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Neutropenia

MedGen UID:
163121
Concept ID:
C0853697
Finding
Synonyms: Decreased neutrophils; Peripheral neutropenia
SNOMED CT: Neutrophil count below reference range (165517008); Neutropenia (165517008)
 
HPO: HP:0001875
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0001475

Definition

An abnormally low number of neutrophils in the peripheral blood. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Chédiak-Higashi syndrome
MedGen UID:
3347
Concept ID:
C0007965
Disease or Syndrome
Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is characterized by partial oculocutaneous albinism, immunodeficiency, and a mild bleeding tendency. Approximately 85% of affected individuals develop the accelerated phase, or hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, a life-threatening, hyperinflammatory condition. All affected individuals including adolescents and adults with atypical CHS and children with classic CHS who have successfully undergone allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) develop neurologic findings during early adulthood.
Felty syndrome
MedGen UID:
4674
Concept ID:
C0015773
Disease or Syndrome
Felty syndrome (FS), also known as ''super rheumatoid'' disease, is a severe form of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), characterized by a triad of RA, splenomegaly and neutropenia, resulting in susceptibility to bacterial infections.
Letterer-Siwe disease
MedGen UID:
7311
Concept ID:
C0023381
Disease or Syndrome
A multifocal, multisystem form of Langerhans-cell histiocytosis. There is involvement of multiple organ systems including the bones, skin, liver, spleen, and lymph nodes. Patients are usually infants presenting with fever, hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, bone and skin lesions, and pancytopenia.
Pelger-Huët anomaly
MedGen UID:
10617
Concept ID:
C0030779
Disease or Syndrome
An autosomal dominant inherited condition caused by mutations in the lamin B receptor gene. It is characterized by defects in the neutrophil lobulation, resulting in the presence of dumbbell-shaped neutrophils with bilobed nuclei in the peripheral blood smear.
Metaphyseal chondrodysplasia, McKusick type
MedGen UID:
67398
Concept ID:
C0220748
Congenital Abnormality
The cartilage-hair hypoplasia – anauxetic dysplasia (CHH-AD) spectrum disorders are a continuum that includes the following phenotypes: Metaphyseal dysplasia without hypotrichosis (MDWH). Cartilage-hair hypoplasia (CHH). Anauxetic dysplasia (AD). CHH-AD spectrum disorders are characterized by severe disproportionate (short-limb) short stature that is usually recognized in the newborn, and occasionally prenatally because of the short extremities. Other findings include joint hypermobility, fine silky hair, immunodeficiency, anemia, increased risk for malignancy, gastrointestinal dysfunction, and impaired spermatogenesis. The most severe phenotype, AD, has the most pronounced skeletal phenotype, may be associated with atlantoaxial subluxation in the newborn, and may include cognitive deficiency. The clinical manifestations of the CHH-AD spectrum disorders are variable, even within the same family.
X-linked agammaglobulinemia
MedGen UID:
65123
Concept ID:
C0221026
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is characterized by recurrent bacterial infections in affected males in the first two years of life. Recurrent otitis is the most common infection prior to diagnosis. Conjunctivitis, sinopulmonary infections, diarrhea, and skin infections are also frequently seen. Approximately 60% of individuals with XLA are recognized as having immunodeficiency when they develop a severe, life-threatening infection such as pneumonia, empyema, meningitis, sepsis, cellulitis, or septic arthritis. S pneumoniae and H influenzae are the most common organisms found prior to diagnosis and may continue to cause sinusitis and otitis after diagnosis and the initiation of gammaglobulin substitution therapy. Severe, difficult-to-treat enteroviral infections (often manifest as dermatomyositis or chronic meningoencephalitis) can be prevented by this treatment. The prognosis for individuals with XLA has improved markedly in the last 25 years as a result of earlier diagnosis, the development of preparations of gammaglobulin that allow normal concentrations of serum IgG to be achieved, and more liberal use of antibiotics.
Cohen syndrome
MedGen UID:
78539
Concept ID:
C0265223
Congenital Abnormality
Cohen syndrome is characterized by failure to thrive in infancy and childhood; truncal obesity in the teen years; early-onset hypotonia and developmental delays; microcephaly developing during the first year of life; moderate to profound psychomotor retardation; progressive retinochoroidal dystrophy and high myopia; neutropenia in many with recurrent infections and aphthous ulcers in some; a cheerful disposition; joint hypermobility; and characteristic facial features.
Glucose-6-phosphate transport defect
MedGen UID:
78644
Concept ID:
C0268146
Disease or Syndrome
Glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI) is characterized by accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver and kidneys resulting in hepatomegaly and nephromegaly. Severely affected infants present in the neonatal period with severe hypoglycemia due to fasting intolerance. More commonly, untreated infants present at age three to four months with hepatomegaly, severe hypoglycemia with or without seizures, lactic acidosis, hyperuricemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. Affected children typically have doll-like faces with full cheeks, relatively thin extremities, short stature, and a protuberant abdomen. Xanthoma and diarrhea may be present. Impaired platelet function and development of reduced or dysfunctional von Willebrand factor can lead to a bleeding tendency with frequent epistaxis and menorrhagia in females. Individuals with untreated GSDIb are more likely to develop impaired neutrophil and monocyte function as well as chronic neutropenia resulting in recurrent bacterial infections, gingivitis, periodontitis, and genital and intestinal ulcers. Long-term complications of untreated GSDI include short stature, osteoporosis, delayed puberty, renal disease (including proximal and distal renal tubular acidosis, renal stones, and renal failure), gout, systemic hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, hepatic adenomas with potential for malignancy, pancreatitis, and polycystic ovaries. Seizures and cognitive impairment may occur in individuals with prolonged periods of hypoglycemia. Normal growth and puberty are expected in treated children. Most affected individuals live into adulthood.
Aspartylglucosaminuria
MedGen UID:
78649
Concept ID:
C0268225
Disease or Syndrome
Aspartylglucosaminuria (AGU) is a severe autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder that involves the central nervous system and causes skeletal abnormalities as well as connective tissue lesions. The most characteristic feature is progressive mental retardation. The disorder is caused by deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme glycosylasparaginase, which results in body fluid and tissue accumulation of a series of glycoasparagines, i.e., glycoconjugates with an aspartylglucosamine moiety at the reducing end. AGU belongs to the group of disorders commonly referred to as the Finnish disease heritage (summary by Mononen et al., 1993 and Arvio and Arvio, 2002).
Propionic acidemia
MedGen UID:
75694
Concept ID:
C0268579
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of propionic acidemia (PA) ranges from neonatal-onset to late-onset disease. Neonatal-onset PA, the most common form, is characterized by a healthy newborn with poor feeding and decreased arousal in the first few days of life, followed by progressive encephalopathy of unexplained origin. Without prompt diagnosis and management, this is followed by progressive encephalopathy manifesting as lethargy, seizures, or coma that can result in death. It is frequently accompanied by metabolic acidosis with anion gap, lactic acidosis, ketonuria, hypoglycemia, hyperammonemia, and cytopenias. Individuals with late-onset PA may remain asymptomatic and suffer a metabolic crisis under catabolic stress (e.g., illness, surgery, fasting) or may experience a more insidious onset with the development of multiorgan complications including vomiting, protein intolerance, failure to thrive, hypotonia, developmental delays or regression, movement disorders, or cardiomyopathy. Isolated cardiomyopathy can be observed on rare occasion in the absence of clinical metabolic decompensation or neurocognitive deficits. Manifestations of neonatal and late-onset PA over time can include growth impairment, intellectual disability, seizures, basal ganglia lesions, pancreatitis, and cardiomyopathy. Other rarely reported complications include optic atrophy, hearing loss, premature ovarian insufficiency, and chronic renal failure.
Lazy leukocyte syndrome
MedGen UID:
78795
Concept ID:
C0272174
Disease or Syndrome
Periodic fever, immunodeficiency, and thrombocytopenia syndrome (PFITS) is an autosomal recessive immunologic disorder with variable manifestations. Common features include early-onset recurrent respiratory infections, stomatitis, and cutaneous infections. Organisms usually include bacteria such as pneumococcus, Staphylococcus, and H. influenzae, but severe viral infections, including varicella, may also occur. Laboratory investigations may show neutropenia, neutrophilia, leukocytosis, or lymphopenia, although levels of immune cells may also be normal. Detailed studies often show impaired neutrophil chemotaxis associated with increased or abnormal F-actin levels, and impaired, normal, or even increased oxidative burst, depending on the stimulus. B- and T-cell abnormalities have also been observed. Some patients develop autoimmune manifestations, including chronic thrombocytopenia, anemia, and periodic fevers, associated with activation of the inflammasome. Early death may occur; however, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may be curative (summary by Kuhns et al., 2016, Standing et al., 2017, and Pfajfer et al., 2018).
Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus secretory diarrhea syndrome
MedGen UID:
83339
Concept ID:
C0342288
Disease or Syndrome
IPEX (immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked) syndrome is characterized by systemic autoimmunity, typically beginning in the first year of life. Presentation is most commonly the clinical triad of watery diarrhea, endocrinopathy (most commonly insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus), and eczematous dermatitis. Most children have other autoimmune phenomena including cytopenias, autoimmune hepatitis, or nephropathy; lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, alopecia, arthritis, and lung disease related to immune dysregulation have all been observed. Fetal presentation of IPEX includes hydrops, echogenic bowel, skin desquamation, IUGR, and fetal akinesia. Without aggressive immunosuppression or bone marrow transplantation, the majority of affected males die within the first one to two years of life from metabolic derangements, severe malabsorption, or sepsis; a few with a milder phenotype have survived into the second or third decade of life.
Transcobalamin II deficiency
MedGen UID:
137976
Concept ID:
C0342701
Disease or Syndrome
Transcobalamin II deficiency (TCN2D) is an autosomal recessive disorder with onset in early infancy characterized by failure to thrive, megaloblastic anemia, and pancytopenia. Other features include methylmalonic aciduria, recurrent infections, and vomiting and diarrhea. Treatment with cobalamin results in clinical improvement, but the untreated disorder may result in mental retardation and neurologic abnormalities (summary by Haberle et al., 2009). Hall (1981) gave a clinically oriented review of congenital defects of vitamin B12 transport, and Frater-Schroder (1983) gave a genetically oriented review.
Congenital defect of folate absorption
MedGen UID:
83348
Concept ID:
C0342705
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary folate malabsorption (HFM) is characterized by folate deficiency due to impaired intestinal folate absorption and impaired folate transport into the central nervous system. Findings include poor feeding, failure to thrive, and anemia. There can be leukopenia and thrombocytopenia, diarrhea and/or oral mucositis, hypoimmunoglobulinemia, and other immunologic dysfunction resulting in infections, most often Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. Neurologic manifestations include developmental delays, cognitive and motor disorders, behavioral disorders, and seizures.
Trimethylaminuria
MedGen UID:
83350
Concept ID:
C0342739
Disease or Syndrome
Primary trimethylaminuria is characterized by a fishy odor resembling that of rotten or decaying fish that results from excess excretion of trimethylamine in the urine, breath, sweat, and reproductive fluids. No physical symptoms are associated with trimethylaminuria. Affected individuals appear normal and healthy; however, the unpleasant odor often results in social and psychological problems. Symptoms are usually present from birth and may worsen during puberty. In females, symptoms are more severe just before and during menstruation, after taking oral contraceptives, and around the time of menopause.
Pearson syndrome
MedGen UID:
87459
Concept ID:
C0342784
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion syndromes predominantly comprise three overlapping phenotypes that are usually simplex (i.e., a single occurrence in a family), but rarely may be observed in different members of the same family or may evolve from one clinical syndrome to another in a given individual over time. The three classic phenotypes caused by mtDNA deletions are Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS), Pearson syndrome, and progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO). KSS is a progressive multisystem disorder defined by onset before age 20 years, pigmentary retinopathy, and PEO; additional features include cerebellar ataxia, impaired intellect (intellectual disability, dementia, or both), sensorineural hearing loss, ptosis, oropharyngeal and esophageal dysfunction, exercise intolerance, muscle weakness, cardiac conduction block, and endocrinopathy. Pearson syndrome is characterized by sideroblastic anemia and exocrine pancreas dysfunction and may be fatal in infancy without appropriate hematologic management. PEO is characterized by ptosis, impaired eye movements due to paralysis of the extraocular muscles (ophthalmoplegia), oropharyngeal weakness, and variably severe proximal limb weakness with exercise intolerance. Rarely, a mtDNA deletion can manifest as Leigh syndrome.
Hyper-IgM syndrome type 1
MedGen UID:
96019
Concept ID:
C0398689
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked hyper IgM syndrome (HIGM1), a disorder of abnormal T- and B-cell function, is characterized by low serum concentrations of IgG, IgA, and IgE with normal or elevated serum concentrations of IgM. Mitogen proliferation may be normal, but NK- and T-cell cytotoxicity can be impaired. Antigen-specific responses are usually decreased or absent. Total numbers of B cells are normal but there is a marked reduction of class-switched memory B cells. Defective oxidative burst of both neutrophils and macrophages has been reported. The range of clinical findings varies, even within the same family. More than 50% of males with HIGM1 develop symptoms by age one year, and more than 90% are symptomatic by age four years. HIGM1 usually presents in infancy with recurrent upper- and lower-respiratory tract bacterial infections, opportunistic infections including Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, and recurrent or protracted diarrhea that can be infectious or noninfectious and is associated with failure to thrive. Neutropenia is common; thrombocytopenia and anemia are less commonly seen. Autoimmune and/or inflammatory disorders (such as sclerosing cholangitis) as well as increased risk for neoplasms have been reported as medical complications of this disorder. Significant neurologic complications, often the result of a CNS infection, are seen in 5%-15% of affected males. Liver disease, a serious complication of HIGM1 once observed in more than 80% of affected males by age 20 years, may be decreasing with adequate screening and treatment of Cryptosporidium infection.
Glutathione synthetase deficiency with 5-oxoprolinuria
MedGen UID:
97988
Concept ID:
C0398746
Disease or Syndrome
Glutathione synthetase deficiency, or 5-oxoprolinuria, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized, in its severe form, by massive urinary excretion of 5-oxoproline, metabolic acidosis, hemolytic anemia, and central nervous system damage. The metabolic defect results in decreased levels of cellular glutathione, which overstimulates the synthesis of gamma-glutamylcysteine and its subsequent conversion to 5-oxoproline (Larsson and Anderson, 2001).
3-Methylglutaconic aciduria type 2
MedGen UID:
107893
Concept ID:
C0574083
Disease or Syndrome
Barth syndrome is characterized in affected males by cardiomyopathy, neutropenia, skeletal myopathy, prepubertal growth delay, and distinctive facial gestalt (most evident in infancy); not all features may be present in a given affected male. Cardiomyopathy, which is almost always present before age five years, is typically dilated cardiomyopathy with or without endocardial fibroelastosis or left ventricular noncompaction; hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can also occur. Heart failure is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality; risk of arrhythmia and sudden death is increased. Neutropenia is most often associated with mouth ulcers, pneumonia, and sepsis. The nonprogressive myopathy predominantly affects the proximal muscles, and results in early motor delays. Prepubertal growth delay is followed by a postpubertal growth spurt with remarkable "catch-up" growth. Heterozygous females who have a normal karyotype are asymptomatic and have normal biochemical studies.
Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia
MedGen UID:
164078
Concept ID:
C0877024
Congenital Abnormality
Schimke immunoosseous dysplasia (SIOD) is characterized by spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED) resulting in short stature, nephropathy, and T-cell deficiency. Radiographic manifestations of SED include ovoid and mildly flattened vertebral bodies, small ilia with shallow dysplastic acetabular fossae, and small deformed capital femoral epiphyses. Nearly all affected individuals have progressive steroid-resistant nephropathy, usually developing within five years of the diagnosis of growth failure and terminating with end-stage renal disease. The majority of tested individuals have T-cell deficiency and an associated risk for opportunistic infection, a common cause of death. SIOD involves a spectrum that ranges from an infantile or severe early-onset form with a greater risk of death during childhood to a juvenile or milder later-onset form with likely survival into adulthood if renal disease is appropriately treated.
Sponastrime dysplasia
MedGen UID:
266247
Concept ID:
C1300260
Disease or Syndrome
Sponastrime dysplasia is an autosomal recessive spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMD) named for characteristic clinical and radiographic findings, including spine (spondylar) abnormalities, midface hypoplasia with a depressed nasal bridge, and striation of the metaphyses. Additional features include disproportionate short stature with exaggerated lumbar lordosis, scoliosis, coxa vara, limited elbow extension, small dysplastic epiphyses, childhood cataracts, short dental roots, and hypogammaglobulinemia. Radiographically, the abnormalities of the lumbar vertebral bodies are suggested to be the most specific finding because the characteristic metaphyseal striations may not be apparent at young ages. Striking clinical variability in presentation, severity, and associated features has been observed (summary by Burrage et al., 2019).
Microcephalic osteodysplastic dysplasia, Saul-Wilson type
MedGen UID:
722057
Concept ID:
C1300285
Disease or Syndrome
Saul-Wilson syndrome (SWS) is a skeletal dysplasia characterized by profound short stature, distinctive craniofacial features, short distal phalanges of fingers and toes, and often clubfoot. Early development (primarily speech and motor) is delayed; cognition is normal. Other findings can include hearing loss (conductive, sensorineural, and mixed), lamellar cataracts, and/or rod-cone retinal dystrophy. To date, 16 affected individuals have been reported.
Revesz syndrome
MedGen UID:
231230
Concept ID:
C1327916
Disease or Syndrome
Dyskeratosis congenita and related telomere biology disorders (DC/TBD) are caused by impaired telomere maintenance resulting in short or very short telomeres. The phenotypic spectrum of telomere biology disorders is broad and includes individuals with classic dyskeratosis congenita (DC) as well as those with very short telomeres and an isolated physical finding. Classic DC is characterized by a triad of dysplastic nails, lacy reticular pigmentation of the upper chest and/or neck, and oral leukoplakia, although this may not be present in all individuals. People with DC/TBD are at increased risk for progressive bone marrow failure (BMF), myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myelogenous leukemia, solid tumors (usually squamous cell carcinoma of the head/neck or anogenital cancer), and pulmonary fibrosis. Other findings can include eye abnormalities (epiphora, blepharitis, sparse eyelashes, ectropion, entropion, trichiasis), taurodontism, liver disease, gastrointestinal telangiectasias, and avascular necrosis of the hips or shoulders. Although most persons with DC/TBD have normal psychomotor development and normal neurologic function, significant developmental delay is present in both forms; additional findings include cerebellar hypoplasia (Hoyeraal Hreidarsson syndrome) and bilateral exudative retinopathy and intracranial calcifications (Revesz syndrome and Coats plus syndrome). Onset and progression of manifestations of DC/TBD vary: at the mild end of the spectrum are those who have only minimal physical findings with normal bone marrow function, and at the severe end are those who have the diagnostic triad and early-onset BMF.
Ataxia-pancytopenia syndrome
MedGen UID:
230896
Concept ID:
C1327919
Disease or Syndrome
SAMD9L ataxia-pancytopenia (ATXPC) syndrome is characterized by cerebellar ataxia, variable hematologic cytopenias, and predisposition to marrow failure, myelodysplasia, and myeloid leukemia, sometimes associated with monosomy 7. The onset of hematologic abnormalities has been reported as early as age three months. The cytopenias in all cell lineages range from mild to very severe. Onset of neurologic impairment is variable. Nystagmus, dysmetria, increased deep tendon reflexes, and clonus are common. Gait impairment and other neurologic abnormalities are slowly progressive.
Hyper-IgM syndrome type 3
MedGen UID:
328419
Concept ID:
C1720957
Disease or Syndrome
Type 3 immunodeficiency with hyper-IgM (HIGM3), first described in humans by Ferrari et al. (2001), is characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia with normal or elevated levels of IgM. For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of immunodeficiency with hyper-IgM, see HIGM1 (308230).
Primary immunodeficiency syndrome due to p14 deficiency
MedGen UID:
372135
Concept ID:
C1835829
Disease or Syndrome
Primary immunodeficiency syndrome due to p14 deficiency is characterised by short stature, hypopigmentation, coarse facies and frequent bronchopulmonary <i>Streptococcus pneumoniae</i> infections.
Fanconi anemia complementation group I
MedGen UID:
323016
Concept ID:
C1836861
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
Wolfram syndrome, mitochondrial form
MedGen UID:
325511
Concept ID:
C1838782
Disease or Syndrome
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
374912
Concept ID:
C1842362
Disease or Syndrome
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, a bleeding diathesis, and, in some individuals, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. Ocular findings include reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in variable bruising, epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects occur primarily in individuals with pathogenic variants in AP3B1 and AP3D1.
Spondyloenchondrodysplasia with immune dysregulation
MedGen UID:
375009
Concept ID:
C1842763
Disease or Syndrome
Spondyloenchondrodysplasia with immune dysregulation (SPENCDI) is an immunoosseous dysplasia combining the typical metaphyseal and vertebral bone lesions of spondyloenchondrodysplasia (SPENCD) with immune dysfunction and neurologic involvement. The skeletal dysplasia is characterized by radiolucent and irregular spondylar and metaphyseal lesions that represent islands of chondroid tissue within bone. The vertebral bodies show dorsally accentuated platyspondyly with disturbance of ossification. Clinical abnormalities such as short stature, rhizomelic micromelia, increased lumbar lordosis, barrel chest, facial anomalies, and clumsy movements may be present (Menger et al., 1989). Central nervous system involvement includes spasticity, mental retardation, and cerebral calcifications, and immune dysregulation ranges from autoimmunity to immunodeficiency. Neurologic and autoimmune manifestations have been observed in different combinations within a single family, suggesting that this disorder may be defined by specific radiographic features but has remarkably pleiotropic manifestations (Renella et al., 2006). Briggs et al. (2016) also noted variability in skeletal, neurologic, and immune phenotypes, which was sometimes marked between members of the same family. Classification of the Enchondromatoses In their classification of the enchondromatoses, Spranger et al. (1978) called Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome types I and II enchondromatosis, respectively; metachondromatosis (156250), type III; and spondyloenchondrodysplasia (SPENCD), also called spondyloenchondromatosis, type IV; enchondromatosis with irregular vertebral lesions, type V; and generalized enchondromatosis, type VI. Halal and Azouz (1991) added 3 tentative categories to the 6 in the classification of Spranger et al. (1978). Pansuriya et al. (2010) suggested a new classification of enchondromatosis (multiple enchondromas).
Nonimmune chronic idiopathic neutropenia of adults
MedGen UID:
375050
Concept ID:
C1842930
Disease or Syndrome
Nonimmune chronic idiopathic neutropenia of adults (NI-CINA) is a relatively mild form of neutropenia diagnosed in adults but predisposing to leukemia in a subset of patients (Papadaki et al., 2002).
X-linked severe congenital neutropenia
MedGen UID:
335314
Concept ID:
C1845987
Disease or Syndrome
The WAS-related disorders, which include Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, X-linked thrombocytopenia (XLT), and X-linked congenital neutropenia (XLN), are a spectrum of disorders of hematopoietic cells, with predominant defects of platelets and lymphocytes caused by pathogenic variants in WAS. WAS-related disorders usually present in infancy. Affected males have thrombocytopenia with intermittent mucosal bleeding, bloody diarrhea, and intermittent or chronic petechiae and purpura; eczema; and recurrent bacterial and viral infections, particularly of the ear. At least 40% of those who survive the early complications develop one or more autoimmune conditions including hemolytic anemia, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, immune-mediated neutropenia, rheumatoid arthritis, vasculitis, and immune-mediated damage to the kidneys and liver. Individuals with a WAS-related disorder, particularly those who have been exposed to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), are at increased risk of developing lymphomas, which often occur in unusual, extranodal locations including the brain, lung, or gastrointestinal tract. Males with XLT have thrombocytopenia with small platelets; other complications of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, including eczema and immune dysfunction, are usually mild or absent. Males with XLN have congenital neutropenia, myeloid dysplasia, and lymphoid cell abnormalities.
Cobalamin C disease
MedGen UID:
341256
Concept ID:
C1848561
Disease or Syndrome
Disorders of intracellular cobalamin metabolism have a variable phenotype and age of onset that are influenced by the severity and location within the pathway of the defect. The prototype and best understood phenotype is cblC; it is also the most common of these disorders. The age of initial presentation of cblC spans a wide range: In utero with fetal presentation of nonimmune hydrops, cardiomyopathy, and intrauterine growth restriction. Newborns, who can have microcephaly, poor feeding, and encephalopathy. Infants, who can have poor feeding and slow growth, neurologic abnormality, and, rarely, hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Toddlers, who can have poor growth, progressive microcephaly, cytopenias (including megaloblastic anemia), global developmental delay, encephalopathy, and neurologic signs such as hypotonia and seizures. Adolescents and adults, who can have neuropsychiatric symptoms, progressive cognitive decline, thromboembolic complications, and/or subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord.
Methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type cblF
MedGen UID:
336373
Concept ID:
C1848578
Disease or Syndrome
Disorders of intracellular cobalamin metabolism have a variable phenotype and age of onset that are influenced by the severity and location within the pathway of the defect. The prototype and best understood phenotype is cblC; it is also the most common of these disorders. The age of initial presentation of cblC spans a wide range: In utero with fetal presentation of nonimmune hydrops, cardiomyopathy, and intrauterine growth restriction. Newborns, who can have microcephaly, poor feeding, and encephalopathy. Infants, who can have poor feeding and slow growth, neurologic abnormality, and, rarely, hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Toddlers, who can have poor growth, progressive microcephaly, cytopenias (including megaloblastic anemia), global developmental delay, encephalopathy, and neurologic signs such as hypotonia and seizures. Adolescents and adults, who can have neuropsychiatric symptoms, progressive cognitive decline, thromboembolic complications, and/or subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord.
Onychotrichodysplasia and neutropenia
MedGen UID:
340512
Concept ID:
C1850316
Disease or Syndrome
Neutropenia, lethal congenital, with eosinophilia
MedGen UID:
338037
Concept ID:
C1850381
Disease or Syndrome
Methylmalonic aciduria, cblB type
MedGen UID:
344420
Concept ID:
C1855102
Disease or Syndrome
For this GeneReview, the term "isolated methylmalonic acidemia" refers to a group of inborn errors of metabolism associated with elevated methylmalonic acid (MMA) concentration in the blood and urine that result from the failure to isomerize (convert) methylmalonyl-coenzyme A (CoA) into succinyl-CoA during propionyl-CoA metabolism in the mitochondrial matrix, without hyperhomocysteinemia or homocystinuria, hypomethioninemia, or variations in other metabolites, such as malonic acid. Isolated MMA is caused by complete or partial deficiency of the enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (mut0 enzymatic subtype or mut– enzymatic subtype, respectively), a defect in the transport or synthesis of its cofactor, 5-deoxy-adenosyl-cobalamin (cblA, cblB, or cblD-MMA), or deficiency of the enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA epimerase. Prior to the advent of newborn screening, common phenotypes included: Infantile/non-B12-responsive form (mut0 enzymatic subtype, cblB), the most common phenotype, associated with infantile-onset lethargy, tachypnea, hypothermia, vomiting, and dehydration on initiation of protein-containing feeds. Without appropriate treatment, the infantile/non-B12-responsive phenotype could rapidly progress to coma due to hyperammonemic encephalopathy. Partially deficient or B12-responsive phenotypes (mut– enzymatic subtype, cblA, cblB [rare], cblD-MMA), in which symptoms occur in the first few months or years of life and are characterized by feeding problems, failure to thrive, hypotonia, and developmental delay marked by episodes of metabolic decompensation. Methylmalonyl-CoA epimerase deficiency, in which findings range from complete absence of symptoms to severe metabolic acidosis. Affected individuals can also develop ataxia, dysarthria, hypotonia, mild spastic paraparesis, and seizures. In those individuals diagnosed by newborn screening and treated from an early age, there appears to be decreased early mortality, less severe symptoms at diagnosis, favorable short-term neurodevelopmental outcome, and lower incidence of movement disorders and irreversible cerebral damage. However, secondary complications may still occur and can include intellectual disability, tubulointerstitial nephritis with progressive impairment of renal function, "metabolic stroke" (bilateral lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia during acute metabolic decompensation), pancreatitis, growth failure, functional immune impairment, bone marrow failure, optic nerve atrophy, arrhythmias and/or cardiomyopathy (dilated or hypertrophic), liver steatosis/fibrosis/cancer, and renal cancer.
Methylmalonic aciduria, cblA type
MedGen UID:
344422
Concept ID:
C1855109
Disease or Syndrome
For this GeneReview, the term "isolated methylmalonic acidemia" refers to a group of inborn errors of metabolism associated with elevated methylmalonic acid (MMA) concentration in the blood and urine that result from the failure to isomerize (convert) methylmalonyl-coenzyme A (CoA) into succinyl-CoA during propionyl-CoA metabolism in the mitochondrial matrix, without hyperhomocysteinemia or homocystinuria, hypomethioninemia, or variations in other metabolites, such as malonic acid. Isolated MMA is caused by complete or partial deficiency of the enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (mut0 enzymatic subtype or mut– enzymatic subtype, respectively), a defect in the transport or synthesis of its cofactor, 5-deoxy-adenosyl-cobalamin (cblA, cblB, or cblD-MMA), or deficiency of the enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA epimerase. Prior to the advent of newborn screening, common phenotypes included: Infantile/non-B12-responsive form (mut0 enzymatic subtype, cblB), the most common phenotype, associated with infantile-onset lethargy, tachypnea, hypothermia, vomiting, and dehydration on initiation of protein-containing feeds. Without appropriate treatment, the infantile/non-B12-responsive phenotype could rapidly progress to coma due to hyperammonemic encephalopathy. Partially deficient or B12-responsive phenotypes (mut– enzymatic subtype, cblA, cblB [rare], cblD-MMA), in which symptoms occur in the first few months or years of life and are characterized by feeding problems, failure to thrive, hypotonia, and developmental delay marked by episodes of metabolic decompensation. Methylmalonyl-CoA epimerase deficiency, in which findings range from complete absence of symptoms to severe metabolic acidosis. Affected individuals can also develop ataxia, dysarthria, hypotonia, mild spastic paraparesis, and seizures. In those individuals diagnosed by newborn screening and treated from an early age, there appears to be decreased early mortality, less severe symptoms at diagnosis, favorable short-term neurodevelopmental outcome, and lower incidence of movement disorders and irreversible cerebral damage. However, secondary complications may still occur and can include intellectual disability, tubulointerstitial nephritis with progressive impairment of renal function, "metabolic stroke" (bilateral lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia during acute metabolic decompensation), pancreatitis, growth failure, functional immune impairment, bone marrow failure, optic nerve atrophy, arrhythmias and/or cardiomyopathy (dilated or hypertrophic), liver steatosis/fibrosis/cancer, and renal cancer.
Methylmalonic aciduria due to methylmalonyl-CoA mutase deficiency
MedGen UID:
344424
Concept ID:
C1855114
Disease or Syndrome
For this GeneReview, the term "isolated methylmalonic acidemia" refers to a group of inborn errors of metabolism associated with elevated methylmalonic acid (MMA) concentration in the blood and urine that result from the failure to isomerize (convert) methylmalonyl-coenzyme A (CoA) into succinyl-CoA during propionyl-CoA metabolism in the mitochondrial matrix, without hyperhomocysteinemia or homocystinuria, hypomethioninemia, or variations in other metabolites, such as malonic acid. Isolated MMA is caused by complete or partial deficiency of the enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (mut0 enzymatic subtype or mut– enzymatic subtype, respectively), a defect in the transport or synthesis of its cofactor, 5-deoxy-adenosyl-cobalamin (cblA, cblB, or cblD-MMA), or deficiency of the enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA epimerase. Prior to the advent of newborn screening, common phenotypes included: Infantile/non-B12-responsive form (mut0 enzymatic subtype, cblB), the most common phenotype, associated with infantile-onset lethargy, tachypnea, hypothermia, vomiting, and dehydration on initiation of protein-containing feeds. Without appropriate treatment, the infantile/non-B12-responsive phenotype could rapidly progress to coma due to hyperammonemic encephalopathy. Partially deficient or B12-responsive phenotypes (mut– enzymatic subtype, cblA, cblB [rare], cblD-MMA), in which symptoms occur in the first few months or years of life and are characterized by feeding problems, failure to thrive, hypotonia, and developmental delay marked by episodes of metabolic decompensation. Methylmalonyl-CoA epimerase deficiency, in which findings range from complete absence of symptoms to severe metabolic acidosis. Affected individuals can also develop ataxia, dysarthria, hypotonia, mild spastic paraparesis, and seizures. In those individuals diagnosed by newborn screening and treated from an early age, there appears to be decreased early mortality, less severe symptoms at diagnosis, favorable short-term neurodevelopmental outcome, and lower incidence of movement disorders and irreversible cerebral damage. However, secondary complications may still occur and can include intellectual disability, tubulointerstitial nephritis with progressive impairment of renal function, "metabolic stroke" (bilateral lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia during acute metabolic decompensation), pancreatitis, growth failure, functional immune impairment, bone marrow failure, optic nerve atrophy, arrhythmias and/or cardiomyopathy (dilated or hypertrophic), liver steatosis/fibrosis/cancer, and renal cancer.
Methylcobalamin deficiency type cblG
MedGen UID:
344426
Concept ID:
C1855128
Disease or Syndrome
Disorders of intracellular cobalamin metabolism have a variable phenotype and age of onset that are influenced by the severity and location within the pathway of the defect. The prototype and best understood phenotype is cblC; it is also the most common of these disorders. The age of initial presentation of cblC spans a wide range: In utero with fetal presentation of nonimmune hydrops, cardiomyopathy, and intrauterine growth restriction. Newborns, who can have microcephaly, poor feeding, and encephalopathy. Infants, who can have poor feeding and slow growth, neurologic abnormality, and, rarely, hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Toddlers, who can have poor growth, progressive microcephaly, cytopenias (including megaloblastic anemia), global developmental delay, encephalopathy, and neurologic signs such as hypotonia and seizures. Adolescents and adults, who can have neuropsychiatric symptoms, progressive cognitive decline, thromboembolic complications, and/or subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord.
Vici syndrome
MedGen UID:
340962
Concept ID:
C1855772
Disease or Syndrome
With the current widespread use of multigene panels and comprehensive genomic testing, it has become apparent that the phenotypic spectrum of EPG5-related disorder represents a continuum. At the most severe end of the spectrum is classic Vici syndrome (defined as a neurodevelopmental disorder with multisystem involvement characterized by the combination of agenesis of the corpus callosum, cataracts, hypopigmentation, cardiomyopathy, combined immunodeficiency, microcephaly, and failure to thrive); at the milder end of the spectrum are attenuated neurodevelopmental phenotypes with variable multisystem involvement. Median survival in classic Vici syndrome appears to be 24 months, with only 10% of children surviving longer than age five years; the most common causes of death are respiratory infections as a result of primary immunodeficiency and/or cardiac insufficiency resulting from progressive cardiac failure. No data are available on life span in individuals at the milder end of the spectrum.
Hemochromatosis type 3
MedGen UID:
388114
Concept ID:
C1858664
Disease or Syndrome
TFR2-related hereditary hemochromatosis (TFR2-HHC) is characterized by increased intestinal iron absorption resulting in iron accumulation in the liver, heart, pancreas, and endocrine organs. Age of onset is earlier than in HFE-HHC. The majority of individuals present with signs and symptoms of iron overload in the third decade (e.g., weakness, fatigue, abdominal pain, hepatomegaly, arthritis, arthralgia, progressive increase in skin pigmentation). Others present as young adults with nonspecific symptoms and abnormal serum iron studies or as adults with abnormal serum iron studies and signs of organ involvement including cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, and arthropathy.
Poikiloderma with neutropenia
MedGen UID:
388129
Concept ID:
C1858723
Disease or Syndrome
Poikiloderma with neutropenia (PN) is characterized by an inflammatory eczematous rash (ages 6-12 months) followed by post-inflammatory poikiloderma (age >2 years) and chronic noncyclic neutropenia typically associated with recurrent sinopulmonary infections in the first two years of life and (often) bronchiectasis. There is increased risk for myelodysplastic syndrome and, rarely, acute myelogenous leukemia. Other ectodermal findings include nail dystrophy and palmar/plantar hyperkeratosis. Most affected individuals also have reactive airway disease and some have short stature, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, midfacial retrusion, calcinosis cutis, and non-healing skin ulcers.
Neutropenia, severe congenital, 1, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
348506
Concept ID:
C1859966
Disease or Syndrome
ELANE-related neutropenia includes congenital neutropenia and cyclic neutropenia, both of which are primary hematologic disorders characterized by recurrent fever, skin and oropharyngeal inflammation (i.e., mouth ulcers, gingivitis, sinusitis, and pharyngitis), and cervical adenopathy. Infectious complications are generally more severe in congenital neutropenia than in cyclic neutropenia. In congenital neutropenia, omphalitis immediately after birth may be the first sign; in untreated children diarrhea, pneumonia, and deep abscesses in the liver, lungs, and subcutaneous tissues are common in the first year of life. After 15 years with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment, the risk of developing myelodysplasia (MDS) or acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is approximately 15%-25%. Cyclic neutropenia is usually diagnosed within the first year of life based on approximately three-week intervals of fever and oral ulcerations and regular oscillations of blood cell counts. Cellulitis, especially perianal cellulitis, is common during neutropenic periods. Between neutropenic periods, affected individuals are generally healthy. Symptoms improve in adulthood. Cyclic neutropenia is not associated with risk of malignancy or conversion to leukemia.
Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis 4
MedGen UID:
350245
Concept ID:
C1863728
Disease or Syndrome
Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is a hyperinflammatory disorder clinically diagnosed based on the fulfillment of 5 of 8 criteria, including fever, splenomegaly, bicytopenia, hypertriglyceridemia and/or hypofibrinogenemia, hemophagocytosis, low or absent natural killer (NK) cell activity, hyperferritinemia, and high soluble IL2 receptor levels (IL2R; 147730). The disorder typically presents in infancy or early childhood. Persistent remission is rarely achieved with chemo- or immunotherapy; hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only cure (summary by Muller et al., 2014). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL), see 267700.
SLC35A1-congenital disorder of glycosylation
MedGen UID:
370234
Concept ID:
C1970344
Disease or Syndrome
An extremely rare form of carbohydrate deficient glycoprotein syndrome characterized clinically in the single reported case by repeated hemorrhagic incidents, including severe pulmonary hemorrhage.
Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome type 4
MedGen UID:
382434
Concept ID:
C2674723
Disease or Syndrome
RAS-associated leukoproliferative disorder is characterized by lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, and variable autoimmune phenomena, including autoimmune hemolytic anemia, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, and neutropenia. Laboratory studies show an expansion of lymphocytes due to defective apoptosis, as well as significant autoantibodies. Some patients have recurrent infections, and there may be an increased risk of hematologic malignancy (summary by Oliveira, 2013 and Niemela et al., 2010). The disorder shows significant overlap with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS; 601859) and was originally designated ALPS IV.
Diamond-Blackfan anemia 8
MedGen UID:
390817
Concept ID:
C2675511
Disease or Syndrome
Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is characterized by a profound normochromic and usually macrocytic anemia with normal leukocytes and platelets, congenital malformations in up to 50%, and growth deficiency in 30% of affected individuals. The hematologic complications occur in 90% of affected individuals during the first year of life. The phenotypic spectrum ranges from a mild form (e.g., mild anemia or no anemia with only subtle erythroid abnormalities, physical malformations without anemia) to a severe form of fetal anemia resulting in nonimmune hydrops fetalis. DBA is associated with an increased risk for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and solid tumors including osteogenic sarcoma.
Diamond-Blackfan anemia 7
MedGen UID:
436451
Concept ID:
C2675512
Disease or Syndrome
Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is characterized by a profound normochromic and usually macrocytic anemia with normal leukocytes and platelets, congenital malformations in up to 50%, and growth deficiency in 30% of affected individuals. The hematologic complications occur in 90% of affected individuals during the first year of life. The phenotypic spectrum ranges from a mild form (e.g., mild anemia or no anemia with only subtle erythroid abnormalities, physical malformations without anemia) to a severe form of fetal anemia resulting in nonimmune hydrops fetalis. DBA is associated with an increased risk for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and solid tumors including osteogenic sarcoma.
Diamond-Blackfan anemia 4
MedGen UID:
393906
Concept ID:
C2675860
Disease or Syndrome
Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is characterized by a profound normochromic and usually macrocytic anemia with normal leukocytes and platelets, congenital malformations in up to 50%, and growth deficiency in 30% of affected individuals. The hematologic complications occur in 90% of affected individuals during the first year of life. The phenotypic spectrum ranges from a mild form (e.g., mild anemia or no anemia with only subtle erythroid abnormalities, physical malformations without anemia) to a severe form of fetal anemia resulting in nonimmune hydrops fetalis. DBA is associated with an increased risk for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and solid tumors including osteogenic sarcoma.
Diamond-Blackfan anemia 1
MedGen UID:
390966
Concept ID:
C2676137
Disease or Syndrome
Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is characterized by a profound normochromic and usually macrocytic anemia with normal leukocytes and platelets, congenital malformations in up to 50%, and growth deficiency in 30% of affected individuals. The hematologic complications occur in 90% of affected individuals during the first year of life. The phenotypic spectrum ranges from a mild form (e.g., mild anemia or no anemia with only subtle erythroid abnormalities, physical malformations without anemia) to a severe form of fetal anemia resulting in nonimmune hydrops fetalis. DBA is associated with an increased risk for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and solid tumors including osteogenic sarcoma.
Neutropenia, severe congenital, 2, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
413975
Concept ID:
C2751288
Disease or Syndrome
Severe congenital neutropenia inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern and caused by mutation(s) in the GFI1 gene, encoding zinc finger protein Gfi-1.
Autosomal recessive severe congenital neutropenia due to G6PC3 deficiency
MedGen UID:
414066
Concept ID:
C2751630
Disease or Syndrome
G6PC3 deficiency is characterized by severe congenital neutropenia which occurs in a phenotypic continuum that includes the following: Isolated severe congenital neutropenia (nonsyndromic). Classic G6PC3 deficiency (severe congenital neutropenia plus cardiovascular and/or urogenital abnormalities). Severe G6PC3 deficiency (classic G6PC3 deficiency plus involvement of non-myeloid hematopoietic cell lines, additional extra-hematologic features, and pulmonary hypertension; known as Dursun syndrome). Neutropenia usually presents with recurrent bacterial infections in the first few months of life. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), failure to thrive (FTT), and poor postnatal growth are common. Other findings in classic and severe G6PC3 deficiency can include inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) resembling Crohn's disease, and endocrine disorders (growth hormone deficiency, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and delayed puberty).
MHC class II deficiency
MedGen UID:
444051
Concept ID:
C2931418
Disease or Syndrome
A rare autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency characterized by absence of HLA class II molecules on the surface of immune cells, leading to severely impaired cellular and humoral immune response to foreign antigens, severe CD4+ T-cell lymphopenia, and hypogammaglobulinemia. The disease clinically manifests with early onset of severe and recurrent infections mainly of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract, protracted diarrhea with failure to thrive, and autoimmune disease, and is frequently fatal in childhood.
Agammaglobulinemia 3, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
462101
Concept ID:
C3150751
Disease or Syndrome
Any autosomal agammaglobulinemia in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the CD79A gene.
Agammaglobulinemia 4, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
462102
Concept ID:
C3150752
Disease or Syndrome
Any autosomal agammaglobulinemia in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the BLNK gene.
Dyskeratosis congenita, autosomal dominant 2
MedGen UID:
462793
Concept ID:
C3151443
Disease or Syndrome
Dyskeratosis congenita and related telomere biology disorders (DC/TBD) are caused by impaired telomere maintenance resulting in short or very short telomeres. The phenotypic spectrum of telomere biology disorders is broad and includes individuals with classic dyskeratosis congenita (DC) as well as those with very short telomeres and an isolated physical finding. Classic DC is characterized by a triad of dysplastic nails, lacy reticular pigmentation of the upper chest and/or neck, and oral leukoplakia, although this may not be present in all individuals. People with DC/TBD are at increased risk for progressive bone marrow failure (BMF), myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myelogenous leukemia, solid tumors (usually squamous cell carcinoma of the head/neck or anogenital cancer), and pulmonary fibrosis. Other findings can include eye abnormalities (epiphora, blepharitis, sparse eyelashes, ectropion, entropion, trichiasis), taurodontism, liver disease, gastrointestinal telangiectasias, and avascular necrosis of the hips or shoulders. Although most persons with DC/TBD have normal psychomotor development and normal neurologic function, significant developmental delay is present in both forms; additional findings include cerebellar hypoplasia (Hoyeraal Hreidarsson syndrome) and bilateral exudative retinopathy and intracranial calcifications (Revesz syndrome and Coats plus syndrome). Onset and progression of manifestations of DC/TBD vary: at the mild end of the spectrum are those who have only minimal physical findings with normal bone marrow function, and at the severe end are those who have the diagnostic triad and early-onset BMF.
Dyskeratosis congenita, autosomal dominant 3
MedGen UID:
462795
Concept ID:
C3151445
Disease or Syndrome
Dyskeratosis congenita and related telomere biology disorders (DC/TBD) are caused by impaired telomere maintenance resulting in short or very short telomeres. The phenotypic spectrum of telomere biology disorders is broad and includes individuals with classic dyskeratosis congenita (DC) as well as those with very short telomeres and an isolated physical finding. Classic DC is characterized by a triad of dysplastic nails, lacy reticular pigmentation of the upper chest and/or neck, and oral leukoplakia, although this may not be present in all individuals. People with DC/TBD are at increased risk for progressive bone marrow failure (BMF), myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myelogenous leukemia, solid tumors (usually squamous cell carcinoma of the head/neck or anogenital cancer), and pulmonary fibrosis. Other findings can include eye abnormalities (epiphora, blepharitis, sparse eyelashes, ectropion, entropion, trichiasis), taurodontism, liver disease, gastrointestinal telangiectasias, and avascular necrosis of the hips or shoulders. Although most persons with DC/TBD have normal psychomotor development and normal neurologic function, significant developmental delay is present in both forms; additional findings include cerebellar hypoplasia (Hoyeraal Hreidarsson syndrome) and bilateral exudative retinopathy and intracranial calcifications (Revesz syndrome and Coats plus syndrome). Onset and progression of manifestations of DC/TBD vary: at the mild end of the spectrum are those who have only minimal physical findings with normal bone marrow function, and at the severe end are those who have the diagnostic triad and early-onset BMF.
Autosomal recessive agammaglobulinemia 1
MedGen UID:
463494
Concept ID:
C3152144
Disease or Syndrome
Agammaglobulinemia is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by profoundly low or absent serum antibodies and low or absent circulating B cells due to an early block of B-cell development. Affected individuals develop severe infections in the first years of life. The most common form of agammaglobulinemia is X-linked agammaglobulinemia (AGMX1, XLA; 300755), also known as Bruton disease, which is caused by mutation in the BTK gene (300300). AGMX1 accounts for anywhere from 85 to 95% of males who have the characteristic findings (Lopez Granados et al., 2002; Ferrari et al., 2007). Autosomal recessive inheritance of agammaglobulinemia, which has a similar phenotype to that of the X-linked form, has been observed in a small number of families, and accounts for up to 15% of patients with agammaglobulinemia (Ferrari et al., 2007). Conley (1999) gave a comprehensive review of autosomal recessive agammaglobulinemia. Genetic Heterogeneity of Autosomal Agammaglobulinemia Autosomal agammaglobulinemia is a genetically heterogeneous disorder: see also AGM2 (613500), caused by mutation in the IGLL1 gene (146770); AGM3 (613501), caused by mutation in the CD79A gene (112205); AGM4 (613502), caused by mutation in the BLNK gene (604515); AGM5 (613506), caused by disruption of the LRRC8 gene (608360); AGM6 (612692), caused by mutation in the CD79B gene (147245); AGM7 (615214), caused by mutation in the PIK3R1 gene (171833); AGM8 (616941), caused by mutation in the TCF3 gene (147141); AGM9 (619693), caused by mutation in the SLC39A7 gene (601416); and AGM10 (619707), caused by mutation in the SPI1 gene (165170).
Fanconi anemia complementation group D2
MedGen UID:
463627
Concept ID:
C3160738
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
Fanconi anemia complementation group E
MedGen UID:
463628
Concept ID:
C3160739
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
Monocytopenia with susceptibility to infections
MedGen UID:
481660
Concept ID:
C3280030
Disease or Syndrome
This primary immunodeficiency, designated IMD21, DCML, or MONOMAC, is characterized by profoundly decreased or absent monocytes, B lymphocytes, natural killer (NK) lymphocytes, and circulating and tissue dendritic cells (DCs), with little or no effect on T-cell numbers. Clinical features of IMD21 are variable and include susceptibility to disseminated nontuberculous mycobacterial infections, papillomavirus infections, opportunistic fungal infections, and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Bone marrow hypocellularity and dysplasia of myeloid, erythroid, and megakaryocytic lineages are present in most patients, as are karyotypic abnormalities, including monosomy 7 and trisomy 8. In the absence of cytogenetic abnormalities or overt dysplasia, hypoplastic bone marrow may initially be diagnosed as aplastic anemia. Bone marrow transplantation is the only cure. Some patients may have an increased risk of miscarriage. Both autosomal dominant transmission and sporadic cases occur. Less common manifestations of GATA2 deficiency include lymphedema and sensorineural hearing loss, a phenotype usually termed 'Emberger syndrome' (614038) (summary by Bigley et al. (2011), Hsu et al. (2011), and Spinner et al. (2014)).
Encephalomyopathy, mitochondrial, due to voltage-dependent anion channel deficiency
MedGen UID:
482736
Concept ID:
C3281106
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia complementation group C
MedGen UID:
483324
Concept ID:
C3468041
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
Fanconi anemia complementation group A
MedGen UID:
483333
Concept ID:
C3469521
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
Fanconi anemia complementation group G
MedGen UID:
854017
Concept ID:
C3469527
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
X-linked dyserythropoetic anemia with abnormal platelets and neutropenia
MedGen UID:
763770
Concept ID:
C3550856
Disease or Syndrome
XLANP is an X-linked recessive hematologic disorder characterized by early-onset anemia and bone marrow erythroid hypoplasia with variable neutropenia. Some patients may have low platelets or platelet abnormalities. The severity is variable. Some patients have shown a favorable response to corticosteroid treatment (summary by Hollanda et al., 2006 and Sankaran et al., 2012). In some cases, the disorder may resemble Diamond-Blackfan anemia (see, e.g., DBA1; 105650) (Sankaran et al., 2012; Parrella et al., 2014; Klar et al., 2014).
Methylmalonic acidemia with homocystinuria, type cblJ
MedGen UID:
766829
Concept ID:
C3553915
Disease or Syndrome
Combined methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) and homocystinuria is a genetically heterogeneous metabolic disorder of cobalamin (cbl; vitamin B12) metabolism, which is essential for hematologic and neurologic function. Biochemically, the defect causes decreased levels of the coenzymes adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) and methylcobalamin (MeCbl), which results in decreased activity of the respective enzymes methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MUT; 609058) and methyltetrahydrofolate:homocysteine methyltransferase, also known as methionine synthase (MTR; 156570). The cblJ type is phenotypically and biochemically similar to the cblF type (MAHCF; 277380) (summary by Coelho et al., 2012).
Combined immunodeficiency due to STK4 deficiency
MedGen UID:
766857
Concept ID:
C3553943
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-110 (IMD110) is an autosomal recessive primary T-cell immunodeficiency syndrome characterized by progressive loss of naive T cells, recurrent bacterial, viral, and fungal infections, warts, and abscesses, and autoimmune manifestations. Patients are at risk for developing lymphoproliferative disorders or lymphoma, particularly associated with EBV. Some patients may show cardiac malformations, including atrial septal defect (Abdollahpour et al., 2012; Nehme et al., 2012).
Diamond-Blackfan anemia 11
MedGen UID:
766956
Concept ID:
C3554042
Disease or Syndrome
Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is characterized by a profound normochromic and usually macrocytic anemia with normal leukocytes and platelets, congenital malformations in up to 50%, and growth deficiency in 30% of affected individuals. The hematologic complications occur in 90% of affected individuals during the first year of life. The phenotypic spectrum ranges from a mild form (e.g., mild anemia or no anemia with only subtle erythroid abnormalities, physical malformations without anemia) to a severe form of fetal anemia resulting in nonimmune hydrops fetalis. DBA is associated with an increased risk for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and solid tumors including osteogenic sarcoma.
Agammaglobulinemia 7, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
767603
Concept ID:
C3554689
Disease or Syndrome
Any autosomal agammaglobulinemia in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the PIK3R1 gene.
Chronic familial neutropenia
MedGen UID:
777137
Concept ID:
C3665676
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital neutropenia-myelofibrosis-nephromegaly syndrome
MedGen UID:
815361
Concept ID:
C3809031
Disease or Syndrome
Severe congenital neutropenia-5 is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency disorder characterized primarily by neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction, a lack of response to G-CSF, life-threatening infections, bone marrow fibrosis, and renal extramedullary hematopoiesis (summary by Vilboux et al., 2013). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of severe congenital neutropenia, see SCN1 (202700).
TCR-alpha-beta-positive T-cell deficiency
MedGen UID:
815662
Concept ID:
C3809332
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-7 (IMD7) is an autosomal recessive immunologic disorder characterized by onset of recurrent bacterial and viral infections in infancy or early childhood. Affected individuals may also have features of immune dysregulation, including lymphadenopathy and presence of autoantibodies. Laboratory studies show increased serum IgE, low numbers of T cells, low TCR-alpha/beta cells, and increased TCR-gamma/delta cells. The disorder often results in death in childhood, although bone marrow transplant is effective (summary by Morgan et al., 2011 and Rawat et al., 2021).
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 13
MedGen UID:
815922
Concept ID:
C3809592
Disease or Syndrome
FBXL4-related encephalomyopathic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome is a multi-system disorder characterized primarily by congenital or early-onset lactic acidosis and growth failure, feeding difficulty, hypotonia, and developmental delay. Other neurologic manifestations can include seizures, movement disorders, ataxia, autonomic dysfunction, and stroke-like episodes. All affected individuals alive at the time they were reported (median age: 3.5 years) demonstrated significant developmental delay. Other findings can involve the heart (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, congenital heart malformations, arrhythmias), liver (mildly elevated transaminases), eyes (cataract, strabismus, nystagmus, optic atrophy), hearing (sensorineural hearing loss), and bone marrow (neutropenia, lymphopenia). Survival varies; the median age of reported deaths was two years (range 2 days – 75 months), although surviving individuals as old as 36 years have been reported. To date FBXL4-related mtDNA depletion syndrome has been reported in 50 individuals.
Disabling pansclerotic morphea of childhood
MedGen UID:
858243
Concept ID:
C3898649
Disease or Syndrome
Disabling pansclerotic morphea of childhood is the most severe subtype of deep morphea within the spectrum of juvenile localized scleroderma. Patients affected by this systemic inflammatory disorder experience poor wound healing with rapidly progressive deep fibrosis involving the mucous membranes, dermis, subcutaneous fat, fascia, muscles, and bone, leading to contractures, musculoskeletal atrophy, and articular ankylosis. Systemic manifestations include cytopenias and hypogammaglobulinemia, but scleroderma-associated autoantibodies are usually not present. The disorder is associated with high morbidity and mortality due to squamous cell carcinoma, restrictive pulmonary disease, sepsis, and gangrene (Baghdassarian et al., 2023).
Immunodeficiency 23
MedGen UID:
862808
Concept ID:
C4014371
Disease or Syndrome
IMD23 is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency syndrome characterized by onset of recurrent infections, usually respiratory or cutaneous, in early childhood. Immune workup usually shows neutropenia, lymphopenia, eosinophilia, and increased serum IgE or IgA. Neutrophil chemotactic defects have also been reported. Infectious agents include bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Many patients develop atopic dermatitis, eczema, and other signs of autoinflammation. Affected individuals may also show developmental delay or cognitive impairment of varying severity (summary by Bjorksten and Lundmark, 1976 and Zhang et al., 2014).
Autosomal recessive severe congenital neutropenia due to JAGN1 deficiency
MedGen UID:
863391
Concept ID:
C4014954
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive severe congenital neutropenia due to JAGN1 deficiency is a rare, genetic, primary immunodeficiency disorder characterized by early-onset, recurrent, severe bacterial infections, granulopoiesis maturation arrest at the promyelocyte/myelocyte stage and markedly reduced absolute neutrophil counts, resulting from recessively inherited mutations in the <i>JAGN1</i> gene. Mild facial dysmorphism (i.e. triangular face), short stature, failure to thrive, hypothyroidism, developmental delay, pancreatic insufficiency and coarctation of aorta, as well as bone and urogenital abnormalities, may also be associated.
Thrombocytopenia 5
MedGen UID:
863974
Concept ID:
C4015537
Disease or Syndrome
Individuals with ETV6 thrombocytopenia and predisposition to leukemia most often present with a lifelong history of thrombocytopenia, which is usually in the mild to moderate range. No syndromic features or associations are consistently shared across pedigrees. Affected individuals also have a moderate risk of developing a hematologic malignancy (with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia [B-ALL] being the most common) and possibly other malignant solid tumors, particularly colorectal cancer.
Trichothiodystrophy 3, photosensitive
MedGen UID:
865608
Concept ID:
C4017171
Disease or Syndrome
Trichothiodystrophy is a rare autosomal recessive disorder in which patients have brittle, sulfur-deficient hair that displays a diagnostic alternating light and dark banding pattern, called 'tiger tail banding,' under polarizing microscopy. TTD patients display a wide variety of clinical features, including cutaneous, neurologic, and growth abnormalities. Common additional clinical features are ichthyosis, intellectual/developmental disabilities, decreased fertility, abnormal characteristics at birth, ocular abnormalities, short stature, and infections. There are both photosensitive and nonphotosensitive forms of the disorder. Patients with TTD have not been reported to have a predisposition to cancer (summary by Faghri et al., 2008). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of TTD, see 601675.
Radioulnar synostosis with amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia 2
MedGen UID:
901732
Concept ID:
C4225221
Disease or Syndrome
Radioulnar synostosis with amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia (RUSAT) is characterized by thrombocytopenia that progresses to pancytopenia, in association with congenital proximal fusion of the radius and ulna that results in extremely limited pronation and supination of the forearm (summary by Niihori et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of radioulnar synostosis with amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia, see RUSAT1 (605432).
Mucopolysaccharidosis-plus syndrome
MedGen UID:
934594
Concept ID:
C4310627
Disease or Syndrome
MPSPS is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism resulting in a multisystem disorder with features of the mucopolysaccharidosis lysosomal storage diseases (see, e.g., 607016). Patients present in infancy or early childhood with respiratory difficulties, cardiac problems, anemia, dysostosis multiplex, renal involvement, coarse facies, and delayed psychomotor development. Most patients die of cardiorespiratory failure in the first years of life (summary by Kondo et al., 2017).
3-methylglutaconic aciduria type 8
MedGen UID:
934617
Concept ID:
C4310650
Disease or Syndrome
MGCA8 is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder resulting in death in infancy. Features include hypotonia, abnormal movements, respiratory insufficiency with apneic episodes, and lack of developmental progress, often with seizures. Brain imaging is variable, but may show progressive cerebral atrophy. Laboratory studies show increased serum lactate and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, suggesting a mitochondrial defect (summary by Mandel et al., 2016). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, see MGCA type I (250950).
Fanconi anemia complementation group V
MedGen UID:
934619
Concept ID:
C4310652
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
Hyperuricemic nephropathy, familial juvenile type 4
MedGen UID:
934708
Concept ID:
C4310741
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease-5 (ADTKD5) is characterized by the onset of progressive chronic renal disease in the first decades of life. Mild hyperuricemia may be present, but gout, hypertension, and proteinuria are usually absent. The disease may be associated with anemia or neutropenia. Some patients may have additional findings, including poor overall growth and impaired cognitive function. Renal biopsy shows tubulointerstitial abnormalities with atrophic tubules and fibrosis; secondary glomerular abnormalities and simple cysts may also be present (summary by Bolar et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity and revised nomenclature of ADTKD, see ADTKD1 (162000).
Bone marrow failure syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
934711
Concept ID:
C4310744
Disease or Syndrome
Bone marrow failure syndrome-3 is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by onset of pancytopenia in early childhood. Patients may have additional variable nonspecific somatic abnormalities, including poor growth, microcephaly, and skin anomalies (summary by Tummala et al., 2016). BMFS3 has a distinct phenotype and may include features that overlap with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS1; 260400), such as pancreatic insufficiency and short stature, and with dyskeratosis congenita (see, e.g., DKCA1, 127550), such as dental and hair abnormalities and shortened telomeres. In addition, some patients may have joint and skeletal abnormalities, impaired development, and retinal dysplasia (summary by D'Amours et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of BMFS, see BMFS1 (614675).
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 10
MedGen UID:
934713
Concept ID:
C4310746
Disease or Syndrome
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, a bleeding diathesis, and, in some individuals, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. Ocular findings include reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in variable bruising, epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects occur primarily in individuals with pathogenic variants in AP3B1 and AP3D1.
Autosomal recessive severe congenital neutropenia due to CSF3R deficiency
MedGen UID:
934731
Concept ID:
C4310764
Disease or Syndrome
Severe congenital neutropenia-7 is an autosomal recessive immunodeficiency characterized by onset of recurrent infections in infancy or early childhood. Patients have peripheral neutropenia, although bone marrow biopsy shows normal granulocyte maturation. The neutropenia is not responsive to treatment with G-CSF, but may be responsive to GM-CSF (summary by Triot et al., 2014 and Klimiankou et al., 2015). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of severe congenital neutropenia, see SCN1 (202700).
Specific granule deficiency 2
MedGen UID:
1371952
Concept ID:
C4479548
Disease or Syndrome
Specific granule deficiency-2 (SGD2) is an autosomal recessive immunologic disorder characterized by recurrent infections due to defective neutrophil development. Bone marrow findings include paucity of neutrophil granulocytes, absence of granule proteins in neutrophils, abnormal megakaryocytes, and features of progressive myelofibrosis with blasts. The disorder is apparent from infancy, and patients may die in early childhood unless they undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Most patients have additional findings, including delayed development, mild dysmorphic features, tooth abnormalities, and distal skeletal defects (Witzel et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of SGD, see SGD1 (245480).
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 54
MedGen UID:
1614787
Concept ID:
C4540484
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Shwachman-Diamond syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1640046
Concept ID:
C4692625
Disease or Syndrome
Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) is characterized by: exocrine pancreatic dysfunction with malabsorption, malnutrition, and growth failure; hematologic abnormalities with single- or multilineage cytopenias and susceptibility to myelodysplasia syndrome (MDS) and acute myelogeneous leukemia (AML); and bone abnormalities. In almost all affected children, persistent or intermittent neutropenia is a common presenting finding, often before the diagnosis of SDS is made. Short stature and recurrent infections are common.
Shwachman-Diamond syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
1634617
Concept ID:
C4693704
Disease or Syndrome
Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) is characterized by: exocrine pancreatic dysfunction with malabsorption, malnutrition, and growth failure; hematologic abnormalities with single- or multilineage cytopenias and susceptibility to myelodysplasia syndrome (MDS) and acute myelogeneous leukemia (AML); and bone abnormalities. In almost all affected children, persistent or intermittent neutropenia is a common presenting finding, often before the diagnosis of SDS is made. Short stature and recurrent infections are common.
Congenital disorder of glycosylation with defective fucosylation
MedGen UID:
1647704
Concept ID:
C4693905
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital disorder of glycosylation with defective fucosylation is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder apparent from birth. Affected infants have poor growth, failure to thrive, hypotonia, skeletal anomalies, and delayed psychomotor development with intellectual disability. Additional highly variable congenital defects may be observed (summary by Ng et al., 2018). Genetic Heterogeneity of Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation with Defective Fucosylation See also CDGF2 (618323), caused by mutation in the FCSK gene (608675) on chromosome 16q22. For an overview of congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG), see CDG1A (212065) and CDG2A (212066).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 66
MedGen UID:
1648486
Concept ID:
C4748070
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-66 (DEE66) is a neurologic disorder characterized by the onset of various types of seizures in the first days or weeks of life. Most seizures have focal origins; secondary generalization is common. Seizure control is difficult at first, but may become easier with time. Affected individuals show global developmental delay with hypotonia, behavioral abnormalities, and dysmorphic features or ophthalmologic defects. Brain imaging often shows cerebellar dysgenesis. A subset of patients have extraneurologic manifestations, including hematologic and distal limb abnormalities (summary by Olson et al., 2018). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Mitochondrial complex 1 deficiency, nuclear type 33
MedGen UID:
1648420
Concept ID:
C4748840
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 23
MedGen UID:
1667331
Concept ID:
C4750914
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-23 is a neurologic disorder characterized by epilepsy, intellectual disability, and gait ataxia (summary by Gomez-Herreros et al., 2014).
Diamond-Blackfan anemia 18
MedGen UID:
1681154
Concept ID:
C5193020
Disease or Syndrome
Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is characterized by a profound normochromic and usually macrocytic anemia with normal leukocytes and platelets, congenital malformations in up to 50%, and growth deficiency in 30% of affected individuals. The hematologic complications occur in 90% of affected individuals during the first year of life. The phenotypic spectrum ranges from a mild form (e.g., mild anemia or no anemia with only subtle erythroid abnormalities, physical malformations without anemia) to a severe form of fetal anemia resulting in nonimmune hydrops fetalis. DBA is associated with an increased risk for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and solid tumors including osteogenic sarcoma.
Khan-Khan-Katsanis syndrome
MedGen UID:
1682553
Concept ID:
C5193110
Disease or Syndrome
Khan-Khan-Katsanis syndrome (3KS) is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder with variable involvement of the ocular, renal, skeletal, and sometimes cardiac systems. Affected individuals present at birth with multiple congenital anomalies, defects in urogenital and limb morphogenesis, poor overall growth with microcephaly, and global developmental delay (summary by Khan et al., 2019).
Mitochondrial myopathy, episodic, with optic atrophy and reversible leukoencephalopathy
MedGen UID:
1679560
Concept ID:
C5193223
Disease or Syndrome
Episodic mitochondrial myopathy with or without optic atrophy and reversible leukoencephalopathy (MEOAL) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized mainly by childhood onset of progressive muscle weakness and exercise intolerance. Patients have episodic exacerbation, which may be associated with increased serum creatine kinase or lactic acid. Additional more variable features may include optic atrophy, reversible leukoencephalopathy, and later onset of a sensorimotor polyneuropathy. The disorder results from impaired formation of Fe-S clusters, which are essential cofactors for proper mitochondrial function (summary by Gurgel-Giannetti et al., 2018)
Neutropenia, severe congenital, 8, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1684816
Concept ID:
C5203411
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant severe congenital neutropenia-8 (SCN8) is a pleiotropic disorder with the consistent feature of decreased neutrophils associated with recurrent bacterial infections apparent from early infancy. Other hematologic parameters are usually normal, although some patients may have mild anemia. Bone marrow examination shows hypocellularity with arrested maturation of the granulocyte lineage at the level of promyelocytes or myeloblasts. Treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF; 138970) is usually ineffective or only partially effective, whereas hematopoietic bone marrow transplantation is effective. A subset of patients have additional features, including exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, which resembles Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (see SDS1, 260400), and/or neurologic deficits, including developmental delay, impaired intellectual development, speech delay, and/or autistic features (summary by Carapito et al., 2017 and Bellanne-Chantelot et al., 2018). For discussion of genetic heterogeneity of severe congenital neutropenia, see SCN1 (202700).
Kostmann syndrome
MedGen UID:
1713491
Concept ID:
C5235141
Disease or Syndrome
Severe congenital neutropenia-3 is an autosomal recessive bone marrow failure disorder characterized by low numbers of neutrophils, increased susceptibility to bacterial and fungal infections, and increased risk of developing myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia. In addition, patients with HAX1 mutations affecting both isoform A and B of the gene develop neurologic abnormalities (summary by Boztug et al., 2010). The Swedish physician Rolf Kostmann (1956) described an autosomal recessive hematologic disorder, termed infantile agranulocytosis, with severe neutropenia with an absolute neutrophil count below 0.5 x 10(9)/l and early onset of severe bacterial infections. The disorder was later termed Kostmann syndrome (Skokowa et al., 2007). Lekstrom-Himes and Gallin (2000) discussed severe congenital neutropenia in a review of immunodeficiencies caused by defects in phagocytes. In addition to Kostmann agranulocytosis, recessively inherited neutropenic syndromes include congenital neutropenia with eosinophilia (257100), Chediak-Higashi syndrome (214500), and Fanconi pancytopenic syndrome (see 227650). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of severe congenital neutropenia, see SCN1 (202700).
Bone marrow failure syndrome 6
MedGen UID:
1717739
Concept ID:
C5394274
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked lymphoproliferative disease due to SH2D1A deficiency
MedGen UID:
1770239
Concept ID:
C5399825
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) has two recognizable subtypes, XLP1 and XLP2. XLP1 is characterized predominantly by one of three commonly recognized phenotypes: Inappropriate immune response to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection leading to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) or severe mononucleosis. Dysgammaglobulinemia. Lymphoproliferative disease (malignant lymphoma). XLP2 is most often characterized by HLH (often associated with EBV), dysgammaglobulinemia, and inflammatory bowel disease. HLH resulting from EBV infection is associated with an unregulated and exaggerated immune response with widespread proliferation of cytotoxic T cells, EBV-infected B cells, and macrophages. Dysgammaglobulinemia is typically hypogammaglobulinemia of one or more immunoglobulin subclasses. The malignant lymphomas are typically B-cell lymphomas, non-Hodgkin type, often extranodal, and in particular involving the intestine.
Immunodeficiency 73b with defective neutrophil chemotaxis and lymphopenia
MedGen UID:
1740566
Concept ID:
C5436549
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-73B with defective neutrophil chemotaxis (IMD73B) is an autosomal dominant immunologic disorder characterized by onset of recurrent infections in infancy or early childhood. Affected individuals develop respiratory infections, cellulitis, and severe invasive infections or sepsis; organisms include bacteria such as Staphylococcus, as well as viruses, fungi, and mycobacterial species. Laboratory studies show variable abnormalities, including B- and T-cell lymphopenia, decreased immunoglobulin subsets, decreased TRECs and dysfunctional T cells, decreased NK cells, neutropenia, and impaired neutrophil chemotaxis. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is curative (summary by Hsu et al., 2019; review by Lougaris et al., 2020). In a review of autosomal forms of chronic granulomatous disease (see 306400 for genetic heterogeneity of CGD), Roos et al. (2021) noted that patients with RAC2 mutations may manifest CGD-like symptoms due to defects in neutrophil NADPH oxidase activity.
Monosomy 7 myelodysplasia and leukemia syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
1762901
Concept ID:
C5436668
Disease or Syndrome
Monosomy 7 myelodysplasia and leukemia syndrome-2 (M7MLS2) is an autosomal dominant hematologic disorder characterized by onset of pancytopenia, acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), and variable features of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) usually in the first decades of life. Bone marrow cells show monosomy 7. Germline mutations in the SAMD9 gene, located on chromosome 7q, have a gain-of-function suppressive effect on the cell cycle, resulting in decreased cellular proliferation. It is hypothesized that this germline defect leads to selective pressure favoring somatic loss of the chromosome 7 harboring the mutant allele (adaptation by aneuploidy) (summary by Wong et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of monosomy 7 myelodysplasia and leukemia syndrome, see 252270.
WHIM syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1778124
Concept ID:
C5542296
Disease or Syndrome
WHIM syndrome-1 (WHIMS1) is an autosomal dominant immunologic disorder characterized by neutropenia, hypogammaglobulinemia, and warts due to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Despite the peripheral neutropenia, bone marrow aspirates from affected individuals contain abundant mature myeloid cells, a condition termed myelokathexis. The susceptibility to HPV is disproportionate compared with other immunodeficiency conditions (summary by Hernandez et al., 2003). Heusinkveld et al. (2019) provided a detailed review of the clinical features, proposed pathogenesis, and possible therapeutic treatments of WHIM syndrome. There is significant phenotypic variation among patients, such that some individuals may have an 'incomplete' form of the disorder in which one or more of the classic tetrad features are not present. In general, the WHIMS phenotype comprises a spectrum of manifestations with variable expressivity. The pathogenesis of WHIMS1 is postulated to result from impaired CXCL12 (600835)-induced internalization of CXCR4, resulting in prolonged receptor presence at the cell surface that likely contributes to amplification of signaling with a gain-of-function effect. Genetic Heterogeneity of WHIM Syndrome See also WHIMS2 (619407), caused by mutation in the CXCR2 gene (146928) on chromosome 2q35.
Anemia, sideroblastic, 5
MedGen UID:
1794195
Concept ID:
C5561985
Disease or Syndrome
Sideroblastic anemia-5 (SIDBA5) is an autosomal recessive hematologic disorder characterized by abnormal iron accumulation in the mitochondria or erythroid cells. The pathologic iron deposits appear to ring the nucleus, resulting in a 'ringed sideroblast' on pathologic examination. Affected individuals have congenital hypochromic microcytic anemia apparent in childhood; they may also develop thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia (summary by Crispin et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of sideroblastic anemia, see SIDBA1 (300751).
Combined immunodeficiency due to moesin deficiency
MedGen UID:
1799546
Concept ID:
C5568123
Disease or Syndrome
IMD50 is an X-linked recessive primary immunodeficiency characterized by the onset of recurrent bacterial or varicella zoster virus (VZV) infections in early childhood. Laboratory studies show profound lymphopenia, hypogammaglobulinemia, poor immune response to vaccine antigens, and fluctuating neutropenia. The disorder does not affect overall patient survival (summary by Lagresle-Peyrou et al., 2016).
Combined immunodeficiency due to GINS1 deficiency
MedGen UID:
1799555
Concept ID:
C5568132
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-55 is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency characterized by intrauterine growth retardation, natural killer (NK) cell deficiency, and chronic neutropenia. Most patients also have postnatal growth retardation. Other clinical manifestations include mild facial dysmorphism, dry or eczematous skin, and recurrent infections with both viruses and bacteria. The disorder appears to result from a defect in DNA replication causing blockade of immune cell differentiation in the bone marrow, particularly affecting NK cells (summary by Cottineau et al., 2017).
TFRC-related combined immunodeficiency
MedGen UID:
1799556
Concept ID:
C5568133
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic combined T and B cell immunodeficiency characterised by life-threatening infections due to disrupted transferrin receptor 1 endocytosis, resulting in defective cellular iron transport and impaired T and B cell function. Patients present with early-onset chronic diarrhoea, severe recurrent infections and failure to thrive. Laboratory studies reveal hypo or agammaglobulinaemia, normal lymphocyte counts but decreased numbers of memory B cells, intermittent neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, and mild anaemia (resistant to iron supplementation) with low mean corpuscular volume.
Immunodeficiency 98 with autoinflammation, X-linked
MedGen UID:
1805285
Concept ID:
C5676883
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked immunodeficiency-98 with autoinflammation (IMD98) is characterized by onset of recurrent infections associated with lymphoproliferation and autoinflammation in the first decade of life. Mostly males are affected; carrier females may have mild symptoms. Laboratory studies show evidence of immune dysregulation, including hypogammaglobulinemia with reduced memory B cells, skewed T-cell subsets, increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines, activated T cells and monocytes, and autoimmune cytopenias, including neutropenia (Aluri et al., 2021; Fejtkova et al., 2022).
Autoinflammatory disease, X-linked
MedGen UID:
1811268
Concept ID:
C5676885
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked systemic autoinflammatory disease (SAIDX) is characterized by the onset of systemic autoinflammation in the first months of life. Features include lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, fever, panniculitis, and nodular skin rash. Additional manifestations may include inflammation of the optic nerve, intracranial hemorrhage, and lipodystrophy. Laboratory studies show hypogammaglobulinemia, increased or decreased white blood cell count, autoimmune cytopenias, elevated serum inflammatory markers, and a type I interferon signature (de Jesus et al., 2020 and Lee et al., 2022).
3-methylglutaconic aciduria, type VIIB
MedGen UID:
1810214
Concept ID:
C5676893
Disease or Syndrome
CLPB (caseinolytic peptidase B) deficiency is characterized by neurologic involvement and neutropenia, which can range from severe to mild. In severe CLPB deficiency, death usually occurs at a few months of age due to significant neonatal neurologic involvement (hyperekplexia or absence of voluntary movements, hypotonia or hypertonia, swallowing problems, respiratory insufficiency, and epilepsy) and severe neutropenia associated with life-threatening infections. Individuals with moderate CLPB deficiency present with neurologic abnormalities in infancy including hypotonia and feeding problems, and develop spasticity, a progressive movement disorder (ataxia, dystonia, and/or dyskinesia), epilepsy, and intellectual disability. Neutropenia is variable, but not life threatening. In those with mild CLPB deficiency there is no neurologic involvement, intellect is normal, neutropenia is mild and intermittent, and life expectancy is normal.
Immunodeficiency 93 and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
MedGen UID:
1804175
Concept ID:
C5676899
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-93 and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (IMD93) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by onset of recurrent viral and bacterial infections, particularly with encapsulated bacteria, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the first months or years of life. Immunologic workup typically shows decreased circulating B cells and hypo- or agammaglobulinemia, sometimes with neutropenia or T-cell lymphocytosis, although laboratory findings may be variable among patients. Ig replacement therapy is beneficial. Cardiac involvement can also include atrial septal defect, valvular insufficiency, and pre-excitation syndrome. Rare myopathic or neurologic involvement has been reported, but these features are not consistently part of the disorder and may be related to other genetic defects (summary by Niehues et al., 2020 and Saettini et al., 2021).
Hyper-IgE recurrent infection syndrome 4A, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1809613
Concept ID:
C5676920
Disease or Syndrome
Hyper-IgE syndrome-4A with recurrent infections (HIES4A) is an autosomal dominant immunologic disorder characterized by recurrent, mainly sinopulmonary infections associated with increased serum IgE. The phenotype is variable, even within families. Some patients have onset of symptoms in early childhood and develop complications, including bronchiectasis or hemoptysis, whereas others have later onset of less severe infections. Immunologic workup usually shows normal leukocyte levels, although some patients may demonstrate alterations in lymphocyte subsets, including T cells. Affected individuals also have variable skeletal abnormalities, including high-arched palate, hyperextensible joints, scoliosis, and bone fractures. The IL6ST mutations are loss-of-function, although the truncated mutant proteins are expressed and interfere with the wildtype protein in a dominant-negative manner by disrupting IL6 (147620) and IL11 (147681) signaling (summary by Beziat et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of hyper-IgE syndrome, see HIES1 (147060).
3-methylglutaconic aciduria, type VIIA
MedGen UID:
1813022
Concept ID:
C5676967
Disease or Syndrome
3-Methylglutaconic aciduria (MGCA7) is an inborn error of metabolism characterized primarily by increased levels of 3-methylglutaconic acid (3-MGA) associated with variable neurologic deficits and neutropenia. The phenotype is highly variable: most patients have infantile onset of a severe progressive encephalopathy with various movement abnormalities and delayed psychomotor development. Other common variable features include seizures, recurrent infections due to neutropenia, anemia, and brain imaging abnormalities (Wortmann et al., 2021). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, see MGCA1 (250950).
Developmental delay, hypotonia, and impaired language
MedGen UID:
1823975
Concept ID:
C5774202
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental delay, hypotonia, and impaired language (DEDHIL) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by variably impaired intellectual development usually with hypotonia, mild motor delay, and language difficulties. Affected individuals may also have nonspecific dysmorphic facial features, gastrointestinal problems, and abnormalities on brain imaging (Stephenson et al., 2022).
Hemolytic uremic syndrome, atypical, 8, with rhizomelic short stature
MedGen UID:
1840221
Concept ID:
C5829585
Disease or Syndrome
Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome-8 with rhizomelic short stature (AHUS8) is an X-linked disorder with variable manifestations. The age at onset of renal symptoms is variable, ranging from infancy to the early twenties. Features of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) include acute renal dysfunction with proteinuria, thrombotic microangiopathy, anemia, thrombocytopenia, increased serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and schistocytes on peripheral blood smear. Affected individuals also have short stature with short limbs. More variable features include immunodeficiency with recurrent infections, developmental delay, and dysmorphic features. Treatment with C5 inhibitors results in improvement of renal function. Female carriers may show an attenuated phenotype (Hadar et al., 2023; Erger et al., 2023). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of aHUS, see AHUS1 (235400).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Sekeres MA, Taylor J
JAMA 2022 Sep 6;328(9):872-880. doi: 10.1001/jama.2022.14578. PMID: 36066514
Escrihuela-Vidal F, Laporte J, Albasanz-Puig A, Gudiol C
Rev Esp Quimioter 2019 Sep;32 Suppl 2(Suppl 2):55-58. PMID: 31475812Free PMC Article
Nicolle LE, Gupta K, Bradley SF, Colgan R, DeMuri GP, Drekonja D, Eckert LO, Geerlings SE, Köves B, Hooton TM, Juthani-Mehta M, Knight SL, Saint S, Schaeffer AJ, Trautner B, Wullt B, Siemieniuk R
Clin Infect Dis 2019 May 2;68(10):e83-e110. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciy1121. PMID: 30895288

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Boccia R, Glaspy J, Crawford J, Aapro M
Oncologist 2022 Aug 5;27(8):625-636. doi: 10.1093/oncolo/oyac074. PMID: 35552754Free PMC Article
Mijovic A, MacCabe JH
Ann Hematol 2020 Nov;99(11):2477-2482. Epub 2020 Aug 20 doi: 10.1007/s00277-020-04215-y. PMID: 32815018Free PMC Article
Dale DC
Br J Haematol 2017 Aug;178(3):351-363. Epub 2017 Apr 17 doi: 10.1111/bjh.14677. PMID: 28419427
Dale DC
Curr Opin Hematol 2016 Jan;23(1):1-4. doi: 10.1097/MOH.0000000000000208. PMID: 26554885Free PMC Article
Schwartzberg LS
Clin Cornerstone 2006;8 Suppl 5:S5-11. doi: 10.1016/s1098-3597(06)80053-0. PMID: 17379162

Diagnosis

Michel M
Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2022 Apr;36(2):381-392. Epub 2022 Mar 11 doi: 10.1016/j.hoc.2021.12.004. PMID: 35282950
Frater JL
Int J Lab Hematol 2020 Jun;42 Suppl 1:121-132. doi: 10.1111/ijlh.13210. PMID: 32543073
Spoor J, Farajifard H, Rezaei N
Crit Rev Oncol Hematol 2019 Jan;133:149-162. Epub 2018 Oct 13 doi: 10.1016/j.critrevonc.2018.10.003. PMID: 30661651
Dale DC
Br J Haematol 2017 Aug;178(3):351-363. Epub 2017 Apr 17 doi: 10.1111/bjh.14677. PMID: 28419427
Dale DC
Curr Opin Hematol 2016 Jan;23(1):1-4. doi: 10.1097/MOH.0000000000000208. PMID: 26554885Free PMC Article

Therapy

Izutsu K, Kumode T, Yuda J, Nagai H, Mishima Y, Suehiro Y, Yamamoto K, Fujisaki T, Ishitsuka K, Ishizawa K, Ikezoe T, Nishikori M, Akahane D, Fujita J, Dinh M, Soong D, Noguchi H, Buchbjerg JK, Favaro E, Fukuhara N
Cancer Sci 2023 Dec;114(12):4643-4653. Epub 2023 Nov 3 doi: 10.1111/cas.15996. PMID: 37921363Free PMC Article
Verstovsek S, Mesa R, Gupta V, Lavie D, Dubruille V, Cambier N, Platzbecker U, Hus M, Xicoy B, Oh ST, Kiladjian JJ, Vannucchi AM, Gerds A, Egyed M, Mayer J, Sacha T, Kawashima J, Morris M, Huang M, Harrison C
Blood Adv 2023 Jul 25;7(14):3582-3591. doi: 10.1182/bloodadvances.2022009311. PMID: 37042865Free PMC Article
Pollyea DA, Pratz KW, Wei AH, Pullarkat V, Jonas BA, Recher C, Babu S, Schuh AC, Dail M, Sun Y, Potluri J, Chyla B, DiNardo CD
Clin Cancer Res 2022 Dec 15;28(24):5272-5279. doi: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-22-1183. PMID: 36007102Free PMC Article
Stern A, Carrara E, Bitterman R, Yahav D, Leibovici L, Paul M
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2019 Jan 3;1(1):CD012184. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD012184.pub2. PMID: 30605229Free PMC Article
Scott K, Hayden PJ, Will A, Wheatley K, Coyne I
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2016 Apr 20;4(4):CD010816. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD010816.pub2. PMID: 27096326Free PMC Article

Prognosis

Tam CS, Opat S, D'Sa S, Jurczak W, Lee HP, Cull G, Owen RG, Marlton P, Wahlin BE, Sanz RG, McCarthy H, Mulligan S, Tedeschi A, Castillo JJ, Czyz J, Fernández de Larrea C, Belada D, Libby E, Matous JV, Motta M, Siddiqi T, Tani M, Trneny M, Minnema MC, Buske C, Leblond V, Trotman J, Chan WY, Schneider J, Ro S, Cohen A, Huang J, Dimopoulos M
Blood 2020 Oct 29;136(18):2038-2050. doi: 10.1182/blood.2020006844. PMID: 32731259Free PMC Article
Salles G, Duell J, González Barca E, Tournilhac O, Jurczak W, Liberati AM, Nagy Z, Obr A, Gaidano G, André M, Kalakonda N, Dreyling M, Weirather J, Dirnberger-Hertweck M, Ambarkhane S, Fingerle-Rowson G, Maddocks K
Lancet Oncol 2020 Jul;21(7):978-988. Epub 2020 Jun 5 doi: 10.1016/S1470-2045(20)30225-4. PMID: 32511983
Italiano A, Mir O, Mathoulin-Pelissier S, Penel N, Piperno-Neumann S, Bompas E, Chevreau C, Duffaud F, Entz-Werlé N, Saada E, Ray-Coquard I, Lervat C, Gaspar N, Marec-Berard P, Pacquement H, Wright J, Toulmonde M, Bessede A, Crombe A, Kind M, Bellera C, Blay JY
Lancet Oncol 2020 Mar;21(3):446-455. Epub 2020 Feb 17 doi: 10.1016/S1470-2045(19)30825-3. PMID: 32078813Free PMC Article
DiNardo CD, Pratz K, Pullarkat V, Jonas BA, Arellano M, Becker PS, Frankfurt O, Konopleva M, Wei AH, Kantarjian HM, Xu T, Hong WJ, Chyla B, Potluri J, Pollyea DA, Letai A
Blood 2019 Jan 3;133(1):7-17. Epub 2018 Oct 25 doi: 10.1182/blood-2018-08-868752. PMID: 30361262Free PMC Article
Curtis BR
Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program 2017 Dec 8;2017(1):187-193. doi: 10.1182/asheducation-2017.1.187. PMID: 29222255Free PMC Article

Clinical prediction guides

Rossini D, Boccaccino A, Sbrana A, Daniel F, Borelli B, Raimondi A, Santini D, Conca V, Tomasello G, Caponnetto S, Marmorino F, Zaniboni A, Buonadonna A, Masi G, Lonardi S, Pietrantonio F, Falcone A, Antonuzzo A, Cremolini C
ESMO Open 2021 Dec;6(6):100293. Epub 2021 Oct 22 doi: 10.1016/j.esmoop.2021.100293. PMID: 34689001Free PMC Article
Rejeski K, Perez A, Sesques P, Hoster E, Berger C, Jentzsch L, Mougiakakos D, Frölich L, Ackermann J, Bücklein V, Blumenberg V, Schmidt C, Jallades L, Fehse B, Faul C, Karschnia P, Weigert O, Dreyling M, Locke FL, von Bergwelt-Baildon M, Mackensen A, Bethge W, Ayuk F, Bachy E, Salles G, Jain MD, Subklewe M
Blood 2021 Dec 16;138(24):2499-2513. doi: 10.1182/blood.2020010543. PMID: 34166502Free PMC Article
Sjøqvist C, Snarski E
Arch Immunol Ther Exp (Warsz) 2013 Aug;61(4):301-7. Epub 2013 Apr 7 doi: 10.1007/s00005-013-0228-z. PMID: 23563864
Rolston KV
Int J Antimicrob Agents 2000 Oct;16(2):113-5. doi: 10.1016/s0924-8579(00)00215-6. PMID: 11053790
Klastersky J, Paesmans M, Rubenstein EB, Boyer M, Elting L, Feld R, Gallagher J, Herrstedt J, Rapoport B, Rolston K, Talcott J
J Clin Oncol 2000 Aug;18(16):3038-51. doi: 10.1200/JCO.2000.18.16.3038. PMID: 10944139

Recent systematic reviews

Taplitz RA, Kennedy EB, Bow EJ, Crews J, Gleason C, Hawley DK, Langston AA, Nastoupil LJ, Rajotte M, Rolston K, Strasfeld L, Flowers CR
J Clin Oncol 2018 May 10;36(14):1443-1453. Epub 2018 Feb 20 doi: 10.1200/JCO.2017.77.6211. PMID: 29461916
Dale DC, Crawford J, Klippel Z, Reiner M, Osslund T, Fan E, Morrow PK, Allcott K, Lyman GH
Support Care Cancer 2018 Jan;26(1):7-20. Epub 2017 Sep 22 doi: 10.1007/s00520-017-3854-x. PMID: 28939926Free PMC Article
Lehrnbecher T, Robinson P, Fisher B, Alexander S, Ammann RA, Beauchemin M, Carlesse F, Groll AH, Haeusler GM, Santolaya M, Steinbach WJ, Castagnola E, Davis BL, Dupuis LL, Gaur AH, Tissing WJE, Zaoutis T, Phillips R, Sung L
J Clin Oncol 2017 Jun 20;35(18):2082-2094. Epub 2017 May 1 doi: 10.1200/JCO.2016.71.7017. PMID: 28459614
Smith TJ, Bohlke K, Lyman GH, Carson KR, Crawford J, Cross SJ, Goldberg JM, Khatcheressian JL, Leighl NB, Perkins CL, Somlo G, Wade JL, Wozniak AJ, Armitage JO; American Society of Clinical Oncology
J Clin Oncol 2015 Oct 1;33(28):3199-212. Epub 2015 Jul 13 doi: 10.1200/JCO.2015.62.3488. PMID: 26169616
Lyman GH, Abella E, Pettengell R
Crit Rev Oncol Hematol 2014 Jun;90(3):190-9. Epub 2013 Dec 12 doi: 10.1016/j.critrevonc.2013.12.006. PMID: 24434034

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