2-C3; and moderate mental retardation. Skin wrinkling over the glabellar region seems common, and in males, hypospadias has always been present. Inter- and intrafamilial variability has been reported regarding the presence of vertebral fusions, hearing loss, and dentigerous cysts. Midface hypoplasia, facial asymmetry, progressive dental anomalies, and impaired cognitive development become more evident in adulthood (summary by Castori et al., 2010).
Hajdu-Cheney syndrome
MedGen UID:
182961
Concept ID:
C0917715
Disease or Syndrome
Hajdu-Cheney syndrome (HJCYS) is a rare autosomal dominant skeletal disorder characterized by short stature, coarse and dysmorphic facies, bowing of the long bones, and vertebral anomalies. Facial features include hypertelorism, bushy eyebrows, micrognathia, small mouth with dental anomalies, low-set ears, and short neck. There is progressive focal bone destruction, including acroosteolysis and generalized osteoporosis. Additional and variable features include hearing loss, renal cysts, and cardiovascular anomalies (summary by Ramos et al., 1998; Simpson et al., 2011; Isidor et al., 2011).
Barber-Say syndrome
MedGen UID:
230818
Concept ID:
C1319466
Disease or Syndrome
Barber-Say syndrome (BBRSAY) is a rare congenital condition characterized by severe hypertrichosis, especially of the back, skin abnormalities such as hyperlaxity and redundancy, and facial dysmorphism, including macrostomia, eyelid deformities, ocular telecanthus, abnormal and low-set ears, bulbous nasal tip with hypoplastic alae nasi, and low frontal hairline (summary by Roche et al., 2010).
Facial dysmorphism-lens dislocation-anterior segment abnormalities-spontaneous filtering blebs syndrome
MedGen UID:
330396
Concept ID:
C1832167
Disease or Syndrome
Traboulsi syndrome is characterized by dislocated crystalline lenses and anterior segment abnormalities in association with a distinctive facies involving flat cheeks and a beaked nose. Some affected individuals develop highly unusual nontraumatic conjunctival cysts (filtering blebs), presumably caused by abnormal thinning of the sclera (Patel et al., 2014).
Multiple synostoses syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
331348
Concept ID:
C1832708
Disease or Syndrome
Multiple synostoses syndrome-2 (SYNS2) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by progressive joint fusions of the fingers, wrists, ankles, and cervical spine; characteristic facies, including a broad hemicylindrical nose; and progressive conductive hearing loss (summary by Dawson et al., 2006). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of multiple synostoses syndrome, see SYNS1 (186500).
Hartsfield-Bixler-Demyer syndrome
MedGen UID:
335111
Concept ID:
C1845146
Congenital Abnormality
FGFR1-related Hartsfield syndrome comprises two core features: holoprosencephaly (HPE) spectrum disorder and ectrodactyly spectrum disorder. HPE spectrum disorder, resulting from failed or incomplete forebrain division early in gestation, includes alobar, semilobar, or lobar HPE. Other observed midline brain malformations include corpus callosum agenesis, absent septum pellucidum, absent olfactory bulbs and tracts, and vermian hypoplasia. Other findings associated with the HPE spectrum such as craniofacial dysmorphism, neurologic issues (developmental delay, spasticity, seizures, hypothalamic dysfunction), feeding problems, and endocrine issues (hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and central insipidus diabetes) are common. Ectrodactyly spectrum disorders are unilateral or bilateral malformations of the hands and/or feet characterized by a median cleft of hand or foot due to absence of the longitudinal central rays (also called split-hand/foot malformation). The number of digits on the right and left can vary. Polydactyly and syndactyly can also be seen.
Uruguay Faciocardiomusculoskeletal syndrome
MedGen UID:
335320
Concept ID:
C1846010
Disease or Syndrome
Uruguay faciocardiomusculoskeletal syndrome (FCMSU) is an X-linked disorder in which affected males have a distinctive facial appearance, muscular hypertrophy, and cardiac ventricular hypertrophy leading to premature death. Additional features include large, broad, and deformed hands and feet, congenital hip dislocation, and scoliosis (summary by Xue et al., 2016).
Cold-induced sweating syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
338577
Concept ID:
C1848947
Disease or Syndrome
Cold-induced sweating syndrome (CISS) and its infantile presentation, Crisponi syndrome(CS) is characterized by dysmorphic features (distinctive facies, lower facial weakness, flexion deformity at the elbows, camptodactyly with fisted hands, misshapen feet, and overriding toes); intermittent contracture of facial and oropharyngeal muscles when crying or being handled with puckering of lips and drooling of foamy saliva often associated with laryngospasm and respiratory distress; excessive startling and opisthotonus-like posturing with unexpected tactile or auditory stimuli; poor suck reflex and severely impaired swallowing; and a scaly erythematous rash. During the first decade of life, children with CISS/CS develop profuse sweating of the face, arms, and chest with ambient temperatures below 18º to 22º C, and with other stimuli including nervousness or ingestion of sweets. Affected individuals sweat very little in hot environments and may feel overheated. Progressive thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis occurs, requiring intervention in the second decade.
Mosaic variegated aneuploidy syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
338026
Concept ID:
C1850343
Disease or Syndrome
Mosaic variegated aneuploidy (MVA) syndrome is a rare disorder in which some cells in the body have an abnormal number of chromosomes instead of the usual 46 chromosomes, a situation known as aneuploidy. Most commonly, cells have an extra chromosome, which is called trisomy, or are missing a chromosome, which is known as monosomy. In MVA syndrome, some cells are aneuploid and others have the normal number of chromosomes, which is a phenomenon known as mosaicism. Typically, at least one-quarter of cells in affected individuals have an abnormal number of chromosomes. Because the additional or missing chromosomes vary among the abnormal cells, the aneuploidy is described as variegated.\n\nIn MVA syndrome, growth before birth is slow (intrauterine growth restriction). After birth, affected individuals continue to grow at a slow rate and are shorter than average. In addition, they typically have an unusually small head size (microcephaly). Another common feature of MVA syndrome is an increased risk of developing cancer in childhood. Cancers that occur most frequently in affected individuals include a cancer of muscle tissue called rhabdomyosarcoma, a form of kidney cancer known as Wilms tumor, and a cancer of the blood-forming tissue known as leukemia.\n\nLess commonly, people with MVA syndrome have eye abnormalities or distinctive facial features, such as a broad nasal bridge and low-set ears. Some affected individuals have brain abnormalities, the most common of which is called Dandy-Walker malformation. Intellectual disability, seizures, and other health problems can also occur in people with MVA syndrome.\n\nThere are at least three types of MVA syndrome, each with a different genetic cause. Type 1 is the most common and displays the classic signs and symptoms described above. Type 2 appears to have slightly different signs and symptoms than type 1, although the small number of affected individuals makes it difficult to define its characteristic features. Individuals with MVA syndrome type 2 grow slowly before and after birth; however, their head size is typically normal. Some people with MVA syndrome type 2 have unusually short arms. Individuals with MVA syndrome type 2 do not seem to have an increased risk of cancer. Another form of MVA syndrome is characterized by a high risk of developing Wilms tumor. Individuals with this form may also have other signs and symptoms typical of MVA syndrome type 1.
Keipert syndrome
MedGen UID:
338088
Concept ID:
C1850627
Disease or Syndrome
Keipert syndrome (KPTS) is characterized by craniofacial and digital abnormalities and variable learning difficulties. The distinctive facial appearance includes broad forehead, hypertelorism, prominent nose, wide mouth, and prominent upper lip with cupid bow configuration. Digital anomalies are also distinctive, with widening of all distal phalanges, particularly of the thumbs and great toes (Amor et al., 2019).
Genitopatellar syndrome
MedGen UID:
381208
Concept ID:
C1853566
Disease or Syndrome
KAT6B disorders include genitopatellar syndrome (GPS) and Say-Barber-Biesecker-Young-Simpson variant of Ohdo syndrome (SBBYSS) which are part of a broad phenotypic spectrum with variable expressivity; individuals presenting with a phenotype intermediate between GPS and SBBYSS have been reported. Both phenotypes are characterized by some degree of global developmental delay / intellectual disability; hypotonia; genital abnormalities; and skeletal abnormalities including patellar hypoplasia/agenesis, flexion contractures of the knees and/or hips, and anomalies of the digits, spine, and/or ribs. Congenital heart defects, small bowel malrotation, feeding difficulties, slow growth, cleft palate, hearing loss, and dental anomalies have been observed in individuals with either phenotype.
MOGS-congenital disorder of glycosylation
MedGen UID:
342954
Concept ID:
C1853736
Disease or Syndrome
A form of congenital disorders of N-linked glycosylation characterized by generalized hypotonia, craniofacial dysmorphism (prominent occiput, short palpebral fissures, long eyelashes, broad nose, high arched palate, retrognathia), hypoplastic genitalia, seizures, feeding difficulties, hypoventilation, severe hypogammaglobulinemia with generalized edema and increased resistance to particular viral infections (particularly to enveloped viruses). The disease is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene MOGS (2p13.1).
Wiedemann-Steiner syndrome
MedGen UID:
340266
Concept ID:
C1854630
Disease or Syndrome
Wiedemann-Steiner syndrome (WSS) is characterized by developmental delay, intellectual disability, and characteristic facial features, with or without additional congenital anomalies. The facial features include thick eyebrows with lateral flare, vertically narrow and downslanted palpebral fissures, widely spaced eyes, long eyelashes, wide nasal bridge, broad nasal tip, thin vermilion of the upper lip, and thick scalp hair. About 60% of affected individuals have hypertrichosis cubiti ("hairy elbows"), which was once thought to be pathognomic for the syndrome, with a majority having hypertrichosis of other body parts. Other clinical features include feeding difficulties, prenatal and postnatal growth restriction, epilepsy, ophthalmologic anomalies, congenital heart defects, hand anomalies (such as brachydactyly and clinodactyly), hypotonia, vertebral anomalies (especially fusion anomalies of the cervical spine), renal and uterine anomalies, immune dysfunction, brain malformations, and dental anomalies.
Microcephaly-micromelia syndrome
MedGen UID:
381553
Concept ID:
C1855079
Disease or Syndrome
Microcephaly-micromelia syndrome (MIMIS) is a severe autosomal recessive disorder that usually results in death in utero or in the perinatal period. Affected individuals have severe growth retardation with microcephaly and variable malformations of the limbs, particularly the upper limbs. Defects include radial ray anomalies, malformed digits, and clubfeet (summary by Evrony et al., 2017).
Vici syndrome
MedGen UID:
340962
Concept ID:
C1855772
Disease or Syndrome
With the current widespread use of multigene panels and comprehensive genomic testing, it has become apparent that the phenotypic spectrum of EPG5-related disorder represents a continuum. At the most severe end of the spectrum is classic Vici syndrome (defined as a neurodevelopmental disorder with multisystem involvement characterized by the combination of agenesis of the corpus callosum, cataracts, hypopigmentation, cardiomyopathy, combined immunodeficiency, microcephaly, and failure to thrive); at the milder end of the spectrum are attenuated neurodevelopmental phenotypes with variable multisystem involvement. Median survival in classic Vici syndrome appears to be 24 months, with only 10% of children surviving longer than age five years; the most common causes of death are respiratory infections as a result of primary immunodeficiency and/or cardiac insufficiency resulting from progressive cardiac failure. No data are available on life span in individuals at the milder end of the spectrum.
Acrofrontofacionasal dysostosis type 2
MedGen UID:
383797
Concept ID:
C1855904
Disease or Syndrome
A very rare syndrome associating an acro-fronto-facio-nasal dysostosis with genitourinary anomalies. It has been described in three families. Craniofacial manifestations include wide anterior fontanelle, flat occiput, hypertelorism, ptosis, proptosis, broad nasal bridge and nasal tip, long philtrum and posteriorly rotated or low set ears. Hypospadias and shawl scrotum are present in all males. Acral manifestations include syndactyly of fingers, broad thumbs or halluces or preaxial polydactyly. The affected patients have no intellectual deficit. The condition seems to be hereditary, and transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait.
Brachymorphism-onychodysplasia-dysphalangism syndrome
MedGen UID:
350585
Concept ID:
C1862082
Disease or Syndrome
A very rare malformation syndrome with characteristics of short stature, hypoplastic fifth digits with tiny dysplastic nails, facial dysmorphism with coarse features including a wide mouth and broad nose, and mild intellectual disability. It has been suggested that Coffin-Siris syndrome and BOD syndrome are perhaps allelic variants.
Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, Genevieve type
MedGen UID:
355314
Concept ID:
C1864872
Disease or Syndrome
Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia of the Genevieve type (SEMDG) is characterized by infantile-onset severe developmental delay and skeletal dysplasia, including short stature, premature carpal ossification, platyspondyly, longitudinal metaphyseal striations, and small epiphyses (summary by van Karnebeek et al., 2016).
Pierpont syndrome
MedGen UID:
356049
Concept ID:
C1865644
Disease or Syndrome
Pierpont syndrome (PRPTS) is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome associated with learning disability. Key features include distinctive facial characteristics, especially when smiling, plantar fat pads, and other limb anomalies (summary by Burkitt Wright et al., 2011).
Syndactyly-telecanthus-anogenital and renal malformations syndrome
MedGen UID:
394424
Concept ID:
C2678045
Disease or Syndrome
Syndrome with the association of toe syndactyly, facial dysmorphism including telecanthus and a broad nasal tip, urogenital malformations and anal atresia. Around ten cases have been reported so far. The syndrome is caused by mutations in the FAM58A gene (located on the X chromosome) encoding a protein of unknown function.
Temple-Baraitser syndrome
MedGen UID:
395636
Concept ID:
C2678486
Disease or Syndrome
Temple-Baraitser syndrome is a rare developmental disorder characterized by severe mental retardation and anomalies of the first ray of the upper and lower limbs with absence/hypoplasia of the nails. Most patients also have seizures; various dysmorphic facial features have been reported (summary by Jacquinet et al., 2010).
Autosomal recessive spondylometaphyseal dysplasia, Megarbane type
MedGen UID:
413221
Concept ID:
C2750075
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spondylometaphyseal dysplasia, Mégarbané type is a rare, primary bone dysplasia characterized by intrauterine growth retardation, pre- and postnatal disproportionate short stature with short, rhizomelic limbs, facial dysmorphism, a short neck and small thorax. Hypotonia, cardiomegaly and global developmental delay have also been associated. Several radiographic findings have been reported, including ribs with cupped ends, platyspondyly, square iliac bones, horizontal and trident acetabula, hypoplastic ischia, and delayed epiphyseal ossification.
Zechi-Ceide syndrome
MedGen UID:
416693
Concept ID:
C2752047
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic multiple congenital anomalies/dysmorphic syndrome with characteristics of occipital atretic cephalocele associated with a specific facial dysmorphism (consisting of prominent forehead, narrow palpebral fissures, midface deficiency, narrow, malformed ears, broad nose and nasal root, grooved nasal tip and columella, laterally angulated, hypoplastic nares, short philtrum, thin upper lip, clift lip/palate, severe oligodontia, prominent chin) and large feet with sandal gap. Intellectual disability, developmental delay and hypoplastic finger and toenails have also been reported.
ALG12-congenital disorder of glycosylation
MedGen UID:
443954
Concept ID:
C2931001
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG), previously called carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndromes (CDGSs), are a group of hereditary multisystem disorders first recognized by Jaeken et al. (1980). The characteristic biochemical abnormality of CDGs is the hypoglycosylation of glycoproteins, which is routinely determined by isoelectric focusing (IEF) of serum transferrin. Type I CDG comprises those disorders in which there is a defect in the assembly of lipid-linked oligosaccharides or their transfer onto nascent glycoproteins, whereas type II CDG comprises defects of trimming, elongation, and processing of protein-bound glycans. CDG1G is a multisystem disorder characterized by impaired psychomotor development, dysmorphic features, failure to thrive, male genital hypoplasia, coagulation abnormalities, and immune deficiency. More variable features include skeletal dysplasia, cardiac anomalies, ocular abnormalities, and sensorineural hearing loss. Some patients die in the early neonatal or infantile period, whereas others are mildly affected and live to adulthood (summary by Tahata et al., 2019). For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065).
COG7 congenital disorder of glycosylation
MedGen UID:
419311
Concept ID:
C2931010
Disease or Syndrome
CDG IIe is caused by a mutation that impairs the integrity of the conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex and alters Golgi trafficking, resulting in the disruption of multiple glycosylation pathways. For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065).
Chromosome 2q37 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
419169
Concept ID:
C2931817
Disease or Syndrome
Patients with chromosome 2q37 deletion syndrome show highly variable clinical manifestations likely resulting from different deletion sizes and deletions of different genes. Variable clinical features included brachydactyly type E (BDE), affecting the metacarpals and metatarsals (in about 50% of patients), short stature, mild to moderate intellectual disability, behavioral abnormalities, and dysmorphic facial features. However, many individuals with deletions do not show cognitive deficits (summary by Villavicencio-Lorini et al., 2013, Wheeler et al., 2014, Jean-Marcais et al., 2015).
Antley-Bixler syndrome with genital anomalies and disordered steroidogenesis
MedGen UID:
461449
Concept ID:
C3150099
Disease or Syndrome
Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency (PORD) is a disorder of steroidogenesis with a broad phenotypic spectrum including cortisol deficiency, altered sex steroid synthesis, disorders of sex development (DSD), and skeletal malformations of the Antley-Bixler syndrome (ABS) phenotype. Cortisol deficiency is usually partial, with some baseline cortisol production but failure to mount an adequate cortisol response in stress. Mild mineralocorticoid excess can be present and causes arterial hypertension, usually presenting in young adulthood. Manifestations of altered sex steroid synthesis include ambiguous genitalia/DSD in both males and females, large ovarian cysts in females, poor masculinization and delayed puberty in males, and maternal virilization during pregnancy with an affected fetus. Skeletal malformations can manifest as craniosynostosis, mid-face retrusion with proptosis and choanal stenosis or atresia, low-set dysplastic ears with stenotic external auditory canals, hydrocephalus, radiohumeral synostosis, neonatal fractures, congenital bowing of the long bones, joint contractures, arachnodactyly, and clubfeet; other anomalies observed include urinary tract anomalies (renal pelvic dilatation, vesicoureteral reflux). Cognitive impairment is of minor concern and likely associated with the severity of malformations; studies of developmental outcomes are lacking.
Chromosome 16p13.3 duplication syndrome
MedGen UID:
462058
Concept ID:
C3150708
Disease or Syndrome
16p13.3 microduplication syndrome is a rare chromosomal anomaly syndrome resulting from a partial duplication of the short arm of chromosome 16 and manifesting with a variable phenotype which is mostly characterized by: mild to moderate intellectual deficit and developmental delay (particularly speech), normal growth, short, proximally implanted thumbs and other hand and feet malformations (such as camptodactyly, syndactyly, club feet), mild arthrogryposis and characteristic facies (upslanting, narrow palpebral fissures, hypertelorism, mid face hypoplasia, bulbous nasal tip and low set ears). Other reported manifestations include cryptorchidism, inguinal hernia and behavioral problems.
Moyamoya angiopathy-short stature-facial dysmorphism-hypergonadotropic hypogonadism syndrome
MedGen UID:
463207
Concept ID:
C3151857
Disease or Syndrome
This multisystem disorder is characterized by moyamoya disease, short stature, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, and facial dysmorphism. Other variable features include dilated cardiomyopathy, premature graying of the hair, and early-onset cataracts. Moyamoya disease is a progressive cerebrovascular disorder characterized by stenosis or occlusion of the internal carotid arteries and the main branches, leading to the development of small collateral vessels (moyamoya vessels) at the base of the brain. Affected individuals can develop acute neurologic events due to stroke-like episodes (summary by Miskinyte et al., 2011). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of moyamoya disease, see MYMY1 (252350).
Craniosynostosis and dental anomalies
MedGen UID:
481703
Concept ID:
C3280073
Disease or Syndrome
CRSDA is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by craniosynostosis, maxillary hypoplasia, and dental anomalies, including malocclusion, delayed and ectopic tooth eruption, and/or supernumerary teeth. Some patients also display minor digit anomalies, such as syndactyly and/or clinodactyly (summary by Nieminen et al., 2011).
Rafiq syndrome
MedGen UID:
481757
Concept ID:
C3280127
Disease or Syndrome
Rafiq syndrome (RAFQS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by variably impaired intellectual and motor development, a characteristic facial dysmorphism, truncal obesity, and hypotonia. The facial dysmorphism comprises prominent eyebrows with lateral thinning, downward-slanting palpebral fissures, bulbous tip of the nose, large ears, and a thin upper lip. Behavioral problems, including overeating, verbal and physical aggression, have been reported in some cases. Serum transferrin isoelectric focusing shows a type 2 pattern (summary by Balasubramanian et al., 2019).
Microcephaly-capillary malformation syndrome
MedGen UID:
481926
Concept ID:
C3280296
Disease or Syndrome
The defining clinical characteristics of the microcephaly-capillary malformation (MIC-CAP) syndrome are typically present at birth: microcephaly and generalized cutaneous capillary malformations (a few to hundreds of oval/circular macules or patches varying in size from 1-2 mm to several cm), hypoplastic distal phalanges of the hands and/or feet, early-onset intractable epilepsy, and profound developmental delay. Seizures, which can be focal, tonic, and complex partial and can include infantile spasms, appear to stabilize after age two years. Myoclonus of the limbs and eyelids is common; other abnormal movements (dyskinetic, choreiform) may be seen. To date, the diagnosis has been confirmed in 18 individuals from 15 families.
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 14
MedGen UID:
766161
Concept ID:
C3553247
Disease or Syndrome
Coffin-Siris syndrome is a congenital malformation syndrome characterized by developmental delay, intellectual disability, coarse facial features, feeding difficulties, and hypoplastic or absent fifth fingernails and fifth distal phalanges. Other more variable features may also occur. Patients with ARID1A mutations have a wide spectrum of manifestations, from severe intellectual disability and serious internal complications that could result in early death to mild intellectual disability (summary by Kosho et al., 2014). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Coffin-Siris syndrome, see CSS1 (135900). The chromosome 1p36.11 duplication syndrome, in which the ARID1A gene is duplicated, is characterized by impaired intellectual development, microcephaly, dysmorphic facial features, and hand and foot anomalies.
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 15
MedGen UID:
766162
Concept ID:
C3553248
Disease or Syndrome
Coffin-Siris syndrome is a congenital malformation syndrome characterized by developmental delay, intellectual disability, coarse facial features, feeding difficulties, and hypoplastic or absent fifth fingernails and fifth distal phalanges. Other more variable features may also occur. Patients with SMARCB1 mutations may have more severe neurodevelopmental deficits including severe intellectual disability, brain structural abnormalities, and no expressive words, as well as scoliosis (summary by Kosho et al., 2014). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Coffin-Siris syndrome, see CSS1 (135900).
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 16
MedGen UID:
766163
Concept ID:
C3553249
Disease or Syndrome
Coffin-Siris syndrome is a congenital malformation syndrome characterized by developmental delay, intellectual disability, coarse facial features, feeding difficulties, and hypoplastic or absent fifth fingernails and fifth distal phalanges. Other more variable features may also occur. Patients with SMARCA4 mutations may have less coarse craniofacial appearances and fewer behavioral abnormalities than Coffin-Siris patients with mutations in other genes (summary by Kosho et al., 2014). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Coffin-Siris syndrome, see CSS1 (135900).
Intellectual developmental disorder with autism and macrocephaly
MedGen UID:
767287
Concept ID:
C3554373
Disease or Syndrome
CHD8-related neurodevelopmental disorder with overgrowth (CHD8-NDD) is characterized by generalized overgrowth, developmental delay / intellectual disability (DD/ID), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), neuropsychiatric issues, neurologic problems, sleep disturbance, and gastrointestinal issues The most common findings are the development of macrocephaly (most often during infancy) and tall stature (most typically during puberty), which is often accompanied by ASD and/or DD/ID. Most, if not all, affected individuals have some degree of DD, most commonly speech and motor delays. When present, ID is most often in the mild-to-moderate range. Sleep disturbance is characterized by difficulty with both initiation (delayed sleep onset) and maintenance (frequent night awakenings) of sleep. The most common gastrointestinal issue is constipation with or without periods of diarrhea. Less common features are hypotonia (about 30% of affected individuals), seizures (10%-15%), dystonia (rare), and Chiari I malformation (rare).
Microcephalic primordial dwarfism, Alazami type
MedGen UID:
767353
Concept ID:
C3554439
Disease or Syndrome
Alazami syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe growth restriction present at birth, severely impaired intellectual development, and distinctive facial features. Some patients have been reported with skeletal and behavioral features (summary by Imbert-Bouteille et al., 2019).
Short ulna-dysmorphism-hypotonia-intellectual disability syndrome
MedGen UID:
767523
Concept ID:
C3554609
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Short ulna-dysmorphism-hypotonia-intellectual disability syndrome is a rare, genetic, multiple congenital anomalies/dysmorphic syndrome characterized by mild to severe global development delay, severe intellectual disability, mild hypotonia, a short ulna, hirsutism of the face and extremities, minimal scoliosis, and facial dysmorphism, notably a tall broad forehead, synophrys, hypertelorism, malar hypoplasia, broad nose with thick alae nasi, low-set, small ears, long philtrum, thin upper lip and everted lower lip vermilion.
Microcornea-myopic chorioretinal atrophy
MedGen UID:
815897
Concept ID:
C3809567
Disease or Syndrome
Microcornea-myopic chorioretinal atrophy-telecanthus syndrome is rare, genetic, developmental defect of the eye disease characterized by childhood onset of mild to severe myopia with microcornea and chorioretinal atrophy, typically associated with telecanthus and posteriorly rotated ears. Other variable features include early-onset cataracts, ectopia lentis, ecotpia pupilae and retinal detachment.
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 2E
MedGen UID:
862925
Concept ID:
C4014488
Disease or Syndrome
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 2E is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by profound mental retardation, progressive microcephaly, spasticity, and early-onset epilepsy (summary by Feinstein et al., 2014). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 2, see PCH2A (277470).
Microcephaly, short stature, and impaired glucose metabolism 1
MedGen UID:
863434
Concept ID:
C4014997
Disease or Syndrome
Microcephaly, short stature, and impaired glucose metabolism-1 (MSSGM1) is an autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by microcephaly associated with impaired intellectual development, short stature, and early-onset diabetes or abnormalities of glucose homeostasis (Igoillo-Esteve et al., 2013; Gillis et al., 2014). Genetic Heterogeneity of Microcephaly, Short Stature, and Impaired Glucose Metabolism MSSGM2 (616817) is caused by mutation in the PPP1R15B gene (613257) on chromosome 1q32. Also see Wolcott-Rallison syndrome (226980), which is characterized by multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, microcephaly, short stature, and early-onset diabetes mellitus and is caused by mutation in the EIF2AK3 gene (604032) on chromosome 2p11.
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 29
MedGen UID:
863578
Concept ID:
C4015141
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
SETBP1 haploinsufficiency disorder (SETBP1-HD) is characterized by hypotonia and mild motor developmental delay; intellectual abilities ranging from normal to severe disability; speech and language disorder; behavioral problems (most commonly attention/concentration deficits and hyperactivity, impulsivity), and refractive errors and strabismus. Typically children with SETBP1-HD whose intellect is in the normal or borderline range (IQ 80-90) were diagnosed following genetic testing for behavioral problems and/or severe speech and language disorders (respectively: the inability to produce sounds in words correctly, and deficits in the understanding and/or expression of words and sentences). To date, 47 individuals with SETBP1-HD have been reported.
Motor developmental delay due to 14q32.2 paternally expressed gene defect
MedGen UID:
863995
Concept ID:
C4015558
Disease or Syndrome
Temple syndrome is a short stature disorder of imprinting. The cardinal features are low birth weight, hypotonia and motor delay, feeding problems early in life, early puberty, and significantly reduced final height. Facial features include a broad forehead and short nose with a wide nasal tip, and the majority of patients have small hands and feet. However, many of the clinical features are nonspecific, making diagnosis difficult. In addition, isodisomy may uncover recessive disorders, which may influence the phenotype in maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 14 (UPD14mat) cases (summary by Ioannides et al., 2014).
Tenorio syndrome
MedGen UID:
864147
Concept ID:
C4015710
Disease or Syndrome
Tenorio syndrome (TNORS) is characterized by overgrowth, macrocephaly, and impaired intellectual development. Some patients may have mild hydrocephaly, hypoglycemia, and inflammatory diseases resembling Sjogren syndrome (270150) (summary by Tenorio et al., 2014).
PMP22-RAI1 contiguous gene duplication syndrome
MedGen UID:
894862
Concept ID:
C4225255
Disease or Syndrome
Yuan-Harel-Lupski syndrome is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay and early-onset peripheral neuropathy. The disorder comprises features of both demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A; 118220), which results from duplication of the PMP22 gene on 17p12, and Potocki-Lupski syndrome (PTLS; 610883), which results from duplication of a slightly proximal region on 17p11.2 that includes the RAI1 gene. These 2 loci are about 2.5 Mb apart. The resultant YUHAL phenotype may be more severe in comparison to the individual contributions of each gene, with particularly early onset of peripheral neuropathy and features of both central and peripheral nervous system involvement (summary by Yuan et al., 2015).
Mucopolysaccharidosis-plus syndrome
MedGen UID:
934594
Concept ID:
C4310627
Disease or Syndrome
MPSPS is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism resulting in a multisystem disorder with features of the mucopolysaccharidosis lysosomal storage diseases (see, e.g., 607016). Patients present in infancy or early childhood with respiratory difficulties, cardiac problems, anemia, dysostosis multiplex, renal involvement, coarse facies, and delayed psychomotor development. Most patients die of cardiorespiratory failure in the first years of life (summary by Kondo et al., 2017).
Coffin-Siris syndrome 5
MedGen UID:
934755
Concept ID:
C4310788
Disease or Syndrome
Coffin-Siris syndrome is a rare congenital disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, intellectual disability, coarse facial features, and hypoplasia of the distal phalanges, particularly the fifth digit. Other features may also be observed, including congenital heart defects, hypoplasia of the corpus callosum, and poor overall growth with short stature and microcephaly (summary by Wieczorek et al., 2013). Patients with SMARCE1 mutations have a wide spectrum of manifestations, including severe to moderate intellectual disability and heart defects (summary by Kosho et al., 2014). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Coffin-Siris syndrome, see CSS1 (135900).
SIN3A-related intellectual disability syndrome due to a point mutation
MedGen UID:
934771
Concept ID:
C4310804
Disease or Syndrome
Witteveen-Kolk syndrome (WITKOS) is an autosomal dominant disorder with characteristic distinctive facial features, microcephaly, short stature, and mildly impaired intellectual development with delayed cognitive and motor development and subtle anomalies on MRI-brain imaging (summary by Balasubramanian et al., 2021).
Noonan syndrome-like disorder with loose anagen hair 2
MedGen UID:
1376945
Concept ID:
C4479577
Disease or Syndrome
An inherited condition caused by autosomal dominant mutation(s) in the PPP1CB gene, encoding serine/threonine-protein phosphatase PP1-beta catalytic subunit. The condition is characterized by facial features similar to those seen in Noonan syndrome but may also include short stature, cognitive deficits, relative macrocephaly, small posterior fossa resulting in Chiari I malformation, hypernasal voice, cardiac defects, and ectodermal abnormalities, which typically presents as slow-growing, sparse, and/or unruly hair.
Fraser syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
1624349
Concept ID:
C4540036
Disease or Syndrome
Fraser syndrome is an autosomal recessive malformation disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, and abnormalities of the respiratory and urogenital tract (summary by van Haelst et al., 2008). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Fraser syndrome, see 219000.
Fraser syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
1621907
Concept ID:
C4540040
Disease or Syndrome
Fraser syndrome is an autosomal recessive malformation disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, and abnormalities of the respiratory and urogenital tract (summary by van Haelst et al., 2008). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Fraser syndrome, see 219000.
Neu-Laxova syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1633287
Concept ID:
C4551478
Disease or Syndrome
Any Neu-Laxova syndrome in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the PHGDH gene.
Fraser syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1639061
Concept ID:
C4551480
Disease or Syndrome
Fraser syndrome is an autosomal recessive malformation disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, and abnormalities of the respiratory and urogenital tract (summary by van Haelst et al., 2008). Genetic Heterogeneity of Fraser Syndrome Fraser syndrome-2 (FRASRS2) is caused by mutation in the FREM2 gene (608945) on chromosome 13q13, and Fraser syndrome-3 (FRASRS3; 617667) is caused by mutation in the GRIP1 gene (604597) on chromosome 12q14. See Bowen syndrome (211200) for a comparable but probably distinct syndrome of multiple congenital malformations.
Trichohepatoenteric syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1644087
Concept ID:
C4551982
Disease or Syndrome
Trichohepatoenteric syndrome (THES), generally considered to be a neonatal enteropathy, is characterized by intractable diarrhea (seen in almost all affected children), woolly hair (seen in all), intrauterine growth restriction, facial dysmorphism, and short stature. Additional findings include poorly characterized immunodeficiency, recurrent infections, skin abnormalities, and liver disease. Mild intellectual disability (ID) is seen in about 50% of affected individuals. Less common findings include congenital heart defects and platelet anomalies. To date 52 affected individuals have been reported.
Ververi-Brady syndrome
MedGen UID:
1647785
Concept ID:
C4693824
Disease or Syndrome
Ververi-Brady syndrome (VEBRAS) is characterized by mild developmental delay, mildly impaired intellectual development and speech delay, and mild dysmorphic facial features. Affected individuals can usually attend mainstream schools with support, and may also show autistic features (summary by Ververi et al., 2018).
Coffin-Siris syndrome 7
MedGen UID:
1648281
Concept ID:
C4747954
Disease or Syndrome
Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) is classically characterized by aplasia or hypoplasia of the distal phalanx or nail of the fifth and additional digits, developmental or cognitive delay of varying degree, distinctive facial features, hypotonia, hirsutism/hypertrichosis, and sparse scalp hair. Congenital anomalies can include malformations of the cardiac, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and/or central nervous systems. Other findings commonly include feeding difficulties, slow growth, ophthalmologic abnormalities, and hearing impairment.
Hyper-IgE recurrent infection syndrome 3, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
1648483
Concept ID:
C4748969
Disease or Syndrome
Hyper-IgE syndrome-3 with recurrent infections (HIES3) is an autosomal recessive immunologic disorder characterized by childhood onset of atopic dermatitis, skin infections particularly with Staphylococcus aureus, recurrent sinopulmonary infections, and increased serum IgE and IgG. Patients are susceptible to bacterial and fungal infections, including chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. Immunologic workup shows impaired differentiation of CD4+ T cells into T-helper 17 cells, decreased memory B cells, and often decreased NK cells (summary by Beziat et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of hyper-IgE syndrome, see HIES1 (147060).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with speech impairment and dysmorphic facies
MedGen UID:
1758434
Concept ID:
C5436699
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with speech impairment and dysmorphic facies (NEDSID) is characterized by developmental delay associated with mild to moderately impaired intellectual development or learning difficulties, behavioral or psychiatric abnormalities, and delayed speech and language acquisition. Additional features include dysmorphic facies, distal limb anomalies, gastrointestinal problems or feeding difficulties, and hypotonia. The phenotypic features and severity of the disorder are variable (summary by Kummeling et al., 2021).
Blepharophimosis-impaired intellectual development syndrome
MedGen UID:
1779966
Concept ID:
C5443984
Disease or Syndrome
Blepharophimosis-impaired intellectual development syndrome (BIS) is a congenital disorder characterized by a distinct facial appearance with blepharophimosis and global development delay. Affected individuals have delayed motor skills, sometimes with inability to walk, and impaired intellectual development with poor or absent speech; some patients show behavioral abnormalities. There are recognizable facial features, including epicanthal folds, sparse eyebrows, broad nasal bridge, short nose with downturned tip, and open mouth with thin upper lip. Other more variable features include distal skeletal anomalies, feeding difficulties with poor growth, respiratory infections, and hypotonia with peripheral spasticity (summary by Cappuccio et al., 2020).
Joubert syndrome 37
MedGen UID:
1786742
Concept ID:
C5543064
Disease or Syndrome
Joubert syndrome-37 (JBTS37) is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental ciliopathy characterized classically by a distinctive hindbrain malformation affecting the midbrain and cerebellum, recognizable as the 'molar tooth sign' on brain imaging. Affected individuals have hypotonia, ataxia, and variably impaired intellectual development. Additional variable features, such as postaxial polydactyly, liver or kidney anomalies, retinal dystrophy, and coloboma, may also occur. In severe cases, affected fetuses with these malformations may be terminated (summary by Latour et al., 2020). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Joubert syndrome, see JBTS1 (213300).
Vertebral, cardiac, tracheoesophageal, renal, and limb defects
MedGen UID:
1788069
Concept ID:
C5543189
Disease or Syndrome
VCTERL syndrome is characterized by anomalies of the vertebrae, heart, trachea, esophagus, kidneys, and limbs. Some patients also exhibit craniofacial abnormalities. Incomplete penetrance and markedly variable disease expression have been observed, including intrafamilial variability (Martin et al., 2020).
Luo-Schoch-Yamamoto syndrome
MedGen UID:
1794156
Concept ID:
C5561946
Disease or Syndrome
Luo-Schoch-Yamamoto syndrome (LUSYAM) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay and impaired intellectual development apparent from infancy. Affected individuals have delayed walking, early-onset seizures, hypotonia, dysmorphic facial features, and white matter abnormalities on brain imaging (Luo et al., 2021).
Congenital disorder of glycosylation, type IIw
MedGen UID:
1794196
Concept ID:
C5561986
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital disorder of glycosylation type IIw (CDG2W) is an autosomal dominant metabolic disorder characterized by liver dysfunction, coagulation deficiencies, and profound abnormalities in N-glycosylation of serum specific proteins. All reported patients carry the same mutation (602671.0017) (summary by Ng et al., 2021). For an overview of congenital disorders of glycosylation, see CDG1A (212065) and CDG2A (212066).
Zaki syndrome
MedGen UID:
1794247
Concept ID:
C5562037
Disease or Syndrome
Zaki syndrome (ZKS) is characterized by developmental delay, progressive microcephaly, and short stature, as well as dysmorphic features including sparse scalp hair, cupped ears, wide nose and mouth, short philtrum, and high-arched palate. Other variable features have been observed, including ocular, skeletal, cardiac, and renal anomalies (Chai et al., 2021).
Developmental delay with variable neurologic and brain abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1794270
Concept ID:
C5562060
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental delay with variable neurologic and brain abnormalities (DENBA) is characterized most often by motor and speech delay apparent from early childhood. Most patients have delayed walking and variably impaired intellectual development. Additional neurologic features may include seizures, spasticity, and ocular abnormalities. Brain imaging often shows thin corpus callosum and may show white matter atrophy, myelination abnormalities, or enlarged ventricles. The severity of the disorder and clinical manifestations are highly variable (summary by Malhotra et al., 2021).
Craniofacial dysmorphism, skeletal anomalies, and impaired intellectual development 1
MedGen UID:
1808104
Concept ID:
C5677021
Disease or Syndrome
Craniofacial dysmorphism, skeletal anomalies, and impaired intellectual development syndrome-1 (CFSMR1) is characterized by cranial involvement with macrocrania at birth, brachycephaly, anomalies of middle fossa structures including hypoplasia of corpus callosum, enlargement of septum pellucidum, and dilated lateral ventricles, as well as cortical atrophy and hypodensity of the gray matter. Facial dysmorphisms include flat face, hypertelorism, epicanthal folds, synophrys, broad nasal bridge, cleft lip and cleft palate, and low-set posteriorly rotated ears. Patients also exhibit short neck and multiple costal and vertebral anomalies. The face is rather characteristic, and various authors have consistently reported affable/friendly personality, despite intellectual delay (summary by Alanay et al., 2014). Genetic Heterogeneity of Craniofacial Dysmorphism, Skeletal Anomalies, and Impaired Intellectual Development Syndrome CFSMR2 (616994) is caused by mutation in the RAB5IF gene (619960) on chromosome 20q11.
Neurodevelopmental disorder with intention tremor, pyramidal signs, dyspraxia, and ocular anomalies
MedGen UID:
1823969
Concept ID:
C5774196
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with intention tremor, pyramidal signs, dyspraxia, and ocular anomalies (NEDITPO) is an autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by mild to moderate intellectual disability, dysmorphic facial features, intention tremor, dyspraxia, and vertical strabismus (Rahikkala et al., 2022).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with motor and language delay, ocular defects, and brain abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1841232
Concept ID:
C5830596
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with motor and language delay, ocular defects, and brain abnormalities (NEDMLOB) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by the onset of features in infancy or early childhood. Affected individuals show hypotonia, severe motor delay with ataxic gait or sometimes an inability to achieve walking, and impaired intellectual development with speech and language delay. Ocular defects can include optic atrophy, nystagmus, strabismus, and retinal dystrophy. Additional features may include seizures (in some), dysmorphic facial features, poor overall growth, and variable brain imaging abnormalities (Tepe et al., 2023).
Intellectual developmental disorder, autosomal dominant 73
MedGen UID:
1841272
Concept ID:
C5830636
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Autosomal dominant intellectual developmental disorder-73 (MRD73) is a highly variable neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impaired intellectual development that ranges from mild to severe, speech delay, behavioral abnormalities, and nonspecific dysmorphic facial features (Janssen et al., 2022).
Hyper-IgE recurrent infection syndrome 1, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1846538
Concept ID:
CN031130
Disease or Syndrome
STAT3 hyper IgE syndrome (STAT3-HIES) is a primary immune deficiency syndrome characterized by elevated serum IgE, eczema, and recurrent skin and respiratory tract infections, together with several nonimmune features. This disorder typically manifests in the newborn period with a rash (often diagnosed as eosinophilic pustulosis) that subsequently evolves into an eczematoid dermatitis. Recurrent staphylococcal skin boils and bacterial pneumonias usually manifest in the first years of life. Pneumatoceles and bronchiectasis often result from aberrant healing of pneumonias. Mucocutaneous candidiasis is common. Nonimmune features may include retained primary teeth, scoliosis, bone fractures following minimal trauma, joint hyperextensibility, and characteristic facial appearance, which typically emerges in adolescence. Vascular abnormalities have been described and include middle-sized artery tortuosity and aneurysms, with infrequent clinical sequelae of myocardial infarction and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Gastrointestinal (GI) manifestations include gastroesophageal reflux disease, esophageal dysmotility, and spontaneous intestinal perforations (some of which are associated with diverticuli). Fungal infections of the GI tract (typically histoplasmosis, Cryptococcus, and Coccidioides) also occur infrequently. Survival is typically into adulthood, with most individuals now living into or past the sixth decade. Most deaths are associated with gram-negative (Pseudomonas) or filamentous fungal pneumonias resulting in hemoptysis. Lymphomas occur at an increased frequency.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Wang Y, Eccles R, Bell J, Chua AH, Salvi S, Schellack N, Marks P, Wong YC
Expert Rev Respir Med 2021 Dec;15(12):1517-1523. Epub 2021 Oct 19 doi: 10.1080/17476348.2021.1988569. PMID: 34613861
Anzengruber F, Czernielewski J, Conrad C, Feldmeyer L, Yawalkar N, Häusermann P, Cozzio A, Mainetti C, Goldblum D, Läuchli S, Imhof L, Brand C, Laffitte E, Navarini AA
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol 2017 Nov;31(11):1775-1791. Epub 2017 Aug 21 doi: 10.1111/jdv.14349. PMID: 28833645
Yahalom J, Illidge T, Specht L, Hoppe RT, Li YX, Tsang R, Wirth A; International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2015 May 1;92(1):11-31. doi: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2015.01.009. PMID: 25863750

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Zhang J, Chen A, Liu Y, Herrler T, Yu B, Fang L, Zhu F, Li X, Dai C, Wei J
J Craniofac Surg 2023 Nov-Dec 01;34(8):2475-2478. Epub 2023 Aug 28 doi: 10.1097/SCS.0000000000009615. PMID: 37639666
Kim YH, Lee WS, Kim JW, Chung KJ
J Craniofac Surg 2023 Jun 1;34(4):e358-e363. Epub 2023 Mar 24 doi: 10.1097/SCS.0000000000009232. PMID: 36959116
Horlenko O, Lenchenko A, Kossey G, Tomey A, Debretseni O
Georgian Med News 2018 Dec;(285):47-51. PMID: 30702069
Kucuker I, Ozmen S
Aesthetic Plast Surg 2013 Aug;37(4):684-91. Epub 2013 Jul 3 doi: 10.1007/s00266-013-0168-3. PMID: 23820790
Gerarchi P, Mendelsohn M
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2007 Apr;136(4 Suppl):S32-40. doi: 10.1016/j.otohns.2007.01.029. PMID: 17398339

Diagnosis

Houb-Dine A, Jalila H, Zaoui F, Benkaddour A
Tunis Med 2023 Apr 5;101(4):456-459. PMID: 38372531
Horlenko O, Lenchenko A, Kossey G, Tomey A, Debretseni O
Georgian Med News 2018 Dec;(285):47-51. PMID: 30702069
Yoshida R, Fukushima Y, Ohashi H, Asoh M, Fukuyama Y
Jpn J Hum Genet 1993 Dec;38(4):437-44. doi: 10.1007/BF01907992. PMID: 8186422

Therapy

Horlenko O, Lenchenko A, Kossey G, Tomey A, Debretseni O
Georgian Med News 2018 Dec;(285):47-51. PMID: 30702069
Lindemann J, Tsakiropoulou E, Scheithauer MO, Konstantinidis I, Wiesmiller KM
Am J Rhinol 2008 Jul-Aug;22(4):402-5. doi: 10.2500/ajr.2008.22.3194. PMID: 18702906

Prognosis

Kleider-Offutt HM, Bond AD, Williams SE, Bohil CJ
Mem Cognit 2018 Jul;46(5):716-728. doi: 10.3758/s13421-018-0801-0. PMID: 29516401
Mitteroecker P, Windhager S, Müller GB, Schaefer K
PLoS One 2015;10(2):e0118374. Epub 2015 Feb 11 doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0118374. PMID: 25671667Free PMC Article
Onizuka T, Hosaka Y, Satoh K
Aesthetic Plast Surg 1993 Winter;17(1):23-9. doi: 10.1007/BF00455045. PMID: 8430526

Clinical prediction guides

Kim YH, Lee WS, Kim JW, Chung KJ
J Craniofac Surg 2023 Jun 1;34(4):e358-e363. Epub 2023 Mar 24 doi: 10.1097/SCS.0000000000009232. PMID: 36959116
Kleider-Offutt HM, Bond AD, Williams SE, Bohil CJ
Mem Cognit 2018 Jul;46(5):716-728. doi: 10.3758/s13421-018-0801-0. PMID: 29516401
Mitteroecker P, Windhager S, Müller GB, Schaefer K
PLoS One 2015;10(2):e0118374. Epub 2015 Feb 11 doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0118374. PMID: 25671667Free PMC Article
Kucuker I, Ozmen S
Aesthetic Plast Surg 2013 Aug;37(4):684-91. Epub 2013 Jul 3 doi: 10.1007/s00266-013-0168-3. PMID: 23820790
Lindemann J, Tsakiropoulou E, Scheithauer MO, Konstantinidis I, Wiesmiller KM
Am J Rhinol 2008 Jul-Aug;22(4):402-5. doi: 10.2500/ajr.2008.22.3194. PMID: 18702906

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