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Polyuria

MedGen UID:
19404
Concept ID:
C0032617
Sign or Symptom
Synonym: Polyurias
SNOMED CT: Increased urine output (718402002); Urine output high (718402002); Polyuria (28442001); Passes too much urine (28442001); Polyuric state (56574000)
 
HPO: HP:0000103

Definition

An increased rate of urine production. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Diabetes mellitus type 1
MedGen UID:
41522
Concept ID:
C0011854
Disease or Syndrome
Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D), also designated insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), is a disorder of glucose homeostasis characterized by susceptibility to ketoacidosis in the absence of insulin therapy. It is a genetically heterogeneous autoimmune disease affecting about 0.3% of Caucasian populations (Todd, 1990). Genetic studies of T1D have focused on the identification of loci associated with increased susceptibility to this multifactorial phenotype. The classic phenotype of diabetes mellitus is polydipsia, polyphagia, and polyuria which result from hyperglycemia-induced osmotic diuresis and secondary thirst. These derangements result in long-term complications that affect the eyes, kidneys, nerves, and blood vessels.
Primary hypomagnesemia
MedGen UID:
120640
Concept ID:
C0268448
Disease or Syndrome
Familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis is a progressive renal disorder characterized by excessive urinary Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) excretion. There is progressive loss of kidney function, and in about 50% of cases, the need for renal replacement therapy arises as early as the second decade of life (summary by Muller et al., 2006). Amelogenesis imperfecta may also be present in some patients (Bardet et al., 2016). A similar disorder with renal magnesium wasting, renal failure, and nephrocalcinosis (HOMG5; 248190) is caused by mutations in another tight-junction gene, CLDN19 (610036), and is distinguished by the association of severe ocular involvement. For a discussion of phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of familial hypomagnesemia, see HOMG1 (602014).
Familial hypokalemia-hypomagnesemia
MedGen UID:
75681
Concept ID:
C0268450
Disease or Syndrome
Gitelman syndrome (GTLMNS) is an autosomal recessive renal tubular salt-wasting disorder characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis with hypomagnesemia and hypocalciuria. It is the most common renal tubular disorder among Caucasians (prevalence of 1 in 40,000). Most patients have onset of symptoms as adults, but some present in childhood. Clinical features include transient periods of muscle weakness and tetany, abdominal pains, and chondrocalcinosis (summary by Glaudemans et al., 2012). Gitelman syndrome is sometimes referred to as a mild variant of classic Bartter syndrome (607364). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bartter syndrome, see 607364.
Diabetes insipidus, nephrogenic, X-linked
MedGen UID:
288785
Concept ID:
C1563705
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is characterized by inability to concentrate the urine, which results in polyuria (excessive urine production) and polydipsia (excessive thirst). Affected untreated infants usually have poor feeding and failure to thrive, and rapid onset of severe dehydration with illness, hot environment, or the withholding of water. Short stature and secondary dilatation of the ureters and bladder from the high urine volume is common in untreated individuals.
Diabetes insipidus, nephrogenic, autosomal
MedGen UID:
289643
Concept ID:
C1563706
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is characterized by inability to concentrate the urine, which results in polyuria (excessive urine production) and polydipsia (excessive thirst). Affected untreated infants usually have poor feeding and failure to thrive, and rapid onset of severe dehydration with illness, hot environment, or the withholding of water. Short stature and secondary dilatation of the ureters and bladder from the high urine volume is common in untreated individuals.
Neonatal severe primary hyperparathyroidism
MedGen UID:
331326
Concept ID:
C1832615
Disease or Syndrome
Neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism usually manifests in the first 6 months of life with severe hypercalcemia, bone demineralization, and failure to thrive. Early diagnosis is critical because untreated NSHPT can be a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder, which in some cases is lethal without parathyroidectomy. Some infants have milder hyperparathyroidism and a substantially milder clinical presentation and natural history (summary by Egbuna and Brown, 2008).
Bartter disease type 3
MedGen UID:
335399
Concept ID:
C1846343
Disease or Syndrome
Bartter syndrome refers to a group of disorders that are unified by autosomal recessive transmission of impaired salt reabsorption in the thick ascending loop of Henle with pronounced salt wasting, hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, and hypercalciuria. Clinical disease results from defective renal reabsorption of sodium chloride in the thick ascending limb (TAL) of the Henle loop, where 30% of filtered salt is normally reabsorbed (Simon et al., 1997). Patients with antenatal (or neonatal) forms of Bartter syndrome (e.g., BARTS1, 601678) typically present with premature birth associated with polyhydramnios and low birth weight and may develop life-threatening dehydration in the neonatal period. Patients with classic Bartter syndrome present later in life and may be sporadically asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic (summary by Simon et al., 1996 and Fremont and Chan, 2012). Genetic Heterogeneity of Bartter Syndrome Antenatal Bartter syndrome type 1 (601678) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the butmetanide-sensitive Na-K-2Cl cotransporter NKCC2 (SLC12A1; 600839). Antenatal Bartter syndrome type 2 (241200) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the ATP-sensitive potassium channel ROMK (KCNJ1; 600359). One form of neonatal Bartter syndrome with sensorineural deafness, Bartter syndrome type 4A (602522), is caused by mutation in the BSND gene (606412). Another form of neonatal Bartter syndrome with sensorineural deafness, Bartter syndrome type 4B (613090), is caused by simultaneous mutation in both the CLCNKA (602024) and CLCNKB (602023) genes. Also see autosomal dominant hypocalcemia-1 with Bartter syndrome (601198), which is sometimes referred to as Bartter syndrome type 5 (Fremont and Chan, 2012), caused by mutation in the CASR gene (601199). See Gitelman syndrome (GTLMN; 263800), which is often referred to as a mild variant of Bartter syndrome, caused by mutation in the thiazide-sensitive sodium-chloride cotransporter SLC12A3 (600968).
Senior-Loken syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
337697
Concept ID:
C1846979
Disease or Syndrome
Senior-Loken syndrome-4 (SLSN4) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the association of the cystic renal disorder nephronophthisis with late-onset retinitis pigmentosa (Schuermann et al., 2002). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Senior-Loken syndrome, see 266900.
Senior-loken syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
335569
Concept ID:
C1846980
Disease or Syndrome
Senior-Løken syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the combination of two specific features: a kidney condition called nephronophthisis and an eye condition known as Leber congenital amaurosis.\n\nLeber congenital amaurosis primarily affects the retina, which is the specialized tissue at the back of the eye that detects light and color. This condition causes vision problems, including an increased sensitivity to light (photophobia), involuntary movements of the eyes (nystagmus), and extreme farsightedness (hyperopia). Some people with Senior-Løken syndrome develop the signs of Leber congenital amaurosis within the first few years of life, while others do not develop vision problems until later in childhood.\n\nNephronophthisis causes fluid-filled cysts to develop in the kidneys beginning in childhood. These cysts impair kidney function, initially causing increased urine production (polyuria), excessive thirst (polydipsia), general weakness, and extreme tiredness (fatigue). Nephronophthisis leads to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) later in childhood or in adolescence. ESRD is a life-threatening failure of kidney function that occurs when the kidneys are no longer able to filter fluids and waste products from the body effectively.
Nephronophthisis 4
MedGen UID:
339667
Concept ID:
C1847013
Disease or Syndrome
The nephronophthisis (NPH) phenotype is characterized by reduced renal concentrating ability, chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, cystic renal disease, and progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) before age 30 years. Three age-based clinical subtypes are recognized: infantile, juvenile, and adolescent/adult. Infantile NPH can present in utero with oligohydramnios sequence (limb contractures, pulmonary hypoplasia, and facial dysmorphisms) or postnatally with renal manifestations that progress to ESRD before age 3 years. Juvenile NPH, the most prevalent subtype, typically presents with polydipsia and polyuria, growth retardation, chronic iron-resistant anemia, or other findings related to chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hypertension is typically absent due to salt wasting. ESRD develops at a median age of 13 years. Ultrasound findings are increased echogenicity, reduced corticomedullary differentiation, and renal cysts (in 50% of affected individuals). Histologic findings include tubulointerstitial fibrosis, thickened and disrupted tubular basement membrane, sporadic corticomedullary cysts, and normal or reduced kidney size. Adolescent/adult NPH is clinically similar to juvenile NPH, but ESRD develops at a median age of 19 years. Within a subtype, inter- and intrafamilial variability in rate of progression to ESRD is considerable. Approximately 80%-90% of individuals with the NPH phenotype have no extrarenal features (i.e., they have isolated NPH); ~10%-20% have extrarenal manifestations that constitute a recognizable syndrome (e.g., Joubert syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, Jeune syndrome and related skeletal disorders, Meckel-Gruber syndrome, Senior-Løken syndrome, Leber congenital amaurosis, COACH syndrome, and oculomotor apraxia, Cogan type).
Teratoma, pineal
MedGen UID:
336449
Concept ID:
C1848902
Neoplastic Process
Joubert syndrome with oculorenal defect
MedGen UID:
340930
Concept ID:
C1855675
Disease or Syndrome
Classic Joubert syndrome (JS) is characterized by three primary findings: A distinctive cerebellar and brain stem malformation called the molar tooth sign (MTS). Hypotonia. Developmental delays. Often these findings are accompanied by episodic tachypnea or apnea and/or atypical eye movements. In general, the breathing abnormalities improve with age, truncal ataxia develops over time, and acquisition of gross motor milestones is delayed. Cognitive abilities are variable, ranging from severe intellectual disability to normal. Additional findings can include retinal dystrophy, renal disease, ocular colobomas, occipital encephalocele, hepatic fibrosis, polydactyly, oral hamartomas, and endocrine abnormalities. Both intra- and interfamilial variation are seen.
Nephronophthisis 1
MedGen UID:
343406
Concept ID:
C1855681
Disease or Syndrome
The nephronophthisis (NPH) phenotype is characterized by reduced renal concentrating ability, chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, cystic renal disease, and progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) before age 30 years. Three age-based clinical subtypes are recognized: infantile, juvenile, and adolescent/adult. Infantile NPH can present in utero with oligohydramnios sequence (limb contractures, pulmonary hypoplasia, and facial dysmorphisms) or postnatally with renal manifestations that progress to ESRD before age 3 years. Juvenile NPH, the most prevalent subtype, typically presents with polydipsia and polyuria, growth retardation, chronic iron-resistant anemia, or other findings related to chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hypertension is typically absent due to salt wasting. ESRD develops at a median age of 13 years. Ultrasound findings are increased echogenicity, reduced corticomedullary differentiation, and renal cysts (in 50% of affected individuals). Histologic findings include tubulointerstitial fibrosis, thickened and disrupted tubular basement membrane, sporadic corticomedullary cysts, and normal or reduced kidney size. Adolescent/adult NPH is clinically similar to juvenile NPH, but ESRD develops at a median age of 19 years. Within a subtype, inter- and intrafamilial variability in rate of progression to ESRD is considerable. Approximately 80%-90% of individuals with the NPH phenotype have no extrarenal features (i.e., they have isolated NPH); ~10%-20% have extrarenal manifestations that constitute a recognizable syndrome (e.g., Joubert syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, Jeune syndrome and related skeletal disorders, Meckel-Gruber syndrome, Senior-Løken syndrome, Leber congenital amaurosis, COACH syndrome, and oculomotor apraxia, Cogan type).
Bartter disease type 2
MedGen UID:
343428
Concept ID:
C1855849
Disease or Syndrome
Bartter syndrome refers to a group of disorders that are unified by autosomal recessive transmission of impaired salt reabsorption in the thick ascending loop of Henle with pronounced salt wasting, hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, and hypercalciuria. Clinical disease results from defective renal reabsorption of sodium chloride in the thick ascending limb (TAL) of the Henle loop, where 30% of filtered salt is normally reabsorbed (Simon et al., 1997). Patients with antenatal forms of Bartter syndrome typically present with premature birth associated with polyhydramnios and low birth weight and may develop life-threatening dehydration in the neonatal period. Patients with classic Bartter syndrome (see BARTS3, 607364) present later in life and may be sporadically asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic (summary by Simon et al., 1996 and Fremont and Chan, 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bartter syndrome, see 607364.
Nephronophthisis 3
MedGen UID:
346809
Concept ID:
C1858392
Disease or Syndrome
The nephronophthisis (NPH) phenotype is characterized by reduced renal concentrating ability, chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, cystic renal disease, and progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) before age 30 years. Three age-based clinical subtypes are recognized: infantile, juvenile, and adolescent/adult. Infantile NPH can present in utero with oligohydramnios sequence (limb contractures, pulmonary hypoplasia, and facial dysmorphisms) or postnatally with renal manifestations that progress to ESRD before age 3 years. Juvenile NPH, the most prevalent subtype, typically presents with polydipsia and polyuria, growth retardation, chronic iron-resistant anemia, or other findings related to chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hypertension is typically absent due to salt wasting. ESRD develops at a median age of 13 years. Ultrasound findings are increased echogenicity, reduced corticomedullary differentiation, and renal cysts (in 50% of affected individuals). Histologic findings include tubulointerstitial fibrosis, thickened and disrupted tubular basement membrane, sporadic corticomedullary cysts, and normal or reduced kidney size. Adolescent/adult NPH is clinically similar to juvenile NPH, but ESRD develops at a median age of 19 years. Within a subtype, inter- and intrafamilial variability in rate of progression to ESRD is considerable. Approximately 80%-90% of individuals with the NPH phenotype have no extrarenal features (i.e., they have isolated NPH); ~10%-20% have extrarenal manifestations that constitute a recognizable syndrome (e.g., Joubert syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, Jeune syndrome and related skeletal disorders, Meckel-Gruber syndrome, Senior-Løken syndrome, Leber congenital amaurosis, COACH syndrome, and oculomotor apraxia, Cogan type).
Bartter disease type 4A
MedGen UID:
355430
Concept ID:
C1865270
Disease or Syndrome
Bartter syndrome refers to a group of disorders that are unified by autosomal recessive transmission of impaired salt reabsorption in the thick ascending loop of Henle with pronounced salt wasting, hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, and hypercalciuria. Clinical disease results from defective renal reabsorption of sodium chloride in the thick ascending limb (TAL) of the Henle loop, where 30% of filtered salt is normally reabsorbed (Simon et al., 1997). Patients with antenatal (or neonatal) forms of Bartter syndrome typically present with premature birth associated with polyhydramnios and low birth weight and may develop life-threatening dehydration in the neonatal period. Patients with classic Bartter syndrome (see BARTS3, 607364) present later in life and may be sporadically asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic (summary by Simon et al., 1996 and Fremont and Chan, 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bartter syndrome, see 607364.
Bartter disease type 1
MedGen UID:
355727
Concept ID:
C1866495
Disease or Syndrome
Bartter syndrome refers to a group of disorders that are unified by autosomal recessive transmission of impaired salt reabsorption in the thick ascending loop of Henle with pronounced salt wasting, hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, and hypercalciuria. Clinical disease results from defective renal reabsorption of sodium chloride in the thick ascending limb (TAL) of the Henle loop, where 30% of filtered salt is normally reabsorbed (Simon et al., 1997). Patients with antenatal forms of Bartter syndrome typically present with premature birth associated with polyhydramnios and low birth weight and may develop life-threatening dehydration in the neonatal period. Patients with classic Bartter syndrome (see BARTS3, 607364) present later in life and may be sporadically asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic (summary by Simon et al., 1996 and Fremont and Chan, 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bartter syndrome, see 607364.
EAST syndrome
MedGen UID:
411243
Concept ID:
C2748572
Disease or Syndrome
Syndrome with characteristics of seizures, sensorineural deafness, ataxia, intellectual deficit, and electrolyte imbalance. It has been described in five patients from four families. The disease is caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the KCNJ10 gene, encoding a potassium channel expressed in the brain, spinal cord, inner ear and kidneys. Transmission is autosomal recessive.
Nephropathic cystinosis
MedGen UID:
419735
Concept ID:
C2931187
Disease or Syndrome
Cystinosis comprises three allelic phenotypes: Nephropathic cystinosis in untreated children is characterized by renal Fanconi syndrome, poor growth, hypophosphatemic/calcipenic rickets, impaired glomerular function resulting in complete glomerular failure, and accumulation of cystine in almost all cells, leading to cellular dysfunction with tissue and organ impairment. The typical untreated child has short stature, rickets, and photophobia. Failure to thrive is generally noticed after approximately age six months; signs of renal tubular Fanconi syndrome (polyuria, polydipsia, dehydration, and acidosis) appear as early as age six months; corneal crystals can be present before age one year and are always present after age 16 months. Prior to the use of renal transplantation and cystine-depleting therapy, the life span in nephropathic cystinosis was no longer than ten years. With these interventions, affected individuals can survive at least into the mid-forties or fifties with satisfactory quality of life. Intermediate cystinosis is characterized by all the typical manifestations of nephropathic cystinosis, but onset is at a later age. Renal glomerular failure occurs in all untreated affected individuals, usually between ages 15 and 25 years. The non-nephropathic (ocular) form of cystinosis is characterized clinically only by photophobia resulting from corneal cystine crystal accumulation.
Amelogenesis imperfecta type 1G
MedGen UID:
419162
Concept ID:
C2931783
Disease or Syndrome
Amelogenesis imperfecta and gingival fibromatosis syndrome is an autosomal recessive condition characterized by mild gingival fibromatosis and dental anomalies, including hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta, intrapulpal calcifications, delay of tooth eruption, hypodontia/oligodontia, pericoronal radiolucencies, and unerupted teeth (Martelli-Junior et al., 2008).
Nephronophthisis 11
MedGen UID:
462146
Concept ID:
C3150796
Disease or Syndrome
The nephronophthisis (NPH) phenotype is characterized by reduced renal concentrating ability, chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, cystic renal disease, and progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) before age 30 years. Three age-based clinical subtypes are recognized: infantile, juvenile, and adolescent/adult. Infantile NPH can present in utero with oligohydramnios sequence (limb contractures, pulmonary hypoplasia, and facial dysmorphisms) or postnatally with renal manifestations that progress to ESRD before age 3 years. Juvenile NPH, the most prevalent subtype, typically presents with polydipsia and polyuria, growth retardation, chronic iron-resistant anemia, or other findings related to chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hypertension is typically absent due to salt wasting. ESRD develops at a median age of 13 years. Ultrasound findings are increased echogenicity, reduced corticomedullary differentiation, and renal cysts (in 50% of affected individuals). Histologic findings include tubulointerstitial fibrosis, thickened and disrupted tubular basement membrane, sporadic corticomedullary cysts, and normal or reduced kidney size. Adolescent/adult NPH is clinically similar to juvenile NPH, but ESRD develops at a median age of 19 years. Within a subtype, inter- and intrafamilial variability in rate of progression to ESRD is considerable. Approximately 80%-90% of individuals with the NPH phenotype have no extrarenal features (i.e., they have isolated NPH); ~10%-20% have extrarenal manifestations that constitute a recognizable syndrome (e.g., Joubert syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, Jeune syndrome and related skeletal disorders, Meckel-Gruber syndrome, Senior-Løken syndrome, Leber congenital amaurosis, COACH syndrome, and oculomotor apraxia, Cogan type).
Nephronophthisis 9
MedGen UID:
462538
Concept ID:
C3151188
Disease or Syndrome
The nephronophthisis (NPH) phenotype is characterized by reduced renal concentrating ability, chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, cystic renal disease, and progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) before age 30 years. Three age-based clinical subtypes are recognized: infantile, juvenile, and adolescent/adult. Infantile NPH can present in utero with oligohydramnios sequence (limb contractures, pulmonary hypoplasia, and facial dysmorphisms) or postnatally with renal manifestations that progress to ESRD before age 3 years. Juvenile NPH, the most prevalent subtype, typically presents with polydipsia and polyuria, growth retardation, chronic iron-resistant anemia, or other findings related to chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hypertension is typically absent due to salt wasting. ESRD develops at a median age of 13 years. Ultrasound findings are increased echogenicity, reduced corticomedullary differentiation, and renal cysts (in 50% of affected individuals). Histologic findings include tubulointerstitial fibrosis, thickened and disrupted tubular basement membrane, sporadic corticomedullary cysts, and normal or reduced kidney size. Adolescent/adult NPH is clinically similar to juvenile NPH, but ESRD develops at a median age of 19 years. Within a subtype, inter- and intrafamilial variability in rate of progression to ESRD is considerable. Approximately 80%-90% of individuals with the NPH phenotype have no extrarenal features (i.e., they have isolated NPH); ~10%-20% have extrarenal manifestations that constitute a recognizable syndrome (e.g., Joubert syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, Jeune syndrome and related skeletal disorders, Meckel-Gruber syndrome, Senior-Løken syndrome, Leber congenital amaurosis, COACH syndrome, and oculomotor apraxia, Cogan type).
Hyperuricemia, pulmonary hypertension, renal failure, alkalosis syndrome
MedGen UID:
462559
Concept ID:
C3151209
Disease or Syndrome
HUPRA syndrome is a severe autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by onset in infancy of progressive renal failure leading to electrolyte imbalances, metabolic alkalosis, pulmonary hypertension, hypotonia, and delayed development. Affected individuals are born prematurely (summary by Belostotsky et al., 2011).
Proximal tubulopathy-diabetes mellitus-cerebellar ataxia syndrome
MedGen UID:
463309
Concept ID:
C3151959
Disease or Syndrome
Proximal tubulopathy-diabetes mellitus-cerebellar ataxia syndrome is characterized by onset of proximal tubulopathy in the first year of life, followed by progressive development during childhood of skin anomalies (erythrocyanosis and abnormal pigmentation), blindness, osteoporosis, cerebellar ataxia, mitochondrial myopathy, deafness and diabetes mellitus.
Familial renal glucosuria
MedGen UID:
757652
Concept ID:
C3245525
Disease or Syndrome
Patients with familial renal glucosuria have decreased renal tubular resorption of glucose form the urine in the absence of hyperglycemia and any other signs of tubular dysfunction. Glucosuria in these patients can range from less than 1 to over 150 g/1.73 m(2) per day (Santer and Calado, 2010).
Bardet-Biedl syndrome 17
MedGen UID:
811538
Concept ID:
C3714980
Disease or Syndrome
Bardet-Biedl syndrome-17 (BBS17) is an autosomal recessive ciliopathy characterized by retinitis pigmentosa, cognitive impairment, obesity, renal dysfunction, and hypogenitalism. Polydactyly, most often postaxial, is also a primary feature of BBS; in BBS17, mesoaxial polydactyly, with fused or Y-shaped metacarpals, is a distinct manifestation (Deffert et al., 2007; Schaefer et al., 2014). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bardet-Biedl syndrome, see BBS1 (209900).
Partial lipodystrophy, congenital cataracts, and neurodegeneration syndrome
MedGen UID:
813897
Concept ID:
C3807567
Disease or Syndrome
Lipodystrophies are rare disorders characterized by loss of body fat from various regions and predisposition to metabolic complications of insulin resistance and lipid abnormalities. FPLD7 is an autosomal dominant disorder with a highly variable phenotype. Additional features, including early-onset cataracts and later onset of spasticity of the lower limbs, have been noted in some patients (summary by Garg et al., 2015). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD), see 151660.
Familial hyperaldosteronism type III
MedGen UID:
824604
Concept ID:
C3838758
Disease or Syndrome
Hyperaldosteronism type III (HALD3) is characterized by hypertension secondary to massive adrenal mineralocorticoid production. Like patients with glucocorticoid-remediable aldosteronism (GRA, or HALD1; 103900), patients with HALD3 present with childhood hypertension, elevated aldosteronism levels, and high levels of the hybrid steroids 18-oxocortisol and 18-hydroxycortisol. However, hypertension and aldosteronism in HALD3 are not reversed by administration of exogenous glucocorticoids and patients require adrenalectomy to control hypertension (Geller et al., 2008).
Hypercalcemia, infantile, 1
MedGen UID:
934200
Concept ID:
C4310232
Disease or Syndrome
Infantile hypercalcemia is characterized by severe hypercalcemia, failure to thrive, vomiting, dehydration, and nephrocalcinosis. An epidemic of idiopathic infantile hypercalcemia occurred in the United Kingdom in the 1950s after the implementation of an increased prophylactic dose of vitamin D supplementation; however, the fact that most infants receiving the prophylaxis remained unaffected suggested that an intrinsic hypersensitivity to vitamin D might be implicated in the pathogenesis (summary by Schlingmann et al., 2011). Genetic Heterogeneity Infantile hypercalcemia-2 (HCINF2; 616963) is caused by mutation in the SLC34A1 gene (182309) on chromosome 5q35.
Hypercalcemia, infantile, 2
MedGen UID:
934441
Concept ID:
C4310473
Disease or Syndrome
Infantile hypercalcemia is characterized by severe hypercalcemia with failure to thrive, vomiting, dehydration, and nephrocalcinosis (summary by Schlingmann et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of infantile hypercalcemia, see HCINF1 (143880).
ZTTK syndrome
MedGen UID:
934663
Concept ID:
C4310696
Disease or Syndrome
ZTTK syndrome (ZTTKS) is a severe multisystem developmental disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development and intellectual disability. Affected individuals have characteristic dysmorphic facial features, hypotonia, poor feeding, poor overall growth, and eye or visual abnormalities. Most patients also have musculoskeletal abnormalities, and some have congenital defects of the heart and urogenital system. Brain imaging usually shows developmental abnormalities such as gyral changes, cortical and/or cerebellar atrophy, and thin corpus callosum (summary by Kim et al., 2016).
Bartter disease type 4B
MedGen UID:
934772
Concept ID:
C4310805
Disease or Syndrome
Bartter syndrome refers to a group of disorders that are unified by autosomal recessive transmission of impaired salt reabsorption in the thick ascending loop of Henle with pronounced salt wasting, hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, and hypercalciuria. Clinical disease results from defective renal reabsorption of sodium chloride in the thick ascending limb (TAL) of the Henle loop, where 30% of filtered salt is normally reabsorbed (Simon et al., 1997). Patients with antenatal (or neonatal) forms of Bartter syndrome (e.g., BARTS1, 601678) typically present with premature birth associated with polyhydramnios and low birth weight and may develop life-threatening dehydration in the neonatal period. Patients with classic Bartter syndrome present later in life and may be sporadically asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic (summary by Simon et al., 1996 and Fremont and Chan, 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bartter syndrome, see 607364.
Bartter disease type 5
MedGen UID:
934787
Concept ID:
C4310820
Disease or Syndrome
Antenatal Bartter syndrome is a potentially life-threatening disease characterized by fetal polyuria, polyhydramnios, prematurity, and postnatal polyuria with persistent renal salt wasting. In transient antenatal Bartter syndrome-5, the onset of polyhydramnios and labor occur several weeks earlier than in other forms of Bartter syndrome. Polyuria lasts from a few days to 6 weeks, ending around 30 to 33 weeks of gestational age. Other features in the neonatal period include hypercalciuria, causing nephrocalcinosis in some cases, as well as hyponatremia, hypokalemia, and elevated renin and aldosterone; these subsequently resolve or normalize, although nephrocalcinosis may persist (Laghmani et al., 2016).
HELIX syndrome
MedGen UID:
1621482
Concept ID:
C4522164
Disease or Syndrome
HELIX syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by Hypohidrosis, Electrolyte imbalance, Lacrimal gland dysfunction, Ichthyosis, and Xerostomia (summary by Hadj-Rabia et al., 2018).
Senior-Loken syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1639722
Concept ID:
C4551559
Disease or Syndrome
Leber congenital amaurosis primarily affects the retina, which is the specialized tissue at the back of the eye that detects light and color. This condition causes vision problems, including an increased sensitivity to light (photophobia), involuntary movements of the eyes (nystagmus), and extreme farsightedness (hyperopia). Some people with Senior-Løken syndrome develop the signs of Leber congenital amaurosis within the first few years of life, while others do not develop vision problems until later in childhood.\n\nNephronophthisis causes fluid-filled cysts to develop in the kidneys beginning in childhood. These cysts impair kidney function, initially causing increased urine production (polyuria), excessive thirst (polydipsia), general weakness, and extreme tiredness (fatigue). Nephronophthisis leads to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) later in childhood or in adolescence. ESRD is a life-threatening failure of kidney function that occurs when the kidneys are no longer able to filter fluids and waste products from the body effectively.\n\nSenior-Løken syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the combination of two specific features: a kidney condition called nephronophthisis and an eye condition known as Leber congenital amaurosis.
Tumoral calcinosis, hyperphosphatemic, familial, 3
MedGen UID:
1638917
Concept ID:
C4693864
Disease or Syndrome
Hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis (HFTC) is a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by the progressive deposition of basic calcium phosphate crystals in periarticular spaces, soft tissues, and sometimes bone (Chefetz et al., 2005). The biochemical hallmark of tumoral calcinosis is hyperphosphatemia caused by increased renal absorption of phosphate due to loss-of-function mutations in the FGF23 (605380) or GALNT3 (601756) gene. The term 'hyperostosis-hyperphosphatemia syndrome' (HHS) is sometimes used when the disorder is characterized by involvement of the long bones associated with the radiographic findings of periosteal reaction and cortical hyperostosis. Although some have distinguished HHS from FTC by the presence of bone involvement and the absence of skin involvement (Frishberg et al., 2005), Ichikawa et al. (2010) concluded that the 2 entities represent a continuous spectrum of the same disease, best described as familial hyperphosphatemic tumoral calcinosis. HFTC is considered to be the clinical converse of autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (ADHR; 193100), an allelic disorder caused by gain-of-function mutations in the FGF23 gene and associated with hypophosphatemia and decreased renal phosphate absorption (Chefetz et al., 2005; Ichikawa et al., 2005). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HFTC, see 211900.
Diarrhea 10, protein-losing enteropathy type
MedGen UID:
1648311
Concept ID:
C4748579
Disease or Syndrome
Diarrhea-10 (DIAR10) is a protein-losing enteropathy characterized by intractable secretory diarrhea and massive protein loss due to leaky fenestrated capillaries. Features include early-onset anasarca, severe hypoalbuminemia, hypogammaglobulinemia, and hypertriglyceridemia, as well as electrolyte abnormalities. Some patients exhibit facial dysmorphism and cardiac and renal anomalies. Intrafamilial variability has been observed, and the disease can be severe, with death occurring in infancy in some patients (Broekaert et al., 2018; Kurolap et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of diarrhea, see DIAR1 (214700).
Hypomagnesemia, seizures, and intellectual disability 2
MedGen UID:
1675904
Concept ID:
C5193023
Disease or Syndrome
Hypomagnesemia, seizures, and impaired intellectual development-2 (HOMGSMR2) is characterized by generalized seizures in infancy, severe hypomagnesemia, and renal magnesium wasting. Seizures persist despite magnesium supplementation and are associated with significantly impaired intellectual development (Schlingmann et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of hypomagnesemia, seizures, and impaired intellectual development, see HOMGSMR1 (616418).
Nephronophthisis-like nephropathy 2
MedGen UID:
1794163
Concept ID:
C5561953
Disease or Syndrome
Nephronophthisis-like nephropathy-2 (NPHPL2) is an autosomal recessive cystic kidney disease characterized by onset of progressive renal insufficiency in the first decades of life. Renal imaging and biopsy show corticomedullary cysts, tubular ectasia, tubular basement membrane disruption, and tubulointerstitial infiltrations. Patients eventually progress to end-stage renal failure, necessitating kidney transplantation or dialysis (summary by Hurd et al., 2013). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of nephronophthisis, see NPHP1 (256100).
Hypomagnesemia 7, renal, with or without dilated cardiomyopathy
MedGen UID:
1824039
Concept ID:
C5774266
Disease or Syndrome
Renal hypomagnesemia-7 with or without dilated cardiomyopathy (HOMG7) is characterized primarily by renal salt wasting resulting in hypomagnesemia with secondary effects such as hypokalemia or hypocalcemia. Many patients develop nephrocalcinosis, although renal function is generally well-preserved. The age at onset is highly variable, ranging from infancy to young adulthood. A subset of patients develop severe dilated cardiomyopathy as early as in infancy, which may require heart transplant (Schlingmann et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of hypomagnesemia, see 602014.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Tomkins M, Lawless S, Martin-Grace J, Sherlock M, Thompson CJ
J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2022 Sep 28;107(10):2701-2715. doi: 10.1210/clinem/dgac381. PMID: 35771962Free PMC Article
Christ-Crain M, Winzeler B, Refardt J
J Intern Med 2021 Jul;290(1):73-87. Epub 2021 Mar 13 doi: 10.1111/joim.13261. PMID: 33713498
Refardt J
Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab 2020 Sep;34(5):101398. Epub 2020 Feb 28 doi: 10.1016/j.beem.2020.101398. PMID: 32387127

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Almalki MH, Ahmad MM, Brema I, Almehthel M, AlDahmani KM, Mahzari M, Beshyah SA
Sultan Qaboos Univ Med J 2021 Aug;21(3):354-364. Epub 2021 Aug 29 doi: 10.18295/squmj.4.2021.010. PMID: 34522399Free PMC Article
Mrad FCC, Soares SBM, de Menezes Silva LAW, Dos Anjos Menezes PV, Simões-E-Silva AC
World J Pediatr 2021 Feb;17(1):31-39. Epub 2020 Jun 1 doi: 10.1007/s12519-020-00370-4. PMID: 32488762
Patti G, Ibba A, Morana G, Napoli F, Fava D, di Iorgi N, Maghnie M
Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab 2020 Sep;34(5):101440. Epub 2020 Jun 29 doi: 10.1016/j.beem.2020.101440. PMID: 32646670
Bagga A, Sinha A
Indian J Pediatr 2020 Sep;87(9):733-744. Epub 2020 Jun 26 doi: 10.1007/s12098-020-03318-8. PMID: 32591997
Ziegler R, Neu A
Dtsch Arztebl Int 2018 Mar 2;115(9):146-156. doi: 10.3238/arztebl.2018.0146. PMID: 29563012Free PMC Article

Diagnosis

Tomkins M, Lawless S, Martin-Grace J, Sherlock M, Thompson CJ
J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2022 Sep 28;107(10):2701-2715. doi: 10.1210/clinem/dgac381. PMID: 35771962Free PMC Article
Vaz de Castro PAS, Bitencourt L, de Oliveira Campos JL, Fischer BL, Soares de Brito SBC, Soares BS, Drummond JB, Simões E Silva AC
J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab 2022 Apr 26;35(4):421-434. Epub 2022 Feb 11 doi: 10.1515/jpem-2021-0566. PMID: 35146976
Christ-Crain M, Gaisl O
Presse Med 2021 Dec;50(4):104093. Epub 2021 Oct 27 doi: 10.1016/j.lpm.2021.104093. PMID: 34718110
Refardt J
Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab 2020 Sep;34(5):101398. Epub 2020 Feb 28 doi: 10.1016/j.beem.2020.101398. PMID: 32387127
Dabrowski E, Kadakia R, Zimmerman D
Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab 2016 Mar;30(2):317-28. Epub 2016 Feb 27 doi: 10.1016/j.beem.2016.02.006. PMID: 27156767

Therapy

Refardt J, Atila C, Chifu I, Ferrante E, Erlic Z, Drummond JB, Indirli R, Drexhage RC, Sailer CO, Widmer A, Felder S, Powlson AS, Hutter N, Vogt DR, Gurnell M, Soares BS, Hofland J, Beuschlein F, Fassnacht M, Winzeler B, Christ-Crain M
N Engl J Med 2023 Nov 16;389(20):1877-1887. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa2306263. PMID: 37966286
Ramírez-Guerrero G, Müller-Ortiz H, Pedreros-Rosales C
Rev Clin Esp (Barc) 2022 May;222(5):301-308. Epub 2021 Sep 9 doi: 10.1016/j.rceng.2021.03.003. PMID: 34509418
Christ-Crain M, Gaisl O
Presse Med 2021 Dec;50(4):104093. Epub 2021 Oct 27 doi: 10.1016/j.lpm.2021.104093. PMID: 34718110
Gordon DJ, Emeruwa CJ, Weiss JP
Curr Urol Rep 2019 Nov 9;20(11):75. doi: 10.1007/s11934-019-0940-2. PMID: 31707521
Kavanagh C, Uy NS
Pediatr Clin North Am 2019 Feb;66(1):227-234. doi: 10.1016/j.pcl.2018.09.006. PMID: 30454745

Prognosis

Arora N, Durvasula R
Am J Kidney Dis 2018 Nov;72(5):A17-A19. doi: 10.1053/j.ajkd.2018.07.006. PMID: 30343734
Bockenhauer D, Bichet DG
Curr Opin Pediatr 2017 Apr;29(2):199-205. doi: 10.1097/MOP.0000000000000473. PMID: 28134709
Yu X, Liu R, Wang Y, Wang H, Zhao H, Wu Z
Clin Neurol Neurosurg 2012 Feb;114(2):112-9. Epub 2011 Oct 21 doi: 10.1016/j.clineuro.2011.09.010. PMID: 22018920
Walker RG
Kidney Int Suppl 1993 Jul;42:S93-8. PMID: 8361139
Morin JP, Fillastre JP, Olier B
Chemioterapia 1984 Feb;3(1):33-40. PMID: 6100174

Clinical prediction guides

Almalki MH, Ahmad MM, Brema I, Almehthel M, AlDahmani KM, Mahzari M, Beshyah SA
Sultan Qaboos Univ Med J 2021 Aug;21(3):354-364. Epub 2021 Aug 29 doi: 10.18295/squmj.4.2021.010. PMID: 34522399Free PMC Article
Lakhal K, Hivert A, Alexandre PL, Fresco M, Robert-Edan V, Rodie-Talbere PA, Ambrosi X, Bourcier R, Rozec B, Cadiet J
Neurocrit Care 2021 Dec;35(3):669-679. Epub 2021 Sep 3 doi: 10.1007/s12028-021-01331-z. PMID: 34478028
Mahía J, Bernal A
Handb Clin Neurol 2021;181:275-288. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-12-820683-6.00020-8. PMID: 34238463
Valenti G, Tamma G
G Ital Nefrol 2016 Feb;33 Suppl 66:33.S66.1. PMID: 26913870
Yu X, Liu R, Wang Y, Wang H, Zhao H, Wu Z
Clin Neurol Neurosurg 2012 Feb;114(2):112-9. Epub 2011 Oct 21 doi: 10.1016/j.clineuro.2011.09.010. PMID: 22018920

Recent systematic reviews

Qasba RK, Bucharles ACF, Piccoli MVF, Sharma P, Banga A, Kamaraj B, Nawaz FA, Kumar HJ, Happy MA, Qasba RK, Kogilathota Jagirdhar GS, Essar MY, Garg P, Reddy ST, Rama K, Surani S, Kashyap R
Medicina (Kaunas) 2023 Sep 11;59(9) doi: 10.3390/medicina59091638. PMID: 37763757Free PMC Article
Pasqualotto E, Figueiredo Watanabe JM, Gewehr DM, da Silva Maintinguer R, van de Sande-Lee S, de Araujo GN, Leal FS, Pinheiro CEA
Diabetes Obes Metab 2023 Jul;25(7):1794-1802. Epub 2023 Apr 3 doi: 10.1111/dom.15051. PMID: 36929659
van Durme CM, Wechalekar MD, Landewé RB, Pardo Pardo J, Cyril S, van der Heijde D, Buchbinder R
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2021 Dec 9;12(12):CD010120. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD010120.pub3. PMID: 34882311Free PMC Article
Miranda GHN, Alvarenga MOP, Ferreira MKM, Puty B, Bittencourt LO, Fagundes NCF, Pessan JP, Buzalaf MAR, Lima RR
Sci Rep 2021 Nov 22;11(1):22659. doi: 10.1038/s41598-021-99688-w. PMID: 34811523Free PMC Article
Leone Roberti Maggiore U, Scala C, Venturini PL, Ferrero S
Expert Opin Pharmacother 2013 Jul;14(10):1383-97. Epub 2013 May 6 doi: 10.1517/14656566.2013.796930. PMID: 23641864

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