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Valvular pulmonary stenosis

MedGen UID:
18768
Concept ID:
C0034089
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: Heart valve pulmonary stenosis; Pulmonary valve stenosis; Valvate pulmonary stenosis; Valvular pulmonic stenosis
SNOMED CT: PVS - Pulmonary valve stenosis (56786000); PS - Pulmonary valve stenosis (56786000); Pulmonic valve stenosis (56786000); Pulmonary valve stenosis (56786000)
 
HPO: HP:0001642
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0006936

Definition

A narrowing of the right ventricular outflow tract that can occur at the pulmonary valve (valvular stenosis), below the pulmonary valve (infundibular stenosis), or above the pulmonary valve (supravalvar stenosis). [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Supravalvar aortic stenosis
MedGen UID:
2001
Concept ID:
C0003499
Disease or Syndrome
Supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) is a heart defect that develops before birth. This defect is a narrowing (stenosis) of the large blood vessel that carries blood from the heart to the rest of the body (the aorta). The condition is described as supravalvular because the section of the aorta that is narrowed is located just above the valve that connects the aorta with the heart (the aortic valve). Some people with SVAS also have defects in other blood vessels, most commonly stenosis of the artery from the heart to the lungs (the pulmonary artery). An abnormal heart sound during a heartbeat (heart murmur) can often be heard during a chest exam. If SVAS is not treated, the aortic narrowing can lead to shortness of breath, chest pain, and ultimately heart failure.\n\nThe severity of SVAS varies considerably, even among family members. Some affected individuals die in infancy, while others never experience symptoms of the disorder.
Williams syndrome
MedGen UID:
59799
Concept ID:
C0175702
Disease or Syndrome
Williams syndrome (WS) is characterized by cardiovascular disease (elastin arteriopathy, peripheral pulmonary stenosis, supravalvar aortic stenosis, hypertension), distinctive facies, connective tissue abnormalities, intellectual disability (usually mild), a specific cognitive profile, unique personality characteristics, growth abnormalities, and endocrine abnormalities (hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria, hypothyroidism, and early puberty). Feeding difficulties often lead to poor weight gain in infancy. Hypotonia and hyperextensible joints can result in delayed attainment of motor milestones.
Femoral hypoplasia - unusual facies syndrome
MedGen UID:
120523
Concept ID:
C0265263
Disease or Syndrome
Femoral-facial syndrome (FFS), also known as femoral hypoplasia-unusual facies syndrome (FHUFS), is a rare and sporadic multiple congenital anomaly syndrome comprising bilateral femoral hypoplasia and characteristic facial features, such as long philtrum, thin upper lip, micrognathia with or without cleft palate, upward-slanting palpebral fissures, and a short nose with broad tip. Other features, such as renal anomalies, are more variable (summary by Nowaczyk et al., 2010).
CHARGE association
MedGen UID:
75567
Concept ID:
C0265354
Disease or Syndrome
CHD7 disorder encompasses the entire phenotypic spectrum of heterozygous CHD7 pathogenic variants that includes CHARGE syndrome as well as subsets of features that comprise the CHARGE syndrome phenotype. The mnemonic CHARGE syndrome, introduced in the premolecular era, stands for coloboma, heart defect, choanal atresia, retarded growth and development, genital hypoplasia, ear anomalies (including deafness). Following the identification of the genetic cause of CHD7 disorder, the phenotypic spectrum expanded to include cranial nerve anomalies, vestibular defects, cleft lip and/or palate, hypothyroidism, tracheoesophageal anomalies, brain anomalies, seizures, and renal anomalies. Life expectancy highly depends on the severity of manifestations; mortality can be high in the first few years when severe birth defects (particularly complex heart defects) are present and often complicated by airway and feeding issues. In childhood, adolescence, and adulthood, decreased life expectancy is likely related to a combination of residual heart defects, infections, aspiration or choking, respiratory issues including obstructive and central apnea, and possibly seizures. Despite these complications, the life expectancy for many individuals can be normal.
Cat eye syndrome
MedGen UID:
120543
Concept ID:
C0265493
Disease or Syndrome
Cat eye syndrome (CES) is characterized clinically by the combination of coloboma of the iris and anal atresia with fistula, downslanting palpebral fissures, preauricular tags and/or pits, frequent occurrence of heart and renal malformations, and normal or near-normal mental development. A small supernumerary chromosome (smaller than chromosome 21) is present, frequently has 2 centromeres, is bisatellited, and represents an inv dup(22)(q11).
Prune belly syndrome with pulmonic stenosis, intellectual disability, and deafness
MedGen UID:
96043
Concept ID:
C0403551
Disease or Syndrome
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (congenital with brain and eye anomalies), type A, 4
MedGen UID:
140820
Concept ID:
C0410174
Disease or Syndrome
Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) is characterized by hypotonia, symmetric generalized muscle weakness, and CNS migration disturbances that result in changes consistent with cobblestone lissencephaly with cerebral and cerebellar cortical dysplasia. Mild, typical, and severe phenotypes are recognized. Onset typically occurs in early infancy with poor suck, weak cry, and floppiness. Affected individuals have contractures of the hips, knees, and interphalangeal joints. Later features include myopathic facial appearance, pseudohypertrophy of the calves and forearms, motor and speech delays, intellectual disability, seizures, ophthalmologic abnormalities including visual impairment and retinal dysplasia, and progressive cardiac involvement after age ten years. Swallowing disturbance occurs in individuals with severe FCMD and in individuals older than age ten years, leading to recurrent aspiration pneumonia and death.
Café-au-lait macules with pulmonary stenosis
MedGen UID:
107817
Concept ID:
C0553586
Disease or Syndrome
Watson syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by pulmonic stenosis, cafe-au-lait spots, decreased intellectual ability (Watson, 1967), and short stature (Partington et al., 1985). Most affected individuals have relative macrocephaly and Lisch nodules and about one-third of those affected have neurofibroma (Allanson et al., 1991).
Costello syndrome
MedGen UID:
108454
Concept ID:
C0587248
Disease or Syndrome
While the majority of individuals with Costello syndrome share characteristic findings affecting multiple organ systems, the phenotypic spectrum is wide, ranging from a milder or attenuated phenotype to a severe phenotype with early lethal complications. Costello syndrome is typically characterized by failure to thrive in infancy as a result of severe postnatal feeding difficulties; short stature; developmental delay or intellectual disability; coarse facial features (full lips, large mouth, full nasal tip); curly or sparse, fine hair; loose, soft skin with deep palmar and plantar creases; papillomata of the face and perianal region; diffuse hypotonia and joint laxity with ulnar deviation of the wrists and fingers; tight Achilles tendons; and cardiac involvement including: cardiac hypertrophy (usually typical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy), congenital heart defect (usually valvar pulmonic stenosis), and arrhythmia (usually supraventricular tachycardia, especially chaotic atrial rhythm/multifocal atrial tachycardia or ectopic atrial tachycardia). Relative or absolute macrocephaly is typical, and postnatal cerebellar overgrowth can result in the development of a Chiari I malformation with associated anomalies including hydrocephalus or syringomyelia. Individuals with Costello syndrome have an approximately 15% lifetime risk for malignant tumors including rhabdomyosarcoma and neuroblastoma in young children and transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder in adolescents and young adults.
Recombinant 8 syndrome
MedGen UID:
167070
Concept ID:
C0795822
Disease or Syndrome
Recombinant chromosome 8 syndrome (Rec8 syndrome) is a chromosomal disorder found among individuals of Hispanic descent with ancestry from the San Luis Valley of southern Colorado and northern New Mexico. Affected individuals typically have impaired intellectual development, congenital heart defects, seizures, a characteristic facial appearance with hypertelorism, thin upper lip, anteverted nares, wide face, and abnormal hair whorl, and other manifestations (Sujansky et al., 1993, summary by Graw et al., 2000).
Peters plus syndrome
MedGen UID:
163204
Concept ID:
C0796012
Disease or Syndrome
Peters plus syndrome is characterized by anterior chamber eye anomalies, short limbs with broad distal extremities, characteristic facial features, cleft lip/palate, and variable developmental delay / intellectual disability. The most common anterior chamber defect is Peters' anomaly, consisting of central corneal clouding, thinning of the posterior cornea, and iridocorneal adhesions. Cataracts and glaucoma are common. Developmental delay is observed in about 80% of children; intellectual disability can range from mild to severe.
Mesoaxial hexadactyly and cardiac malformation
MedGen UID:
167099
Concept ID:
C0796057
Disease or Syndrome
A syndrome of mental retardation, short stature, delayed puberty, polydactyly, synmetracarpalia, ocular torticollis, orofacial dysmorphism, and multiple cardiac malformations.
Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome type 1
MedGen UID:
162917
Concept ID:
C0796154
Disease or Syndrome
Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome type 1 (SGBS1) is characterized by pre- and postnatal macrosomia; distinctive craniofacial features (including macrocephaly, coarse facial features, macrostomia, macroglossia, and palatal abnormalities); and commonly, mild-to-severe intellectual disability with or without structural brain anomalies. Other variable findings include supernumerary nipples, diastasis recti / umbilical hernia, congenital heart defects, diaphragmatic hernia, genitourinary defects, and gastrointestinal anomalies. Skeletal anomalies can include vertebral fusion, scoliosis, rib anomalies, and congenital hip dislocation. Hand anomalies can include large hands and postaxial polydactyly. Affected individuals are at increased risk for embryonal tumors including Wilms tumor, hepatoblastoma, adrenal neuroblastoma, gonadoblastoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and medulloblastoma.
Cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome
MedGen UID:
266149
Concept ID:
C1275081
Disease or Syndrome
Cardiofaciocutaneous (CFC) syndrome is characterized by cardiac abnormalities (pulmonic stenosis and other valve dysplasias, septal defects, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, rhythm disturbances), distinctive craniofacial appearance, and cutaneous abnormalities (including xerosis, hyperkeratosis, ichthyosis, keratosis pilaris, ulerythema ophryogenes, eczema, pigmented moles, hemangiomas, and palmoplantar hyperkeratosis). The hair is typically sparse, curly, fine or thick, woolly or brittle; eyelashes and eyebrows may be absent or sparse. Nails may be dystrophic or fast growing. Some form of neurologic and/or cognitive delay (ranging from mild to severe) is seen in all affected individuals. Neoplasia, mostly acute lymphoblastic leukemia, has been reported in some individuals.
Matthew-Wood syndrome
MedGen UID:
318679
Concept ID:
C1832661
Disease or Syndrome
Syndromic microphthalmia-9, also referred to as pulmonary hypoplasia-diaphragmatic hernia-anophthalmia-cardiac defect, is characterized by bilateral clinical anophthalmia, pulmonary hypoplasia/aplasia, cardiac malformations, and diaphragmatic defects. The phenotype is variable, ranging from isolated clinical anophthalmia or microphthalmia to complex presentations involving the cardiac, pulmonary, diaphragmatic, and renal systems. At its most severe, infants are born without pulmonary structures and die soon after birth (Marcadier et al., 2015).
Fallot complex-intellectual disability-growth delay syndrome
MedGen UID:
322025
Concept ID:
C1832735
Disease or Syndrome
A rare disorder characterised by tetralogy of Fallot, minor facial anomalies, and severe intellectual deficiency and growth delay. Dysmorphic features include large, protruding, abnormally modelled ears and broad nasal root. Microcephaly and syndactyly of second and third toes have also been recorded. All patients have severe intellectual deficiency. The condition is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait.
Emanuel syndrome
MedGen UID:
323030
Concept ID:
C1836929
Disease or Syndrome
Emanuel syndrome is characterized by pre- and postnatal growth deficiency, microcephaly, hypotonia, severe developmental delays, ear anomalies, preauricular tags or pits, cleft or high-arched palate, congenital heart defects, kidney abnormalities, and genital abnormalities in males.
Marfanoid habitus with situs inversus
MedGen UID:
323046
Concept ID:
C1836994
Disease or Syndrome
Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia with congenital joint dislocations
MedGen UID:
373381
Concept ID:
C1837657
Disease or Syndrome
CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia is characterized by short stature of prenatal onset, joint dislocations (knees, hips, radial heads), clubfeet, and limitation of range of motion that can involve all large joints. Kyphosis and occasionally scoliosis with slight shortening of the trunk develop in childhood. Minor heart valve dysplasia has been described in several persons. Intellect and vision are normal.
Paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 14
MedGen UID:
330856
Concept ID:
C1842466
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic disease with characteristics of polyhydramnios (mostly due to placentomegaly), fetal macrosomia, abdominal wall defects, skeletal abnormalities (including bell-shaped thorax, coat-hanger appearance of the ribs and decreased mid to wide thorax diameter ratio in infancy), feeding difficulties and impaired swallowing, dysmorphic features (hairy forehead, full cheeks, protruding philtrum, micrognathia), developmental delay and intellectual disability. Additional features may include kyphoscoliosis, joint contractures, diastasis recti, and muscular hypotonia. There is increased risk of hepatoblastoma. The syndrome is an imprinting disorder involving genes within the imprinted region of chromosome 14q32.
Atrial septal defect 2
MedGen UID:
334249
Concept ID:
C1842778
Congenital Abnormality
Any atrial heart septal defect in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the GATA4 gene.
Heterotaxy, visceral, 1, X-linked
MedGen UID:
336609
Concept ID:
C1844020
Disease or Syndrome
Heterotaxy Heterotaxy ('heter' meaning 'other' and 'taxy' meaning 'arrangement'), or situs ambiguus, is a developmental condition characterized by randomization of the placement of visceral organs, including the heart, lungs, liver, spleen, and stomach. The organs are oriented randomly with respect to the left-right axis and with respect to one another (Srivastava, 1997). Heterotaxy is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. Multiple Types of Congenital Heart Defects Congenital heart defects (CHTD) are among the most common congenital defects, occurring with an incidence of 8/1,000 live births. The etiology of CHTD is complex, with contributions from environmental exposure, chromosomal abnormalities, and gene defects. Some patients with CHTD also have cardiac arrhythmias, which may be due to the anatomic defect itself or to surgical interventions (summary by van de Meerakker et al., 2011). Reviews Obler et al. (2008) reviewed published cases of double-outlet right ventricle and discussed etiology and associations. Genetic Heterogeneity of Visceral Heterotaxy See also HTX2 (605376), caused by mutation in the CFC1 gene (605194) on chromosome 2q21; HTX3 (606325), which maps to chromosome 6q21; HTX4 (613751), caused by mutation in the ACVR2B gene (602730) on chromosome 3p22; HTX5 (270100), caused by mutation in the NODAL gene (601265) on chromosome 10q22; HTX6 (614779), caused by mutation in the CCDC11 gene (614759) on chromosome 18q21; HTX7 (616749), caused by mutation in the MMP21 gene (608416) on chromosome 10q26; HTX8 (617205), caused by mutation in the PKD1L1 gene (609721) on chromosome 7p12; HTX9 (618948), caused by mutation in the MNS1 gene (610766) on chromosome 15q21; HTX10 (619607), caused by mutation in the CFAP52 gene (609804) on chromosome 17p13; HTX11 (619608), caused by mutation in the CFAP45 gene (605152) on chromosome 1q23; and HTX12 (619702), caused by mutation in the CIROP gene (619703) on chromosome 14q11. Genetic Heterogeneity of Multiple Types of Congenital Heart Defects An X-linked form of CHTD, CHTD1, is caused by mutation in the ZIC3 gene on chromosome Xq26. CHTD2 (614980) is caused by mutation in the TAB2 gene (605101) on chromosome 6q25. A form of nonsyndromic congenital heart defects associated with cardiac rhythm and conduction disturbances (CHTD3; 614954) has been mapped to chromosome 9q31. CHTD4 (615779) is caused by mutation in the NR2F2 gene (107773) on chromosome 15q26. CHTD5 (617912) is caused by mutation in the GATA5 gene (611496) on chromosome 20q13. CHTD6 (613854) is caused by mutation in the GDF1 gene (602880) on chromosome 19p13. CHTD7 (618780) is caused by mutation in the FLT4 gene (136352) on chromosome 5q35.
X-linked mandibulofacial dysostosis
MedGen UID:
375543
Concept ID:
C1844918
Disease or Syndrome
An extremely rare multiple congenital abnormality syndrome that has characteristics of microcephaly, malar hypoplasia with downslanting palpebral fissures, highly arched palate, apparently low-set and protruding ears, micrognathia, short stature, bilateral hearing loss, and learning disability. Occasionally, additional features have been observed such as bilateral cryptorchidism, cardiac valvular lesions, body asymmetry, and pectus excavatum.
Oculofaciocardiodental syndrome
MedGen UID:
337547
Concept ID:
C1846265
Disease or Syndrome
Oculofaciocardiodental (OFCD) syndrome is a condition that affects the development of the eyes (oculo-), facial features (facio-), heart (cardio-) and teeth (dental). This condition occurs only in females.\n\nThe eye abnormalities associated with OFCD syndrome can affect one or both eyes. Many people with this condition are born with eyeballs that are abnormally small (microphthalmia). Other eye problems can include clouding of the lens (cataract) and a higher risk of glaucoma, an eye disease that increases the pressure in the eye. These abnormalities can lead to vision loss or blindness.\n\nPeople with OFCD syndrome often have a long, narrow face with distinctive facial features, including deep-set eyes and a broad nasal tip that is divided by a cleft. Some affected people have an opening in the roof of the mouth called a cleft palate.\n\nHeart defects are another common feature of OFCD syndrome. Babies with this condition may be born with a hole between two chambers of the heart (an atrial or ventricular septal defect) or a leak in one of the valves that controls blood flow through the heart (mitral valve prolapse).\n\nTeeth with very large roots (radiculomegaly) are characteristic of OFCD syndrome. Additional dental abnormalities can include delayed loss of primary (baby) teeth, missing or abnormally small teeth, misaligned teeth, and defective tooth enamel.
Rhizomelic syndrome, Urbach type
MedGen UID:
376574
Concept ID:
C1849382
Disease or Syndrome
Rhizomelic syndrome, Urbach type is a rare primary bone dysplasia characterized by upper limbs rhizomelia and other skeletal anomalies (e.g. short stature, dislocated hips, digitalization of the thumb with bifid distal phalanx), craniofacial features (e.g. microcephaly, large anterior fontanelle, fine and sparse scalp hair, depressed nasal bridge, high arched palate, micrognathia, short neck), congenital heart defects (e.g. pulmonary stenosis), delayed psychomotor development and mild flexion contractures of elbows. Radiologic evaluation may reveal flared epiphyses, platyspondyly and/or digital anomalies.
Mosaic variegated aneuploidy syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
338026
Concept ID:
C1850343
Disease or Syndrome
Mosaic variegated aneuploidy (MVA) syndrome is a rare disorder in which some cells in the body have an abnormal number of chromosomes instead of the usual 46 chromosomes, a situation known as aneuploidy. Most commonly, cells have an extra chromosome, which is called trisomy, or are missing a chromosome, which is known as monosomy. In MVA syndrome, some cells are aneuploid and others have the normal number of chromosomes, which is a phenomenon known as mosaicism. Typically, at least one-quarter of cells in affected individuals have an abnormal number of chromosomes. Because the additional or missing chromosomes vary among the abnormal cells, the aneuploidy is described as variegated.\n\nIn MVA syndrome, growth before birth is slow (intrauterine growth restriction). After birth, affected individuals continue to grow at a slow rate and are shorter than average. In addition, they typically have an unusually small head size (microcephaly). Another common feature of MVA syndrome is an increased risk of developing cancer in childhood. Cancers that occur most frequently in affected individuals include a cancer of muscle tissue called rhabdomyosarcoma, a form of kidney cancer known as Wilms tumor, and a cancer of the blood-forming tissue known as leukemia.\n\nLess commonly, people with MVA syndrome have eye abnormalities or distinctive facial features, such as a broad nasal bridge and low-set ears. Some affected individuals have brain abnormalities, the most common of which is called Dandy-Walker malformation. Intellectual disability, seizures, and other health problems can also occur in people with MVA syndrome.\n\nThere are at least three types of MVA syndrome, each with a different genetic cause. Type 1 is the most common and displays the classic signs and symptoms described above. Type 2 appears to have slightly different signs and symptoms than type 1, although the small number of affected individuals makes it difficult to define its characteristic features. Individuals with MVA syndrome type 2 grow slowly before and after birth; however, their head size is typically normal. Some people with MVA syndrome type 2 have unusually short arms. Individuals with MVA syndrome type 2 do not seem to have an increased risk of cancer. Another form of MVA syndrome is characterized by a high risk of developing Wilms tumor. Individuals with this form may also have other signs and symptoms typical of MVA syndrome type 1.
Short stature-valvular heart disease-characteristic facies syndrome
MedGen UID:
338866
Concept ID:
C1852073
Disease or Syndrome
Short stature-valvular heart disease-characteristic facies syndrome is characterised by severe short stature with disproportionately short legs, small hands, clinodactyly, valvular heart disease and dysmorphism (ptosis, high-arched palate, abnormal dentition). It has been described in a mother and two daughters. This syndrome is probably transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait.
Cranioacrofacial syndrome
MedGen UID:
338947
Concept ID:
C1852512
Disease or Syndrome
Cornelia de Lange syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
339902
Concept ID:
C1853099
Disease or Syndrome
Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) encompasses a spectrum of findings from mild to severe. Severe (classic) CdLS is characterized by distinctive facial features, growth restriction (prenatal onset; <5th centile throughout life), hypertrichosis, and upper-limb reduction defects that range from subtle phalangeal abnormalities to oligodactyly (missing digits). Craniofacial features include synophrys, highly arched and/or thick eyebrows, long eyelashes, short nasal bridge with anteverted nares, small widely spaced teeth, and microcephaly. Individuals with a milder phenotype have less severe growth, cognitive, and limb involvement, but often have facial features consistent with CdLS. Across the CdLS spectrum IQ ranges from below 30 to 102 (mean: 53). Many individuals demonstrate autistic and self-destructive tendencies. Other frequent findings include cardiac septal defects, gastrointestinal dysfunction, hearing loss, myopia, and cryptorchidism or hypoplastic genitalia.
Noonan syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
339908
Concept ID:
C1853120
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population.
Frontoocular syndrome
MedGen UID:
344278
Concept ID:
C1854405
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
344290
Concept ID:
C1854469
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population.
Keutel syndrome
MedGen UID:
383722
Concept ID:
C1855607
Disease or Syndrome
Keutel syndrome (KTLS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by multiple peripheral pulmonary stenoses, brachytelephalangy, inner ear deafness, and abnormal cartilage ossification or calcification (summary by Khosroshahi et al., 2014).
Mowat-Wilson syndrome
MedGen UID:
341067
Concept ID:
C1856113
Disease or Syndrome
Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS) is characterized by distinctive facial features (widely spaced eyes, broad eyebrows with a medial flare, low-hanging columella, prominent or pointed chin, open-mouth expression, and uplifted earlobes with a central depression), congenital heart defects with predilection for abnormalities of the pulmonary arteries and/or valves, Hirschsprung disease or chronic constipation, genitourinary anomalies (particularly hypospadias in males), and hypogenesis or agenesis of the corpus callosum. Most affected individuals have moderate-to-severe intellectual disability. Speech is typically limited to a few words or is absent, with relative preservation of receptive language skills. Growth restriction with microcephaly and seizure disorder are also common. Most affected people have a happy demeanor and a wide-based gait that can sometimes be confused with Angelman syndrome.
Alagille syndrome due to a NOTCH2 point mutation
MedGen UID:
341844
Concept ID:
C1857761
Disease or Syndrome
Alagille syndrome (ALGS) is a multisystem disorder with a wide spectrum of clinical variability; this variability is seen even among individuals from the same family. The major clinical manifestations of ALGS are bile duct paucity on liver biopsy, cholestasis, congenital cardiac defects (primarily involving the pulmonary arteries), butterfly vertebrae, ophthalmologic abnormalities (most commonly posterior embryotoxon), and characteristic facial features. Renal abnormalities, growth failure, developmental delays, splenomegaly, and vascular abnormalities may also occur.
Cenani-Lenz syndactyly syndrome
MedGen UID:
395226
Concept ID:
C1859309
Disease or Syndrome
A congenital malformation syndrome that associates a complex syndactyly of the hands with malformations of the forearm bones and similar manifestations in the lower limbs. Fewer than 30 cases have been described, the majority of cases occurred in related families. The syndrome affects both the upper and lower limbs but, in general, the latter are less severely affected. Associated malformations (renal hypoplasia and vertebral and hemi-vertebral anomalies) have occasionally been reported. Mild facial dysmorphism has been described in isolated cases. The disease is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. Homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations of the LRP4 gene (11p12-p11.2) have been identified.
Cardiac valvular defect, developmental
MedGen UID:
349143
Concept ID:
C1859330
Disease or Syndrome
Cardiac valvular dysplasia-1 (CVDP1) is characterized by congenital malformations of the pulmonic, tricuspid, and mitral valves. Structural cardiac defects, including atrial and ventricular septal defects, single left ventricle, and hypoplastic right ventricle have also been observed in affected individuals (Ta-Shma et al., 2017). Genetic Heterogeneity of Cardiac Valvular Dysplasia CVDP2 (620067) is caused by mutation in the ADAMTS19 gene (607513) on chromosome 5q23.
Noonan syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
349931
Concept ID:
C1860991
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population.
H syndrome
MedGen UID:
400532
Concept ID:
C1864445
Disease or Syndrome
The histiocytosis-lymphadenopathy plus syndrome comprises features of 4 histiocytic disorders previously thought to be distinct: Faisalabad histiocytosis (FHC), sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML), H syndrome, and pigmented hypertrichosis with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus syndrome (PHID). FHC described an autosomal recessive disease involving joint deformities, sensorineural hearing loss, and subsequent development of generalized lymphadenopathy and swellings in the eyelids that contain histiocytes (summary by Morgan et al., 2010). SHML, or familial Rosai-Dorfman disease, was described as a rare cause of lymph node enlargement in children, consisting of chronic massive enlargement of cervical lymph nodes frequently accompanied by fever, leukocytosis, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia. Extranodal sites were involved in approximately 25% of patients, including salivary glands, orbit, eyelid, spleen, and testes. The involvement of retropharyngeal lymphoid tissue sometimes caused snoring and sleep apnea (summary by Kismet et al., 2005). H syndrome was characterized by cutaneous hyperpigmentation and hypertrichosis, hepatosplenomegaly, heart anomalies, and hypogonadism; hearing loss was also found in about half of patients, and many had short stature. PHID was characterized by predominantly antibody-negative insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus associated with pigmented hypertrichosis and variable occurrence of other features of H syndrome, with hepatosplenomegaly occurring in about half of patients (Cliffe et al., 2009). Bolze et al. (2012) noted that mutations in the SLC29A3 gene (612373) had been implicated in H syndrome, PHID, FHC, and SHML, and that some patients presented a combination of features from 2 or more of these syndromes, leading to the suggestion that these phenotypes should be grouped together as 'SLC29A3 disorder.' Bolze et al. (2012) suggested that the histologic features of the lesions seemed to be the most uniform phenotype in these patients. In addition, the immunophenotype of infiltrating cells in H syndrome patients was shown to be the same as that seen in patients with the familial form of Rosai-Dorfman disease, further supporting the relationship between these disorders (Avitan-Hersh et al., 2011; Colmenero et al., 2012).
Koolen-de Vries syndrome
MedGen UID:
355853
Concept ID:
C1864871
Disease or Syndrome
Koolen-de Vries syndrome (KdVS) is characterized by developmental delay / intellectual disability, neonatal/childhood hypotonia, dysmorphisms, congenital malformations, and behavioral features. Psychomotor developmental delay is noted in all individuals from an early age. The majority of individuals with KdVS function in the mild-to-moderate range of intellectual disability. Other findings include speech and language delay (100%), epilepsy (~33%), congenital heart defects (25%-50%), renal and urologic anomalies (25%-50%), and cryptorchidism (71% of males). Behavior in most is described as friendly, amiable, and cooperative.
Pulmonic stenosis and deafness
MedGen UID:
357273
Concept ID:
C1867406
Disease or Syndrome
Pulmonic stenosis, atrial septal defect, and unique electrocardiographic abnormalities
MedGen UID:
357274
Concept ID:
C1867407
Disease or Syndrome
Weill-Marchesani syndrome 2, dominant
MedGen UID:
358388
Concept ID:
C1869115
Disease or Syndrome
Weill-Marchesani syndrome (WMS) is a connective tissue disorder characterized by abnormalities of the lens of the eye, short stature, brachydactyly, joint stiffness, and cardiovascular defects. The ocular problems, typically recognized in childhood, include microspherophakia (small spherical lens), myopia secondary to the abnormal shape of the lens, ectopia lentis (abnormal position of the lens), and glaucoma, which can lead to blindness. Height of adult males is 142-169 cm; height of adult females is 130-157 cm. Autosomal recessive WMS cannot be distinguished from autosomal dominant WMS by clinical findings alone.
Pulmonic stenosis
MedGen UID:
408291
Concept ID:
C1956257
Disease or Syndrome
Narrowing of the opening between the pulmonary artery and the right ventricle, usually at the level of the valve leaflets.
Noonan syndrome 5
MedGen UID:
370589
Concept ID:
C1969057
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population.
Mungan syndrome
MedGen UID:
369554
Concept ID:
C1969653
Disease or Syndrome
Temple-Baraitser syndrome
MedGen UID:
395636
Concept ID:
C2678486
Disease or Syndrome
Temple-Baraitser syndrome is a rare developmental disorder characterized by severe mental retardation and anomalies of the first ray of the upper and lower limbs with absence/hypoplasia of the nails. Most patients also have seizures; various dysmorphic facial features have been reported (summary by Jacquinet et al., 2010).
Hypophosphatemic rickets, autosomal recessive, 2
MedGen UID:
442380
Concept ID:
C2750078
Disease or Syndrome
In most cases, the signs and symptoms of hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets begin in early childhood. The features of the disorder vary widely, even among affected members of the same family. Mildly affected individuals may have hypophosphatemia without other signs and symptoms. More severely affected children experience slow growth and are shorter than their peers. They develop bone abnormalities that can interfere with movement and cause bone pain. The most noticeable of these abnormalities are bowed legs or knock knees. These abnormalities become apparent with weight-bearing activities such as walking. If untreated, they tend to worsen with time.\n\nAnother rare type of the disorder is known as hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets with hypercalciuria (HHRH). In addition to hypophosphatemia, this condition is characterized by the excretion of high levels of calcium in the urine (hypercalciuria).\n\nResearchers have described several forms of hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets, which are distinguished by their pattern of inheritance and genetic cause. The most common form of the disorder is known as X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH). It has an X-linked dominant pattern of inheritance. X-linked recessive, autosomal dominant, and autosomal recessive forms of the disorder are much rarer.\n\nOther signs and symptoms of hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets can include premature fusion of the skull bones (craniosynostosis) and dental abnormalities. The disorder may also cause abnormal bone growth where ligaments and tendons attach to joints (enthesopathy). In adults, hypophosphatemia is characterized by a softening of the bones known as osteomalacia.\n\nHereditary hypophosphatemic rickets is a disorder related to low levels of phosphate in the blood (hypophosphatemia). Phosphate is a mineral that is essential for the normal formation of bones and teeth.
Noonan syndrome 6
MedGen UID:
413028
Concept ID:
C2750732
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population.
Autosomal recessive severe congenital neutropenia due to G6PC3 deficiency
MedGen UID:
414066
Concept ID:
C2751630
Disease or Syndrome
G6PC3 deficiency is characterized by severe congenital neutropenia which occurs in a phenotypic continuum that includes the following: Isolated severe congenital neutropenia (nonsyndromic). Classic G6PC3 deficiency (severe congenital neutropenia plus cardiovascular and/or urogenital abnormalities). Severe G6PC3 deficiency (classic G6PC3 deficiency plus involvement of non-myeloid hematopoietic cell lines, additional extra-hematologic features, and pulmonary hypertension; known as Dursun syndrome). Neutropenia usually presents with recurrent bacterial infections in the first few months of life. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), failure to thrive (FTT), and poor postnatal growth are common. Other findings in classic and severe G6PC3 deficiency can include inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) resembling Crohn's disease, and endocrine disorders (growth hormone deficiency, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and delayed puberty).
Neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome
MedGen UID:
419089
Concept ID:
C2931482
Disease or Syndrome
A variant of neurofibromatosis type 1 characterized by the combination of features of neurofibromatosis type 1, such as café-au-lait spots, iris Lisch nodules, axillary and inguinal freckling, optic nerve glioma and multiple neurofibromas; and Noonan syndrome, with features such as short stature, typical facial features, congenital heart defects and unusual pectus deformity.
Noonan syndrome 7
MedGen UID:
462320
Concept ID:
C3150970
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population.
Aneurysm-osteoarthritis syndrome
MedGen UID:
462437
Concept ID:
C3151087
Disease or Syndrome
Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is characterized by vascular findings (cerebral, thoracic, and abdominal arterial aneurysms and/or dissections), skeletal manifestations (pectus excavatum or pectus carinatum, scoliosis, joint laxity, arachnodactyly, talipes equinovarus, cervical spine malformation and/or instability), craniofacial features (widely spaced eyes, strabismus, bifid uvula / cleft palate, and craniosynostosis that can involve any sutures), and cutaneous findings (velvety and translucent skin, easy bruising, and dystrophic scars). Individuals with LDS are predisposed to widespread and aggressive arterial aneurysms and pregnancy-related complications including uterine rupture and death. Individuals with LDS can show a strong predisposition for allergic/inflammatory disease including asthma, eczema, and reactions to food or environmental allergens. There is also an increased incidence of gastrointestinal inflammation including eosinophilic esophagitis and gastritis or inflammatory bowel disease. Wide variation in the distribution and severity of clinical features can be seen in individuals with LDS, even among affected individuals within a family who have the same pathogenic variant.
Congenital heart defects, multiple types, 6
MedGen UID:
462571
Concept ID:
C3151221
Congenital Abnormality
Multiple types of congenital heart defects are associated with mutation in the GDF1 gene, including tetralogy of fallot (TOF), transposition of the great arteries (TGA), double-outlet right ventricle (DORV), total anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR), pulmonary stenosis or atresia, atrioventricular canal, ventricular septal defect (VSD), and hypoplastic left or right ventricle (Jin et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of multiple types of congenital heart defects, see 306955.
Right atrial isomerism
MedGen UID:
465274
Concept ID:
C3178806
Congenital Abnormality
Right atrial isomerism (RAI) is a severe complex congenital heart defect resulting from embryonic disruption of proper left-right axis determination. RAI is usually characterized by complete atrioventricular septal defect with a common atrium and univentricular AV connection, total anomalous pulmonary drainage, and transposition or malposition of the great arteries. Affected individuals present at birth with severe cardiac failure. Other associated abnormalities include bilateral trilobed lungs, midline liver, and asplenia, as well as situs inversus affecting other organs. Left atrial isomerism (LAI) is a related disorder with a somewhat better prognosis. LAI is characterized by bilateral superior vena cava, interruption of the intrahepatic portion of the inferior vena cava, partial anomalous pulmonary venous drainage, and ventricular septal defect. Patients with LAI may have polysplenia and bilateral bilobed lungs, as well as situs inversus affecting other organs. Both RAI and LAI malformation complexes have classically been referred to as Ivemark syndrome (summary by Eronen et al., 2004 and Kaasinen et al., 2010).
Kabuki syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
477126
Concept ID:
C3275495
Disease or Syndrome
Kabuki syndrome (KS) is characterized by typical facial features (long palpebral fissures with eversion of the lateral third of the lower eyelid; arched and broad eyebrows; short columella with depressed nasal tip; large, prominent, or cupped ears), minor skeletal anomalies, persistence of fetal fingertip pads, mild-to-moderate intellectual disability, and postnatal growth deficiency. Other findings may include: congenital heart defects, genitourinary anomalies, cleft lip and/or palate, gastrointestinal anomalies including anal atresia, ptosis and strabismus, and widely spaced teeth and hypodontia. Functional differences can include: increased susceptibility to infections and autoimmune disorders, seizures, endocrinologic abnormalities (including isolated premature thelarche in females), feeding problems, and hearing loss.
Familial retinal arterial macroaneurysm
MedGen UID:
481835
Concept ID:
C3280205
Disease or Syndrome
Retinal arterial macroaneurysm is an autosomal recessive condition characterized by the bilateral appearance of 'beading' along the major retinal arterial trunks, with the subsequent formation of macroaneurysms. Affected individuals also have supravalvular pulmonic stenosis, often requiring surgical correction (summary by Abu-Safieh et al., 2011).
Arthrogryposis, Perthes disease, and upward gaze palsy
MedGen UID:
481939
Concept ID:
C3280309
Disease or Syndrome
Pitt-Hopkins-like syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
482109
Concept ID:
C3280479
Disease or Syndrome
Any Pitt-Hopkins-like syndrome in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the NRXN1 gene.
Ventricular septal defect 1
MedGen UID:
482407
Concept ID:
C3280777
Disease or Syndrome
Ventricular septal defect (VSD) is the most common form of congenital cardiovascular anomaly, occurring in nearly 50% of all infants with a congenital heart defect and accounting for 14 to 16% of cardiac defects that require invasive treatment within the first year of life. Congenital VSDs may occur alone or in combination with other cardiac malformations. Large VSDs that go unrepaired may give rise to cardiac enlargement, congestive heart failure, pulmonary hypertension, Eisenmenger's syndrome, delayed fetal brain development, arrhythmias, and even sudden cardiac death (summary by Wang et al., 2011, 2011). Other congenital cardiac defects caused by mutation in the GATA4 gene include atrial septal defect (ASD2; 607941), tetralogy of Fallot (see TOF, 187500), and endocardial cushion defects (AVSD4; 614430). Genetic Heterogeneity of Ventricular Septal Defect VSD2 (614431) is caused by mutation in the CITED2 gene (602937) on chromosome 6q24; VSD3 (614432) is caused by mutation in the NKX2-5 gene (600584) on chromosome 5q34. Somatic mutations in the HAND1 gene (602406) have been identified in tissue samples from patients with VSD.
Weill-Marchesani syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
766699
Concept ID:
C3553785
Disease or Syndrome
Weill-Marchesani syndrome (WMS) is a connective tissue disorder characterized by abnormalities of the lens of the eye, short stature, brachydactyly, joint stiffness, and cardiovascular defects. The ocular problems, typically recognized in childhood, include microspherophakia (small spherical lens), myopia secondary to the abnormal shape of the lens, ectopia lentis (abnormal position of the lens), and glaucoma, which can lead to blindness. Height of adult males is 142-169 cm; height of adult females is 130-157 cm. Autosomal recessive WMS cannot be distinguished from autosomal dominant WMS by clinical findings alone.
Dysmorphism-conductive hearing loss-heart defect syndrome
MedGen UID:
767688
Concept ID:
C3554774
Disease or Syndrome
A rare multiple congenital anomalies syndrome with characteristics of distinctive facial appearance (low frontal hairline, bilateral ptosis, prominent eyes, flat midface, broad, ?at nares, Cupid''s bow upper lip vermilion and small, low-set, posteriorly rotated ears), cleft palate, conductive hearing loss, heart defects (atrial or ventricular septal defect) and mild developmental delay/intellectual disability.
Cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
815336
Concept ID:
C3809006
Disease or Syndrome
Cardiofaciocutaneous (CFC) syndrome is characterized by cardiac abnormalities (pulmonic stenosis and other valve dysplasias, septal defects, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, rhythm disturbances), distinctive craniofacial appearance, and cutaneous abnormalities (including xerosis, hyperkeratosis, ichthyosis, keratosis pilaris, ulerythema ophryogenes, eczema, pigmented moles, hemangiomas, and palmoplantar hyperkeratosis). The hair is typically sparse, curly, fine or thick, woolly or brittle; eyelashes and eyebrows may be absent or sparse. Nails may be dystrophic or fast growing. Some form of neurologic and/or cognitive delay (ranging from mild to severe) is seen in all affected individuals. Neoplasia, mostly acute lymphoblastic leukemia, has been reported in some individuals.
Cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
815337
Concept ID:
C3809007
Disease or Syndrome
Cardiofaciocutaneous (CFC) syndrome is characterized by cardiac abnormalities (pulmonic stenosis and other valve dysplasias, septal defects, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, rhythm disturbances), distinctive craniofacial appearance, and cutaneous abnormalities (including xerosis, hyperkeratosis, ichthyosis, keratosis pilaris, ulerythema ophryogenes, eczema, pigmented moles, hemangiomas, and palmoplantar hyperkeratosis). The hair is typically sparse, curly, fine or thick, woolly or brittle; eyelashes and eyebrows may be absent or sparse. Nails may be dystrophic or fast growing. Some form of neurologic and/or cognitive delay (ranging from mild to severe) is seen in all affected individuals. Neoplasia, mostly acute lymphoblastic leukemia, has been reported in some individuals.
Noonan syndrome 8
MedGen UID:
815563
Concept ID:
C3809233
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population.
Nephronophthisis 16
MedGen UID:
815650
Concept ID:
C3809320
Disease or Syndrome
The nephronophthisis (NPH) phenotype is characterized by reduced renal concentrating ability, chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, cystic renal disease, and progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) before age 30 years. Three age-based clinical subtypes are recognized: infantile, juvenile, and adolescent/adult. Infantile NPH can present in utero with oligohydramnios sequence (limb contractures, pulmonary hypoplasia, and facial dysmorphisms) or postnatally with renal manifestations that progress to ESRD before age 3 years. Juvenile NPH, the most prevalent subtype, typically presents with polydipsia and polyuria, growth retardation, chronic iron-resistant anemia, or other findings related to chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hypertension is typically absent due to salt wasting. ESRD develops at a median age of 13 years. Ultrasound findings are increased echogenicity, reduced corticomedullary differentiation, and renal cysts (in 50% of affected individuals). Histologic findings include tubulointerstitial fibrosis, thickened and disrupted tubular basement membrane, sporadic corticomedullary cysts, and normal or reduced kidney size. Adolescent/adult NPH is clinically similar to juvenile NPH, but ESRD develops at a median age of 19 years. Within a subtype, inter- and intrafamilial variability in rate of progression to ESRD is considerable. Approximately 80%-90% of individuals with the NPH phenotype have no extrarenal features (i.e., they have isolated NPH); ~10%-20% have extrarenal manifestations that constitute a recognizable syndrome (e.g., Joubert syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, Jeune syndrome and related skeletal disorders, Meckel-Gruber syndrome, Senior-Løken syndrome, Leber congenital amaurosis, COACH syndrome, and oculomotor apraxia, Cogan type).
Renal-hepatic-pancreatic dysplasia 2
MedGen UID:
815764
Concept ID:
C3809434
Disease or Syndrome
RHPD2 is an autosomal recessive multisystemic disorder with severe abnormalities apparent in utero and often resulting in fetal death or death in infancy. The main organs affected include the kidney, liver, and pancreas, although other abnormalities, including cardiac, skeletal, and lung defects, may also be present. Affected individuals often have situs inversus. The disorder results from a defect in ciliogenesis and ciliary function, as well as in cell proliferation and epithelial morphogenesis; thus, the clinical manifestations are highly variable (summary by Grampa et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of renal-hepatic-pancreatic dysplasia, see RHPD1 (208540).
Severe dermatitis-multiple allergies-metabolic wasting syndrome
MedGen UID:
816049
Concept ID:
C3809719
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic epidermal disorder with characteristics of congenital erythroderma with severe psoriasiform dermatitis, ichthyosis, severe palmoplantar keratoderma, yellow keratosis on the hands and feet, elevated immunoglobulin E, multiple food allergies, and metabolic wasting. Other variable features may include hypotrichosis, nail dystrophy, recurrent infections, mild global developmental delay, eosinophilia, nystagmus, growth impairment and cardiac defects.
Pancreatic hypoplasia-diabetes-congenital heart disease syndrome
MedGen UID:
860891
Concept ID:
C4012454
Disease or Syndrome
A rare, syndromic diabetes mellitus characterized by partial pancreatic agenesis, diabetes mellitus, and heart anomalies (including transposition of the great vessels, ventricular or atrial septal defects, pulmonary stenosis, or patent ductus arteriosis).
Intellectual disability, autosomal recessive 42
MedGen UID:
862780
Concept ID:
C4014343
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with dysmorphic features, spasticity, and brain abnormalities (NEDDSBA) is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severely delayed global development, with hypotonia, impaired intellectual development, and poor or absent speech. Most patients have spasticity with limb hypertonia and brisk tendon reflexes. Additional features include nonspecific dysmorphic facial features, structural brain abnormalities, and cortical visual impairment (summary by Bosch et al., 2015). Novarino et al. (2014) labeled the disorder 'spastic paraplegia-67' (SPG67). The disorder is caused by a defect in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293).
Adams-Oliver syndrome 5
MedGen UID:
863407
Concept ID:
C4014970
Disease or Syndrome
Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS) is characterized by aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) of the scalp and terminal transverse limb defects (TTLD). ACC lesions usually occur in the midline of the parietal or occipital regions, but can also occur on the abdomen or limbs. At birth, an ACC lesion may already have the appearance of a healed scar. ACC lesions less than 5 cm often involve only the skin and almost always heal over a period of months; larger lesions are more likely to involve the skull and possibly the dura, and are at greater risk for complications, which can include infection, hemorrhage, or thrombosis, and can result in death. The limb defects range from mild (unilateral or bilateral short distal phalanges) to severe (complete absence of all toes or fingers, feet or hands, or more, often resembling an amputation). The lower extremities are almost always more severely affected than the upper extremities. Additional major features frequently include cardiovascular malformations/dysfunction (23%), brain anomalies, and less frequently renal, liver, and eye anomalies.
Chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia
MedGen UID:
863911
Concept ID:
C4015474
Disease or Syndrome
Syndrome with characteristics of sick sinus syndrome and intestinal pseudo-obstruction. The heart and digestive issues develop at the same time, usually by age 20. The syndrome is caused by mutations in the SGO1 gene. This gene provides instructions for making part of a protein complex cohesin. This protein complex helps control the placement of chromosomes during cell division. Research suggests that SGO1 gene mutations may result in a cohesin complex that is less able to hold sister chromatids together, resulting in decreased chromosomal stability during cell division. This instability is thought to cause senescence of cells in the intestinal muscle and in the sinoatrial node, resulting in problems maintaining proper rhythmic movements of the heart and intestines.
Macrothrombocytopenia-lymphedema-developmental delay-facial dysmorphism-camptodactyly syndrome
MedGen UID:
906646
Concept ID:
C4225222
Disease or Syndrome
Takenouchi-Kosaki syndrome is a highly heterogeneous autosomal dominant complex congenital developmental disorder affecting multiple organ systems. The core phenotype includes delayed psychomotor development with variable intellectual disability, dysmorphic facial features, and cardiac, genitourinary, and hematologic or lymphatic defects, including thrombocytopenia and lymphedema. Additional features may include abnormalities on brain imaging, skeletal anomalies, and recurrent infections. Some patients have a milder disease course reminiscent of Noonan syndrome (see, e.g., NS1, 163950) (summary by Martinelli et al., 2018).
Noonan syndrome 10
MedGen UID:
902892
Concept ID:
C4225280
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population.
Noonan syndrome 9
MedGen UID:
896352
Concept ID:
C4225282
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population.
Autosomal dominant intellectual disability-craniofacial anomalies-cardiac defects syndrome
MedGen UID:
903767
Concept ID:
C4225396
Disease or Syndrome
Arboleda-Tham syndrome (ARTHS) is an autosomal dominant disorder with the core features of impaired intellectual development, speech delay, microcephaly, cardiac anomalies, and gastrointestinal complications (summary by Kennedy et al., 2019).
Hypercalcemia, infantile, 1
MedGen UID:
934200
Concept ID:
C4310232
Disease or Syndrome
Infantile hypercalcemia is characterized by severe hypercalcemia, failure to thrive, vomiting, dehydration, and nephrocalcinosis. An epidemic of idiopathic infantile hypercalcemia occurred in the United Kingdom in the 1950s after the implementation of an increased prophylactic dose of vitamin D supplementation; however, the fact that most infants receiving the prophylaxis remained unaffected suggested that an intrinsic hypersensitivity to vitamin D might be implicated in the pathogenesis (summary by Schlingmann et al., 2011). Genetic Heterogeneity Infantile hypercalcemia-2 (HCINF2; 616963) is caused by mutation in the SLC34A1 gene (182309) on chromosome 5q35.
Frontometaphyseal dysplasia 2
MedGen UID:
934664
Concept ID:
C4310697
Disease or Syndrome
Frontometaphyseal dysplasia (FMD) is a progressive sclerosing skeletal dysplasia characterized by supraorbital hyperostosis, undermodeling of the small bones, and small and large joint contractures, as well as extraskeletal developmental abnormalities, primarily of the cardiorespiratory system and genitourinary tract. Patients with FMD2 appear to have a propensity for keloid formation (summary by Wade et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of frontometaphyseal dysplasia, see FMD1 (305620).
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 43
MedGen UID:
934738
Concept ID:
C4310771
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
HIVEP2-related intellectual disability is a neurological disorder characterized by moderate to severe developmental delay and intellectual disability and mild physical abnormalities (dysmorphic features). Early symptoms of the condition include weak muscle tone (hypotonia) and delayed development of motor skills, such as sitting, standing, and walking. After learning to walk, many affected individuals continue to have difficulty with this activity; their walking style (gait) is often unbalanced and wide-based. Speech is also delayed, and some people with this condition never learn to talk. Most people with HIVEP2-related intellectual disability also have unusual physical features, such as widely spaced eyes (hypertelorism), a broad nasal bridge, or fingers with tapered ends, although there is no characteristic pattern of such features among affected individuals. Many people with the condition exhibit behavioral problems, such as hyperactivity, attention deficit disorder, aggression, anxiety, and autism spectrum disorder, which is a group of developmental disorders characterized by impaired communication and social interaction.\n\nOther features of HIVEP2-related intellectual disability include mild abnormalities in the structure of the brain and an abnormally small brain and head size (microcephaly). Less common health problems include seizures; recurrent ear infections; and eye disorders, such as eyes that do not look in the same direction (strabismus), "lazy eye" (amblyopia), and farsightedness (hyperopia). Some people with HIVEP2-related intellectual disability have gastrointestinal problems, which can include backflow of acidic stomach contents into the esophagus (gastroesophageal reflux) and constipation.
Noonan syndrome-like disorder with loose anagen hair 1
MedGen UID:
1379805
Concept ID:
C4478716
Disease or Syndrome
An inherited condition caused by autosomal dominant mutation(s) in the SHOC2 gene, encoding leucine-rich repeat protein SHOC-2. The condition is characterized by facial features similar to those seen in Noonan syndrome but may also include short stature, cognitive deficits, relative macrocephaly, small posterior fossa resulting in Chiari I malformation, hypernasal voice, cardiac defects, and ectodermal abnormalities, which typically presents as slow-growing, sparse, and/or unruly hair.
Diamond-Blackfan anemia 16
MedGen UID:
1385861
Concept ID:
C4479424
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome-like disorder with loose anagen hair 2
MedGen UID:
1376945
Concept ID:
C4479577
Disease or Syndrome
An inherited condition caused by autosomal dominant mutation(s) in the PPP1CB gene, encoding serine/threonine-protein phosphatase PP1-beta catalytic subunit. The condition is characterized by facial features similar to those seen in Noonan syndrome but may also include short stature, cognitive deficits, relative macrocephaly, small posterior fossa resulting in Chiari I malformation, hypernasal voice, cardiac defects, and ectodermal abnormalities, which typically presents as slow-growing, sparse, and/or unruly hair.
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 45
MedGen UID:
1616472
Concept ID:
C4539848
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Adams-Oliver syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1635567
Concept ID:
C4551482
Disease or Syndrome
Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS) is characterized by aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) of the scalp and terminal transverse limb defects (TTLD). ACC lesions usually occur in the midline of the parietal or occipital regions, but can also occur on the abdomen or limbs. At birth, an ACC lesion may already have the appearance of a healed scar. ACC lesions less than 5 cm often involve only the skin and almost always heal over a period of months; larger lesions are more likely to involve the skull and possibly the dura, and are at greater risk for complications, which can include infection, hemorrhage, or thrombosis, and can result in death. The limb defects range from mild (unilateral or bilateral short distal phalanges) to severe (complete absence of all toes or fingers, feet or hands, or more, often resembling an amputation). The lower extremities are almost always more severely affected than the upper extremities. Additional major features frequently include cardiovascular malformations/dysfunction (23%), brain anomalies, and less frequently renal, liver, and eye anomalies.
LEOPARD syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1631694
Concept ID:
C4551484
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NSML) is a condition in which the cardinal features consist of lentigines, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, short stature, pectus deformity, and dysmorphic facial features including widely spaced eyes and ptosis. Multiple lentigines present as dispersed flat, black-brown macules, mostly on the face, neck, and upper part of the trunk with sparing of the mucosa. In general, lentigines do not appear until age four to five years but then increase to the thousands by puberty. Some individuals with NSML do not exhibit lentigines. Approximately 85% of affected individuals have heart defects, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (typically appearing during infancy and sometimes progressive) and pulmonary valve stenosis. Postnatal growth restriction resulting in short stature occurs in fewer than 50% of affected persons, although most affected individuals have a height that is less than the 25th centile for age. Sensorineural hearing deficits, present in approximately 20% of affected individuals, are poorly characterized. Intellectual disability, typically mild, is observed in approximately 30% of persons with NSML.
RAB23-related Carpenter syndrome
MedGen UID:
1644017
Concept ID:
C4551510
Disease or Syndrome
Carpenter syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with the cardinal features of acrocephaly with variable synostosis of the sagittal, lambdoid, and coronal sutures; peculiar facies; brachydactyly of the hands with syndactyly; preaxial polydactyly and syndactyly of the feet; congenital heart defects; growth retardation; mental retardation; hypogenitalism; and obesity. In addition, cerebral malformations, oral and dental abnormalities, coxa valga, genu valgum, hydronephrosis, precocious puberty, and hearing loss may be observed (summary by Altunhan et al., 2011). Genetic Heterogeneity of Carpenter Syndrome Carpenter syndrome-2 (CRPT2; 614976), in which the features of Carpenter syndrome are sometimes associated with defective lateralization, is caused by mutation in the MEGF8 gene (604267).
Noonan syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1638960
Concept ID:
C4551602
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population.
Ritscher-Schinzel syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1634646
Concept ID:
C4551776
Disease or Syndrome
Ritscher-Schinzel syndrome (RSS) is a clinically recognizable condition that includes the cardinal findings of craniofacial features, cerebellar defects, and cardiovascular malformations resulting in the alternate diagnostic name of 3C syndrome. Dysmorphic facial features may include brachycephaly, hypotonic face with protruding tongue, flat appearance of the face on profile view, short midface, widely spaced eyes, downslanted palpebral fissures, low-set ears with overfolding of the upper helix, smooth or short philtrum, and high or cleft palate. Affected individuals also typically have a characteristic metacarpal phalangeal profile showing a consistent wavy pattern on hand radiographs. RSS is associated with variable degrees of developmental delay and intellectual disability. Eye anomalies and hypercholesterolemia may be variably present.
Trichohepatoenteric syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1644087
Concept ID:
C4551982
Disease or Syndrome
Trichohepatoenteric syndrome (THES), generally considered to be a neonatal enteropathy, is characterized by intractable diarrhea (seen in almost all affected children), woolly hair (seen in all), intrauterine growth restriction, facial dysmorphism, and short stature. Additional findings include poorly characterized immunodeficiency, recurrent infections, skin abnormalities, and liver disease. Mild intellectual disability (ID) is seen in about 50% of affected individuals. Less common findings include congenital heart defects and platelet anomalies. To date 52 affected individuals have been reported.
Weill-Marchesani syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1637058
Concept ID:
C4552002
Disease or Syndrome
Weill-Marchesani syndrome (WMS) is a connective tissue disorder characterized by abnormalities of the lens of the eye, short stature, brachydactyly, joint stiffness, and cardiovascular defects. The ocular problems, typically recognized in childhood, include microspherophakia (small spherical lens), myopia secondary to the abnormal shape of the lens, ectopia lentis (abnormal position of the lens), and glaucoma, which can lead to blindness. Height of adult males is 142-169 cm; height of adult females is 130-157 cm. Autosomal recessive WMS cannot be distinguished from autosomal dominant WMS by clinical findings alone.
Adenosine kinase deficiency
MedGen UID:
1632232
Concept ID:
C4706555
Disease or Syndrome
Hypermethioninemia due to adenosine kinase deficiency is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism characterized by global developmental delay, early-onset seizures, mild dysmorphic features, and characteristic biochemical anomalies, including persistent hypermethioninemia with increased levels of S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy); homocysteine is typically normal (summary by Bjursell et al., 2011).
Cardiac, facial, and digital anomalies with developmental delay
MedGen UID:
1648330
Concept ID:
C4748484
Disease or Syndrome
CAFDADD is a multisystemic developmental disorder with variable cardiac and digital anomalies and facial dysmorphism. Some patients may have seizures and ocular/aural abnormalities (Tokita et al., 2018).
Vertebral anomalies and variable endocrine and T-cell dysfunction
MedGen UID:
1648299
Concept ID:
C4748741
Disease or Syndrome
Vertebral anomalies and variable endocrine and T-cell dysfunction is a syndrome characterized by an overlapping spectrum of features. Skeletal malformations primarily involve the vertebrae, and endocrine abnormalities involving parathyroid hormone (PTH; 168450), growth hormone (GH1; 139250), and the thyroid gland have been reported. T-cell abnormalities have been observed, with some patients showing thymus gland aplasia or hypoplasia. Patients have mild craniofacial dysmorphism, and some show developmental delay or behavioral problems. Cardiac defects may be present (Liu et al., 2018).
Polymicrogyria with or without vascular-type ehlers-danlos syndrome
MedGen UID:
1675672
Concept ID:
C5193040
Disease or Syndrome
Polymicrogyria with or without vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder with a highly variable phenotype. Although all patients have polymicrogyria and other variable structural brain anomalies on imaging, only some show developmental delay and/or seizures. Similarly, only some patients have connective tissue defects that particularly affect the vascular system and can result in early death (summary by Vandervore et al., 2017).
Noonan syndrome 11
MedGen UID:
1681177
Concept ID:
C5193130
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population.
Congenital heart defects, multiple types, 7
MedGen UID:
1714491
Concept ID:
C5394062
Congenital Abnormality
Multiple types of congenital heart defects-7 (CHTD7) is an autosomal dominant disorder with incomplete penetrance characterized mainly by tetralogy of Fallot but also including right-sided aortic arch, absent pulmonary valve, and other cardiac abnormalities (Jin et al., 2017, Reuter et al., 2019).
Neurodevelopmental, jaw, eye, and digital syndrome
MedGen UID:
1712714
Concept ID:
C5394477
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental, jaw, eye, and digital syndrome (NEDJED) is characterized by phenotypic diversity, with patients exhibiting a range of overlapping phenotypes. Most patients show developmental delay ranging from mild to severe, and often have behavioral disorders as well. Brain imaging shows hypoplasia of the corpus callosum, prominence of lateral ventricles, and/or white matter abnormalities. Many patients have retro- or micrognathia, but mild prognathism has also been observed. Ocular anomalies are variably present, and may be severe and complex; however, some patients show only mild myopia. Abnormalities of fingers and toes include brachydactyly, clinodactyly, syndactyly, and contractures; polydactyly is rarely seen (Holt et al., 2019).
Cardiofacioneurodevelopmental syndrome
MedGen UID:
1721861
Concept ID:
C5436852
Disease or Syndrome
Cardiofacioneurodevelopmental syndrome (CFNDS) is characterized by microcephaly, midline facial defects, developmental delay, and cerebellar hypoplasia. Variable cardiac defects may be present, including atrioventricular canal and ventricular septal defects. Heterotaxy has also been reported (Harel et al., 2020).
Chromosome 13q33-q34 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
1744234
Concept ID:
C5436890
Disease or Syndrome
Chromosome 13q33-q34 deletion syndrome is associated with developmental delay and/or impaired intellectual development, facial dysmorphism, and an increased risk for epilepsy, cardiac defects and additional anatomic anomalies (summary by Sagi-Dain et al., 2019).
Lessel-Kreienkamp syndrome
MedGen UID:
1762595
Concept ID:
C5436892
Disease or Syndrome
Lessel-Kreienkamp syndrome (LESKRES) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay with intellectual disability and speech and language delay apparent from infancy or early childhood. The severity of the disorder is highly variable: some patients have mildly delayed walking and mild cognitive deficits, whereas others are nonambulatory and nonverbal. Most have behavioral disorders. Additional features, including seizures, hypotonia, gait abnormalities, visual defects, cardiac defects, and nonspecific dysmorphic facial features may also be present (summary by Lessel et al., 2020).
Multiple congenital anomalies-neurodevelopmental syndrome, x-linked
MedGen UID:
1788942
Concept ID:
C5542341
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked multiple congenital anomalies-neurodevelopmental syndrome (MCAND) is an X-linked recessive congenital multisystemic disorder characterized by poor growth, global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development, and variable abnormalities of the cardiac, skeletal, and genitourinary systems. Most affected individuals also have hypotonia and dysmorphic craniofacial features. Brain imaging typically shows enlarged ventricles and thin corpus callosum; some have microcephaly, whereas others have hydrocephalus. The severity of the disorder is highly variable, ranging from death in early infancy to survival into the second or third decade. Pathogenetically, the disorder results from disrupted gene expression and signaling during embryogenesis, thus affecting multiple systems (summary by Tripolszki et al., 2021 and Beck et al., 2021). Beck et al. (2021) referred to the disorder as LINKED syndrome (LINKage-specific deubiquitylation deficiency-induced Embryonic Defects).
Short stature, facial dysmorphism, and skeletal anomalies with or without cardiac anomalies 1
MedGen UID:
1778119
Concept ID:
C5542952
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with or without autism or seizures
MedGen UID:
1784023
Concept ID:
C5543225
Disease or Syndrome
Cardiomyopathy, familial restrictive, 6
MedGen UID:
1780781
Concept ID:
C5543638
Disease or Syndrome
Familial restrictive cardiomyopathy-6 (RCM6) is characterized by prenatal onset of severe restrictive cardiomyopathy predominantly involving the right ventricle, resulting in irreversible heart failure and early death (Louw et al., 2018). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial restrictive cardiomyopathy, see RCM1 (115210).
DEGCAGS SYNDROME
MedGen UID:
1794177
Concept ID:
C5561967
Disease or Syndrome
DEGCAGS syndrome is an autosomal recessive syndromic neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay, coarse and dysmorphic facial features, and poor growth and feeding apparent from infancy. Affected individuals have variable systemic manifestations often with significant structural defects of the cardiovascular, genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and/or skeletal systems. Additional features may include sensorineural hearing loss, hypotonia, anemia or pancytopenia, and immunodeficiency with recurrent infections. Death in childhood may occur (summary by Bertoli-Avella et al., 2021).
CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS, MULTIPLE TYPES, 8, WITH OR WITHOUT HETEROTAXY
MedGen UID:
1794252
Concept ID:
C5562042
Disease or Syndrome
Multiple types of congenital heart defects-8 (CHTD8) is characterized by cardiac septal defects, double-outlet right ventricle, unbalanced complete atrioventricular canal, and valvular anomalies, as well as vascular anomalies including dextroposition of the great arteries, anomalous pulmonary venous return, and superior vena cava to left atrium defect. Patients may also exhibit laterality defects, including dextrocardia, atrial isomerism, dextrogastria, left-sided gallbladder, and intestinal malrotation (Zaidi et al., 2013; Granadillo et al., 2018).
Chromosome 1p36 deletion syndrome, proximal
MedGen UID:
1794324
Concept ID:
C5562114
Disease or Syndrome
Proximal 1p36 deletion syndrome is a multisystem developmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development, poor overall growth with microcephaly, axial hypotonia, and dysmorphic facial features. Most patients have congenital cardiac malformations or cardiac dysfunction. Additional more variable features may include distal skeletal anomalies, seizures, and cleft palate. The phenotype shows some overlap with distal chromosome 1p36 deletion syndrome (summary by Kang et al., 2007).
Heterotaxy, visceral, 12, autosomal
MedGen UID:
1803695
Concept ID:
C5676898
Congenital Abnormality
Visceral heterotaxy-12 (HTX12) is an embryonic developmental disorder characterized by defects in the asymmetric positioning of visceral organs across the left-right axis, known as laterality defects. The phenotype is highly variable, ranging from complete organ reversal (situs inversus totalis) to selective misarrangement of organs (situs ambiguus) such as the liver, spleen, and pancreas. The disorder is often associated with dextrocardia or variable complex congenital heart defects. Early death may occur in the most severe cases (summary by Szenker-Ravi et al., 2022). For a discussion of the genetic heterogeneity of visceral heterotaxy, see HTX1 (306955).
Noonan syndrome 14
MedGen UID:
1807988
Concept ID:
C5676916
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome-14 (NS14) is a recessive developmental disorder within the RASopathy clinical spectrum. Patients exhibit developmental delay, impaired intellectual development, and short stature, as well as distinctive dysmorphic features including bitemporal narrowing, hypertelorism, low-set posteriorly rotated ears, prominent nasal bridge, low posterior hairline with a short webbed neck, and pectus excavatum (Motta et al., 2021). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Noonan syndrome, see NS1 (163950).

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Iwai S, Miwa K, Nagashima T
Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg 2022 May 2;34(5):930-932. doi: 10.1093/icvts/ivac022. PMID: 35137109Free PMC Article
Poupart S, Navarro-Castellanos I, Raboisson MJ, Lapierre C, Dery J, Miró J, Dahdah N
Pediatr Cardiol 2021 Apr;42(4):814-820. Epub 2021 Jan 19 doi: 10.1007/s00246-021-02545-w. PMID: 33464372
Huang SC, Shih JC, Lin MT, Wu ET
Ann Thorac Surg 2011 Sep;92(3):1115-6. doi: 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2011.03.048. PMID: 21871313
Lee R, Son JS, Park YM
Pediatr Cardiol 2011 Oct;32(7):1055-6. Epub 2011 Jun 11 doi: 10.1007/s00246-011-0021-x. PMID: 21667183
Lee ML, Peng JW, Tu GJ, Chen SY, Lee JY, Chang SL
Yonsei Med J 2008 Jun 30;49(3):416-21. doi: 10.3349/ymj.2008.49.3.416. PMID: 18581591Free PMC Article

Diagnosis

Poupart S, Navarro-Castellanos I, Raboisson MJ, Lapierre C, Dery J, Miró J, Dahdah N
Pediatr Cardiol 2021 Apr;42(4):814-820. Epub 2021 Jan 19 doi: 10.1007/s00246-021-02545-w. PMID: 33464372
El-Saeidi SA, Hamza HS, Agha HM, Soliman MM, Attia WA, El-Kaffas R, Abdel-Aziz F, Abdel-Aziz O, Shaker S, Esmat A, Ammar R, Fattouh A, Mohi-Eldin K, El-Sisi AM
Cardiol Young 2020 Apr;30(4):482-488. Epub 2020 Feb 19 doi: 10.1017/S1047951120000360. PMID: 32070441
Asada D, Tomita H, Fujii T
Cardiol Young 2018 Oct;28(10):1162-1164. Epub 2018 Jul 11 doi: 10.1017/S1047951118000896. PMID: 29991370
Huang SC, Shih JC, Lin MT, Wu ET
Ann Thorac Surg 2011 Sep;92(3):1115-6. doi: 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2011.03.048. PMID: 21871313
Lee R, Son JS, Park YM
Pediatr Cardiol 2011 Oct;32(7):1055-6. Epub 2011 Jun 11 doi: 10.1007/s00246-011-0021-x. PMID: 21667183

Therapy

Iwai S, Miwa K, Nagashima T
Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg 2022 May 2;34(5):930-932. doi: 10.1093/icvts/ivac022. PMID: 35137109Free PMC Article
Dale MTG, Magnus P, Leirgul E, Holmstrøm H, Gjessing HK, Brodwall K, Haugen M, Stoltenberg C, Øyen N
Eur J Epidemiol 2019 Apr;34(4):383-396. Epub 2019 Jan 19 doi: 10.1007/s10654-019-00480-y. PMID: 30661159
Sugiyama H, Kise H, Toda T, Hoshiai M
Heart Vessels 2016 Nov;31(11):1889-1893. Epub 2016 Apr 30 doi: 10.1007/s00380-016-0845-7. PMID: 27138441
Lee ML, Peng JW, Tu GJ, Chen SY, Lee JY, Chang SL
Yonsei Med J 2008 Jun 30;49(3):416-21. doi: 10.3349/ymj.2008.49.3.416. PMID: 18581591Free PMC Article
Witsenburg M, Talsma M, Rohmer J, Hess J
Eur Heart J 1993 Dec;14(12):1657-60. doi: 10.1093/eurheartj/14.12.1657. PMID: 8131764

Prognosis

Poupart S, Navarro-Castellanos I, Raboisson MJ, Lapierre C, Dery J, Miró J, Dahdah N
Pediatr Cardiol 2021 Apr;42(4):814-820. Epub 2021 Jan 19 doi: 10.1007/s00246-021-02545-w. PMID: 33464372
Nakamura Y, Thattaliyath B, Ricci M
Ann Thorac Surg 2019 Jan;107(1):e49-e50. Epub 2018 Jun 8 doi: 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2018.05.029. PMID: 29890149
Huang SC, Shih JC, Lin MT, Wu ET
Ann Thorac Surg 2011 Sep;92(3):1115-6. doi: 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2011.03.048. PMID: 21871313
Lee R, Son JS, Park YM
Pediatr Cardiol 2011 Oct;32(7):1055-6. Epub 2011 Jun 11 doi: 10.1007/s00246-011-0021-x. PMID: 21667183
Lee ML, Peng JW, Tu GJ, Chen SY, Lee JY, Chang SL
Yonsei Med J 2008 Jun 30;49(3):416-21. doi: 10.3349/ymj.2008.49.3.416. PMID: 18581591Free PMC Article

Clinical prediction guides

Poupart S, Navarro-Castellanos I, Raboisson MJ, Lapierre C, Dery J, Miró J, Dahdah N
Pediatr Cardiol 2021 Apr;42(4):814-820. Epub 2021 Jan 19 doi: 10.1007/s00246-021-02545-w. PMID: 33464372
El-Saeidi SA, Hamza HS, Agha HM, Soliman MM, Attia WA, El-Kaffas R, Abdel-Aziz F, Abdel-Aziz O, Shaker S, Esmat A, Ammar R, Fattouh A, Mohi-Eldin K, El-Sisi AM
Cardiol Young 2020 Apr;30(4):482-488. Epub 2020 Feb 19 doi: 10.1017/S1047951120000360. PMID: 32070441
Akiba T, Nakasato M, Suzuki H, Sato S, Sato T
Pediatr Cardiol 2000 Sep-Oct;21(5):448-51. doi: 10.1007/s002460010105. PMID: 10982703
Leblanc MH, Paquet M
Br Heart J 1981 Oct;46(4):363-8. doi: 10.1136/hrt.46.4.363. PMID: 7295431Free PMC Article
Weyman AE, Dillon JC, Feigenbaum H, Chang S
Am J Cardiol 1975 Jul;36(1):21-6. doi: 10.1016/0002-9149(75)90862-0. PMID: 125035

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