U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination

Gait ataxia

MedGen UID:
155642
Concept ID:
C0751837
Sign or Symptom
Synonyms: Ataxia of Gait; Ataxia, Gait; Ataxias, Gait; Gait Ataxia; Gait Ataxias
SNOMED CT: Ataxic gait (25136009)
 
HPO: HP:0002066

Definition

A type of ataxia characterized by the impairment of the ability to coordinate the movements required for normal walking. Gait ataxia is characteirzed by a wide-based staggering gait with a tendency to fall. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

Conditions with this feature

Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome
MedGen UID:
4886
Concept ID:
C0017495
Disease or Syndrome
Genetic prion disease generally manifests with cognitive difficulties, ataxia, and myoclonus (abrupt jerking movements of muscle groups and/or entire limbs). The order of appearance and/or predominance of these features and other associated neurologic and psychiatric findings vary. The three major phenotypes of genetic prion disease are genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (gCJD), fatal familial insomnia (FFI), and Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS) syndrome. Although these phenotypes display overlapping clinical and pathologic features, recognition of these phenotypes can be useful when providing affected individuals and their families with information about the expected clinical course. The age at onset typically ranges from 50 to 60 years. The disease course ranges from a few months in gCJD and FFI to a few (up to 4, and in rare cases up to 10) years in GSS syndrome.
Huntington disease
MedGen UID:
5654
Concept ID:
C0020179
Disease or Syndrome
Huntington disease (HD) is a progressive disorder of motor, cognitive, and psychiatric disturbances. The mean age of onset is 35 to 44 years, and the median survival time is 15 to 18 years after onset.
Deficiency of alpha-mannosidase
MedGen UID:
7467
Concept ID:
C0024748
Disease or Syndrome
Alpha-mannosidosis encompasses a continuum of clinical findings from mild to severe. Three major clinical subtypes have been suggested: A mild form recognized after age ten years with absence of skeletal abnormalities, myopathy, and slow progression (type 1). A moderate form recognized before age ten years with presence of skeletal abnormalities, myopathy, and slow progression (type 2). A severe form manifested as prenatal loss or early death from progressive central nervous system involvement or infection (type 3). Individuals with a milder phenotype have mild-to-moderate intellectual disability, impaired hearing, characteristic coarse features, clinical or radiographic skeletal abnormalities, immunodeficiency, and primary central nervous system disease – mainly cerebellar involvement causing ataxia. Periods of psychiatric symptoms are common. Associated medical problems can include corneal opacities, hepatosplenomegaly, aseptic destructive arthritis, and metabolic myopathy. Alpha-mannosidosis is insidiously progressive; some individuals may live into the sixth decade.
Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome
MedGen UID:
6222
Concept ID:
C0024814
Disease or Syndrome
Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome (MSS) is characterized by cerebellar ataxia with cerebellar atrophy, dysarthria, nystagmus, early-onset (not necessarily congenital) cataracts, myopathy, muscle weakness, and hypotonia. Additional features may include psychomotor delay, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, short stature, and various skeletal abnormalities. Children with MSS usually present with muscular hypotonia in early infancy; distal and proximal muscular weakness is noticed during the first decade of life. Later, cerebellar findings of truncal ataxia, dysdiadochokinesia, nystagmus, and dysarthria become apparent. Motor function worsens progressively for some years, then stabilizes at an unpredictable age and degree of severity. Cataracts can develop rapidly and typically require lens extraction in the first decade of life. Although many adults have severe disabilities, life span in MSS appears to be near normal.
Rett syndrome
MedGen UID:
48441
Concept ID:
C0035372
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of MECP2-related phenotypes in females ranges from classic Rett syndrome to variant Rett syndrome with a broader clinical phenotype (either milder or more severe than classic Rett syndrome) to mild learning disabilities; the spectrum in males ranges from severe neonatal encephalopathy to pyramidal signs, parkinsonism, and macroorchidism (PPM-X) syndrome to severe syndromic/nonsyndromic intellectual disability. Females: Classic Rett syndrome, a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder primarily affecting girls, is characterized by apparently normal psychomotor development during the first six to 18 months of life, followed by a short period of developmental stagnation, then rapid regression in language and motor skills, followed by long-term stability. During the phase of rapid regression, repetitive, stereotypic hand movements replace purposeful hand use. Additional findings include fits of screaming and inconsolable crying, autistic features, panic-like attacks, bruxism, episodic apnea and/or hyperpnea, gait ataxia and apraxia, tremors, seizures, and acquired microcephaly. Males: Severe neonatal-onset encephalopathy, the most common phenotype in affected males, is characterized by a relentless clinical course that follows a metabolic-degenerative type of pattern, abnormal tone, involuntary movements, severe seizures, and breathing abnormalities. Death often occurs before age two years.
Roussy-Lévy syndrome
MedGen UID:
64430
Concept ID:
C0205713
Disease or Syndrome
Roussy-Levy syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by early onset of prominent ataxia followed by late onset of mild motor involvement. Symptoms progress very slowly, and affected individuals may remain ambulatory throughout life (Auer-Grumbach et al., 1998; Plante-Bordeneuve et al., 1999).
Adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency
MedGen UID:
78641
Concept ID:
C0268126
Disease or Syndrome
Adenylosuccinase deficiency is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by an enzymatic defect in de novo purine synthesis (DNPS) pathway. ADSL deficiency leads to the accumulation of toxic intermediates, including succinyladenosine (S-Ado) and succinylaminoimidazole carboxamide riboside (SAICAr) in body fluids. There are 3 major phenotypic forms of the disorder that correlate with different values of the S-Ado and SAICAr concentration ratios (S-Ado/SAICAr) in the cerebrospinal fluid. These include the most severe fatal neonatal encephalopathy (S-Ado/SAICAr ratio less than 1); childhood form (type I) with severe psychomotor retardation (S-Ado/SAICAr ratio close to 1), and a milder form (type II) with psychomotor retardation or hypotonia (S-Ado/SAICAr ratio greater than 2) (summary by Baresova et al., 2012).
Sphingolipid activator protein 1 deficiency
MedGen UID:
120624
Concept ID:
C0268262
Disease or Syndrome
Metachromatic leukodystrophy gets its name from the way cells with an accumulation of sulfatides appear when viewed under a microscope. The sulfatides form granules that are described as metachromatic, which means they pick up color differently than surrounding cellular material when stained for examination.\n\nThe adult form of metachromatic leukodystrophy affects approximately 15 to 20 percent of individuals with the disorder. In this form, the first symptoms appear during the teenage years or later. Often behavioral problems such as alcohol use disorder, drug abuse, or difficulties at school or work are the first symptoms to appear. The affected individual may experience psychiatric symptoms such as delusions or hallucinations. People with the adult form of metachromatic leukodystrophy may survive for 20 to 30 years after diagnosis. During this time there may be some periods of relative stability and other periods of more rapid decline.\n\nIn 20 to 30 percent of individuals with metachromatic leukodystrophy, onset occurs between the age of 4 and adolescence. In this juvenile form, the first signs of the disorder may be behavioral problems and increasing difficulty with schoolwork. Progression of the disorder is slower than in the late infantile form, and affected individuals may survive for about 20 years after diagnosis.\n\nThe most common form of metachromatic leukodystrophy, affecting about 50 to 60 percent of all individuals with this disorder, is called the late infantile form. This form of the disorder usually appears in the second year of life. Affected children lose any speech they have developed, become weak, and develop problems with walking (gait disturbance). As the disorder worsens, muscle tone generally first decreases, and then increases to the point of rigidity. Individuals with the late infantile form of metachromatic leukodystrophy typically do not survive past childhood.\n\nIn people with metachromatic leukodystrophy, white matter damage causes progressive deterioration of intellectual functions and motor skills, such as the ability to walk. Affected individuals also develop loss of sensation in the extremities (peripheral neuropathy), incontinence, seizures, paralysis, an inability to speak, blindness, and hearing loss. Eventually they lose awareness of their surroundings and become unresponsive. While neurological problems are the primary feature of metachromatic leukodystrophy, effects of sulfatide accumulation on other organs and tissues have been reported, most often involving the gallbladder.\n\nMetachromatic leukodystrophy is an inherited disorder characterized by the accumulation of fats called sulfatides in cells. This accumulation especially affects cells in the nervous system that produce myelin, the substance that insulates and protects nerves. Nerve cells covered by myelin make up a tissue called white matter. Sulfatide accumulation in myelin-producing cells causes progressive destruction of white matter (leukodystrophy) throughout the nervous system, including in the brain and spinal cord (the central nervous system) and the nerves connecting the brain and spinal cord to muscles and sensory cells that detect sensations such as touch, pain, heat, and sound (the peripheral nervous system).
Urocanate hydratase deficiency
MedGen UID:
120644
Concept ID:
C0268514
Disease or Syndrome
An increased concentration of urocanic acid in the urine.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1C
MedGen UID:
75728
Concept ID:
C0270913
Disease or Syndrome
For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1, see CMT1B (118200).
Chiari type I malformation
MedGen UID:
196689
Concept ID:
C0750929
Congenital Abnormality
Arnold-Chiari type I malformation refers to a relatively mild degree of herniation of the posteroinferior region of the cerebellum (the cerebellar tonsils) into the cervical canal with little or no displacement of the fourth ventricle. It is characterized by one or both pointed (not rounded) cerebellar tonsils that project 5 mm below the foramen magnum, measured by a line drawn from the basion to the opisthion (McRae Line)
Inherited Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease
MedGen UID:
155837
Concept ID:
C0751254
Disease or Syndrome
Genetic prion disease generally manifests with cognitive difficulties, ataxia, and myoclonus (abrupt jerking movements of muscle groups and/or entire limbs). The order of appearance and/or predominance of these features and other associated neurologic and psychiatric findings vary. The three major phenotypes of genetic prion disease are genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (gCJD), fatal familial insomnia (FFI), and Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS) syndrome. Although these phenotypes display overlapping clinical and pathologic features, recognition of these phenotypes can be useful when providing affected individuals and their families with information about the expected clinical course. The age at onset typically ranges from 50 to 60 years. The disease course ranges from a few months in gCJD and FFI to a few (up to 4, and in rare cases up to 10) years in GSS syndrome.
Action myoclonus-renal failure syndrome
MedGen UID:
155629
Concept ID:
C0751779
Disease or Syndrome
The action myoclonus-renal failure syndrome, also known as progressive myclonic epilepsy-4 with or without renal failure (EPM4), is an autosomal recessive progressive myoclonic epilepsy associated with renal failure. Cognitive function is preserved (Badhwar et al., 2004). Some patients do not develop renal failure (Dibbens et al., 2009). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of progressive myoclonic epilepsy, see EPM1A (254800).
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 5
MedGen UID:
155705
Concept ID:
C0752123
Disease or Syndrome
For a general discussion of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA), see SCA1 (164400).
Microbrachycephaly-ptosis-cleft lip syndrome
MedGen UID:
162914
Concept ID:
C0796142
Disease or Syndrome
The Richieri-Costa/Guion-Almeida syndrome is characterized by mild mental retardation, short stature, microbrachycephaly, ptosis, esotropia, cleft lip/palate (Richieri-Costa and Guion-Almeida, 1992).
Pettigrew syndrome
MedGen UID:
162924
Concept ID:
C0796254
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked Dandy-Walker malformation with intellectual disability, basal ganglia disease and seizures (XDIBS), or Pettigrew syndrome is a central nervous system malformation characterized by severe intellectual deficit, early hypotonia with progression to spasticity and contractures, choreoathetosis, seizures, dysmorphic face (long face with prominent forehead), and brain imaging abnormalities such as Dandy-Walker malformation, and iron deposition. (From Mondo:0010574)
Familial infantile myoclonic epilepsy
MedGen UID:
181488
Concept ID:
C0917800
Disease or Syndrome
TBC1D24-related disorders comprise a continuum of features that were originally described as distinct, recognized phenotypes: DOORS syndrome (deafness, onychodystrophy, osteodystrophy, mental retardation, and seizures). Profound sensorineural hearing loss, onychodystrophy, osteodystrophy, intellectual disability / developmental delay, and seizures. Familial infantile myoclonic epilepsy (FIME). Early-onset myoclonic seizures, focal epilepsy, dysarthria, and mild-to-moderate intellectual disability. Progressive myoclonus epilepsy (PME). Action myoclonus, tonic-clonic seizures, progressive neurologic decline, and ataxia. Early-infantile epileptic encephalopathy 16 (EIEE16). Epileptiform EEG abnormalities which themselves are believed to contribute to progressive disturbance in cerebral function. Autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss, DFNB86. Profound prelingual deafness. Autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss, DFNA65. Slowly progressive deafness with onset in the third decade, initially affecting the high frequencies.
Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome
MedGen UID:
220983
Concept ID:
C1303073
Disease or Syndrome
Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome (NCBRS) is characterized by sparse scalp hair, prominence of the inter-phalangeal joints and distal phalanges due to decreased subcutaneous fat, characteristic coarse facial features, microcephaly, seizures, and developmental delay / intellectual disability. Seizures are of various types and can be difficult to manage. Developmental delay / intellectual disability (ID) is severe in nearly a half, moderate in a third, and mild in the remainder. Nearly a third never develop speech or language skills.
Cerebellar ataxia-areflexia-pes cavus-optic atrophy-sensorineural hearing loss syndrome
MedGen UID:
318633
Concept ID:
C1832466
Disease or Syndrome
ATP1A3-related neurologic disorders represent a clinical continuum in which at least three distinct phenotypes have been delineated: rapid-onset dystonia-parkinsonism (RDP); alternating hemiplegia of childhood (ACH); and cerebellar ataxia, areflexia, pes cavus, optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss (CAPOS). However, some affected individuals have intermediate phenotypes or only a few features that do not fit well into one of these major phenotypes. RDP has been characterized by: abrupt onset of dystonia over days to weeks with parkinsonism (primarily bradykinesia and postural instability); common bulbar involvement; and absence or minimal response to an adequate trial of L-dopa therapy, with few exceptions. Often fever, physiologic stress, or alcoholic binges trigger the onset of symptoms. After their initial appearance, symptoms often stabilize with little improvement; occasionally second episodes occur with abrupt worsening of symptoms. Rarely, affected individuals have reported a more gradual onset of symptoms over weeks to months. Anxiety, depression, and seizures have been reported. Age of onset ranges from four to 55 years, although a childhood variation of RDP with onset between ages nine and 14 months has been reported. AHC is a complex neurodevelopmental syndrome most frequently manifesting in infancy or early childhood with paroxysmal episodic neurologic dysfunction including alternating hemiparesis or dystonia, quadriparesis, seizure-like episodes, and oculomotor abnormalities. Episodes can last for minutes, hours, days, or even weeks. Remission of symptoms occurs with sleep and immediately after awakening. Over time, persistent neurologic deficits including oculomotor apraxia, ataxia, choreoathetosis, dystonia, parkinsonism, and cognitive and behavioral dysfunction develop in the majority of those affected; more than 50% develop epilepsy in addition to their episodic movement disorder phenotype. CAPOS (cerebellar ataxia, areflexia, pes cavus, optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss) syndrome is characterized by episodes of ataxic encephalopathy and/or weakness during and after a febrile illness. Onset is between ages six months and four years. Some acute symptoms resolve; progression of sensory losses and severity vary.
Cayman type cerebellar ataxia
MedGen UID:
331319
Concept ID:
C1832585
Disease or Syndrome
Cayman cerebellar ataxia (ATCAY) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by hypotonia from birth, variable psychomotor retardation, and cerebellar dysfunction, including nystagmus, intention tremor, dysarthria, ataxic gait, and truncal ataxia. Although the disorder was initially believed to be restricted to an isolated region of Grand Cayman Island (summary by Nystuen et al., 1996; Bomar et al., 2003), one Pakistani family with the disorder and an ATCAY mutation has been reported, thus expanding the ethnic distribution (Manzoor et al., 2018).
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal dominant 1
MedGen UID:
371919
Concept ID:
C1834846
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life and about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called "chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus," or "CPEO+").
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 27
MedGen UID:
373075
Concept ID:
C1836383
Disease or Syndrome
Disease with characteristics of early-onset tremor, dyskinesia and slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia. Fewer than 30 cases have been reported to date. This disease is caused by a mutation in the fibroblast growth factor 14 FGF14 gene (13q34). Prognosis is relatively good. Life-threatening status epilepticus and intractable seizure or severe dysphagia is rare.
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 26
MedGen UID:
373077
Concept ID:
C1836395
Disease or Syndrome
A very rare subtype of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type 3 with characteristics of late-onset and slowly progressive cerebellar signs (gait ataxia) and eye movement abnormalities. To date, only 23 affected patients have been described from one American family of Norwegian descent. Disease onset occurs between the ages of 26-60. A candidate gene has recently been identified as the eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2 (EEF2) gene, located on chromosome 19p13.3. Inherited autosomal dominantly.
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia 7
MedGen UID:
324520
Concept ID:
C1836474
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia is a neurologic disorder characterized by onset of progressive gait difficulties, eye movement abnormalities, and dysarthria in the first or second decade of life (summary by Dy et al., 2015).
Autosomal dominant sensory ataxia 1
MedGen UID:
332346
Concept ID:
C1837015
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant sensory ataxia-1 (SNAX1) is a peripheral neuropathy resulting from the degeneration of dorsal root ganglia that affects both central and peripheral neurites of sensory neurons. Affected individuals show adult onset of slowly progressive clumsiness, gait ataxia, walking difficulties, and distal sensory loss which may be associated with abnormal sensory nerve conduction values. Some patients have vestibular ocular dysfunction. Muscle weakness and atrophy are not observed, and brain imaging is normal (summary by Cortese et al., 2020).
Pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase deficiency
MedGen UID:
332448
Concept ID:
C1837429
Disease or Syndrome
Pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase deficiency (PDHPD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of pyruvate metabolism characterized by neonatal/infantile and childhood lactic acidosis, normal lactate to pyruvate ratio, elevated plasma alanine, delayed psychomotor development, epileptic encephalopathy, and hypotonia (summary by Bedoyan et al., 2019). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) deficiency, see 312170.
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 20
MedGen UID:
373352
Concept ID:
C1837541
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 20 (SCA20) is characterized by a slowly progressive ataxia and dysarthria. Approximately two thirds of those affected also display palatal tremor ("myoclonus") and/or abnormal phonation clinically resembling spasmodic adductor dysphonia. Dysarthria, which may be abrupt in onset, precedes the onset of ataxia in about two thirds of affected individuals, sometimes by a number of years. Hypermetric horizontal saccades (without nystagmus or disturbance of vestibulo-ocular reflex gain) are seen in about half of affected persons. Although minor pyramidal signs (brisk knee jerks, crossed adductor spread) may be seen, spasticity and extensor plantar responses are not. Cognition is normal. Clinical information is based on the findings in 16 personally examined affected members of a single Australian family of Anglo-Celtic descent.
Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome
MedGen UID:
333403
Concept ID:
C1839780
Disease or Syndrome
FMR1 disorders include fragile X syndrome (FXS), fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), and fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI). Fragile X syndrome occurs in individuals with an FMR1 full mutation or other loss-of-function variant and is nearly always characterized in affected males by developmental delay and intellectual disability along with a variety of behavioral issues. Autism spectrum disorder is present in 50%-70% of individuals with FXS. Affected males may have characteristic craniofacial features (which become more obvious with age) and medical problems including hypotonia, gastroesophageal reflux, strabismus, seizures, sleep disorders, joint laxity, pes planus, scoliosis, and recurrent otitis media. Adults may have mitral valve prolapse or aortic root dilatation. The physical and behavioral features seen in males with FXS have been reported in females heterozygous for the FMR1 full mutation, but with lower frequency and milder involvement. FXTAS occurs in individuals who have an FMR1 premutation and is characterized by late-onset, progressive cerebellar ataxia and intention tremor followed by cognitive impairment. Psychiatric disorders are common. Age of onset is typically between 60 and 65 years and is more common among males who are hemizygous for the premutation (40%) than among females who are heterozygous for the premutation (16%-20%). FXPOI, defined as hypergonadotropic hypogonadism before age 40 years, has been observed in 20% of women who carry a premutation allele compared to 1% in the general population.
Infantile-onset autosomal recessive nonprogressive cerebellar ataxia
MedGen UID:
334220
Concept ID:
C1842676
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia disease with characteristics of nonprogressive cerebellar ataxia, with onset in infancy, manifesting with delayed motor and speech development, gait ataxia, dysmetria, hypotonia, increased deep tendon reflexes and dysarthria. Additional variable manifestations include moderate nystagmus on lateral gaze, mild spasticity, intention tremor, short stature and pes planus. Brain imaging reveals cerebellar vermis atrophy.
Biotin-responsive basal ganglia disease
MedGen UID:
375289
Concept ID:
C1843807
Disease or Syndrome
Biotin-thiamine-responsive basal ganglia disease (BTBGD) may present in childhood, early infancy, or adulthood. The classic presentation of BTBGD occurs in childhood (age 3-10 years) and is characterized by recurrent subacute encephalopathy manifest as confusion, seizures, ataxia, dystonia, supranuclear facial palsy, external ophthalmoplegia, and/or dysphagia which, if left untreated, can eventually lead to coma and even death. Dystonia and cogwheel rigidity are nearly always present; hyperreflexia, ankle clonus, and Babinski responses are common. Hemiparesis or quadriparesis may be seen. Episodes are often triggered by febrile illness or mild trauma or stress. Simple partial or generalized seizures are easily controlled with anti-seizure medication. An early-infantile Leigh-like syndrome / atypical infantile spasms presentation occurs in the first three months of life with poor feeding, vomiting, acute encephalopathy, and severe lactic acidosis. An adult-onset Wernicke-like encephalopathy presentation is characterized by acute onset of status epilepticus, ataxia, nystagmus, diplopia, and ophthalmoplegia in the second decade of life. Prompt administration of biotin and thiamine early in the disease course results in partial or complete improvement within days in the childhood and adult presentations, but most with the infantile presentation have had poor outcome even after supplementation with biotin and thiamine.
Sensory ataxic neuropathy, dysarthria, and ophthalmoparesis
MedGen UID:
375302
Concept ID:
C1843851
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life and about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called "chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus," or "CPEO+").
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 21
MedGen UID:
375311
Concept ID:
C1843891
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia-21 (SCA21) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by onset in the first decades of life of slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia, which is associated with cognitive impairment in most patients (summary by Delplanque et al., 2014). For a general discussion of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia, see SCA1 (164400).
X-linked intellectual disability-cerebellar hypoplasia syndrome
MedGen UID:
336920
Concept ID:
C1845366
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked intellectual deficit-cerebellar hypoplasia, also known as OPHN1 syndrome, is a rare syndromic form of cerebellar dysgenesis characterized by moderate to severe intellectual deficit and cerebellar abnormalities.
X-linked intellectual disability Cabezas type
MedGen UID:
337334
Concept ID:
C1845861
Disease or Syndrome
The Cabezas type of X-linked syndromic intellectual developmental disorder is characterized primarily by short stature, hypogonadism, and abnormal gait, with other more variable features such as speech delay, prominent lower lip, and tremor (Cabezas et al., 2000).
MEHMO syndrome
MedGen UID:
375855
Concept ID:
C1846278
Disease or Syndrome
MEHMO syndrome is a rare intellectual disability disorder that exhibits phenotypic heterogeneity and is variably characterized by mental retardation, epileptic seizures, hypogonadism with hypogenitalism, microcephaly, and obesity. Life expectancy ranges from less than 1 year to adulthood, and the condition is associated with significant morbidity and mortality (summary by Gregory et al., 2019).
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 19/22
MedGen UID:
339504
Concept ID:
C1846367
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia-19 (SCA19) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia with a variable age of onset (age 2 years to late adulthood). Other neurologic manifestations include developmental delay and cognitive impairment; movement disorders including myoclonus, dystonia, rigidity, and bradykinesia; and seizures. For a general discussion of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia, see SCA1 (164400).
Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia-saccadic intrusion syndrome
MedGen UID:
335442
Concept ID:
C1846492
Disease or Syndrome
VPS13D movement disorder is a hyperkinetic movement disorder (dystonia, chorea, and/or ataxia) of variable age of onset that can be associated with developmental delay. Onset ranges from birth to adulthood. Individuals can present in childhood with motor delays and gait instability. Cognitive impairment ranging from mild intellectual disability to developmental delay has been reported, and several individuals have normal cognitive function. Individuals have also presented as young adults with gait difficulties caused by spastic ataxia or ataxia. In addition to gait ataxia, affected individuals had limb ataxia, dysarthria, and eye movement abnormalities (macro-saccadic oscillations, nystagmus, and saccadic pursuit). Additional features reported in some individuals include peripheral neuropathy and/or seizures. The disorder progresses to spastic ataxia or generalized dystonia, which can lead to loss of independent ambulation.
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 7
MedGen UID:
339552
Concept ID:
C1846564
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia 7 (SPG7) is characterized by insidiously progressive bilateral leg weakness and spasticity. Most affected individuals have decreased vibration sense and cerebellar signs. Onset is mostly in adulthood, although symptoms may start as early as age 11 years and as late as age 72 years. Additional features including ataxia (gait and limbs), spastic dysarthria, dysphagia, pale optic disks, ataxia, nystagmus, strabismus, ptosis, hearing loss, motor and sensory neuropathy, amyotrophy, scoliosis, pes cavus, and urinary sphincter disturbances may be observed.
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 17
MedGen UID:
337637
Concept ID:
C1846707
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 17 (SCA17) is characterized by ataxia, dementia, and involuntary movements, including chorea and dystonia. Psychiatric symptoms, pyramidal signs, and rigidity are common. The age of onset ranges from three to 55 years. Individuals with full-penetrance alleles develop neurologic and/or psychiatric symptoms by age 50 years. Ataxia and psychiatric abnormalities are frequently the initial findings, followed by involuntary movement, parkinsonism, dementia, and pyramidal signs. Brain MRI shows variable atrophy of the cerebrum, brain stem, and cerebellum. The clinical features correlate with the length of the polyglutamine expansion but are not absolutely predictive of the clinical course.
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 15/16
MedGen UID:
338301
Concept ID:
C1847725
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 15 (SCA15) is characterized by slowly progressive gait and limb ataxia, often in combination with ataxic dysarthria, titubation, upper limb postural tremor, mild hyperreflexia, gaze-evoked nystagmus, and impaired vestibuloocular reflex gain. Onset is between ages seven and 72 years, usually with gait ataxia but sometimes with tremor. Affected individuals remain ambulatory for ten to 54 years after symptom onset. Mild dysphagia usually after two or more decades of symptoms has been observed in members of multiple affected families and movement-induced oscillopsia has been described in one member of an affected family.
CHIME syndrome
MedGen UID:
341214
Concept ID:
C1848392
Disease or Syndrome
CHIME syndrome, also known as Zunich neuroectodermal syndrome, is an extremely rare autosomal recessive multisystem disorder clinically characterized by colobomas, congenital heart defects, migratory ichthyosiform dermatosis, mental retardation, and ear anomalies (CHIME). Other clinical features include distinctive facial features, abnormal growth, genitourinary abnormalities, seizures, and feeding difficulties (summary by Ng et al., 2012). The disorder is caused by a defect in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293).
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 34
MedGen UID:
338703
Concept ID:
C1851481
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia-34 is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia. The age at onset is usually during the young adult years, and most patients remain ambulatory until late in life. One family with SCA34 also had onset of erythema and hyperkeratosis in early childhood (Cadieux-Dion et al., 2014), whereas other families have additional neurologic signs, including ocular movement disturbances and pyramidal tract signs (Ozaki et al., 2015). For a general discussion of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia, see SCA1 (164400).
Dystonia 5
MedGen UID:
342121
Concept ID:
C1851920
Disease or Syndrome
GTP cyclohydrolase 1-deficient dopa-responsive dystonia (GTPCH1-deficient DRD) is characterized by childhood-onset dystonia and a dramatic and sustained response to low doses of oral administration of levodopa. This disorder typically presents with gait disturbance caused by foot dystonia, later development of parkinsonism, and diurnal fluctuation of symptoms (aggravation of symptoms toward the evening and alleviation of symptoms in the morning after sleep). Initial symptoms are often gait difficulties attributable to flexion-inversion (equinovarus posture) of the foot. Occasionally, initial symptoms are arm dystonia, postural tremor of the hand, or slowness of movements. Brisk deep-tendon reflexes in the legs, ankle clonus, and/or the striatal toe (dystonic extension of the big toe) are present in many affected individuals. In general, gradual progression to generalized dystonia is observed. Intellectual, cerebellar, sensory, and autonomic disturbances generally do not occur.
Torsion dystonia 4
MedGen UID:
342124
Concept ID:
C1851943
Disease or Syndrome
Dystonia-4, also known as whispering dysphonia, is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by onset in the second to third decade of progressive laryngeal dysphonia followed by the involvement of other muscles, such as the neck or limbs. Some patients develop an ataxic gait (summary by Hersheson et al., 2013).
Autosomal recessive ataxia, Beauce type
MedGen UID:
343973
Concept ID:
C1853116
Disease or Syndrome
SYNE1 deficiency comprises a phenotypic spectrum that ranges from autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia at the mild end to arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) at the severe end. SYNE1-deficient cerebellar ataxia, the most commonly recognized manifestation of SYNE1 deficiency to date, is a slowly progressive disorder typically beginning in adulthood (age range 6-45 years). While some individuals have a pure cerebellar syndrome (i.e., cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria, dysmetria, abnormalities in ocular saccades and smooth pursuit), many also have upper motor neuron dysfunction (spasticity, hyperreflexia, Babinski sign) and/or lower motor neuron dysfunction (amyotrophy, reduced reflexes, fasciculations). Most individuals develop features of the cerebellar cognitive and affective syndrome (i.e., significant deficits in attention, executive functioning, verbal working memory, and visuospatial/visuoconstructional skills). The two less common phenotypes are SYNE1-deficient childhood-onset multisystem disease (ataxia, upper and lower motor neuron dysfunction, muscle weakness and wasting, intellectual disability) and SYNE1-deficient arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (decreased fetal movements and severe neonatal hypotonia associated with multiple congenital joint contractures including clubfoot).
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 28
MedGen UID:
339941
Concept ID:
C1853249
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 28 (SCA28) is characterized by young-adult onset, very slowly progressive gait and limb ataxia resulting in coordination and balance problems, dysarthria, ptosis, nystagmus, and ophthalmoparesis. In most individuals, SCA28 presents as a loss of coordination of lower limbs (unsteadiness, gait ataxia). Less frequently, ptosis/ophthalmoplegia, dysarthria, or upper-limb incoordination may occur as the initial finding. The course of the disease is slowly progressive without impairment of functional autonomy even decades after onset.
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 23
MedGen UID:
339942
Concept ID:
C1853250
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia-23 (SCA23) is an adult-onset autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by slowly progressive gait and limb ataxia, with variable additional features, including peripheral neuropathy and dysarthria (Bakalkin et al., 2010). For a general discussion of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia, see SCA1 (164400).
Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive, with axonal neuropathy 2
MedGen UID:
340052
Concept ID:
C1853761
Disease or Syndrome
Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2) is characterized by onset of ataxia between age three and 30 years after initial normal development, axonal sensorimotor neuropathy, oculomotor apraxia, cerebellar atrophy, and elevated serum concentration of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP).
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 14
MedGen UID:
343106
Concept ID:
C1854369
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 (SCA14) is characterized by slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria, and nystagmus. Axial myoclonus, cognitive impairment, tremor, and sensory loss may also be observed. Parkinsonian features including rigidity and tremor have been described in some families. Findings seen in other ataxia disorders (e.g., dysphagia, dysphonia) may also occur in SCA14. The average age of onset is in the 30s, with a range from childhood to the seventh decade. Life span is not shortened.
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 13
MedGen UID:
344297
Concept ID:
C1854488
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13) is a phenotypic spectrum that includes both non-progressive infantile-onset ataxia and progressive childhood-onset and adult-onset cerebellar ataxia. Three phenotypes are seen: Cerebellar hypoplasia with non-progressive infantile-onset limb, truncal, and gait ataxia with mild-to-moderate intellectual disability and occasionally seizures and/or psychiatric manifestations. Cognition and motor skills improve over time. Childhood-onset slowly progressive cerebellar atrophy with slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia and dysarthria, delayed motor milestones, and mild-to-moderate intellectual disability. Adult-onset progressive cerebellar atrophy with progressive ataxia and spasticity.
Muscular dystrophy, adult-onset, with leukoencephalopathy
MedGen UID:
340269
Concept ID:
C1854646
Disease or Syndrome
Visceral neuropathy, familial, 1, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
340946
Concept ID:
C1855733
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive familial visceral neuropathy-1 (VSCN1) is characterized by a broad spectrum of developmental anomalies associating neural crest and extraneural crest features, including intestinal dysmotility due to aganglionosis (Hirschsprung disease), hypoganglionosis, and/or chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction. Some patients develop progressive peripheral neuropathy, and arthrogryposis has been observed. Hypoplasia or aplasia of the olfactory bulb and of the external auditory canals, as well as microtia or anotia, have been reported. Patients also exhibit facial dysmorphisms, including microretrognathia in most; other variable features include structural cardiac anomalies and arthrogryposis with multiple pterygia (Le et al., 2021). Genetic Heterogeneity of Familial Visceral Neuropathy Autosomal recessive familial visceral neuropathy-2 (VSCN2; 619465) is caused by mutation in the ERBB2 gene (164870) on chromosome 17q12. Also see VSCN3 (609629) for an autosomal dominant form of the disorder.
Friedreich ataxia 1
MedGen UID:
383962
Concept ID:
C1856689
Disease or Syndrome
Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is characterized by slowly progressive ataxia with onset usually before age 25 years (mean age at onset: 10-15 yrs). FRDA is typically associated with dysarthria, muscle weakness, spasticity particularly in the lower limbs, scoliosis, bladder dysfunction, absent lower-limb reflexes, and loss of position and vibration sense. Approximately two thirds of individuals with FRDA have cardiomyopathy, up to 30% have diabetes mellitus, and approximately 25% have an "atypical" presentation with later onset or retained tendon reflexes.
Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation 2B
MedGen UID:
346658
Concept ID:
C1857747
Disease or Syndrome
PLA2G6-associated neurodegeneration (PLAN) comprises a continuum of three phenotypes with overlapping clinical and radiologic features: Infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (INAD). Atypical neuroaxonal dystrophy (atypical NAD). PLA2G6-related dystonia-parkinsonism. INAD usually begins between ages six months and three years with psychomotor regression or delay, hypotonia, and progressive spastic tetraparesis. Many affected children never learn to walk or lose the ability shortly after attaining it. Strabismus, nystagmus, and optic atrophy are common. Disease progression is rapid, resulting in severe spasticity, progressive cognitive decline, and visual impairment. Many affected children do not survive beyond their first decade. Atypical NAD shows more phenotypic variability than INAD. In general, onset is in early childhood but can be as late as the end of the second decade. The presenting signs may be gait instability, ataxia, or speech delay and autistic features, which are sometimes the only evidence of disease for a year or more. Strabismus, nystagmus, and optic atrophy are common. Neuropsychiatric disturbances including impulsivity, poor attention span, hyperactivity, and emotional lability are also common. The course is fairly stable during early childhood and resembles static encephalopathy but is followed by neurologic deterioration between ages seven and 12 years. PLA2G6-related dystonia-parkinsonism has a variable age of onset, but most individuals present in early adulthood with gait disturbance or neuropsychiatric changes. Affected individuals consistently develop dystonia and parkinsonism (which may be accompanied by rapid cognitive decline) in their late teens to early twenties. Dystonia is most common in the hands and feet but may be more generalized. The most common features of parkinsonism in these individuals are bradykinesia, resting tremor, rigidity, and postural instability.
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 11
MedGen UID:
346799
Concept ID:
C1858351
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 11 (SCA11) is characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia and abnormal eye signs (jerky pursuit, horizontal and vertical nystagmus). Pyramidal features are seen on occasion. Peripheral neuropathy and dystonia are rare. Six families have been reported to date, one each from the UK, Pakistan, France, Germany, Denmark, and China. Age of onset ranged from early childhood to the mid-40s. Life span is thought to be normal.
Ataxia-hypogonadism-choroidal dystrophy syndrome
MedGen UID:
347798
Concept ID:
C1859093
Disease or Syndrome
PNPLA6 disorders span a phenotypic continuum characterized by variable combinations of cerebellar ataxia; upper motor neuron involvement manifesting as spasticity and/or brisk reflexes; chorioretinal dystrophy associated with variable degrees of reduced visual function; and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (delayed puberty and lack of secondary sex characteristics). The hypogonadotropic hypogonadism occurs either in isolation or as part of anterior hypopituitarism (growth hormone, thyroid hormone, or gonadotropin deficiencies). Common but less frequent features are peripheral neuropathy (usually of axonal type manifesting as reduced distal reflexes, diminished vibratory sensation, and/or distal muscle wasting); hair anomalies (long eyelashes, bushy eyebrows, or scalp alopecia); short stature; and impaired cognitive functioning (learning disabilities in children; deficits in attention, visuospatial abilities, and recall in adults). Some of these features can occur in distinct clusters on the phenotypic continuum: Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome (cerebellar ataxia, chorioretinal dystrophy, and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism); Gordon Holmes syndrome (cerebellar ataxia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and – to a variable degree – brisk reflexes); Oliver-McFarlane syndrome (trichomegaly, chorioretinal dystrophy, short stature, intellectual disability, and hypopituitarism); Laurence-Moon syndrome; and spastic paraplegia type 39 (SPG39) (upper motor neuron involvement, peripheral neuropathy, and sometimes reduced cognitive functioning and/or cerebellar ataxia).
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia 2
MedGen UID:
349134
Concept ID:
C1859298
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-2 is an neurologic disorder characterized by onset of impaired motor development and ataxic gait in early childhood. Additional features often include loss of fine motor skills, dysarthria, nystagmus, cerebellar signs, and delayed cognitive development with intellectual disability. Brain imaging shows cerebellar atrophy. Overall, the disorder is non- or slowly progressive, with survival into adulthood (summary by Jobling et al., 2015).
Ataxia, early-onset, with oculomotor apraxia and hypoalbuminemia
MedGen UID:
395301
Concept ID:
C1859598
Disease or Syndrome
Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 1 (AOA1) is characterized by childhood onset of slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia, followed by oculomotor apraxia and a severe primary motor peripheral axonal motor neuropathy. The first manifestation is progressive gait imbalance (mean age of onset: 4.3 years; range: 2-10 years), followed by dysarthria, then upper-limb dysmetria with mild intention tremor. Oculomotor apraxia, usually noticed a few years after the onset of ataxia, progresses to external ophthalmoplegia. All affected individuals have generalized areflexia followed by a peripheral neuropathy and quadriplegia with loss of ambulation about seven to ten years after onset. Hands and feet are short and atrophic. Chorea and upper-limb dystonia are common. Intellect remains normal in some individuals; in others, different degrees of cognitive impairment have been observed.
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 29
MedGen UID:
350085
Concept ID:
C1861732
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia-29 (SCA29) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by onset in infancy of delayed motor development and mild cognitive delay. Affected individuals develop a very slowly progressive or nonprogressive gait and limb ataxia associated with cerebellar atrophy on brain imaging. Additional variable features include nystagmus, dysarthria, and tremor (summary by Huang et al., 2012). For a general discussion of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia, see SCA1 (164400).
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 31
MedGen UID:
348439
Concept ID:
C1861736
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 31 (SCA31) is a very rare disease with manifestation of late-onset of cerebral ataxia, dysarthria, and horizontal gaze nystagmus, and that is occasionally accompanied by pyramidal signs, tremor, decreased vibration sense, and hearing difficulties. The mean age of disease onset is 58 years but it can present between the ages of 8 to 83 years. SCA31 is due to non-coding pentanucleotide repeat expansions in the brain expressed, associated with NEDD4, 1 (BEAN1) gene (16q21). Inherited autosomal dominantly with incomplete penetrance.
Migraine, familial hemiplegic, 2
MedGen UID:
355962
Concept ID:
C1865322
Disease or Syndrome
Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) falls within the category of migraine with aura. In migraine with aura (including FHM) the neurologic symptoms of aura are unequivocally localizable to the cerebral cortex or brain stem and include visual disturbance (most common), sensory loss (e.g., numbness or paresthesias of the face or an extremity), and dysphasia (difficulty with speech). FHM must include motor involvement, such as hemiparesis (weakness of an extremity). Hemiparesis occurs with at least one other symptom during FHM aura. Neurologic deficits with FHM attacks can be prolonged for hours to days and may outlast the associated migrainous headache. FHM is often earlier in onset than typical migraine, frequently beginning in the first or second decade; the frequency of attacks tends to decrease with age. Approximately 40%-50% of families with CACNA1A-FHM have cerebellar signs ranging from nystagmus to progressive, usually late-onset mild ataxia.
Autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinson disease 2
MedGen UID:
401500
Concept ID:
C1868675
Disease or Syndrome
Parkin type of early-onset Parkinson disease (PARK-Parkin) is characterized by the cardinal signs of Parkinson disease (PD): bradykinesia, resting tremor, and rigidity. The median age at onset is 31 years (range: 3-81 years). The disease is slowly progressive: disease duration of more than 50 years has been reported. Clinical findings vary; hyperreflexia is common. Lower-limb dystonia may be a presenting sign and cognitive decline appears to be no more frequent than in the general population. Dyskinesia as a result of treatment with levodopa frequently occurs.
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10
MedGen UID:
369786
Concept ID:
C1963674
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10) is characterized by slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia that usually starts as poor balance and unsteady gait, followed by upper-limb ataxia, scanning dysarthria, and dysphagia. Abnormal tracking eye movements are common. Recurrent seizures after the onset of gait ataxia have been reported with variable frequencies among different families. Some individuals have cognitive dysfunction, behavioral disturbances, mood disorders, mild pyramidal signs, and peripheral neuropathy. Age of onset ranges from 12 to 48 years.
Spastic ataxia 3
MedGen UID:
370715
Concept ID:
C1969645
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic autosomal recessive spastic ataxia disease with characteristics of cerebellar ataxia, spasticity, cerebellar (and in some cases cerebral) atrophy, dystonia and leucoencephalopathy. Caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous complex genomic rearrangements involving the MARS2 gene on chromosome 2q33.
Spastic ataxia 2
MedGen UID:
370750
Concept ID:
C1969796
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia-2 (SPAX2) is a neurologic disorder characterized by onset in the first 2 decades of cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria, and variable spasticity of the lower limbs. Cognition is not affected (summary by Dor et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of spastic ataxia, see SPAX1 (108600).
Pitt-Hopkins syndrome
MedGen UID:
370910
Concept ID:
C1970431
Disease or Syndrome
Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS) is characterized by significant developmental delays with moderate-to-severe intellectual disability and behavioral differences, characteristic facial features, and episodic hyperventilation and/or breath-holding while awake. Speech is significantly delayed and most individuals are nonverbal with receptive language often stronger than expressive language. Other common findings are autism spectrum disorder symptoms, sleep disturbance, stereotypic hand movements, seizures, constipation, and severe myopia.
Autosomal recessive DOPA responsive dystonia
MedGen UID:
382128
Concept ID:
C2673535
Disease or Syndrome
Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) deficiency is associated with a broad phenotypic spectrum. Based on severity of symptoms/signs as well as responsiveness to levodopa therapy, clinical phenotypes caused by pathogenic variants in TH are divided into (1) TH-deficient dopa-responsive dystonia (the mild form of TH deficiency), (2) TH-deficient infantile parkinsonism with motor delay (the severe form), and (3) TH-deficient progressive infantile encephalopathy (the very severe form). In individuals with TH-deficient dopa-responsive dystonia (DYT5b, DYT-TH), onset is between age 12 months and 12 years; initial symptoms are typically lower-limb dystonia and/or difficulty in walking. Diurnal fluctuation of symptoms (worsening of the symptoms toward the evening and their alleviation in the morning after sleep) may be present. In most individuals with TH-deficient infantile parkinsonism with motor delay, onset is between age three and 12 months. In contrast to TH-deficient DRD, motor milestones are overtly delayed in this severe form. Affected infants demonstrate truncal hypotonia and parkinsonian symptoms and signs (hypokinesia, rigidity of extremities, and/or tremor). In individuals with TH-deficient progressive infantile encephalopathy, onset is before age three to six months. Fetal distress is reported in most. Affected individuals have marked delay in motor development, truncal hypotonia, severe hypokinesia, limb hypertonia (rigidity and/or spasticity), hyperreflexia, oculogyric crises, ptosis, intellectual disability, and paroxysmal periods of lethargy (with increased sweating and drooling) alternating with irritability.
Chromosome 3q29 microdeletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
393265
Concept ID:
C2674949
Disease or Syndrome
3q29 recurrent deletion is characterized by neurodevelopmental and/or psychiatric manifestations including mild-to-moderate intellectual disability (ID), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), anxiety disorders, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), executive function deficits, graphomotor weakness, and psychosis/schizophrenia. Age at onset for psychosis or prodrome can be younger than the typical age at onset in the general population. Neurodevelopmental and psychiatric conditions are responsible for the majority of the disability associated with the 3q29 deletion. Other common findings are failure to thrive and feeding problems in infancy that persist into childhood, gastrointestinal disorders (including constipation and gastroesophageal reflux disease [GERD]), ocular issues, dental anomalies, and congenital heart defects (especially patent ductus arteriosus). Structural anomalies of the posterior fossa may be seen on neuroimaging. To date more than 200 affected individuals have been identified.
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 8a
MedGen UID:
412815
Concept ID:
C2749861
Disease or Syndrome
Four phenotypes comprise the RRM2B mitochondrial DNA maintenance defects (RRM2B-MDMDs): RRM2B encephalomyopathic MDMD, the most severe phenotype, usually manifesting shortly after birth as hypotonia, poor feeding, and faltering growth requiring hospitalization. Subsequent assessments are likely to reveal multisystem involvement including sensorineural hearing loss, renal tubulopathy, and respiratory failure. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO), typically adult onset; other manifestations can include ptosis, bulbar dysfunction, fatigue, and muscle weakness. RRM2B autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO), a typically childhood-onset predominantly myopathic phenotype of PEO, ptosis, proximal muscle weakness, and bulbar dysfunction. RRM2B mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy (MNGIE)-like, characterized by progressive ptosis, ophthalmoplegia, gastrointestinal dysmotility, cachexia, and peripheral neuropathy. To date, 78 individuals from 52 families with a molecularly confirmed RRM2B-MDMD have been reported.
Cerebellar ataxia, intellectual disability, and dysequilibrium syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
412914
Concept ID:
C2750234
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebellar ataxia, impaired intellectual development, and dysequilibrium syndrome (CAMRQ) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by congenital cerebellar ataxia and intellectual disability (summary by Gulsuner et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CAMRQ, see CAMRQ1 (224050).
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal dominant 5
MedGen UID:
413981
Concept ID:
C2751319
Disease or Syndrome
Four phenotypes comprise the RRM2B mitochondrial DNA maintenance defects (RRM2B-MDMDs): RRM2B encephalomyopathic MDMD, the most severe phenotype, usually manifesting shortly after birth as hypotonia, poor feeding, and faltering growth requiring hospitalization. Subsequent assessments are likely to reveal multisystem involvement including sensorineural hearing loss, renal tubulopathy, and respiratory failure. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO), typically adult onset; other manifestations can include ptosis, bulbar dysfunction, fatigue, and muscle weakness. RRM2B autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO), a typically childhood-onset predominantly myopathic phenotype of PEO, ptosis, proximal muscle weakness, and bulbar dysfunction. RRM2B mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy (MNGIE)-like, characterized by progressive ptosis, ophthalmoplegia, gastrointestinal dysmotility, cachexia, and peripheral neuropathy. To date, 78 individuals from 52 families with a molecularly confirmed RRM2B-MDMD have been reported.
Oxoglutaricaciduria
MedGen UID:
414553
Concept ID:
C2752074
Disease or Syndrome
Oxoglutarate dehydrogenase deficiency (OGDHD) is an autosomal recessive disorder associated with features of infantile- and pediatric-onset basal ganglia-associated movement disorders, hypotonia, developmental delays, ataxia, and seizures (summary by Yap et al., 2021).
Spastic ataxia 4
MedGen UID:
462275
Concept ID:
C3150925
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic autosomal recessive spastic ataxia disease with characteristics of the onset in early childhood of spastic paraparesis, cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria and optic atrophy. Caused by homozygous mutation in the MTPAP gene on chromosome 10p11.
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia 10
MedGen UID:
462348
Concept ID:
C3150998
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-10 is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder with onset in the teenage or young adult years of gait and limb ataxia, dysarthria, and nystagmus associated with marked cerebellar atrophy on brain imaging (summary by Vermeer et al., 2010). Some patients have low levels of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in muscle and may show some clinical improvement with CoQ10 treatment (Balreira et al., 2014).
Niemann-Pick disease, type C1
MedGen UID:
465922
Concept ID:
C3179455
Disease or Syndrome
Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) is a slowly progressive lysosomal disorder whose principal manifestations are age dependent. The manifestations in the perinatal period and infancy are predominantly visceral, with hepatosplenomegaly, jaundice, and (in some instances) pulmonary infiltrates. From late infancy onward, the presentation is dominated by neurologic manifestations. The youngest children may present with hypotonia and developmental delay, with the subsequent emergence of ataxia, dysarthria, dysphagia, and, in some individuals, epileptic seizures, dystonia, and gelastic cataplexy. Although cognitive impairment may be subtle at first, it eventually becomes apparent that affected individuals have a progressive dementia. Older teenagers and young adults may present predominantly with apparent early-onset dementia or psychiatric manifestations; however, careful examination usually identifies typical neurologic signs.
Cognitive impairment with or without cerebellar ataxia
MedGen UID:
482045
Concept ID:
C3280415
Disease or Syndrome
SCN8A-related epilepsy with encephalopathy is characterized by developmental delay, seizure onset in the first 18 months of life (mean 4 months), and intractable epilepsy characterized by multiple seizure types (generalized tonic-clonic seizures, infantile spasms, and absence and focal seizures). Epilepsy syndromes can include Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, West syndrome, and epileptic encephalopathies (e.g., Dravet syndrome). Hypotonia and movement disorders including dystonia, ataxia, and choreoathetosis are common. Psychomotor development varies from normal prior to seizure onset (with subsequent slowing or regression after seizure onset) to abnormal from birth. Intellectual disability, present in all, ranges from mild to severe (in ~50% of affected individuals). Autistic features are noted in some. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) of unknown cause has been reported in approximately 10% of published cases. To date SCN8A-related epilepsy with encephalopathy has been reported in the literature in about 50 individuals.
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia 12
MedGen UID:
482082
Concept ID:
C3280452
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-12 is a neurologic disorder characterized by onset of generalized seizures in infancy, delayed psychomotor development with mental retardation, and cerebellar ataxia. Some patients may also show spasticity (summary by Mallaret et al., 2014).
Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy 8 with or without oligodontia and-or hypogonadotropic hypogonadism
MedGen UID:
482274
Concept ID:
C3280644
Disease or Syndrome
POLR3-related leukodystrophy, a hypomyelinating leukodystrophy with specific features on brain MRI, is characterized by varying combinations of four major clinical findings: Neurologic dysfunction, typically predominated by motor dysfunction (progressive cerebellar dysfunction, and to a lesser extent extrapyramidal [i.e., dystonia], pyramidal [i.e., spasticity] and cognitive dysfunctions). Abnormal dentition (delayed dentition, hypodontia, oligodontia, and abnormally placed or shaped teeth). Endocrine abnormalities such as short stature (in ~50% of individuals) with or without growth hormone deficiency, and more commonly, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism manifesting as delayed, arrested, or absent puberty. Ocular abnormality in the form of myopia, typically progressing over several years and becoming severe. POLR3-related leukodystrophy and 4H leukodystrophy are the two recognized terms for five previously described overlapping clinical phenotypes (initially described as distinct entities before their molecular basis was known). These include: Hypomyelination, hypodontia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (4H syndrome); Ataxia, delayed dentition, and hypomyelination (ADDH); Tremor-ataxia with central hypomyelination (TACH); Leukodystrophy with oligodontia (LO); Hypomyelination with cerebellar atrophy and hypoplasia of the corpus callosum (HCAHC). Age of onset is typically in early childhood but later-onset cases have also been reported. An infant with Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome (neonatal progeroid syndrome) was recently reported to have pathogenic variants in POLR3A on exome sequencing. Confirmation of this as a very severe form of POLR3-related leukodystrophy awaits replication in other individuals with a clinical diagnosis of Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome.
Childhood encephalopathy due to thiamine pyrophosphokinase deficiency
MedGen UID:
482496
Concept ID:
C3280866
Disease or Syndrome
Thiamine metabolism dysfunction syndrome-5 (THMD5) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder due to an inborn error of thiamine metabolism. The phenotype is highly variable, but in general, affected individuals have onset in early childhood of acute encephalopathic episodes associated with increased serum and CSF lactate. These episodes result in progressive neurologic dysfunction manifest as gait disturbances, ataxia, dystonia, and spasticity, which in some cases may result in loss of ability to walk. Cognitive function is usually preserved, although mildly delayed development has been reported. These episodes are usually associated with infection and metabolic decompensation. Some patients may have recovery of some neurologic deficits (Mayr et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of disorders due to thiamine metabolism dysfunction, see THMD1 (249270).
Coffin-Siris syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
482831
Concept ID:
C3281201
Disease or Syndrome
Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) is classically characterized by aplasia or hypoplasia of the distal phalanx or nail of the fifth and additional digits, developmental or cognitive delay of varying degree, distinctive facial features, hypotonia, hirsutism/hypertrichosis, and sparse scalp hair. Congenital anomalies can include malformations of the cardiac, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and/or central nervous systems. Other findings commonly include feeding difficulties, slow growth, ophthalmologic abnormalities, and hearing impairment.
Cerebellar ataxia with neuropathy and bilateral vestibular areflexia syndrome
MedGen UID:
482853
Concept ID:
C3281223
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebellar ataxia, neuropathy, and vestibular areflexia syndrome (CANVAS) is an autosomal recessive adult-onset, slowly progressive neurologic disorder characterized by imbalance due to cerebellar gait and limb ataxia, impaired vestibular function bilaterally, and non-length-dependent sensory neuropathy (summary by Szmulewicz et al., 2011).
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 36
MedGen UID:
483339
Concept ID:
C3472711
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia-36 (SCA36) is a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by adult-onset gait ataxia, eye movement abnormalities, tongue fasciculations, and variable upper motor neuron signs. Some affected individuals may develop hearing loss (summary by Garcia-Murias et al., 2012). For a general discussion of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia, see SCA1 (164400).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4F
MedGen UID:
761704
Concept ID:
C3540453
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4F is an autosomal recessive demyelinating neuropathy characterized by distal sensory impairment and distal muscle weakness and atrophy affecting the lower more than the upper limbs. Nerve conduction velocities are decreased and sural nerve biopsy shows loss of myelinated fibers. The age at onset is variable and can range from childhood to adult years. When the onset is in infancy, the phenotype is characterized as Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS; 145900). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, see CMT4A (214400).
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 49
MedGen UID:
762260
Concept ID:
C3542549
Disease or Syndrome
TECPR2-related hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy with intellectual disability (TECPR2-HSAN with ID) is characterized by developmental delay and subsequent intellectual disability, behavioral abnormalities, neurologic manifestations (muscular hypotonia, sensory neuropathy with lower-limb hypo- or areflexia and ataxic gait), and autonomic dysfunction (including central hypoventilation and apnea, gastrointestinal dysmotility, dysphagia, and gastroesophageal reflux disease with recurrent aspiration). To date, more than 30 individuals with TECPR2-HSAN with ID have been identified.
Cerebellar dysfunction with variable cognitive and behavioral abnormalities
MedGen UID:
766575
Concept ID:
C3553661
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebellar dysfunction with variable cognitive and behavioral abnormalities (CECBA) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder with significant phenotypic heterogeneity, even within families. The disorder is most often diagnosed through genetic analysis with retrospective clinical phenotyping. Symptom onset is usually in early childhood, although later onset, even in adulthood, has been reported. Most affected individuals show global developmental delay from early childhood, particularly of motor and language skills. Many have mild intellectual disability; behavioral and psychiatric abnormalities such as autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder are also often observed. The movement disorder is prominent and may include cerebellar signs such as ataxia, tremor, dysmetria, poor coordination, and dysarthria. Other abnormal movements including spasticity, myoclonus, and dystonia have been reported, thus widening the phenotypic spectrum. Brain imaging is usually normal, but may show cerebellar atrophy or nonspecific white matter lesions. Variable dysmorphic facial features may also be present (summary by Thevenon et al., 2012; Jacobs et al., 2021; Wijnen et al., 2020).
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia 13
MedGen UID:
766730
Concept ID:
C3553816
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-13 (SCAR13) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development beginning in infancy. Affected individuals show mildly to profoundly impaired intellectual development with poor or absent speech as well as gait and stance ataxia and hyperreflexia. Most individuals also have eye movement abnormalities. Brain MRI shows cerebellar atrophy and ventriculomegaly (Guergueltcheva et al., 2012).
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 6B
MedGen UID:
766862
Concept ID:
C3553948
Disease or Syndrome
The overlapping phenotypes of neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD) and infantile Refsum disease (IRD) represent the milder manifestations of the Zellweger syndrome spectrum (ZSS) of peroxisome biogenesis disorders. The clinical course of patients with the NALD and IRD presentation is variable and may include developmental delay, hypotonia, liver dysfunction, sensorineural hearing loss, retinal dystrophy, and visual impairment. Children with the NALD presentation may reach their teens, and those with the IRD presentation may reach adulthood. Some patients with PEX10 mutations have a milder disorder characterized by childhood-onset cerebellar ataxia and neuropathy without mental retardation (summary by Waterham and Ebberink, 2012). For a complete phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PBD(NALD/IRD), see 601539. Individuals with mutations in the PEX10 gene have cells of complementation group 7 (CG7, equivalent to CGB). For information on the history of PBD complementation groups, see 214100.
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 8B
MedGen UID:
766874
Concept ID:
C3553960
Disease or Syndrome
The overlapping phenotypes of neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD) and infantile Refsum disease (IRD) represent the milder manifestations of the Zellweger syndrome spectrum (ZSS) of peroxisome biogenesis disorders. The clinical course of patients with the NALD and IRD presentation is variable and may include developmental delay, hypotonia, liver dysfunction, sensorineural hearing loss, retinal dystrophy, and visual impairment. Children with the NALD presentation may reach their teens, and those with the IRD presentation may reach adulthood (summary by Waterham and Ebberink, 2012). For a complete phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PBD(NALD/IRD), see 601539. Individuals with mutations in the PEX16 gene have cells of complementation group 9 (CG9, equivalent to CGD). For information on the history of PBD complementation groups, see 214100.
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 8
MedGen UID:
767123
Concept ID:
C3554209
Disease or Syndrome
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 8 is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe psychomotor retardation, abnormal movements, hypotonia, spasticity, and variable visual defects. Brain MRI shows pontocerebellar hypoplasia, decreased cerebral white matter, and a thin corpus callosum (summary by Mochida et al., 2012). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PCH, see PCH1 (607596).
Mitochondrial complex III deficiency nuclear type 2
MedGen UID:
767519
Concept ID:
C3554605
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex III deficiency nuclear type 2 is an autosomal recessive severe neurodegenerative disorder that usually presents in childhood, but may show later onset, even in adulthood. Affected individuals have motor disability, with ataxia, apraxia, dystonia, and dysarthria, associated with necrotic lesions throughout the brain. Most patients also have cognitive impairment and axonal neuropathy and become severely disabled later in life (summary by Ghezzi et al., 2011). The disorder may present clinically as spinocerebellar ataxia or Leigh syndrome, or with psychiatric disturbances (Morino et al., 2014; Atwal, 2014; Nogueira et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial complex III deficiency, see MC3DN1 (124000).
Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis 13
MedGen UID:
811566
Concept ID:
C3715049
Disease or Syndrome
Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis-13 (CLN13) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by adult onset of progressive cognitive decline and motor dysfunction leading to dementia and often early death. Some patients develop seizures. Neurons show abnormal accumulation of autofluorescent material (summary by Smith et al., 2013). Adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis is sometimes referred to as Kufs disease (see 204300). In a review of the classification of CLN disease, Gardner and Mole (2021) noted that the CLN13 phenotype corresponds to 'Kufs type B', which is characterized by dementia and a variety of motor signs (Smith et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (CLN), see CLN1 (256730).
Partial lipodystrophy, congenital cataracts, and neurodegeneration syndrome
MedGen UID:
813897
Concept ID:
C3807567
Disease or Syndrome
Lipodystrophies are rare disorders characterized by loss of body fat from various regions and predisposition to metabolic complications of insulin resistance and lipid abnormalities. FPLD7 is an autosomal dominant disorder with a highly variable phenotype. Additional features, including early-onset cataracts and later onset of spasticity of the lower limbs, have been noted in some patients (summary by Garg et al., 2015). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD), see 151660.
Perrault syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
815435
Concept ID:
C3809105
Disease or Syndrome
Perrault syndrome is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in males and females and ovarian dysfunction in females. SNHL is bilateral and ranges from profound with prelingual (congenital) onset to moderate with early-childhood onset. When onset is in early childhood, hearing loss can be progressive. Ovarian dysfunction ranges from gonadal dysgenesis (absent or streak gonads) manifesting as primary amenorrhea to primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) defined as cessation of menses before age 40 years. Fertility in affected males is reported as normal (although the number of reported males is limited). Neurologic features described in some individuals with Perrault syndrome include learning difficulties and developmental delay, cerebellar ataxia, and motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy.
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia 15
MedGen UID:
816656
Concept ID:
C3810326
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-15 (SCAR15) is characterized by early-onset ataxia, cognitive impairment, dysarthria, and developmental delay. Variable features include seizures, nystagmus, and abnormal reflexes (Seidahmed et al., 2020).
Ataxia-telangiectasia-like disorder 1
MedGen UID:
861227
Concept ID:
C4012790
Disease or Syndrome
Ataxia-telangiectasia-like disorder-1 is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized clinically by progressive cerebellar degeneration resulting in ataxia and oculomotor apraxia. Laboratory studies of patient cells showed increased susceptibility to radiation, consistent with a defect in DNA repair. The disorder shares some phenotypic features of ataxia-telangiectasia (AT; 208900), but telangiectases and immune deficiency are not present in ATLD1 (summary by Hernandez et al., 1993 and Stewart et al., 1999). Genetic Heterogeneity of Ataxia-Telangiectasia-Like Disorder See also ATLD2 (615919), caused by mutation in the PCNA gene (176740) on chromosome 20p12.
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia 17
MedGen UID:
863738
Concept ID:
C4015301
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-17 (SCAR17) is a neurologic disorder characterized by onset of gait ataxia and cerebellar signs in early childhood. Patients also have variably impaired intellectual development (summary by Evers et al., 2016).
Juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus-central and peripheral neurodegeneration syndrome
MedGen UID:
863873
Concept ID:
C4015436
Disease or Syndrome
Combined cerebellar and peripheral ataxia with hearing loss and diabetes mellitus (ACPHD) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder including defects in glucose metabolism, diffuse neurodegeneration, multiple hormone deficiencies, severe growth retardation with possible growth hormone deficiencies, and subtle osseous changes suggesting early-onset bone dysplasia (summary by Ozon et al., 2020).
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia 18
MedGen UID:
863942
Concept ID:
C4015505
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-18 is a neurologic disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, severely impaired gait due to cerebellar ataxia, ocular movement abnormalities, and intellectual disability. Brain imaging shows progressive cerebellar atrophy (summary by Hills et al., 2013).
Al-Raqad syndrome
MedGen UID:
897610
Concept ID:
C4085595
Disease or Syndrome
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal recessive 1
MedGen UID:
897191
Concept ID:
C4225153
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life and about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called "chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus," or "CPEO+").
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 41
MedGen UID:
908281
Concept ID:
C4225158
Disease or Syndrome
A rare autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type III disorder with characteristics of adult-onset progressive imbalance and loss of coordination associated with an ataxic gait. Mild atrophy of the cerebellar vermis has been reported on brain magnetic resonance imaging.
Microcephaly, short stature, and impaired glucose metabolism 2
MedGen UID:
906140
Concept ID:
C4225195
Disease or Syndrome
Microcephaly, short stature, and impaired glucose metabolism-2 (MSSGM2) is an autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by microcephaly associated with impaired intellectual development, and short stature. Patients develop diabetes in the second or third decade of life, and hypothyroidism and delayed puberty have also been reported (Abdulkarim et al., 2015; Kernohan et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of microcephaly, short stature, and impaired glucose metabolism, see MSSGM1 (616033).
PMP22-RAI1 contiguous gene duplication syndrome
MedGen UID:
894862
Concept ID:
C4225255
Disease or Syndrome
Yuan-Harel-Lupski syndrome is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay and early-onset peripheral neuropathy. The disorder comprises features of both demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A; 118220), which results from duplication of the PMP22 gene on 17p12, and Potocki-Lupski syndrome (PTLS; 610883), which results from duplication of a slightly proximal region on 17p11.2 that includes the RAI1 gene. These 2 loci are about 2.5 Mb apart. The resultant YUHAL phenotype may be more severe in comparison to the individual contributions of each gene, with particularly early onset of peripheral neuropathy and features of both central and peripheral nervous system involvement (summary by Yuan et al., 2015).
Progressive myoclonic epilepsy type 9
MedGen UID:
901242
Concept ID:
C4225289
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic neurological disorder with characteristics of childhood-onset severe myoclonic and tonic-clonic seizures and early-onset ataxia leading to severe gait disturbances associated with normal to slightly diminished cognition. Scoliosis, diffuse muscle atrophy and subcutaneous fat loss, as well as developmental delay, may be associated. Brain MRI may reveal complete agenesis of the corpus callosum, ventriculomegaly, interhemispheric cysts and simplified gyration (frontally).
Neuropathy, hereditary motor and sensory, type 6B
MedGen UID:
895482
Concept ID:
C4225302
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type VIB is an autosomal recessive complex progressive neurologic disorder characterized mainly by early-onset optic atrophy resulting in progressive visual loss and peripheral axonal sensorimotor neuropathy with highly variable age at onset and severity. Affected individuals may also have cerebellar or pontocerebellar atrophy on brain imaging, and they may show abnormal movements such as ataxia, dysmetria, and myoclonus (summary by Abrams et al., 2015). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HMSN6, see HMSN6A (601152).
Houge-Janssens syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
899880
Concept ID:
C4225352
Disease or Syndrome
PPP2R1A-related neurodevelopmental disorder (NDD) is characterized by: severe, persistent hypotonia; developmental delay with variable intellectual outcomes, typically in the moderate-to-severe intellectual disability range; seizures (more commonly seen in individuals with microcephaly and/or severe intellectual disability); attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and other behavioral problems (anxiousness, repetitive movements, self-injurious or destructive behavior, and autism spectrum disorder); feeding and swallowing issues; and dysmorphic features of the head and face. A minority of affected individuals have ear anomalies, hearing loss, ptosis, generalized joint hypermobility, and patent ductus arteriosus. Brain MRI findings are nonspecific but typically include complete or partial agenesis of the corpus callosum. Nonprogressive ventriculomegaly may be seen in a subset of affected individuals and is often associated with specific pathogenic variants in PPP2R1A: c.544C>T (p.Arg182Trp) and c.547C>T (p.Arg183Trp).
Lichtenstein-Knorr syndrome
MedGen UID:
898996
Concept ID:
C4225383
Disease or Syndrome
Lichtenstein-Knorr syndrome is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by postnatal onset of severe progressive sensorineural hearing loss and progressive cerebellar ataxia. Features usually develop in childhood or young adulthood (summary by Guissart et al., 2015). Some patients with SLC9A1 mutations may not have deafness (Iwama et al., 2018)
Trichothiodystrophy 5, nonphotosensitive
MedGen UID:
899675
Concept ID:
C4225420
Disease or Syndrome
Trichothiodystrophy-5 (TTD5) is an X-linked disorder characterized by sparse and brittle hair, facial dysmorphism, global developmental delays, growth deficiency, hypogonadism, and structural brain abnormalities (summary by Mendelsohn et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of trichothiodystrophy, see TTD1 (601675).
Hypotonia, ataxia, and delayed development syndrome
MedGen UID:
934585
Concept ID:
C4310618
Disease or Syndrome
EBF3 neurodevelopmental disorder (EBF3-NDD) is associated with developmental delay (DD) / intellectual disability (ID), speech delay, gait or truncal ataxia, hypotonia, behavioral problems, and facial dysmorphism. Variability between individuals with EBF3-NDD is significant. Although all affected children have DD noted in early infancy, intellect generally ranges from mild to severe ID, with two individuals functioning in the low normal range. Less common issues can include genitourinary abnormalities and gastrointestinal and/or musculoskeletal involvement. To date, 42 symptomatic individuals from 39 families have been reported.
Congenital bile acid synthesis defect 6
MedGen UID:
934591
Concept ID:
C4310624
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital bile acid synthesis defect-6 (CBAS6) is characterized by persistent hypertransaminasemia and accumulation of C27 bile acids (summary by Alonso-Pena et al., 2022). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital bile acid synthesis defects, see CBAS1 (607765).
Short stature, rhizomelic, with microcephaly, micrognathia, and developmental delay
MedGen UID:
934653
Concept ID:
C4310686
Disease or Syndrome
The core features of short stature-micrognathia syndrome (SSMG) are intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), postnatal short stature that is often rhizomelic, and micrognathia. Other common features include preterm birth, microcephaly, developmental delay, and genitourinary malformations in males. Transient liver dysfunction and glycosylation abnormalities during illness, giant cell hepatitis, hepatoblastoma, and cataracts have also been observed. Inter- and intrafamilial phenotypic severity varies greatly, from a relatively mild disorder to intrauterine death or stillbirth (Ritter et al., 2022).
Neurodegeneration with ataxia, dystonia, and gaze palsy, childhood-onset
MedGen UID:
934660
Concept ID:
C4310693
Disease or Syndrome
Childhood-onset neurodegeneration with ataxia, dystonia, and gaze palsy (NADGP) is an autosomal recessive progressive disorder characterized by onset of gait ataxia, cognitive decline, and gaze palsy in the first or second decades. Additional features include dysarthria, dystonia, and athetoid movements. Some patients may become wheelchair-bound as young adults (summary by Haack et al., 2016).
Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 24
MedGen UID:
934666
Concept ID:
C4310699
Disease or Syndrome
Any autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the UBA5 gene.
Joubert syndrome 27
MedGen UID:
934673
Concept ID:
C4310706
Disease or Syndrome
Classic Joubert syndrome (JS) is characterized by three primary findings: A distinctive cerebellar and brain stem malformation called the molar tooth sign (MTS). Hypotonia. Developmental delays. Often these findings are accompanied by episodic tachypnea or apnea and/or atypical eye movements. In general, the breathing abnormalities improve with age, truncal ataxia develops over time, and acquisition of gross motor milestones is delayed. Cognitive abilities are variable, ranging from severe intellectual disability to normal. Additional findings can include retinal dystrophy, renal disease, ocular colobomas, occipital encephalocele, hepatic fibrosis, polydactyly, oral hamartomas, and endocrine abnormalities. Both intra- and interfamilial variation are seen.
Spinocerebellar ataxia 43
MedGen UID:
934730
Concept ID:
C4310763
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia-43 is an autosomal dominant, slowly progressive neurologic disorder characterized by adult-onset gait and limb ataxia and often associated with peripheral neuropathy mainly affecting the motor system, although some patients may have distal sensory impairment (summary by Depondt et al., 2016). For a general discussion of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia, see SCA1 (164400).
Macrocephaly, dysmorphic facies, and psychomotor retardation
MedGen UID:
934733
Concept ID:
C4310766
Disease or Syndrome
Macrocephaly, dysmorphic facies, and psychomotor retardation (MDFPMR) is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by large head and somatic overgrowth apparent at birth followed by global developmental delay. Affected individuals have characteristic dysmorphic facial features and persistently large head, but increased birth weight normalizes with age. Additional neurologic features, including seizures, hypotonia, and gait ataxia, may also occur. Patients show severe intellectual impairment (summary by Ortega-Recalde et al., 2015).
Intellectual disability, X-linked, syndromic, 35
MedGen UID:
1392054
Concept ID:
C4478383
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 40
MedGen UID:
1385103
Concept ID:
C4518336
Disease or Syndrome
A very rare disease with characteristics of adult-onset unsteady gait and dysarthria, followed by wide-based gait, gait ataxia, ocular dysmetria, intention tremor, scanning speech, hyperreflexia and dysdiadochokinesis.
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 38
MedGen UID:
1379865
Concept ID:
C4518337
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 38 (SCA38) is characterized as a pure cerebellar ataxia with symptoms typically manifesting in the fourth decade of life. The most common presenting features are nystagmus and slowly progressive gait ataxia. As the disease progresses, cerebellar symptoms (limb ataxia, dysarthria, dysphagia, diplopia on the horizontal line) may emerge, and affected individuals may experience sensory loss. In the later stages of the condition, ophthalmoparesis followed by ophthalmoplegia may occur. Features that distinguish SCA38 from other spinocerebellar ataxias include pes cavus without paresis, hyposmia, hearing loss, and anxiety disorder. Dementia and extrapyramidal signs are not common features of SCA38. Brain imaging typically demonstrates cerebellar atrophy mainly affecting the vermis without atrophy of the cerebral cortex and a normal appearance of the brain stem. With disease progression, nerve conduction velocities and electromyography demonstrate a sensory and motor axonal polyneuropathy in all four extremities. Life span is apparently not decreased.
Spinocerebellar ataxia 44
MedGen UID:
1611168
Concept ID:
C4521563
Disease or Syndrome
Syringomyelia, isolated
MedGen UID:
1622554
Concept ID:
C4538540
Disease or Syndrome
Syringomyelia (Greek: 'syrinx,' pipe, and 'myelos,' marrow) is a tubular cavity in the spinal cord. It can occur sporadically in association with spinal cord tumors, inflammatory arachnoiditis, or posttraumatically. It is rarely idiopathic (less than 1% of cases). The vast majority of cases of syringomyelia are cervical, noncommunicating, and associated with an abnormality at the foramen magnum, particularly the Chiari malformation type I (CM1; 118420), as well as basilar impression (109500) and Dandy-Walker malformation (220200) (Speer et al., 2003; Levine, 2004); these cases have shown familial segregation. The form of syringomyelia discussed here is 'noncommunicating' with the fourth ventricle, but may communicate with the subarachnoid space. In contrast, 'communicating' syringomyelia, or 'hydromelia,' opens rostrally into the fourth ventricle and almost always occurs in children with hydrocephalus, Chiari malformation type II (CM2; 207950), and spina bifida (see 182940) (Levine, 2004).
Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 26
MedGen UID:
1617917
Concept ID:
C4539948
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia 45
MedGen UID:
1622156
Concept ID:
C4540400
Disease or Syndrome
A rare autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia with characteristics of slowly progressive late-onset gait and limb ataxia, dysarthria and variable nystagmus. Brain imaging reveals cerebellar atrophy.
Spinocerebellar ataxia 46
MedGen UID:
1624251
Concept ID:
C4540404
Disease or Syndrome
A rare autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia with characteristics of slowly progressive late-onset cerebellar ataxia variably combined with sensory axonal neuropathy. Patients may present gait and limb ataxia, dysarthria, abnormal oculomotor function and distal sensory impairment. Cerebellar atrophy is typically mild or absent.
Neurodevelopmental disorder with ataxic gait, absent speech, and decreased cortical white matter
MedGen UID:
1621102
Concept ID:
C4540498
Disease or Syndrome
NDAGSCW is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severely delayed psychomotor development apparent from infancy. Affected individuals have delayed and difficulty walking, intellectual disability, absent speech, and variable additional features, including hip dysplasia, tapering fingers, and seizures. Brain imaging shows decreased cortical white matter, often with decreased cerebellar white matter, thin corpus callosum, and thin brainstem (summary by Lamers et al., 2017).
Glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis defect 15
MedGen UID:
1615160
Concept ID:
C4540520
Disease or Syndrome
GPIBD15 is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, variable intellectual disability, hypotonia, early-onset seizures in most patients, and cerebellar atrophy, resulting in cerebellar signs including gait ataxia and dysarthria. The disorder is caused by a defect in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis (summary by Nguyen et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293).
Cerebellar ataxia, intellectual disability, and dysequilibrium syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1639436
Concept ID:
C4551552
Disease or Syndrome
VLDLR cerebellar hypoplasia (VLDLR-CH) is characterized by non-progressive congenital ataxia that is predominantly truncal and results in delayed ambulation, moderate-to-profound intellectual disability, dysarthria, strabismus, and seizures. Children either learn to walk very late (often after age 6 years) or never achieve independent ambulation. Brain MRI findings include hypoplasia of the inferior portion of the cerebellar vermis and hemispheres, simplified gyration of the cerebral hemispheres, and small brain stem – particularly the pons.
Perrault syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1640257
Concept ID:
C4551721
Disease or Syndrome
Perrault syndrome is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in males and females and ovarian dysfunction in females. SNHL is bilateral and ranges from profound with prelingual (congenital) onset to moderate with early-childhood onset. When onset is in early childhood, hearing loss can be progressive. Ovarian dysfunction ranges from gonadal dysgenesis (absent or streak gonads) manifesting as primary amenorrhea to primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) defined as cessation of menses before age 40 years. Fertility in affected males is reported as normal (although the number of reported males is limited). Neurologic features described in some individuals with Perrault syndrome include learning difficulties and developmental delay, cerebellar ataxia, and motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy.
Leukoencephalopathy with mild cerebellar ataxia and white matter edema
MedGen UID:
1638681
Concept ID:
C4554120
Disease or Syndrome
CLCN2-related leukoencephalopathy is characterized by nonspecific neurologic findings, mild visual impairment from chorioretinopathy or optic atrophy, male infertility, and characteristic findings on brain MRI. Neurologic findings include mild ataxia (action tremor and gait instability following initially normal motor development; occasionally, mild spasticity), cognitive impairment in some (typically mild, rarely severe), psychiatric symptoms in some (depression and schizophrenia-like symptoms), headaches in some (usually intermittent, severe, and diffuse) and auditory symptoms in some (hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo). Affected individuals remain ambulatory, do not require support for walking, and rarely become blind. To date CLCN2-related leukoencephalopathy has been reported or identified in 31 individuals from 30 families. It is not yet known if the findings occurring in a few individuals (i.e., epilepsy and paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia) are part of the phenotypic spectrum or unrelated findings.
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 55, with seizures
MedGen UID:
1635938
Concept ID:
C4693371
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly, epilepsy, and brain atrophy
MedGen UID:
1637443
Concept ID:
C4693390
Disease or Syndrome
NEDMEBA is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by global developmental delay, severe intellectual disability with poor or absent speech and autistic stereotypic behaviors, microcephaly, early-onset generalized seizures, and hypotonia (summary by Marin-Valencia et al., 2018).
Hypotonia, ataxia, developmental delay, and tooth enamel defect syndrome
MedGen UID:
1647427
Concept ID:
C4693578
Disease or Syndrome
An autosomal dominant condition caused by mutations(s) in the CTBP1 gene, encoding C-terminal-binding protein 1. It is characterized by hypotonia, ataxia, developmental delay, and tooth enamel defects.
Leukodystrophy, hypomyelinating, 16
MedGen UID:
1631337
Concept ID:
C4693779
Disease or Syndrome
Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy-16 is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by onset of hypotonia, nystagmus, and mildly delayed motor development in infancy. Affected individuals have motor disabilities, including ataxic or broad-based gait, hyperreflexia, intention tremor, dysmetria, and a mild pyramidal syndrome. Some patients have cognitive impairment, whereas others may have normal cognition or mild intellectual disability with speech difficulties. Brain imaging typically shows hypomyelination, leukodystrophy, and thin corpus callosum (summary by Simons et al., 2017). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of hypomyelinating leukodystrophy, see 312080.
Jaberi-Elahi syndrome
MedGen UID:
1647359
Concept ID:
C4693848
Disease or Syndrome
JABELS is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by developmental delay and intellectual disability with additional variable features. Patients have onset of symptoms in infancy, but the severity is highly variable. Some patients have social interaction and learn to walk but have an ataxic gait and abnormal movements, such as tremor or dystonia, whereas others do not achieve any motor control and are unable to speak. Additional features may include retinal anomalies, visual impairment, microcephaly, abnormal foot or hand posturing, and kyphoscoliosis; some patients have dysmorphic facial features or seizures. Brain imaging typically shows cerebellar atrophy and hypoplasia of the corpus callosum (summary by et al., 2016 and Bertoli-Avella et al., 2018).
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia 14
MedGen UID:
1636182
Concept ID:
C4706415
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-14 (SCAR14) is a neurologic disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, severe early-onset gait ataxia, eye movement abnormalities, cerebellar atrophy on brain imaging, and impaired intellectual development (summary by Lise et al., 2012).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with cerebellar atrophy and with or without seizures
MedGen UID:
1648373
Concept ID:
C4748032
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with cerebellar atrophy and with or without seizures (NEDCAS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by intellectual disability associated with ataxia (summary by Engel et al., 2023).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with epilepsy and hypoplasia of the corpus callosum
MedGen UID:
1648487
Concept ID:
C4748137
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia 48
MedGen UID:
1648409
Concept ID:
C4748158
Disease or Syndrome
SCA48 is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by onset of gait ataxia and/or cognitive-affective symptoms in midadulthood. Patients may present with involvement of either system, but most eventually develop impairment in both. Features include gait ataxia, dysarthria, and dysphagia, as well as cognitive decline, deficits in executive function, and psychiatric or affective manifestations, such as depression, anxiety, and apathy. Additional more variable features may include movement abnormalities, such as parkinsonism, tremor, chorea, dystonia, and dysmetria; spasticity is not observed. Brain imaging shows selective atrophy of the posterior areas of the cerebellar vermis, often with bilateral T2-weighted hyperintensities in the dentate nuclei (the 'crab sign'), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) may show paucity of cerebellar connections to the brainstem and cerebrum. The presentation is consistent with a clinical diagnosis of cerebellar cognitive-affective syndrome (CCAS). The phenotype shows both inter- and intrafamilial variability as well as some clinical overlap with SCAR16, suggesting that mutations in the STUB1 gene result in a spectrum of neurodegenerative manifestations (summary by Genis et al., 2018; Cocozza et al., 2020; Palvadeau et al., 2020; Ravel et al., 2021). Magri et al. (2022) found evidence that heterozygous STUB1 variants alone do not cause disease but require a concurrent expanded repeat allele of the TBP gene (600075) for disease manifestation; see MOLECULAR GENETICS.
Intellectual disability, autosomal recessive 65
MedGen UID:
1648401
Concept ID:
C4748219
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Intellectual developmental disorder with macrocephaly, seizures, and speech delay
MedGen UID:
1648339
Concept ID:
C4748428
Disease or Syndrome
IDDMSSD is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impaired intellectual development, poor speech, postnatal macrocephaly, and seizures (Harms et al., 2018).
Intellectual disability, autosomal recessive 66
MedGen UID:
1648460
Concept ID:
C4748732
Disease or Syndrome
MRT66 is a nonsyndromic autosomal recessive intellectual developmental disorder with delayed speech development, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and relatively normal life span (Philips et al., 2017).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with impaired intellectual development, hypotonia, and ataxia
MedGen UID:
1648291
Concept ID:
C4749014
Disease or Syndrome
NAD(P)HX dehydratase deficiency
MedGen UID:
1681210
Concept ID:
C5193026
Disease or Syndrome
Early-onset progressive encephalopathy with brain edema and/or leukoencephalopathy-2 (PEBEL2) is an autosomal recessive severe neurometabolic disorder characterized by rapidly progressive neurologic deterioration that is usually associated with a febrile illness. Affected infants tend to show normal early development followed by acute psychomotor regression with ataxia, hypotonia, and sometimes seizures, resulting in death in the first years of life. Brain imaging shows multiple abnormalities, including brain edema and signal abnormalities in the cortical and subcortical regions (summary by Van Bergen et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PEBEL, see PEBEL1 (617186).
Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 27
MedGen UID:
1672866
Concept ID:
C5193058
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-27 (SCAR27) is an adult-onset neurologic disorder characterized by gait difficulties and other cerebellar signs, such as eye movement abnormalities, dysarthria, and difficulty writing. The disorder is progressive, and some patients may lose independent ambulation. Additional features include spasticity of the lower limbs and cognitive impairment. Brain imaging shows cerebellar atrophy (summary by Eidhof et al., 2018).
Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive, with axonal neuropathy 3
MedGen UID:
1673607
Concept ID:
C5193070
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy-3 (SCAN3) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized by onset in the first decade of slowly progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy and distal sensory impairment due to an axonal peripheral neuropathy. Affected individuals have gait disturbances and sometimes manual dexterity difficulties, as well as cerebellar ataxia associated with cerebellar atrophy on brain imaging. Additional features usually include dysarthria, hyporeflexia, and increased serum creatine kinase. Some patients may have impaired intellectual development (summary by Higuchi et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of SCAN, see SCAN1 (607250).
Cerebellar, ocular, craniofacial, and genital syndrome
MedGen UID:
1680057
Concept ID:
C5193118
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebellar, ocular, craniofacial, and genital syndrome (COFG) is characterized by moderate to severe developmental delay and impaired intellectual development, severe cerebellar hypoplasia, a noticeably short forehead, medially sparse/flared and laterally extended eyebrows, corneal dystrophy, underdeveloped labioscrotal folds, and tufts of hair extruding from the lactiferous ducts with breast and nipple underdevelopment. Additional features such as pontine involvement, retinal degeneration, anteverted nares, and low-set ears have been variably observed (Rad et al., 2019).
Cerebellar atrophy with seizures and variable developmental delay
MedGen UID:
1683734
Concept ID:
C5193132
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebellar atrophy with seizures and variable developmental delay (CASVDD) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by cerebellar ataxia associated with atrophy of the cerebellar vermis on brain imaging. Most patients also have onset of severe refractory seizures in the first year of life and show global developmental delay, compatible with epileptic encephalopathy (summary by Edvardson et al., 2013). However, at least 1 patient with normal cognitive development and only 1 febrile seizure has been reported (Valence et al., 2019), suggesting significant clinical variability of this disorder.
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia, type 13
MedGen UID:
1684708
Concept ID:
C5231425
Disease or Syndrome
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 13 (PCH13) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by global developmental delay, impaired intellectual development with absent speech, microcephaly, and progressive atrophy of the cerebellar vermis and brainstem. Additional features, including seizures and visual impairment, are variable (summary by Uwineza et al., 2019). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PCH, see PCH1A (607596).
Intellectual developmental disorder with short stature and behavioral abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1684812
Concept ID:
C5231462
Disease or Syndrome
Intellectual developmental disorder 60 with seizures
MedGen UID:
1684702
Concept ID:
C5231497
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant intellectual developmental disorder-60 with seizures is characterized by global developmental delay apparent in infancy, followed by onset of seizures in the first years of life. Patients have delayed walking, an ataxic gait, and moderately to severely impaired intellectual development with poor speech (summary by Helbig et al., 2019).
Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 28
MedGen UID:
1712568
Concept ID:
C5394101
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-28 (SCAR28) is a neurologic disorder characterized by onset in early childhood of mildly delayed motor development, gait ataxia, incoordination of fine motor movements, and dysarthria. Affected individuals may have features of spasticity and may show mildly impaired cognitive function. Brain imaging shows cerebellar vermis hypoplasia (summary by Walker et al., 2019).
Intellectual developmental disorder with poor growth and with or without seizures or ataxia
MedGen UID:
1711370
Concept ID:
C5394135
Disease or Syndrome
Intellectual developmental disorder with poor growth and with or without seizures or ataxia (IDPOGSA) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by global developmental delay apparent from infancy, hypotonia, and poor overall growth, sometimes with borderline microcephaly. The phenotype is highly variable: some patients may show ataxia and some may have seizures (summary by Hu et al., 2019).
Leukoencephalopathy, developmental delay, and episodic neurologic regression syndrome
MedGen UID:
1719567
Concept ID:
C5394367
Disease or Syndrome
Leukoencephalopathy, developmental delay, and episodic neurologic regression syndrome (LEUDEN) is characterized by global developmental delay apparent in early childhood, followed by episodic neurologic regression or decompensation associated with systemic stress, such as febrile infection. Affected individuals have hypotonia, gait difficulties or ataxia, poor or absent speech with dysarthria, and variable motor abnormalities, including spasticity, dystonia, extrapyramidal signs, and tremor. Many patients have seizures. Brain imaging shows diffuse white matter abnormalities, poor myelination, thin corpus callosum, and generalized cerebral atrophy with enlarged ventricles. The clinical features of the disorder and the abnormal brain imaging findings are progressive (summary by Mao et al., 2020).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with language impairment and behavioral abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1708389
Concept ID:
C5394502
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with speech impairment and behavioral abnormalities (NEDLIB) is characterized by impaired intellectual development or developmental delay, behavioral abnormalities including autistic features, and language impairment. Other features include seizures and developmental regression (Salpietro et al., 2019).
Spastic paraplegia 83, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
1759445
Concept ID:
C5436637
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia-83 (SPG83) is a neurologic disorder characterized by progressive lower limb spasticity resulting in gait instability. Patients develop symptoms in the second decade, consistent with juvenile onset. Some patients may have myalgia or mild dysarthria, but the phenotype is considered to be a pure type of SPG with no additional neurologic abnormalities (summary by Husain et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia, see SPG5A (270800).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly, impaired language, epilepsy, and gait abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1764121
Concept ID:
C5436788
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly, impaired language, epilepsy, and gait abnormalities (NEDMILEG) is characterized by global developmental delay apparent in infancy. Affected individuals have delayed walking with variable gait abnormalities, including ataxia and spasticity, impaired intellectual development with poor or absent speech and language, and progressive microcephaly. Dysmorphic facial features may also be observed. Most patients have early-onset seizures; some may develop a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. The clinical features suggest involvement of both the central and peripheral nervous systems (Manole et al., 2020).
Neurodegeneration with ataxia and late-onset optic atrophy
MedGen UID:
1779901
Concept ID:
C5543254
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodegeneration with ataxia and late-onset optic atrophy (NDAXOA) is an autosomal dominant disorder with somewhat variable manifestations. Most affected individuals present in mid-adulthood with slowly progressive cerebellar and gait ataxia, optic atrophy, and myopathy or myalgia. Some patients may have a childhood history of neurologic features, including limited extraocular movements. Additional features can include cardiomyopathy, psychiatric disturbances, and peripheral sensory impairment (summary by Taylor et al., 1996 and Courage et al., 2017).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with seizures and gingival overgrowth
MedGen UID:
1784299
Concept ID:
C5543395
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with seizures and gingival overgrowth (NEDSGO) is an autosomal recessive disorder with a highly variable phenotype. Some patients have early normal development with developmental regression apparent in the first years of life, whereas others present with hypotonia or delayed development. Most patients develop significant gingival hypertrophy associated with a prominent mandible or cherubism in the first years of life. Other more variable features may include coarse facial features, optic atrophy, sensorineural hearing loss, ataxia, and seizures. Brain imaging may show cerebellar or cerebral atrophy and enlarged ventricles. There is a wide phenotypic spectrum with features that may develop with age; the disorder appears to comprise a continuum of evolving neurologic manifestations (Harms et al., 2020).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia, facial dysmorphism, and brain abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1780615
Concept ID:
C5543591
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia, facial dysmorphism, and brain abnormalities (NEDHFBA) is an autosomal recessive neurologic syndrome characterized by global developmental delay with severely impaired intellectual development, hypotonia and muscle weakness, often resulting in the inability to walk or sit, and characteristic coarse facial features. Additional features include feeding difficulties, respiratory distress, scoliosis, poor visual function, and rotary nystagmus. Brain imaging shows variable abnormalities, including enlarged ventricles, decreased white matter volume, white matter changes, thin corpus callosum, and cerebellar hypoplasia (summary by Loddo et al., 2020).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with impaired language and ataxia and with or without seizures
MedGen UID:
1794216
Concept ID:
C5562006
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with impaired language and ataxia and with or without seizures (NEDLAS) is characterized by axial hypotonia and global developmental delay apparent in early infancy. Affected individuals have delayed walking with gait ataxia and poor language development. Behavioral abnormalities also commonly occur. The severity is highly variable: a subset of patients have a more severe phenotype with early-onset seizures resembling epileptic encephalopathy, inability to walk or speak, and hypomyelination on brain imaging (summary by Stolz et al., 2021).
Autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia type 76
MedGen UID:
1798906
Concept ID:
C5567483
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia-76 is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by young-adult onset of slowly progressive spasticity of the lower limbs resulting in gait difficulties. Most affected individuals have upper limb involvement and additional features such as foot deformities and dysarthria. Cognition is unaffected (summary by Gan-Or et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia, see SPG5A (270800).
Recurrent metabolic encephalomyopathic crises-rhabdomyolysis-cardiac arrhythmia-intellectual disability syndrome
MedGen UID:
1798947
Concept ID:
C5567524
Disease or Syndrome
Individuals with TANGO2-related metabolic encephalopathy and arrhythmias can present in acute metabolic crisis (hypoglycemia, elevated lactate, mild hyperammonemia) or with developmental delay, regression, and/or seizures. The acute presentation varies from profound muscle weakness, ataxia, and/or disorientation to a comatose state. Individuals can present with intermittent acute episodes of rhabdomyolysis. The first episode of myoglobinuria has been known to occur as early as age five months. Acute renal tubular damage due to myoglobinuria can result in acute kidney injury and renal failure. During acute illness, transient electrocardiogram changes can be seen; the most common is QT prolongation. Life-threatening recurrent ventricular tachycardia or torsade de pointes occurs primarily during times of acute illness. Individuals who do not present in metabolic crises may present with gait incoordination, progressively unsteady gait, difficulty with speech, or clumsiness. Intellectual disability of variable severity is observed in almost all individuals. Seizures are observed outside the periods of crises in more than 75% of individuals. Hypothyroidism has been reported in more than one third of individuals.
Autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia type 78
MedGen UID:
1799316
Concept ID:
C5567893
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia-78 is an adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder characterized predominantly by spasticity and muscle weakness of the lower limbs, resulting in gait difficulties and loss of ambulation in some patients. Affected individuals also have cerebellar signs, such as dysarthria, oculomotor disturbances, and limb and gait ataxia; brain imaging shows cerebellar atrophy. Some patients may have mild cognitive impairment or frank dementia. The phenotype is highly variable (summary by Estrada-Cuzcano et al., 2017). Biallelic mutation in the ATP13A2 gene also causes Kufor-Rakeb syndrome (KRS; 606693), a neurodegenerative disorder with overlapping features. Patients with KRS have earlier onset and prominent parkinsonism. Loss of ATP13A2 function results in a multidimensional spectrum of neurologic features reflecting various regions of the brain and nervous system, including cortical, pyramidal, extrapyramidal, brainstem, cerebellar, and peripheral (summary by Estrada-Cuzcano et al., 2017).
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 9A
MedGen UID:
1800401
Concept ID:
C5568978
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia-9A is a neurologic disorder characterized by onset of slowly progressive spasticity mainly affecting the lower limbs. The age at onset usually ranges from adolescence to adulthood, and patients have gait difficulties, motor neuropathy, and dysarthria. Additional variable features include cerebellar signs, cataract, pes cavus, and urinary urgency (summary by Coutelier et al., 2015). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia, see SPG3A (182600).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2Z
MedGen UID:
1800448
Concept ID:
C5569025
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2Z (CMT2Z) is an autosomal dominant axonal peripheral neuropathy characterized by onset, usually in the first decade, of distal lower limb muscle weakness and sensory impairment. The disorder is progressive, and affected individuals tend to develop upper limb and proximal muscle involvement in an asymmetric pattern, resulting in severe disability late in adulthood. Rare occurrence of global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development or learning difficulties has been observed. In some instances, the same mutation may result in different phenotypic manifestations (CMT2Z or DIGFAN), which highlights the clinical spectrum associated with MORC2 mutations and may render the classification of patients into one or the other disorder challenging (summary by Sevilla et al., 2016, Ando et al., 2017, Guillen Sacoto et al., 2020). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT, see CMT2A1 (118210).
Acute infantile liver failure-cerebellar ataxia-peripheral sensory motor neuropathy syndrome
MedGen UID:
1800507
Concept ID:
C5569084
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-21 (SCAR21) is a neurologic disorder characterized by onset of cerebellar ataxia associated with cerebellar atrophy in early childhood. Affected individuals also have recurrent episodes of liver failure in the first decade, resulting in chronic liver fibrosis, as well as later onset of a peripheral neuropathy. Mild learning disabilities may also occur (summary by Schmidt et al., 2015). The phenotype is highly variable: all patients appear to have episodic and severe liver dysfunction in early childhood that tends to resolve with age. Affected individuals also show mild developmental or language delay and/or later onset of variable neurologic features, such as motor dysfunction (summary by Lenz et al., 2018).
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 40
MedGen UID:
1810363
Concept ID:
C5676894
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia, impaired language, and dysmorphic features (NEDHILD) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder associated with impaired intellectual development, speech and language impairment, microcephaly, seizures, hypotonia, ophthalmologic issues, constipation/gastroesophageal reflux, and behavioral problems, including autism and sleep disturbances (summary by Garrity et al., 2021).
Intellectual developmental disorder, autosomal recessive 73
MedGen UID:
1802013
Concept ID:
C5676902
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Autosomal recessive intellectual developmental disorder-73 (MRT73) is characterized by global developmental delay with hypotonia and mildly delayed walking, impaired intellectual development with poor or absent speech, and mildly dysmorphic features (summary by Morrison et al., 2021).
Cerebellar dysfunction, impaired intellectual development, and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism
MedGen UID:
1808634
Concept ID:
C5676924
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebellar dysfunction, impaired intellectual development, and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CDIDHH) is characterized by delayed motor development, ataxia, severe progressive scoliosis, moderate to severe intellectual disability, and delayed sexual development. Cerebellar hypoplasia has been observed in some patients (Whittaker et al., 2021).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy 100
MedGen UID:
1809351
Concept ID:
C5676932
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-100 (DEE100) is a severe neurologic disorder characterized by global developmental delay and onset of variable types of seizures in the first months or years of life. Most patients have refractory seizures and show developmental regression after seizure onset. Affected individuals have ataxic gait or inability to walk and severe to profoundly impaired intellectual development, often with absent speech. Additional more variable features may include axial hypotonia, hyperkinetic movements, dysmorphic facial features, and brain imaging abnormalities (summary by Schneider et al., 2021). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 32
MedGen UID:
1802496
Concept ID:
C5676978
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-32 (SCAR32) is a neurologic disorder characterized by the onset of gait ataxia in the second or third decades of life. The disorder is slowly progressive. Other classic features include upper limb ataxia, oculomotor signs, dysphagia, and dysarthria. Some patients may have hyper- or hypokinetic movement abnormalities. Brain imaging shows cerebellar atrophy (Rebelo et al., 2021).
Neurodegeneration, childhood-onset, with multisystem involvement due to mitochondrial dysfunction
MedGen UID:
1824013
Concept ID:
C5774240
Disease or Syndrome
Childhood-onset neurodegeneration with multisystem involvement due to mitochondrial dysfunction (CONDMIM) is an autosomal recessive syndromic disorder characterized primarily by neurologic deficits. Patients show global developmental delay and variably impaired intellectual development with speech delay apparent from infancy. Affected individuals have hypotonia, poor feeding, poor overall growth, and respiratory distress early in life. Other features include visual impairment due to optic atrophy, sensorineural hearing loss, and neuromuscular abnormalities. The severity is highly variable. The disorder is progressive; about half of patients show developmental regression with loss of previous skills. Features suggestive of a mitochondrial disorder include cataracts, cardiomyopathy, diabetes mellitus, combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, and increased lactate. Some patients develop seizures, some have dysmorphic facial features, and some have nonspecific abnormalities on brain imaging. Death in childhood may occur (Kaiyrzhanov et al., 2022).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy 109
MedGen UID:
1824036
Concept ID:
C5774263
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-109 (DEE109) is characterized by the onset of various types of seizures in the first months or years of life. Affected individuals show developmental delay before and concurrent with the onset of seizures. Features include impaired intellectual development with poor speech, ataxic gait, coordination problems, and behavioral abnormalities (Manivannan et al., 2022). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Spinocerebellar ataxia 27B, late-onset
MedGen UID:
1824051
Concept ID:
C5774278
Disease or Syndrome
Late-onset spinocerebellar ataxia-27B (SCA27B) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the onset of gait and appendicular ataxia in adulthood, usually around age 55 (range 30 to late eighties). About half of patients present with episodic features. The disorder is slowly progressive, and some patients may lose independent ambulation. Additional features include downbeat and horizontal nystagmus, diplopia, vertigo, and dysarthria. Brain imaging tends to show cerebellar atrophy (Pellerin et al., 2023). For a general discussion of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia, see SCA1 (164400).
Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 33
MedGen UID:
1824070
Concept ID:
C5774297
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-33 (SCAR33) is a neurologic disorder characterized by delayed motor development apparent in infancy, unsteady ataxic gait, intention tremor, nystagmus, and speech delay with dysarthria. Some patients have seizures and/or learning difficulties. Brain imaging shows cerebellar hypoplasia (Elsaid et al., 2017).
Spastic paraplegia 79A, autosomal dominant, with ataxia
MedGen UID:
1824073
Concept ID:
C5774300
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia-79A with ataxia (SPG79A) is a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized predominantly by cerebellar and/or sensory ataxia and spasticity of the lower limbs leading to gait difficulties. The onset is usually in adulthood (median age of 49 years), but can range from childhood to age 70. Additional common features include sensorimotor neuropathy and visual impairment with optic atrophy. The disorder is slowly progressive (Park et al., 2022).
Hogue-Janssens syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1830493
Concept ID:
C5779996
Disease or Syndrome
PPP2R5D-related neurodevelopmental disorder is characterized by mild to severe neurodevelopmental delay. Pronounced hypotonia with delay in gross motor skills is common. Onset of independent walking varies widely and ataxia is reported. All reported individuals have speech impairment, with a wide range of abilities. Autism spectrum disorder is reported in six individuals. Macrocephaly is common. Seizures and ophthalmologic abnormalities are reported in fewer than half of individuals. Additional anomalies include skeletal, endocrine, and cardiac malformations, each reported in a few individuals. To date, 23 individuals with PPP2R5D-related neurodevelopmental disorder have been reported.
Leukodystrophy, hypomyelinating, 25
MedGen UID:
1840911
Concept ID:
C5830275
Disease or Syndrome
Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy-25 (HLD25) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by horizontal nystagmus, hypotonia, and global developmental delay apparent soon after birth or in infancy. Most patients show gradual clinical improvement over time with resolution of the nystagmus in early childhood. Many achieve developmental milestones and may have normal cognition, although the severity of the disorder varies and some patients may have persistent neurologic deficits, such as ataxia or intellectual disability. Brain imaging shows hypomyelination that may also improve with time (Yan et al., 2022; do Rosario et al., 2022). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HLD, see 312080.
Intellectual developmental disorder, autosomal recessive 79
MedGen UID:
1841189
Concept ID:
C5830553
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive intellectual developmental disorder-79 (MRT79) is characterized by global developmental delay apparent from infancy. Affected individuals have mildly delayed walking with an ataxic gait and severely impaired intellectual development with poor or absent speech. Additional features may include postnatal microcephaly and dysmorphic features (Van Bergen et al., 2022).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly and movement abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1841260
Concept ID:
C5830624
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly and movement abnormalities (NEDMIM) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by global developmental delay, impaired intellectual development with poor or absent speech, and delayed walking with an abnormal gait. Affected individuals may show hypotonia or hypertonia with spasticity, ataxia, and choreoathetoid movements. Most patients have microcephaly and short stature. Ophthalmic features, behavioral abnormalities, and nonspecific dysmorphic features are commonly observed. Additional more variable features include seizures, brain imaging abnormalities, and skeletal defects (Serey-Gaut et al., 2023).
Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts 4, remitting
MedGen UID:
1841264
Concept ID:
C5830628
Disease or Syndrome
Remitting megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts-4 (MLC4) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by macrocephaly in infancy associated with developmental delay, delayed walking, variable cognitive decline, behavioral abnormalities, and early-onset seizures. The severity of neurologic dysfunction is variable, even within a family, but tends to show improvement with time. Brain imaging shows swelling of the cerebral white matter and subcortical cysts in the anterior temporal region, consistent with MLC. Brain imaging abnormalities also tend to improve with time, indicating a remitting disease course (Passchier et al., 2023). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts, see MLC1 (604004).
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 58
MedGen UID:
1841277
Concept ID:
C5830641
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-58 (COXPD58) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a wide range of clinical presentations including neonatal lactic acidosis, epileptic encephalopathy, developmental delay and impaired intellectual development with nonspecific changes on brain MRI, or mitochondrial myopathy with a treatable neuromuscular transmission defect (Van Haute et al., 2023). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Al-Chalabi M, DelCimmuto NR, Beran A, Devarasetty PP, Mhanna A, Mahfooz N, Sheikh A
Mult Scler Relat Disord 2022 Dec;68:104112. Epub 2022 Aug 18 doi: 10.1016/j.msard.2022.104112. PMID: 36029706
Gunasekaran A, de Los Reyes NKM, Walters J, Kazemi N
World Neurosurg 2018 Jan;109:275-284. Epub 2017 Oct 7 doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2017.09.209. PMID: 29017982
Tobin WO, Guo Y, Krecke KN, Parisi JE, Lucchinetti CF, Pittock SJ, Mandrekar J, Dubey D, Debruyne J, Keegan BM
Brain 2017 Sep 1;140(9):2415-2425. doi: 10.1093/brain/awx200. PMID: 29050399

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Louis ED
Handb Clin Neurol 2023;196:389-401. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-323-98817-9.00012-0. PMID: 37620080
Cabaraux P, Agrawal SK, Cai H, Calabro RS, Casali C, Damm L, Doss S, Habas C, Horn AKE, Ilg W, Louis ED, Mitoma H, Monaco V, Petracca M, Ranavolo A, Rao AK, Ruggieri S, Schirinzi T, Serrao M, Summa S, Strupp M, Surgent O, Synofzik M, Tao S, Terasi H, Torres-Russotto D, Travers B, Roper JA, Manto M
Cerebellum 2023 Jun;22(3):394-430. Epub 2022 Apr 12 doi: 10.1007/s12311-022-01373-9. PMID: 35414041
Serin HM, Arslan EA
Acta Clin Croat 2019 Jun;58(2):295-302. doi: 10.20471/acc.2019.58.02.13. PMID: 31819326Free PMC Article
Baker JM
Am J Med 2018 Jun;131(6):602-607. Epub 2017 Dec 27 doi: 10.1016/j.amjmed.2017.11.051. PMID: 29288631
Buckley E, Mazzà C, McNeill A
Gait Posture 2018 Feb;60:154-163. Epub 2017 Dec 1 doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2017.11.024. PMID: 29220753

Diagnosis

Louis ED
Handb Clin Neurol 2023;196:389-401. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-323-98817-9.00012-0. PMID: 37620080
Cabaraux P, Agrawal SK, Cai H, Calabro RS, Casali C, Damm L, Doss S, Habas C, Horn AKE, Ilg W, Louis ED, Mitoma H, Monaco V, Petracca M, Ranavolo A, Rao AK, Ruggieri S, Schirinzi T, Serrao M, Summa S, Strupp M, Surgent O, Synofzik M, Tao S, Terasi H, Torres-Russotto D, Travers B, Roper JA, Manto M
Cerebellum 2023 Jun;22(3):394-430. Epub 2022 Apr 12 doi: 10.1007/s12311-022-01373-9. PMID: 35414041
Serrao M, Ranavolo A, Casali C
Handb Clin Neurol 2018;154:299-303. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-444-63956-1.00018-7. PMID: 29903447
Baker JM
Am J Med 2018 Jun;131(6):602-607. Epub 2017 Dec 27 doi: 10.1016/j.amjmed.2017.11.051. PMID: 29288631
Buckley E, Mazzà C, McNeill A
Gait Posture 2018 Feb;60:154-163. Epub 2017 Dec 1 doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2017.11.024. PMID: 29220753

Therapy

Serin HM, Arslan EA
Acta Clin Croat 2019 Jun;58(2):295-302. doi: 10.20471/acc.2019.58.02.13. PMID: 31819326Free PMC Article
Buckley E, Mazzà C, McNeill A
Gait Posture 2018 Feb;60:154-163. Epub 2017 Dec 1 doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2017.11.024. PMID: 29220753
Tobin WO, Guo Y, Krecke KN, Parisi JE, Lucchinetti CF, Pittock SJ, Mandrekar J, Dubey D, Debruyne J, Keegan BM
Brain 2017 Sep 1;140(9):2415-2425. doi: 10.1093/brain/awx200. PMID: 29050399
Bultmann U, Pierscianek D, Gizewski ER, Schoch B, Fritsche N, Timmann D, Maschke M, Frings M
Gait Posture 2014;39(1):563-9. Epub 2013 Sep 24 doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2013.09.011. PMID: 24119775
Misra S, Ramesh R, Ramu ChS, Srirangalaxmi G, Radhakrishn H, Vajresware
J Assoc Physicians India 2012 Jul;60:58-61. PMID: 23405547

Prognosis

Serrao M, Ranavolo A, Casali C
Handb Clin Neurol 2018;154:299-303. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-444-63956-1.00018-7. PMID: 29903447
Koeppen AH
Handb Clin Neurol 2018;154:129-149. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-444-63956-1.00008-4. PMID: 29903436Free PMC Article
Jenkins PF
Am Orthopt J 2015;65:104-8. doi: 10.3368/aoj.65.1.104. PMID: 26564935
Bultmann U, Pierscianek D, Gizewski ER, Schoch B, Fritsche N, Timmann D, Maschke M, Frings M
Gait Posture 2014;39(1):563-9. Epub 2013 Sep 24 doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2013.09.011. PMID: 24119775
Misra S, Ramesh R, Ramu ChS, Srirangalaxmi G, Radhakrishn H, Vajresware
J Assoc Physicians India 2012 Jul;60:58-61. PMID: 23405547

Clinical prediction guides

Tobin WO, Guo Y, Krecke KN, Parisi JE, Lucchinetti CF, Pittock SJ, Mandrekar J, Dubey D, Debruyne J, Keegan BM
Brain 2017 Sep 1;140(9):2415-2425. doi: 10.1093/brain/awx200. PMID: 29050399
Keller JL, Bastian AJ
Neurorehabil Neural Repair 2014 Oct;28(8):770-8. Epub 2014 Feb 13 doi: 10.1177/1545968314522350. PMID: 24526707Free PMC Article
Bultmann U, Pierscianek D, Gizewski ER, Schoch B, Fritsche N, Timmann D, Maschke M, Frings M
Gait Posture 2014;39(1):563-9. Epub 2013 Sep 24 doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2013.09.011. PMID: 24119775
Ilg W, Timmann D
Mov Disord 2013 Sep 15;28(11):1566-75. doi: 10.1002/mds.25558. PMID: 24132845
Thompson PD
Handb Clin Neurol 2012;103:619-22. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-444-51892-7.00044-9. PMID: 21827922

Recent systematic reviews

Mistarz N, Canfield L, Nielsen DG, Skøt L, Mellentin AI
Psychol Addict Behav 2024 Jun;38(4):507-517. Epub 2023 Sep 28 doi: 10.1037/adb0000958. PMID: 37768592
Shah VP, Oliveira J E Silva L, Farah W, Seisa MO, Balla AK, Christensen A, Farah M, Hasan B, Bellolio F, Murad MH
Acad Emerg Med 2023 May;30(5):552-578. Epub 2023 Jan 22 doi: 10.1111/acem.14630. PMID: 36453134
Buckley E, Mazzà C, McNeill A
Gait Posture 2018 Feb;60:154-163. Epub 2017 Dec 1 doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2017.11.024. PMID: 29220753
Beauchet O, Annweiler C, Callisaya ML, De Cock AM, Helbostad JL, Kressig RW, Srikanth V, Steinmetz JP, Blumen HM, Verghese J, Allali G
J Am Med Dir Assoc 2016 Jun 1;17(6):482-90. Epub 2016 Feb 4 doi: 10.1016/j.jamda.2015.12.092. PMID: 26852960Free PMC Article
Ayoubi F, Launay CP, Annweiler C, Beauchet O
J Am Med Dir Assoc 2015 Jan;16(1):14-9. Epub 2014 Sep 16 doi: 10.1016/j.jamda.2014.06.020. PMID: 25230892

Supplemental Content

Table of contents

    Clinical resources

    Practice guidelines

    • PubMed
      See practice and clinical guidelines in PubMed. The search results may include broader topics and may not capture all published guidelines. See the FAQ for details.
    • Bookshelf
      See practice and clinical guidelines in NCBI Bookshelf. The search results may include broader topics and may not capture all published guidelines. See the FAQ for details.

    Consumer resources

    Recent activity

    Your browsing activity is empty.

    Activity recording is turned off.

    Turn recording back on

    See more...