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Hypergonadotropic hypogonadism

MedGen UID:
184926
Concept ID:
C0948896
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: Hypergonadotropic Hypogonadism; Hypogonadism, Hypergonadotropic
SNOMED CT: Primary hypogonadism (370999003); Hypergonadotropic hypogonadism (370999003)
 
HPO: HP:0000815

Definition

Reduced function of the gonads (testes in males or ovaries in females) associated with excess pituitary gonadotropin secretion and resulting in delayed sexual development and growth delay. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

Conditions with this feature

Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome
MedGen UID:
6222
Concept ID:
C0024814
Disease or Syndrome
Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome (MSS) is characterized by cerebellar ataxia with cerebellar atrophy, dysarthria, nystagmus, early-onset (not necessarily congenital) cataracts, myopathy, muscle weakness, and hypotonia. Additional features may include psychomotor delay, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, short stature, and various skeletal abnormalities. Children with MSS usually present with muscular hypotonia in early infancy; distal and proximal muscular weakness is noticed during the first decade of life. Later, cerebellar findings of truncal ataxia, dysdiadochokinesia, nystagmus, and dysarthria become apparent. Motor function worsens progressively for some years, then stabilizes at an unpredictable age and degree of severity. Cataracts can develop rapidly and typically require lens extraction in the first decade of life. Although many adults have severe disabilities, life span in MSS appears to be near normal.
Leydig cell agenesis
MedGen UID:
120576
Concept ID:
C0266432
Congenital Abnormality
Leydig cell hypoplasia is an autosomal recessive disorder in which loss of function of the LHCGR gene in the male prevents normal sexual development. Two types of LCH have been defined (Toledo, 1992). Type I, a severe form caused by complete inactivation of LHCGR, is characterized by complete 46,XY male pseudohermaphroditism, low testosterone and high LH levels, total lack of responsiveness to LH/CG challenge, lack of breast development, and absent development of secondary male sex characteristics. Type II, a milder form caused by partial inactivation of the gene, displays a broader range of phenotypic expression ranging from micropenis to severe hypospadias. Females with inactivating mutations in the LHCGR gene display a mild phenotype characterized by defective follicular development and ovulation, amenorrhea, and infertility (review by Themmen and Huhtaniemi, 2000). Reviews Arnhold et al. (2009) noted that the clinical manifestations of female patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism due to isolated LH deficiency (HH23; 228300) are very similar to those of women with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism due to inactivating mutations of the LH receptor: all have female external genitalia, spontaneous development of normal pubic hair and breasts at puberty, and normal to late menarche followed by oligoamenorrhea and infertility. Pelvic ultrasound shows a small or normal uterus and normal or enlarged ovaries with cysts. However, women with LHB (152780) mutations can be treated with luteinizing hormone or chorionic gonadotropin (CG; 118860) replacement therapy; women with LH receptor mutations are resistant to LH, and no treatment is effective in recovering their fertility.
Deficiency of UDPglucose-hexose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase
MedGen UID:
82777
Concept ID:
C0268151
Disease or Syndrome
The term "galactosemia" refers to disorders of galactose metabolism that include classic galactosemia, clinical variant galactosemia, and biochemical variant galactosemia (not covered in this chapter). This GeneReview focuses on: Classic galactosemia, which can result in life-threatening complications including feeding problems, failure to thrive, hepatocellular damage, bleeding, and E coli sepsis in untreated infants. If a lactose-restricted diet is provided during the first ten days of life, the neonatal signs usually quickly resolve and the complications of liver failure, sepsis, and neonatal death are prevented; however, despite adequate treatment from an early age, children with classic galactosemia remain at increased risk for developmental delays, speech problems (termed childhood apraxia of speech and dysarthria), and abnormalities of motor function. Almost all females with classic galactosemia manifest hypergonadatropic hypogonadism or premature ovarian insufficiency (POI). Clinical variant galactosemia, which can result in life-threatening complications including feeding problems, failure to thrive, hepatocellular damage including cirrhosis, and bleeding in untreated infants. This is exemplified by the disease that occurs in African Americans and native Africans in South Africa. Persons with clinical variant galactosemia may be missed with newborn screening as the hypergalactosemia is not as marked as in classic galactosemia and breath testing is normal. If a lactose-restricted diet is provided during the first ten days of life, the severe acute neonatal complications are usually prevented. African Americans with clinical variant galactosemia and adequate early treatment do not appear to be at risk for long-term complications, including POI.
Alstrom syndrome
MedGen UID:
78675
Concept ID:
C0268425
Disease or Syndrome
Alström syndrome is characterized by cone-rod dystrophy, obesity, progressive bilateral sensorineural hearing impairment, acute infantile-onset cardiomyopathy and/or adolescent- or adult-onset restrictive cardiomyopathy, insulin resistance / type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and chronic progressive kidney disease. Cone-rod dystrophy presents as progressive visual impairment, photophobia, and nystagmus usually starting between birth and age 15 months. Many individuals lose all perception of light by the end of the second decade, but a minority retain the ability to read large print into the third decade. Children usually have normal birth weight but develop truncal obesity during their first year. Sensorineural hearing loss presents in the first decade in as many as 70% of individuals and may progress to the severe or moderately severe range (40-70 db) by the end of the first to second decade. Insulin resistance is typically accompanied by the skin changes of acanthosis nigricans, and proceeds to T2DM in the majority by the third decade. Nearly all demonstrate hypertriglyceridemia. Other findings can include endocrine abnormalities (hypothyroidism, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in males, and hyperandrogenism in females), urologic dysfunction / detrusor instability, progressive decrease in renal function, and hepatic disease (ranging from elevated transaminases to steatohepatitis/NAFLD). Approximately 20% of affected individuals have delay in early developmental milestones, most commonly in gross and fine motor skills. About 30% have a learning disability. Cognitive impairment (IQ <70) is very rare. Wide clinical variability is observed among affected individuals, even within the same family.
Woodhouse-Sakati syndrome
MedGen UID:
83337
Concept ID:
C0342286
Disease or Syndrome
Virtually all individuals with Woodhouse-Sakati syndrome (WSS) have the endocrine findings of hypogonadism (evident at puberty) and progressive childhood-onset hair thinning that often progresses to alopecia totalis in adulthood. More than half of individuals have the neurologic findings of progressive extrapyramidal movements (dystonic spasms with dystonic posturing with dysarthria and dysphagia), moderate bilateral postlingual sensorineural hearing loss, and mild intellectual disability. To date, more than 40 families (including 33 with a molecularly confirmed diagnosis) with a total of 88 affected individuals have been reported in the literature.
PMM2-congenital disorder of glycosylation
MedGen UID:
138111
Concept ID:
C0349653
Disease or Syndrome
PMM2-CDG, the most common of a group of disorders of abnormal glycosylation of N-linked oligosaccharides, is divided into three clinical stages: infantile multisystem, late-infantile and childhood ataxia–intellectual disability, and adult stable disability. The clinical manifestations and course are highly variable, ranging from infants who die in the first year of life to mildly affected adults. Clinical findings tend to be similar in sibs. In the infantile multisystem presentation, infants show axial hypotonia, hyporeflexia, esotropia, and developmental delay. Feeding problems, vomiting, faltering growth, and developmental delay are frequently seen. Subcutaneous fat may be excessive over the buttocks and suprapubic region. Two distinct clinical courses are observed: (1) a nonfatal neurologic course with faltering growth, strabismus, developmental delay, cerebellar hypoplasia, and hepatopathy in infancy followed by neuropathy and retinitis pigmentosa in the first or second decade; and (2) a more severe neurologic-multivisceral course with approximately 20% mortality in the first year of life. The late-infantile and childhood ataxia–intellectual disability stage, which begins between ages three and ten years, is characterized by hypotonia, ataxia, severely delayed language and motor development, inability to walk, and IQ of 40 to 70; other findings include seizures, stroke-like episodes or transient unilateral loss of function, coagulopathy, retinitis pigmentosa, joint contractures, and skeletal deformities. In the adult stable disability stage, intellectual ability is stable; peripheral neuropathy is variable, progressive retinitis pigmentosa and myopia are seen, thoracic and spinal deformities with osteoporosis worsen, and premature aging is observed; females may lack secondary sexual development and males may exhibit decreased testicular volume. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and coagulopathy may occur. The risk for deep venous thrombosis is increased.
Dilated cardiomyopathy-hypergonadotropic hypogonadism syndrome
MedGen UID:
162901
Concept ID:
C0796031
Disease or Syndrome
This syndrome is characterized by the association of dilated cardiomyopathy and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism (DCM-HH).
Primrose syndrome
MedGen UID:
162911
Concept ID:
C0796121
Disease or Syndrome
Primrose syndrome is characterized by macrocephaly, hypotonia, developmental delay, intellectual disability with expressive speech delay, behavioral issues, a recognizable facial phenotype, radiographic features, and altered glucose metabolism. Additional features seen in adults: sparse body hair, distal muscle wasting, and contractures. Characteristic craniofacial features include brachycephaly, high anterior hairline, deeply set eyes, ptosis, downslanted palpebral fissures, high palate with torus palatinus, broad jaw, and large ears with small or absent lobes. Radiographic features include calcification of the external ear cartilage, multiple Wormian bones, platybasia, bathrocephaly, slender bones with exaggerated metaphyseal flaring, mild epiphyseal dysplasia, and spondylar dysplasia. Additional features include hearing impairment, ocular anomalies, cryptorchidism, and nonspecific findings on brain MRI.
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal dominant 1
MedGen UID:
371919
Concept ID:
C1834846
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life and about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called "chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus," or "CPEO+").
Male hypergonadotropic hypogonadism-intellectual disability-skeletal anomalies syndrome
MedGen UID:
334557
Concept ID:
C1843994
Disease or Syndrome
This syndrome is characterized by hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, intellectual deficit, congenital skeletal anomalies involving the cervical spine and superior ribs, and diabetes mellitus.
Fanconi anemia complementation group B
MedGen UID:
336901
Concept ID:
C1845292
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
Ovarian dysgenesis 2
MedGen UID:
336903
Concept ID:
C1845294
Disease or Syndrome
Hypergonadotropic ovarian failure is a heterogeneous disorder that, in the most severe forms, is a result of ovarian dysgenesis. Ovarian dysgenesis accounts for about half the cases of primary amenorrhea (Timmreck and Reindollar, 2003). Most cases are associated with major X chromosome abnormalities. Accordingly, genetic studies have identified several loci at Xq and Xp11.2-p.22.1 whose functions are relevant for ovarian development (Zinn et al., 1998; Simpson and Rajkovic, 1999; Marozzi et al., 2000).
Hypotonia-cystinuria syndrome
MedGen UID:
341133
Concept ID:
C1848030
Disease or Syndrome
A rare, genetic disorder of amino acid absorption and transport, characterized by generalized hypotonia at birth, neonatal/infantile failure to thrive (followed by hyperphagia and rapid weight gain in late childhood), cystinuria type 1, nephrolithiasis, growth retardation due to growth hormone deficiency, and minor facial dysmorphism. Dysmorphic features mainly include dolichocephaly and ptosis. Nephrolithiasis occurs at variable ages.
Testes, rudimentary
MedGen UID:
336448
Concept ID:
C1848901
Anatomical Abnormality
Infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia
MedGen UID:
338613
Concept ID:
C1849096
Disease or Syndrome
Infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia (IOSCA) is a severe, progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by normal development until age one year, followed by onset of ataxia, muscle hypotonia, loss of deep-tendon reflexes, and athetosis. Ophthalmoplegia and sensorineural deafness develop by age seven years. By adolescence, affected individuals are profoundly deaf and no longer ambulatory; sensory axonal neuropathy, optic atrophy, autonomic nervous system dysfunction, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism in females become evident. Epilepsy can develop into a serious and often fatal encephalopathy: myoclonic jerks or focal clonic seizures that progress to epilepsia partialis continua followed by status epilepticus with loss of consciousness.
Retinitis pigmentosa-intellectual disability-deafness-hypogenitalism syndrome
MedGen UID:
340317
Concept ID:
C1849401
Disease or Syndrome
A rare syndromic retinitis pigmentosa characterized by pigmentary retinopathy, diabetes mellitus with hyperinsulinism, acanthosis nigricans, secondary cataracts, neurogenic deafness, short stature mild hypogonadism in males and polycystic ovaries with oligomenorrhea in females. Inheritance is thought to be autosomal recessive. It can be distinguished from Alstrom syndrome (see this term) by the presence of intellectual disability and the absence of renal insufficiency. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1993.
Congenital cataracts-facial dysmorphism-neuropathy syndrome
MedGen UID:
346973
Concept ID:
C1858726
Congenital Abnormality
CTDP1-related congenital cataracts, facial dysmorphism, and neuropathy (CTDP1-CCFDN) is characterized by abnormalities of the eye (bilateral congenital cataracts, microcornea, microphthalmia, micropupils), mildly dysmorphic facial features apparent in late childhood, and a hypo-/demyelinating, symmetric, distal peripheral neuropathy. The neuropathy is predominantly motor at the onset and results in delays in early motor development, progressing to severe disability by the third decade of life. Secondary foot deformities and scoliosis are common. Sensory neuropathy develops after age ten years. Most affected individuals have a mild nonprogressive intellectual deficit and cerebellar involvement including ataxia, nystagmus, intention tremor, and dysmetria. All have short stature and most have subnormal weight. Adults have hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Parainfectious rhabdomyolysis (profound muscle weakness, myoglobinuria, and excessively elevated serum concentration of creatine kinase usually following a viral infection) is a potentially life-threatening complication. To date all affected individuals and carriers identified have been from the Romani population.
H syndrome
MedGen UID:
400532
Concept ID:
C1864445
Disease or Syndrome
The histiocytosis-lymphadenopathy plus syndrome comprises features of 4 histiocytic disorders previously thought to be distinct: Faisalabad histiocytosis (FHC), sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML), H syndrome, and pigmented hypertrichosis with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus syndrome (PHID). FHC was described as an autosomal recessive disease involving joint deformities, sensorineural hearing loss, and subsequent development of generalized lymphadenopathy and swellings in the eyelids that contain histiocytes (summary by Morgan et al., 2010). SHML, or familial Rosai-Dorfman disease, was described as a rare cause of lymph node enlargement in children, consisting of chronic massive enlargement of cervical lymph nodes frequently accompanied by fever, leukocytosis, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia. Extranodal sites were involved in approximately 25% of patients, including salivary glands, orbit, eyelid, spleen, and testes. The involvement of retropharyngeal lymphoid tissue sometimes caused snoring and sleep apnea (summary by Kismet et al., 2005). H syndrome was characterized by cutaneous hyperpigmentation and hypertrichosis, hepatosplenomegaly, heart anomalies, and hypogonadism; hearing loss was also found in about half of patients, and many had short stature. PHID was characterized by predominantly antibody-negative insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus associated with pigmented hypertrichosis and variable occurrence of other features of H syndrome, with hepatosplenomegaly occurring in about half of patients (Cliffe et al., 2009). Bolze et al. (2012) noted that mutations in the SLC29A3 gene (612373) had been implicated in H syndrome, PHID, FHC, and SHML, and that some patients presented a combination of features from 2 or more of these syndromes, leading to the suggestion that these phenotypes should be grouped together as 'SLC29A3 disorder.' Bolze et al. (2012) suggested that the histologic features of the lesions seemed to be the most uniform phenotype in these patients. In addition, the immunophenotype of infiltrating cells in H syndrome patients was shown to be the same as that seen in patients with the familial form of Rosai-Dorfman disease, further supporting the relationship between these disorders (Avitan-Hersh et al., 2011; Colmenero et al., 2012).
Aromatase deficiency
MedGen UID:
743307
Concept ID:
C1960539
Disease or Syndrome
Aromatase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder in which individuals cannot synthesize endogenous estrogens. If a fetus lacks aromatase activity, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate produced by the fetal adrenal glands cannot be converted to estrogen by the placenta, and is converted to testosterone peripherally and results in virilization of both fetus and mother. Virilization manifests as pseudohermaphroditism in female infants, with hirsutism and acne in the mother; the maternal indicators resolve following delivery. Affected females are usually diagnosed at birth because of the pseudohermaphroditism. Cystic ovaries and delayed bone maturation can occur during childhood and adolescence in these girls, who present at puberty with primary amenorrhea, failure of breast development, virilization, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Affected males do not present with obvious defects at birth. Their clinical symptoms include tall stature, delayed skeletal maturation, delayed epiphyseal closure, bone pain, eunuchoid body proportions, and excess adiposity. Estrogen replacement therapy reverses the symptoms in males and females (summary by Jones et al., 2007).
Primary hypergonadotropic hypogonadism-partial alopecia syndrome
MedGen UID:
388650
Concept ID:
C2673480
Disease or Syndrome
This syndrome is characterized by primary hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and partial alopecia.
46,XY sex reversal 1
MedGen UID:
412662
Concept ID:
C2748896
Disease or Syndrome
Sex reversal in an individual with 46,XY karyotype caused by point mutations or deletions in the SRY gene, encoding sex-determining region Y protein.
RIN2 syndrome
MedGen UID:
416526
Concept ID:
C2751321
Disease or Syndrome
A very rare inherited connective tissue disorder with characteristics of macrocephaly, sparse scalp hair, soft redundant and hyperextensible skin, joint hypermobility, and scoliosis. Patients have progressive facial coarsening with downslanted palpebral fissures, upper eyelid fullness/infraorbital folds, thick/everted vermillion, gingival overgrowth and abnormal position of the teeth. Rare manifestations such as abnormal high-pitched voice, bronchiectasis, hypergonadotropic hypergonadism and brachydactyly have also been reported. Caused by homozygous mutation in the RIN2 gene on chromosome 20p11.
46,XY sex reversal 4
MedGen UID:
416704
Concept ID:
C2752149
Congenital Abnormality
Sex reversal in an individual associated with a 9p24.3 deletion.
Sterol carrier protein 2 deficiency
MedGen UID:
462340
Concept ID:
C3150990
Disease or Syndrome
Leukoencephalopathy-dystonia-motor neuropathy syndrome is a peroxisomal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by spasmodic torticollis, dystonic head tremor, intention tremor, nystagmus, hyposmia, and hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism with azoospermia. Slight cerebellar signs (left-sided intention tremor, balance and gait impairment) are also noted. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows bilateral hyperintense signals in the thalamus, butterfly-like lesions in the pons, and lesions in the occipital region, whereas nerve conduction studies of the lower extremities shows a predominantly motor and slight sensory neuropathy.
Moyamoya angiopathy-short stature-facial dysmorphism-hypergonadotropic hypogonadism syndrome
MedGen UID:
463207
Concept ID:
C3151857
Disease or Syndrome
This multisystem disorder is characterized by moyamoya disease, short stature, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, and facial dysmorphism. Other variable features include dilated cardiomyopathy, premature graying of the hair, and early-onset cataracts. Moyamoya disease is a progressive cerebrovascular disorder characterized by stenosis or occlusion of the internal carotid arteries and the main branches, leading to the development of small collateral vessels (moyamoya vessels) at the base of the brain. Affected individuals can develop acute neurologic events due to stroke-like episodes (summary by Miskinyte et al., 2011). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of moyamoya disease, see MYMY1 (252350).
Fanconi anemia complementation group D2
MedGen UID:
463627
Concept ID:
C3160738
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
Fanconi anemia complementation group E
MedGen UID:
463628
Concept ID:
C3160739
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
Alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase deficiency
MedGen UID:
482058
Concept ID:
C3280428
Disease or Syndrome
AMACR deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive peroxisomal disorder characterized by adult onset of variable neurodegenerative symptoms affecting the central and peripheral nervous systems. Features may include seizures, visual failure, sensorimotor neuropathy, spasticity, migraine, and white matter hyperintensities on brain imaging. Serum pristanic acid and C27 bile acid intermediates are increased (summary by Smith et al., 2010).
Fanconi anemia complementation group C
MedGen UID:
483324
Concept ID:
C3468041
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
Fanconi anemia complementation group A
MedGen UID:
483333
Concept ID:
C3469521
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
Coenzyme Q10 deficiency, primary, 1
MedGen UID:
764868
Concept ID:
C3551954
Disease or Syndrome
Primary coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency is usually associated with multisystem involvement, including neurologic manifestations such as fatal neonatal encephalopathy with hypotonia; a late-onset slowly progressive multiple-system atrophy-like phenotype (neurodegeneration with autonomic failure and various combinations of parkinsonism and cerebellar ataxia, and pyramidal dysfunction); and dystonia, spasticity, seizures, and intellectual disability. Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS), the hallmark renal manifestation, is often the initial manifestation either as isolated renal involvement that progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), or associated with encephalopathy (seizures, stroke-like episodes, severe neurologic impairment) resulting in early death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), retinopathy or optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss can also be seen.
Obesity due to leptin receptor gene deficiency
MedGen UID:
767139
Concept ID:
C3554225
Disease or Syndrome
Leptin receptor deficiency is characterized by severe early-onset obesity, major hyperphagia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and neuroendocrine/metabolic dysfunction (summary by Dehghani et al., 2018).
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 11
MedGen UID:
767376
Concept ID:
C3554462
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome-11 is an autosomal recessive mitochondrial disorder characterized by onset in childhood or adulthood of progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO), muscle weakness and atrophy, exercise intolerance, and respiratory insufficiency due to muscle weakness. More variable features include spinal deformity, emaciation, and cardiac abnormalities. Skeletal muscle biopsies show deletion and depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) with variable defects in respiratory chain enzyme activities (summary by Kornblum et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive mtDNA depletion syndromes, see MTDPS1 (603041).
Perrault syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
814744
Concept ID:
C3808414
Disease or Syndrome
Perrault syndrome is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in males and females and ovarian dysfunction in females. SNHL is bilateral and ranges from profound with prelingual (congenital) onset to moderate with early-childhood onset. When onset is in early childhood, hearing loss can be progressive. Ovarian dysfunction ranges from gonadal dysgenesis (absent or streak gonads) manifesting as primary amenorrhea to primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) defined as cessation of menses before age 40 years. Fertility in affected males is reported as normal (although the number of reported males is limited). Neurologic features described in some individuals with Perrault syndrome include learning difficulties and developmental delay, cerebellar ataxia, and motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy.
Perrault syndrome 5
MedGen UID:
863744
Concept ID:
C4015307
Disease or Syndrome
Perrault syndrome is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in males and females and ovarian dysfunction in females. SNHL is bilateral and ranges from profound with prelingual (congenital) onset to moderate with early-childhood onset. When onset is in early childhood, hearing loss can be progressive. Ovarian dysfunction ranges from gonadal dysgenesis (absent or streak gonads) manifesting as primary amenorrhea to primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) defined as cessation of menses before age 40 years. Fertility in affected males is reported as normal (although the number of reported males is limited). Neurologic features described in some individuals with Perrault syndrome include learning difficulties and developmental delay, cerebellar ataxia, and motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy.
Acromesomelic dysplasia 3
MedGen UID:
904735
Concept ID:
C4225404
Disease or Syndrome
MIRAGE syndrome
MedGen UID:
924576
Concept ID:
C4284088
Disease or Syndrome
MIRAGE syndrome is an acronym for the major findings of myelodysplasia, infection, restriction of growth, adrenal hypoplasia, genital phenotypes, and enteropathy. Cytopenias are typically seen soon after birth; thrombocytopenia is the most common followed by anemia and pancytopenia. Recurrent infections from early infancy include pneumonia, urinary tract infection, gastroenteritis, meningitis, otitis media, dermatitis, subcutaneous abscess, and sepsis. Reported genital phenotypes in those with 46,XY karyotype included hypospadias, microphallus, bifid shawl scrotum, ambiguous genitalia, or complete female genitalia. Hypoplastic or dysgenetic ovaries have been reported in females. Gastrointestinal complications include chronic diarrhea and esophageal dysfunction. Moderate-to-severe developmental delay is reported in most affected individuals. Autonomic dysfunction and renal dysfunction are also reported.
Neurodegeneration with ataxia, dystonia, and gaze palsy, childhood-onset
MedGen UID:
934660
Concept ID:
C4310693
Disease or Syndrome
Childhood-onset neurodegeneration with ataxia, dystonia, and gaze palsy (NADGP) is an autosomal recessive progressive disorder characterized by onset of gait ataxia, cognitive decline, and gaze palsy in the first or second decades. Additional features include dysarthria, dystonia, and athetoid movements. Some patients may become wheelchair-bound as young adults (summary by Haack et al., 2016).
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 34
MedGen UID:
1631307
Concept ID:
C4693450
Disease or Syndrome
COXPD34 is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from a defect in mitochondrial function. The phenotype is variable, but may include congenital sensorineural deafness, increased serum lactate, and hepatic and renal dysfunction. Neurologic function is relatively preserved (summary by Menezes et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Ovarian dysgenesis 6
MedGen UID:
1648307
Concept ID:
C4748084
Disease or Syndrome
Ovarian dysgenesis-6 is characterized by absence of spontaneous pubertal development in females with elevated gonadotropin levels, small uterus, and absence of ovarian tissue on imaging studies. Males appear to be unaffected (Weinberg-Shukron et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of ovarian dysgenesis, see ODG1 (233300).
46,XY gonadal dysgenesis-motor and sensory neuropathy syndrome
MedGen UID:
1727162
Concept ID:
C5436061
Disease or Syndrome
46,XY gonadal dysgenesis-motor and sensory neuropathy syndrome is a rare, genetic, developmental defect during embryogenesis disorder characterized by partial (unilateral testis, persistence of Müllerian duct structures) or complete (streak gonads only) gonadal dysgenesis, usually manifesting with primary amenorrhea in individuals with female phenotype but 46,XY karyotype, and sensorimotor dysmyelinating minifascicular polyneuropathy, which presents with numbness, weakness, exercise-induced muscle cramps, sensory disturbances and reduced/absent deep tendon reflexes. Germ cell tumors (seminoma, dysgerminoma, gonadoblastoma) may develop from the gonadal tissue.
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 54
MedGen UID:
1812715
Concept ID:
C5676912
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-54 (COXPD54) is an autosomal recessive disorder with pleiotropic multisystem presentations resulting from a disruption in mitochondrial transcription and translation. The phenotype is highly variable. Many patients have early-onset sensorineural hearing loss, sometimes in isolation, and sometimes associated with global developmental delay or primary ovarian failure. Other features may include peripheral hypertonia, seizures, muscle weakness, behavioral abnormalities, and leukoencephalopathy on brain imaging. Serum lactate may or may not be elevated (summary by Hochberg et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Seppä S, Kuiri-Hänninen T, Holopainen E, Voutilainen R
Eur J Endocrinol 2021 May 4;184(6):R225-R242. doi: 10.1530/EJE-20-1487. PMID: 33687345
Zitzmann M, Aksglaede L, Corona G, Isidori AM, Juul A, T'Sjoen G, Kliesch S, D'Hauwers K, Toppari J, Słowikowska-Hilczer J, Tüttelmann F, Ferlin A
Andrology 2021 Jan;9(1):145-167. Epub 2020 Oct 6 doi: 10.1111/andr.12909. PMID: 32959490
Gravholt CH, Viuff MH, Brun S, Stochholm K, Andersen NH
Nat Rev Endocrinol 2019 Oct;15(10):601-614. Epub 2019 Jun 18 doi: 10.1038/s41574-019-0224-4. PMID: 31213699

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Viuff M, Gravholt CH
Ann Endocrinol (Paris) 2022 Aug;83(4):244-249. Epub 2022 Jun 18 doi: 10.1016/j.ando.2022.06.001. PMID: 35728697
Zitzmann M, Aksglaede L, Corona G, Isidori AM, Juul A, T'Sjoen G, Kliesch S, D'Hauwers K, Toppari J, Słowikowska-Hilczer J, Tüttelmann F, Ferlin A
Andrology 2021 Jan;9(1):145-167. Epub 2020 Oct 6 doi: 10.1111/andr.12909. PMID: 32959490
Klein KO, Rosenfield RL, Santen RJ, Gawlik AM, Backeljauw PF, Gravholt CH, Sas TCJ, Mauras N
J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2018 May 1;103(5):1790-1803. doi: 10.1210/jc.2017-02183. PMID: 29438552
Bonomi M, Rochira V, Pasquali D, Balercia G, Jannini EA, Ferlin A; Klinefelter ItaliaN Group (KING)
J Endocrinol Invest 2017 Feb;40(2):123-134. Epub 2016 Sep 19 doi: 10.1007/s40618-016-0541-6. PMID: 27644703Free PMC Article
Groth KA, Skakkebæk A, Høst C, Gravholt CH, Bojesen A
J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2013 Jan;98(1):20-30. Epub 2012 Nov 1 doi: 10.1210/jc.2012-2382. PMID: 23118429

Diagnosis

Gravholt CH, Viuff M, Just J, Sandahl K, Brun S, van der Velden J, Andersen NH, Skakkebaek A
Endocr Rev 2023 Jan 12;44(1):33-69. doi: 10.1210/endrev/bnac016. PMID: 35695701
Seppä S, Kuiri-Hänninen T, Holopainen E, Voutilainen R
Eur J Endocrinol 2021 May 4;184(6):R225-R242. doi: 10.1530/EJE-20-1487. PMID: 33687345
Gravholt CH, Viuff MH, Brun S, Stochholm K, Andersen NH
Nat Rev Endocrinol 2019 Oct;15(10):601-614. Epub 2019 Jun 18 doi: 10.1038/s41574-019-0224-4. PMID: 31213699
Richard-Eaglin A
Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Sep;53(3):395-405. doi: 10.1016/j.cnur.2018.04.006. PMID: 30100005
Groth KA, Skakkebæk A, Høst C, Gravholt CH, Bojesen A
J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2013 Jan;98(1):20-30. Epub 2012 Nov 1 doi: 10.1210/jc.2012-2382. PMID: 23118429

Therapy

Isojima T, Yokoya S
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) 2022;13:1068128. Epub 2023 Jan 12 doi: 10.3389/fendo.2022.1068128. PMID: 36714599Free PMC Article
Viuff M, Gravholt CH
Ann Endocrinol (Paris) 2022 Aug;83(4):244-249. Epub 2022 Jun 18 doi: 10.1016/j.ando.2022.06.001. PMID: 35728697
Bertelli E, DI Frenna M, Cappa M, Salerno M, Wasniewska M, Bizzarri C, DE Sanctis L
Minerva Pediatr (Torino) 2021 Dec;73(6):572-587. Epub 2021 Jul 26 doi: 10.23736/S2724-5276.21.06534-4. PMID: 34309345
Gravholt CH, Viuff MH, Brun S, Stochholm K, Andersen NH
Nat Rev Endocrinol 2019 Oct;15(10):601-614. Epub 2019 Jun 18 doi: 10.1038/s41574-019-0224-4. PMID: 31213699
Klein KO, Rosenfield RL, Santen RJ, Gawlik AM, Backeljauw PF, Gravholt CH, Sas TCJ, Mauras N
J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2018 May 1;103(5):1790-1803. doi: 10.1210/jc.2017-02183. PMID: 29438552

Prognosis

Viuff M, Gravholt CH
Ann Endocrinol (Paris) 2022 Aug;83(4):244-249. Epub 2022 Jun 18 doi: 10.1016/j.ando.2022.06.001. PMID: 35728697
Butler G, Purushothaman P
Minerva Pediatr 2020 Dec;72(6):484-490. Epub 2020 Aug 4 doi: 10.23736/S0026-4946.20.05968-X. PMID: 32748610
Howard SR, Dunkel L
Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab 2018 Aug;32(4):355-372. Epub 2018 Jun 6 doi: 10.1016/j.beem.2018.05.011. PMID: 30086863
Howard S, Dunkel L
Endocr Dev 2016;29:185-97. Epub 2015 Dec 17 doi: 10.1159/000438891. PMID: 26680579
Chrzanowska KH, Gregorek H, Dembowska-Bagińska B, Kalina MA, Digweed M
Orphanet J Rare Dis 2012 Feb 28;7:13. doi: 10.1186/1750-1172-7-13. PMID: 22373003Free PMC Article

Clinical prediction guides

Pozza C, Sesti F, Tenuta M, Spaziani M, Tarantino C, Carlomagno F, Minnetti M, Pofi R, Paparella R, Lenzi A, Radicioni A, Isidori AM, Tarani L, Gianfrilli D
J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2023 Sep 18;108(10):2486-2499. doi: 10.1210/clinem/dgad205. PMID: 37043499Free PMC Article
Isojima T, Yokoya S
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) 2022;13:1068128. Epub 2023 Jan 12 doi: 10.3389/fendo.2022.1068128. PMID: 36714599Free PMC Article
Butler G, Purushothaman P
Minerva Pediatr 2020 Dec;72(6):484-490. Epub 2020 Aug 4 doi: 10.23736/S0026-4946.20.05968-X. PMID: 32748610
Wistuba J, Beumer C, Brehm R, Gromoll J
Am J Med Genet C Semin Med Genet 2020 Jun;184(2):267-278. Epub 2020 May 20 doi: 10.1002/ajmg.c.31796. PMID: 32432406
Howard SR, Dunkel L
Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab 2018 Aug;32(4):355-372. Epub 2018 Jun 6 doi: 10.1016/j.beem.2018.05.011. PMID: 30086863

Recent systematic reviews

Craciunas L, Zdoukopoulos N, Vinayagam S, Mohiyiddeen L
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2022 Oct 6;10(10):CD008209. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD008209.pub2. PMID: 36200708Free PMC Article
Tharakan T, Corona G, Foran D, Salonia A, Sofikitis N, Giwercman A, Krausz C, Yap T, Jayasena CN, Minhas S
Hum Reprod Update 2022 Aug 25;28(5):609-628. doi: 10.1093/humupd/dmac016. PMID: 35526153Free PMC Article
Liang B, Cheung AS, Nolan BJ
Clin Endocrinol (Oxf) 2022 Jul;97(1):3-12. Epub 2022 Apr 15 doi: 10.1111/cen.14734. PMID: 35394664Free PMC Article
Terribile M, Stizzo M, Manfredi C, Quattrone C, Bottone F, Giordano DR, Bellastella G, Arcaniolo D, De Sio M
Medicina (Kaunas) 2019 Jul 12;55(7) doi: 10.3390/medicina55070371. PMID: 31336995Free PMC Article
Flannigan R, Patel P, Paduch DA
Sex Med Rev 2018 Oct;6(4):595-606. Epub 2018 Apr 19 doi: 10.1016/j.sxmr.2018.02.008. PMID: 29680294

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