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Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita(AMC)

MedGen UID:
2455
Concept ID:
C0003886
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
Synonyms: AMC; Congenital arthromyodysplasia; Congenital multiple arthrogryposis; Fibrous ankylosis of multiple joints; Guerin-Stern syndrome; Guérin-Stern syndrome; Myodystrophia fetalis deformans; Otto syndrome; Rocher-Sheldon syndrome; Rossi syndrome
SNOMED CT: Arthrogryposis (111246005); Guerin-Stern syndrome (111246005); Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (111246005); Congenital multiple arthrogryposis (111246005); AMC-Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (111246005)
Modes of inheritance:
Autosomal recessive inheritance
MedGen UID:
141025
Concept ID:
C0441748
Intellectual Product
Source: Orphanet
A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on one of the autosomes (i.e., the human chromosomes 1-22) in which a trait manifests in individuals with two pathogenic alleles, either homozygotes (two copies of the same mutant allele) or compound heterozygotes (whereby each copy of a gene has a distinct mutant allele).
Autosomal dominant inheritance
MedGen UID:
141047
Concept ID:
C0443147
Intellectual Product
Source: Orphanet
A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on one of the autosomes (i.e., the human chromosomes 1-22) in which a trait manifests in heterozygotes. In the context of medical genetics, an autosomal dominant disorder is caused when a single copy of the mutant allele is present. Males and females are affected equally, and can both transmit the disorder with a risk of 50% for each child of inheriting the mutant allele.
X-linked recessive inheritance
MedGen UID:
375779
Concept ID:
C1845977
Finding
Source: Orphanet
A mode of inheritance that is observed for recessive traits related to a gene encoded on the X chromosome. In the context of medical genetics, X-linked recessive disorders manifest in males (who have one copy of the X chromosome and are thus hemizygotes), but generally not in female heterozygotes who have one mutant and one normal allele.
Not genetically inherited
MedGen UID:
988794
Concept ID:
CN307044
Finding
Source: Orphanet
clinical entity without genetic inheritance.
 
HPO: HP:0002804
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0015168
OMIM® Phenotypic series: PS617468
Orphanet: ORPHA1037

Definition

Multiple congenital contractures in different body areas. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVArthrogryposis multiplex congenita
Follow this link to review classifications for Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita in Orphanet.

Conditions with this feature

Glycogen storage disease, type IV
MedGen UID:
6642
Concept ID:
C0017923
Disease or Syndrome
The clinical manifestations of glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV) discussed in this entry span a continuum of different subtypes with variable ages of onset, severity, and clinical features. Clinical findings vary extensively both within and between families. The fatal perinatal neuromuscular subtype presents in utero with fetal akinesia deformation sequence, including decreased fetal movements, polyhydramnios, and fetal hydrops. Death usually occurs in the neonatal period. The congenital neuromuscular subtype presents in the newborn period with profound hypotonia, respiratory distress, and dilated cardiomyopathy. Death usually occurs in early infancy. Infants with the classic (progressive) hepatic subtype may appear normal at birth, but rapidly develop failure to thrive; hepatomegaly, liver dysfunction, and progressive liver cirrhosis; hypotonia; and cardiomyopathy. Without liver transplantation, death from liver failure usually occurs by age five years. Children with the non-progressive hepatic subtype tend to present with hepatomegaly, liver dysfunction, myopathy, and hypotonia; however, they are likely to survive without progression of the liver disease and may not show cardiac, skeletal muscle, or neurologic involvement. The childhood neuromuscular subtype is rare and the course is variable, ranging from onset in the second decade with a mild disease course to a more severe, progressive course resulting in death in the third decade.
Arthrogryposis, distal, type 1A
MedGen UID:
113099
Concept ID:
C0220662
Congenital Abnormality
Distal arthrogryposis type 1 is a disorder characterized by joint deformities (contractures) that restrict movement in the hands and feet. The term "arthrogryposis" comes from the Greek words for joint (arthro-) and crooked or hooked (gryposis). The characteristic features of this condition include permanently bent fingers and toes (camptodactyly), overlapping fingers, and a hand deformity in which all of the fingers are angled outward toward the fifth finger (ulnar deviation). Clubfoot, which is an inward- and upward-turning foot, is also commonly seen with distal arthrogryposis type 1. The specific hand and foot abnormalities vary among affected individuals. However, this condition typically does not cause any signs and symptoms affecting other parts of the body.
Gordon syndrome
MedGen UID:
66314
Concept ID:
C0220666
Disease or Syndrome
DA3, or Gordon syndrome, is distinguished from other distal arthrogryposes by short stature and cleft palate (summary by Bamshad et al., 2009). There are 2 syndromes with features overlapping those of DA3 that are also caused by heterozygous mutation in PIEZO2: distal arthrogryposis type 5 (DA5; 108145) and Marden-Walker syndrome (MWKS; 248700), which are distinguished by the presence of ocular abnormalities and mental retardation, respectively. McMillin et al. (2014) suggested that the 3 disorders may represent variable expressivity of the same condition. For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of distal arthrogryposis, see DA1 (108120).
Cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
66320
Concept ID:
C0220722
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome is an autosomal recessive progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by microcephaly, congenital cataracts, severe mental retardation, facial dysmorphism, and arthrogryposis (summary by Jaakkola et al., 2010). Genetic Heterogeneity of Cerebrooculofacioskeletal Syndrome See also COFS2 (610756), caused by mutation in the ERCC2 gene (126340); COFS3 (616570), caused by mutation in the ERCC5 gene (133530); and COFS4 (610758), caused by mutation in the ERCC1 gene (126380).
Oromandibular-limb hypogenesis spectrum
MedGen UID:
66357
Concept ID:
C0221060
Disease or Syndrome
The most basic description of Moebius syndrome is a congenital facial palsy with impairment of ocular abduction. The facial nerve (cranial nerve VII) and abducens nerve (CN VI) are most frequently involved, but other cranial nerves may be involved as well. Other variable features include orofacial dysmorphism and limb malformations. Mental retardation has been reported in a subset of patients. Most cases of Moebius syndrome are sporadic, but familial occurrence has been reported (Verzijl et al., 2003). The definition of and diagnostic criteria for Moebius syndrome have been controversial and problematic. The syndrome has most frequently been confused with hereditary congenital facial paresis (HCFP; see 601471), which is restricted to involvement of the facial nerve and no other abnormalities. Verzijl et al. (2003) and Verzijl et al. (2005) concluded that HCFP and Moebius syndrome are distinct disorders, and that Moebius syndrome is a complex developmental disorder of the brainstem. Moebius syndrome was defined at the Moebius Syndrome Foundation Research Conference in 2007 as congenital, nonprogressive facial weakness with limited abduction of one or both eyes. Additional features can include hearing loss and other cranial nerve dysfunction, as well as motor, orofacial, musculoskeletal, neurodevelopmental, and social problems (summary by Webb et al., 2012). Kumar (1990) provided a review of Moebius syndrome, which was critiqued by Lipson et al. (1990). Briegel (2006) provided a review of Moebius sequence with special emphasis on neuropsychiatric findings.
Hecht syndrome
MedGen UID:
78540
Concept ID:
C0265226
Disease or Syndrome
The trismus-pseudocamptodactyly syndrome is a distal arthrogryposis characterized by an inability to open the mouth fully (trismus) and pseudocamptodactyly in which wrist dorsiflexion, but not volar flexion, produces involuntary flexion contracture of distal and proximal interphalangeal joints. In these patients, trismus complicates dental care, feeding during infancy, and intubation for anesthesia, and the pseudocamptodactyly impairs manual dexterity, with consequent occupational and social disability (summary by Veugelers et al., 2004).
Autosomal recessive multiple pterygium syndrome
MedGen UID:
82696
Concept ID:
C0265261
Congenital Abnormality
Multiple pterygium syndromes comprise a group of multiple congenital anomaly disorders characterized by webbing (pterygia) of the neck, elbows, and/or knees and joint contractures (arthrogryposis) (Morgan et al., 2006). The multiple pterygium syndromes are phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous but are traditionally divided into prenatally lethal (253290) and nonlethal (Escobar) types.
Metatropic dysplasia
MedGen UID:
82699
Concept ID:
C0265281
Congenital Abnormality
The autosomal dominant TRPV4 disorders (previously considered to be clinically distinct phenotypes before their molecular basis was discovered) are now grouped into neuromuscular disorders and skeletal dysplasias; however, the overlap within each group is considerable. Affected individuals typically have either neuromuscular or skeletal manifestations alone, and in only rare instances an overlap syndrome has been reported. The three autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorders (mildest to most severe) are: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2C. Scapuloperoneal spinal muscular atrophy. Congenital distal spinal muscular atrophy. The autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorders are characterized by a congenital-onset, static, or later-onset progressive peripheral neuropathy with variable combinations of laryngeal dysfunction (i.e., vocal fold paresis), respiratory dysfunction, and joint contractures. The six autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasias (mildest to most severe) are: Familial digital arthropathy-brachydactyly. Autosomal dominant brachyolmia. Spondylometaphyseal dysplasia, Kozlowski type. Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, Maroteaux type. Parastremmatic dysplasia. Metatropic dysplasia. The skeletal dysplasia is characterized by brachydactyly (in all 6); the five that are more severe have short stature that varies from mild to severe with progressive spinal deformity and involvement of the long bones and pelvis. In the mildest of the autosomal dominant TRPV4 disorders life span is normal; in the most severe it is shortened. Bilateral progressive sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) can occur with both autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorders and skeletal dysplasias.
Familial infantile myasthenia
MedGen UID:
140751
Concept ID:
C0393929
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) are a group of inherited disorders affecting the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Patients present clinically with onset of variable muscle weakness between infancy and adulthood. These disorders have been classified according to the location of the defect: presynaptic, synaptic, and postsynaptic. CMS6 is an autosomal recessive CMS resulting from a presynaptic defect; patients have onset of symptoms in infancy or early childhood and tend to have sudden apneic episodes. Treatment with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors may be beneficial (summary by Engel et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMS, see CMS1A (601462).
Adducted thumbs-arthrogryposis syndrome, Christian type
MedGen UID:
98140
Concept ID:
C0431886
Congenital Abnormality
A type of arthrogryposis characterized by congenital cleft palate, microcephaly, craniostenosis and arthrogryposis (limitation of extension of elbows, flexed adducted thumbs, camptodactyly and clubfeet). Additional features include facial dysmorphism ('myopathic' stiff face, antimongoloid slanting, external ophthalmoplegia, telecanthus, low-set large malrotated ears, open mouth, mierogenia and high arched palate). Velopharyngeal insufficiency with difficulties in swallowing, increased secretion of the nose and throat, prominent occiput, generalized muscular hypotonia with mild cyanosis and no spontaneous movements, seizures, torticollis, areflexia, intellectual disability, hypertrichosis of the lower extremities, and scleredema (in the first days of life; see this term) are also observed. The disease often leads to early death. Transmission is autosomal recessive. No new cases have been described since 1983.
Wieacker-Wolff syndrome
MedGen UID:
163227
Concept ID:
C0796200
Disease or Syndrome
Wieacker-Wolff syndrome (WRWF) is a severe X-linked recessive neurodevelopmental disorder affecting the central and peripheral nervous systems. It is characterized by onset of muscle weakness in utero (fetal akinesia), which results in arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) apparent at birth. Affected boys are born with severe contractures, show delayed motor development, facial and bulbar weakness, characteristic dysmorphic facial features, and skeletal abnormalities, such as hip dislocation, scoliosis, and foot deformities. Additional features include global developmental delay with poor or absent speech and impaired intellectual development, feeding difficulties and poor growth, hypotonia, hypogenitalism, and spasticity. Carrier females may be unaffected or have mild features of the disorder (summary by Hirata et al., 2013 and Frints et al., 2019).
Fetal akinesia deformation sequence 1
MedGen UID:
220903
Concept ID:
C1276035
Disease or Syndrome
The fetal akinesia deformation sequence (FADS) refers to a clinically and genetically heterogeneous constellation of features including fetal akinesia, intrauterine growth retardation, arthrogryposis, and developmental anomalies, including lung hypoplasia, cleft palate, and cryptorchidism (Vogt et al., 2009). It shows phenotypic overlap with the lethal form of multiple pterygium syndrome (see 253290). Genetic Heterogeneity of Fetal Akinesia Deformation Sequence FADS2 (618388) is caused by mutation in the RAPSN gene (601592), FADS3 (618389) is caused by mutation in the DOK7 gene (618389), and FADS4 (618393) is caused by mutation in the NUP88 gene (602552). As mutations in the MUSK, RAPSN, and DOK7 genes have been associated with congenital myasthenic syndromes (see, e.g., CMS1A, 601462), the disorders in these patients likely represent extreme phenotypes of CMS (Vogt et al., 2009).
ALG3-congenital disorder of glycosylation
MedGen UID:
322026
Concept ID:
C1832736
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) are a genetically heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders caused by enzymatic defects in the synthesis and processing of asparagine (N)-linked glycans or oligosaccharides on glycoproteins. Type I CDGs comprise defects in the assembly of the dolichol lipid-linked oligosaccharide (LLO) chain and its transfer to the nascent protein. These disorders can be identified by a characteristic abnormal isoelectric focusing profile of plasma transferrin (Leroy, 2006). CDG1D is a type I CDG that generally presents with severe neurologic involvement associated with dysmorphism and visual impairment. Liver involvement is sometimes present (summary by Marques-da-Silva et al., 2017). For a discussion of the classification of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065).
Neuropathy, congenital, with arthrogryposis multiplex
MedGen UID:
320286
Concept ID:
C1834206
Disease or Syndrome
PCWH syndrome
MedGen UID:
373160
Concept ID:
C1836727
Disease or Syndrome
PCWH syndrome is a complex neurocristopathy that includes features of 4 distinct syndromes: peripheral demyelinating neuropathy (see 118200), central dysmyelination, Waardenburg syndrome, and Hirschsprung disease (see 142623) (Inoue et al., 2004). Inoue et al. (2004) proposed the acronym PCWH for this disorder.
Congenital myasthenic syndrome 4C
MedGen UID:
373251
Concept ID:
C1837091
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myasthenic syndrome associated with AChR deficiency is a disorder of the postsynaptic neuromuscular junction (NMJ) clinically characterized by early-onset muscle weakness with variable severity. Electrophysiologic studies show low amplitude of the miniature endplate potential (MEPP) and current (MEPC) resulting from deficiency of AChR at the endplate. Patients with mutations in the CHRNE gene may have compensatory increased expression of the fetal subunit CHRNG (100730) and may respond to treatment with cholinergic agents, pyridostigmine, or amifampridine (summary by Engel et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMS, see CMS1A (601462).
Autosomal dominant congenital benign spinal muscular atrophy
MedGen UID:
373984
Concept ID:
C1838492
Disease or Syndrome
The autosomal dominant TRPV4 disorders (previously considered to be clinically distinct phenotypes before their molecular basis was discovered) are now grouped into neuromuscular disorders and skeletal dysplasias; however, the overlap within each group is considerable. Affected individuals typically have either neuromuscular or skeletal manifestations alone, and in only rare instances an overlap syndrome has been reported. The three autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorders (mildest to most severe) are: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2C. Scapuloperoneal spinal muscular atrophy. Congenital distal spinal muscular atrophy. The autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorders are characterized by a congenital-onset, static, or later-onset progressive peripheral neuropathy with variable combinations of laryngeal dysfunction (i.e., vocal fold paresis), respiratory dysfunction, and joint contractures. The six autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasias (mildest to most severe) are: Familial digital arthropathy-brachydactyly. Autosomal dominant brachyolmia. Spondylometaphyseal dysplasia, Kozlowski type. Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, Maroteaux type. Parastremmatic dysplasia. Metatropic dysplasia. The skeletal dysplasia is characterized by brachydactyly (in all 6); the five that are more severe have short stature that varies from mild to severe with progressive spinal deformity and involvement of the long bones and pelvis. In the mildest of the autosomal dominant TRPV4 disorders life span is normal; in the most severe it is shortened. Bilateral progressive sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) can occur with both autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorders and skeletal dysplasias.
Gaucher disease perinatal lethal
MedGen UID:
374996
Concept ID:
C1842704
Disease or Syndrome
Gaucher disease (GD) encompasses a continuum of clinical findings from a perinatal lethal disorder to an asymptomatic type. The identification of three major clinical types (1, 2, and 3) and two other subtypes (perinatal-lethal and cardiovascular) is useful in determining prognosis and management. GD type 1 is characterized by the presence of clinical or radiographic evidence of bone disease (osteopenia, focal lytic or sclerotic lesions, and osteonecrosis), hepatosplenomegaly, anemia and thrombocytopenia, lung disease, and the absence of primary central nervous system disease. GD types 2 and 3 are characterized by the presence of primary neurologic disease; in the past, they were distinguished by age of onset and rate of disease progression, but these distinctions are not absolute. Disease with onset before age two years, limited psychomotor development, and a rapidly progressive course with death by age two to four years is classified as GD type 2. Individuals with GD type 3 may have onset before age two years, but often have a more slowly progressive course, with survival into the third or fourth decade. The perinatal-lethal form is associated with ichthyosiform or collodion skin abnormalities or with nonimmune hydrops fetalis. The cardiovascular form is characterized by calcification of the aortic and mitral valves, mild splenomegaly, corneal opacities, and supranuclear ophthalmoplegia. Cardiopulmonary complications have been described with all the clinical subtypes, although varying in frequency and severity.
Lethal congenital contracture syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
334413
Concept ID:
C1843478
Disease or Syndrome
Lethal congenital contracture syndrome-2 (LCCS2) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe multiple congenital contractures with muscle wasting and atrophy. Micrognathia and other craniofacial anomalies, including cleft palate, as well as cardiac defects and enlarged urinary bladder at birth have also been reported. Hydrops fetalis and multiple pterygia are absent. Most patients have died in the neonatal period, although 2 survived to early adolescence (Landau et al., 2003). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of LCCS, see LCCS1 (253310).
Infantile-onset X-linked spinal muscular atrophy
MedGen UID:
337123
Concept ID:
C1844934
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked infantile spinal muscular atrophy (XL-SMA) is characterized by congenital hypotonia, areflexia, and evidence of degeneration and loss of anterior horn cells (i.e., lower motor neurons) in the spinal cord and brain stem. Often congenital contractures and/or fractures are present. Intellect is normal. Life span is significantly shortened because of progressive ventilatory insufficiency resulting from chest muscle involvement.
Arthrogryposis, congenital, lower limb, X-linked
MedGen UID:
339477
Concept ID:
C1846273
Disease or Syndrome
Bartsocas-Papas syndrome
MedGen UID:
337894
Concept ID:
C1849718
Disease or Syndrome
Bartsocas-Papas syndrome-1 (BPS1) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by multiple popliteal pterygia, ankyloblepharon, filiform bands between the jaws, cleft lip and palate, and syndactyly. Early lethality is common, although survival into childhood and beyond has been reported (summary by Mitchell et al., 2012). Genetic Heterogeneity of Bartsocas-Papas Syndrome Bartsocas-Papas syndrome-2 (BPS2) is caused by mutation in the CHUK gene (600664). A less severe form of popliteal pterygium syndrome (PPS; 119500) is caused by mutation in the IRF6 gene (607199).
Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy 3
MedGen UID:
342403
Concept ID:
C1850053
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive hypomyelinating leukodystrophy-3 (HLD3) is a severe neurologic disorder characterized by early infantile onset of global developmental delay, lack of development, lack of speech acquisition, and peripheral spasticity associated with decreased myelination in the central nervous system (summary by Feinstein et al., 2010). The disorder is phenotypically similar to X-linked Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD; 312080), which is caused by mutation in the PLP1 gene (300401). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HLD, see 312080.
Lethal osteosclerotic bone dysplasia
MedGen UID:
342416
Concept ID:
C1850106
Disease or Syndrome
Raine syndrome (RNS) is a neonatal osteosclerotic bone dysplasia of early and aggressive onset that usually results in death within the first few weeks of life, although there have been some reports of survival into childhood. Radiographic studies show a generalized increase in the density of all bones and a marked increase in the ossification of the skull. The increased ossification of the basal structures of the skull and facial bones underlies the characteristic facial features, which include narrow prominent forehead, proptosis, depressed nasal bridge, and midface hypoplasia. Periosteal bone formation is also characteristic of this disorder and differentiates it from osteopetrosis and other known lethal and nonlethal osteosclerotic bone dysplasias. The periosteal bone formation typically extends along the diaphysis of long bones adjacent to areas of cellular soft tissue (summary by Simpson et al., 2009). Some patients survive infancy (Simpson et al., 2009; Fradin et al., 2011).
Nemaline myopathy 2
MedGen UID:
342534
Concept ID:
C1850569
Disease or Syndrome
Nemaline myopathy-2 (NEM2) is an autosomal recessive skeletal muscle disorder with a wide range of severity. The most common clinical presentation is early-onset (in infancy or childhood) muscle weakness predominantly affecting proximal limb muscles. Muscle biopsy shows accumulation of Z-disc and thin filament proteins into aggregates named 'nemaline bodies' or 'nemaline rods,' usually accompanied by disorganization of the muscle Z discs. The clinical and histologic spectrum of entities caused by variants in the NEB gene is a continuum, ranging in severity. The distribution of weakness can vary from generalized muscle weakness, more pronounced in proximal limb muscles, to distal-only involvement, although neck flexor weakness appears to be rather consistent. Histologic patterns range from a severe usually nondystrophic disturbance of the myofibrillar pattern to an almost normal pattern, with or without nemaline bodies, sometimes combined with cores (summary by Lehtokari et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of nemaline myopathy, see NEM3 (161800). Mutations in the NEB gene are the most common cause of nemaline myopathy (Lehtokari et al., 2006).
Cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
342008
Concept ID:
C1851443
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome is a severe, progressive neurologic disorder characterized by prenatal onset of arthrogryposis, microcephaly, and growth failure. Postnatal features include severe developmental delay, congenital cataracts (in some), and marked UV sensitivity of the skin. Survival beyond 6 years of age is rare. COFS represents the severe end of the spectrum of disorders caused by mutations in nucleotide excision repair (NER) genes, with Cockayne syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum being milder NER-related phenotypes (summary by Drury et al., 2014). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome, see COFS1 (214150).
Cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
342798
Concept ID:
C1853100
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome-4 is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by growth retardation, dysmorphic facial features, arthrogryposis, and neurologic abnormalities. Cellular studies show a defect in both transcription-coupled and global genome nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER and GG-NER) (summary by Jaspers et al., 2007 and Kashiyama et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome, see 214150.
Noonan syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
344290
Concept ID:
C1854469
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population.
Lethal congenital contracture syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
344338
Concept ID:
C1854664
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive lethal congenital contracture syndrome (LCCS) is the most severe, neonatally lethal, form of arthrogryposis (see 108120), a disorder characterized by congenital nonprogressive joint contractures. The contractures can involve the upper or lower limbs and/or the vertebral column, leading to various degrees of flexion or extension limitations evident at birth (summary by Markus et al., 2012). Genetic Heterogeneity of Lethal Congenital Contracture Syndrome See also lethal congenital contracture syndrome-2 (LCCS2; 607598), caused by mutation in the ERBB3 gene (190151); LCCS3 (611369), caused by mutation in the PIP5K1C gene (606102); LCCS4 (614915), caused by mutation in the MYBPC1 gene (160794); LCCS5 (615368), caused by mutation in the DNM2 gene (602378); LCCS6 (616248), caused by mutation in the ZBTB42 gene (613915); LCCS7 (616286), caused by mutation in the CNTNAP1 gene (602346); LCCS8 (616287), caused by mutation in the ADCY6 gene (600294); LCCS9 (616503), caused by mutation in the ADGRG6 gene (612243); LCCS10 (617022), caused by mutation in the NEK9 gene (609798); and LCCS11 (617194), caused by mutation in the GLDN gene (608603).
Multinucleated neurons-anhydramnios-renal dysplasia-cerebellar hypoplasia-hydranencephaly syndrome
MedGen UID:
343465
Concept ID:
C1856053
Disease or Syndrome
MARCH is an autosomal recessive lethal congenital disorder characterized by severe hydranencephaly with almost complete absence of the cerebral hemispheres, which are replaced by fluid, relative preservation of the posterior fossa structures, and renal dysplasia or agenesis. Affected fetuses either die in utero or shortly after birth, and show arthrogryposis and features consistent with anhydramnios. Histologic examination of residual brain tissue shows multinucleated neurons resulting from impaired cytokinesis (summary by Frosk et al., 2017).
Multiple pterygium-malignant hyperthermia syndrome
MedGen UID:
347490
Concept ID:
C1857576
Disease or Syndrome
An extremely rare arthrogryposis syndrome, described in only two pairs of siblings from two unrelated families to date, and characterized by the association of arthrogryposis, congenital torticollis, dysmorphic facial features (i.e. asymmetry of the face, myopathic facial movements, ptosis, posteriorly rotated ears, cleft palate), progressive scoliosis and episodes of malignant hyperthermia. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1988.
Cataract-microcephaly-failure to thrive-kyphoscoliosis
MedGen UID:
347121
Concept ID:
C1859312
Disease or Syndrome
Arthrogryposis-hyperkeratosis syndrome, lethal form
MedGen UID:
349230
Concept ID:
C1859710
Disease or Syndrome
An arthrogryposis syndrome described in two siblings to date with the association of multiple congenital joint contractures (of the large joints, fingers and toes) and hyperkeratosis (i.e. thick, scaling and fissured skin) and death occurring in early infancy. There have been no further reports in the literature since 1993.
Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita-whistling face syndrome
MedGen UID:
349231
Concept ID:
C1859711
Disease or Syndrome
An extremely rare type of arthrogryposis multiplex congenita with the combination of multiple joint contractures with movement limitation and microstomia with a whistling appearance of the mouth that may cause feeding, swallowing and speech difficulties, a distinctive expressionless facies, severe developmental delay, central and autonomous nervous system dysfunction, occasionally Pierre-Robin sequence and lethality generally occurring during the first months of life.
Arthrogryposis, renal dysfunction, and cholestasis 1
MedGen UID:
347219
Concept ID:
C1859722
Disease or Syndrome
Any arthrogryposis-renal dysfunction-cholestasis syndrome in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the VPS33B gene.
Arthrogryposis, distal, with intellectual disability and characteristic facies
MedGen UID:
347220
Concept ID:
C1859723
Disease or Syndrome
Distal arthrogryposis type 10
MedGen UID:
349990
Concept ID:
C1861238
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic distal arthrogryposis syndrome with characteristics of plantar flexion contractures typically presenting with toe-walking in infancy, variably associated with milder contractures of the hip, elbow, wrist and finger joints. No ocular or neurological abnormalities are associated and serum creatine phosphokinase levels are normal.
Arthrogryposis-like hand anomaly-sensorineural deafness syndrome
MedGen UID:
350677
Concept ID:
C1862471
Disease or Syndrome
Distal arthrogryposis type 6 (DA6) is distinguished by the additional feature of sensorineural deafness (summary by Bamshad et al., 2009). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of distal arthrogryposis, see DA1 (108120).
Arthrogryposis- oculomotor limitation-electroretinal anomalies syndrome
MedGen UID:
350678
Concept ID:
C1862472
Disease or Syndrome
Distal arthrogryposis type 5 is distinguished from other forms of DA by the presence of ocular abnormalities, typically ptosis, ophthalmoplegia, and/or strabismus, in addition to contractures of the skeletal muscles. Some cases have been reported to have pulmonary hypertension as a result of restrictive lung disease (summary by Bamshad et al., 2009). There are 2 syndromes with features overlapping those of DA5 that are also caused by heterozygous mutation in PIEZO2: distal arthrogryposis type 3 (DA3, or Gordon syndrome; 114300) and Marden-Walker syndrome (MWKS; 248700), which are distinguished by the presence of cleft palate and mental retardation, respectively. McMillin et al. (2014) suggested that the 3 disorders might represent variable expressivity of the same condition. For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of distal arthrogryposis, see DA1A (108120). Genetic Heterogeneity of Distal Arthrogryposis 5 A subtype of DA5 due to mutation in the ECEL1 gene (605896) on chromosome 2q36 has been designated DA5D (615065). See NOMENCLATURE.
Pelvic dysplasia-arthrogryposis of lower limbs syndrome
MedGen UID:
400731
Concept ID:
C1865294
Disease or Syndrome
Pelvic dysplasia-arthrogryposis of lower limbs syndrome is a rare, genetic, dysostosis syndrome characterized by intrauterine growth restriction, short stature (with short lower segment), lower limb joint contractures and muscular hypotrophy, narrow, small pelvis, lumbar hyperlordosis with scoliosis, and foot deformity (short, overlapping toes). Imaging reveals ovoid/wedge-shaped vertebral bodies, pelvic and skeletal hypoplasia with metatarsal fusion in the lower limbs, and normal skull and upper limbs.
Desmosterolosis
MedGen UID:
400801
Concept ID:
C1865596
Disease or Syndrome
Desmosterolosis is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies and elevated levels of the cholesterol precursor desmosterol in plasma, tissue, and cultured cells (summary by Waterham et al., 2001).
Spondylospinal thoracic dysostosis
MedGen UID:
400937
Concept ID:
C1866184
Disease or Syndrome
Spondylospinal thoracic dysostosis is an extremely rare skeletal disorder characterized bya short, curved spine and fusion of the spinous processes, short thorax with 'crab-like' configuration of the ribs, underdevelopment of the lungs (pulmonary hypoplasia), severe arthrogryposis and multiple pterygia (webbing of the skin across joints), and underdevelopment of the bones of the mouth.This condition is believed to be inherited in an autosomal recessive manner.It does notappear to be compatible with life.
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, musculocontractural type
MedGen UID:
356497
Concept ID:
C1866294
Disease or Syndrome
The Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are a group of heritable connective tissue disorders that share the common features of skin hyperextensibility, articular hypermobility, and tissue fragility (Beighton et al., 1998). The major characteristics of the musculocontractural form of EDS include distinctive craniofacial dysmorphism, congenital contractures of thumbs and fingers, clubfeet, severe kyphoscoliosis, muscular hypotonia, hyperextensible thin skin with easy bruisability and atrophic scarring, wrinkled palms, joint hypermobility, and ocular involvement (summary by Malfait et al., 2010). Janecke et al. (2015) reviewed the clinical findings in 34 reported EDSMC patients, 31 with CHST14 mutations and 3 with DSE (605942) mutations (see 615539), and stated that the disorder can be recognized based on the presence of distal arthrogryposis, including adducted thumbs or clenched fists and talipes equinovarus, as well as hands with atypically shallow palmar creases and tapering fingers, and neonatal muscular hypotonia. Characteristic craniofacial features include brachycephaly, large fontanel, hypertelorism, downslanting palpebral fissures, microcorneae, strabismus, prominent nasolabial folds, short philtrum, thin upper lip, small mouth, high palate, microretrognathia, and prominent and often low-set and posteriorly rotated ears. In addition, EDSMC patients show muscular hypoplasia and weakness, which has been confirmed by ultrasound and electromyography, and intellectual development appears to be normal. Genetic Heterogeneity of Musculocontractural Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Ehlers-Danlos syndrome musculocontractural type 2 (EDSMC2; 615539) is caused by mutation in the DSE gene (605942) on chromosome 6q22.
Tricho-oculo-dermo-vertebral syndrome
MedGen UID:
355714
Concept ID:
C1866427
Disease or Syndrome
Contractures, pterygia, and spondylocarpotarsal fusion syndrome 1A
MedGen UID:
401232
Concept ID:
C1867440
Disease or Syndrome
Contractures, pterygia, and spondylocarpotarsal fusion syndrome-1A (CPSFS1) is characterized by contractures of proximal and distal joints, pterygia involving the neck, axillae, elbows, and/or knees, as well as variable vertebral, carpal, and tarsal fusions and short stature. Progression of vertebral fusions has been observed, and inter- and intrafamilial variability has been reported (Carapito et al., 2016; Zieba et al., 2017; Cameron-Christie et al., 2018). An autosomal recessive form of CPSFS (CPSFS1B; 618469) is caused by compound heterozygous mutation in the MYH3 gene.
Lethal congenital contracture syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
369555
Concept ID:
C1969655
Disease or Syndrome
Identified in Israeli Bedouin kindred the phenotype is similar to that of Lethal congenital contracture syndrome type 2 but without distended bladder. Affected individuals are born with severe multiple joint contractures with severe muscle wasting and atrophy, mainly in the legs.
Mucolipidosis type II
MedGen UID:
435914
Concept ID:
C2673377
Disease or Syndrome
GNPTAB-related disorders comprise the phenotypes mucolipidosis II (ML II) and mucolipidosis IIIa/ß (ML IIIa/ß), and phenotypes intermediate between ML II and ML IIIa/ß. ML II is evident at birth and slowly progressive; death most often occurs in early childhood. Orthopedic abnormalities present at birth may include thoracic deformity, kyphosis, clubfeet, deformed long bones, and/or dislocation of the hip(s). Growth often ceases in the second year of life; contractures develop in all large joints. The skin is thickened, facial features are coarse, and gingiva are hypertrophic. All children have cardiac involvement, most commonly thickening and insufficiency of the mitral valve and, less frequently, the aortic valve. Progressive mucosal thickening narrows the airways, and gradual stiffening of the thoracic cage contributes to respiratory insufficiency, the most common cause of death. ML IIIa/ß becomes evident at about age three years with slow growth rate and short stature; joint stiffness and pain initially in the shoulders, hips, and fingers; gradual mild coarsening of facial features; and normal to mildly impaired cognitive development. Pain from osteoporosis becomes more severe during adolescence. Cardiorespiratory complications (restrictive lung disease, thickening and insufficiency of the mitral and aortic valves, left and/or right ventricular hypertrophy) are common causes of death, typically in early to middle adulthood. Phenotypes intermediate between ML II and ML IIIa/ß are characterized by physical growth in infancy that resembles that of ML II and neuromotor and speech development that resemble that of ML IIIa/ß.
Arthrogryposis, renal dysfunction, and cholestasis 2
MedGen UID:
462022
Concept ID:
C3150672
Disease or Syndrome
Arthrogryposis, renal dysfunction, and cholestasis-2 (ARCS2) is a multisystem disorder associated with abnormalities in polarized liver and kidney cells (Qiu et al., 2019). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of ARCS, see ARCS1 (208085).
Arthrogryposis, Perthes disease, and upward gaze palsy
MedGen UID:
481939
Concept ID:
C3280309
Disease or Syndrome
Arthrogryposis, distal, type 1B
MedGen UID:
482156
Concept ID:
C3280526
Disease or Syndrome
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 8
MedGen UID:
767123
Concept ID:
C3554209
Disease or Syndrome
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 8 is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe psychomotor retardation, abnormal movements, hypotonia, spasticity, and variable visual defects. Brain MRI shows pontocerebellar hypoplasia, decreased cerebral white matter, and a thin corpus callosum (summary by Mochida et al., 2012). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PCH, see PCH1 (607596).
Microcephalic primordial dwarfism due to ZNF335 deficiency
MedGen UID:
767413
Concept ID:
C3554499
Disease or Syndrome
Primary microcephaly-10 (MCPH10) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by extremely small head size (-9 SD) at birth and death usually by 1 year of age. Neuropathologic examination shows severe loss of neurons as well as neuronal loss of polarity and abnormal dendritic maturation (summary by Yang et al., 2012). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of primary microcephaly, see MCPH1 (251200).
Actin accumulation myopathy
MedGen UID:
777997
Concept ID:
C3711389
Disease or Syndrome
Nemaline myopathy is a form of congenital myopathy characterized by abnormal thread- or rod-like structures in muscle fibers on histologic examination ('nema' is Greek for 'thread'). The clinical phenotype is highly variable, with differing age at onset and severity. Muscle weakness typically involves proximal muscles, with involvement of the facial, bulbar, and respiratory muscles (Ilkovski et al., 2001). Attempts at classification of nemaline myopathies into clinical subtypes have been complicated by the overlap of clinical features and a continuous phenotypic spectrum of disease (North et al., 1997; Wallgren-Pettersson et al., 1999; Ryan et al., 2001; Sanoudou and Beggs, 2001). In general, 2 clinical groups can be readily distinguished: 'typical' and 'severe.' Typical nemaline myopathy is the most common form, presenting as infantile hypotonia and muscle weakness. It is slowly progressive or nonprogressive, and most adults achieve ambulation. The severe form of the disorder is characterized by absence of spontaneous movement or respiration at birth, arthrogryposis, and death in the first months of life. Much less commonly, late-childhood or even adult-onset can occur. However, adult-onset nemaline myopathy is usually not familial and may represent a different disease (Wallgren-Pettersson et al., 1999; Sanoudou and Beggs, 2001). Myopathy caused by mutations in the ACTA1 gene can show a range of clinical and pathologic phenotypes. Some patients have classic rods, whereas others may also show intranuclear rods, clumped filaments, cores, or fiber-type disproportion (see 255310), all of which are nonspecific pathologic findings and not pathognomonic of a specific congenital myopathy. The spectrum of clinical phenotypes caused by mutations in ACTA1 may result from different mutations, modifying factors affecting the severity of the disorder, variability in clinical care, or a combination of these factors (Nowak et al., 1999; Kaindl et al., 2004). Genetic Heterogeneity of Nemaline Myopathy See also NEM1 (609284), caused by mutation in the tropomyosin-3 gene (TPM3; 191030) on chromosome 1q22; NEM2 (256030), caused by mutation in the nebulin gene (NEB; 161650) on chromosome 2q23; NEM4 (609285), caused by mutation in the beta-tropomyosin gene (TPM2; 190990) on chromosome 9p13; NEM5 (605355), also known as Amish nemaline myopathy, caused by mutation in the troponin T1 gene (TNNT1; 191041) on chromosome 19q13; NEM6 (609273), caused by mutation in the KBTBD13 gene (613727) on chromosome 15q22; NEM7 (610687), caused by mutation in the cofilin-2 gene (CFL2; 601443) on chromosome 14q13; NEM8 (615348), caused by mutation in the KLHL40 gene (615340), on chromosome 3p22; NEM9 (615731), caused by mutation in the KLHL41 gene (607701) on chromosome 2q31; NEM10 (616165), caused by mutation in the LMOD3 gene (616112) on chromosome 3p14; and NEM11 (617336), caused by mutation in the MYPN gene (608517) on chromosome 10q21. Several of the genes encode components of skeletal muscle sarcomeric thin filaments (Sanoudou and Beggs, 2001). Mutations in the NEB gene are the most common cause of nemaline myopathy (Lehtokari et al., 2006).
Complex cortical dysplasia with other brain malformations 2
MedGen UID:
815343
Concept ID:
C3809013
Disease or Syndrome
Any complex cortical dysplasia with other brain malformations in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the KIF5C gene.
Multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
815495
Concept ID:
C3809165
Disease or Syndrome
MMDS3 is an autosomal recessive severe neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of previously acquired developmental milestones in the first months or years of life. Some affected patients have normal development in early infancy before the onset of symptoms, whereas others show delays from birth. Features included loss of motor function, spasticity, pyramidal signs, loss of speech, and cognitive impairment. The disease course is highly variable: some patients die of respiratory failure early in childhood, whereas some survive but may be bedridden with a feeding tube. Less commonly, some patients may survive and have a stable course with motor deficits and mild or even absent cognitive impairment, although there may be fluctuating symptoms, often in response to infection. Other variable features include visual problems and seizures. Brain imaging shows diffuse leukodystrophy in the subcortical region, brainstem, cerebellum, and spinal cord. Laboratory studies tend to show increased lactate and CSF glycine, and decreased activity of mitochondrial complexes I and II, although these findings are also variable. There may be additional biochemical evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction (summary by Liu et al., 2018). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome, see MMDS1 (605711).
Schaaf-Yang syndrome
MedGen UID:
816207
Concept ID:
C3809877
Disease or Syndrome
Schaaf-Yang syndrome (SYS) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder that shares multiple clinical features with the genetically related Prader-Willi syndrome. It usually manifests at birth with muscular hypotonia in all and distal joint contractures in a majority of affected individuals. Gastrointestinal/feeding problems are particularly pronounced in infancy and childhood, but can transition to hyperphagia and obesity in adulthood. Respiratory distress is present in many individuals at birth, with approximately half requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation, and approximately 20% requiring tracheostomy. Skeletal manifestations such as joint contractures, scoliosis, and decreased bone mineral density are frequently observed. All affected individuals show developmental delay, resulting in intellectual disability of variable degree, from low-normal intelligence to severe intellectual disability. Other findings may include short stature, seizures, eye anomalies, and hypogonadism.
Autism spectrum disorder - epilepsy - arthrogryposis syndrome
MedGen UID:
816240
Concept ID:
C3809910
Disease or Syndrome
Arthrogryposis, impaired intellectual development, and seizures (AMRS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by skeletal abnormalities, including arthrogryposis, short limbs, and vertebral malformations, impaired intellectual development, and seizures consistent with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy in some patients. Other features may include cleft palate, micrognathia, posterior embryotoxon, talipes valgus, rocker-bottom feet, and dysmorphic facies (Edmondson et al., 2017; Marini et al., 2017).
Nemaline myopathy 9
MedGen UID:
816714
Concept ID:
C3810384
Disease or Syndrome
Nemaline myopathy-9 is an autosomal recessive muscle disorder characterized by onset of muscle weakness in early infancy. The phenotype is highly variable, ranging from death in infancy due to lack of antigravity movements, to slowly progressive distal muscle weakness with preserved ambulation later in childhood. Muscle biopsy shows typical rod-like structure in myofibers (summary by Gupta et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of nemaline myopathy, see 161800.
German syndrome
MedGen UID:
854357
Concept ID:
C3887495
Disease or Syndrome
German syndrome is an autosomal recessive arthrogryposis syndrome, described in 5 cases. Three of the four known families with affected children were Ashkenazi Jews. German syndrome is characterized by arthrogryposis, hypotonia-hypokinesia sequence, and lymphedema. Patients present distinct craniofacial appearance (tall forehead and carp shaped mouth, cleft palate), contractures, and severe hypotonia manifesting as motor delay and swallowing difficulties. The disease has a severe morbidity and mortality rate and survivors present a small stature, hypotonia, frequent upper respiratory infections and psychomotor delay. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1987.
Autism spectrum disorder due to AUTS2 deficiency
MedGen UID:
862872
Concept ID:
C4014435
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
A rare genetic syndromic intellectual disability characterized by global developmental delay and borderline to severe intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder with obsessive behavior, stereotypies, hyperactivity but frequently friendly and affable personality, feeding difficulties, short stature, muscular hypotonia, microcephaly, characteristic dysmorphic features (hypertelorism, high arched eyebrows, ptosis, deep and/or broad nasal bridge, broad/prominent nasal tip, short and/or upturned philtrum, narrow mouth, and micrognathia), and skeletal anomalies (kyphosis and/or scoliosis, arthrogryposis, slender habitus and extremities). Other clinical features may include hernias, congenital heart defects, cryptorchidism and seizures.
Nemaline myopathy 10
MedGen UID:
863797
Concept ID:
C4015360
Disease or Syndrome
Nemaline myopathy-10 (NEM10) is an autosomal recessive severe congenital myopathy characterized by early-onset generalized muscle weakness and hypotonia with respiratory insufficiency and feeding difficulties. Many patients present antenatally with decreased fetal movements, and most die of respiratory failure in early infancy (summary by Yuen et al., 2014). Patients with a stable and much milder disease course have been described (Schatz et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of nemaline myopathy, see NEM3 (161800).
Lethal fetal cerebrorenogenitourinary agenesis/hypoplasia syndrome
MedGen UID:
864138
Concept ID:
C4015701
Disease or Syndrome
Lethal fetal cerebrorenogenitourinary agenesis/hypoplasia syndrome is a rare, genetic developmental defect during embryogenesis malformation syndrome characterized by intrauterine growth restriction, flexion arthrogryposis of all joints, severe microcephaly, renal cystic dysplasia/agenesis/hypoplasia and complex malformations of the brain (cerebral and cerebellar hypoplasia, vermis, corpus callosum and/or occipital lobe agenesis, with or without arhinencephaly), as well as of the genitourinary tract (ureteral agenesis/hypoplasia, uterine hypoplasia and/or vaginal atresia), leading to fetal demise.
Spinal muscular atrophy with congenital bone fractures 2
MedGen UID:
907910
Concept ID:
C4225176
Disease or Syndrome
Spinal muscular atrophy with congenital bone fractures is an autosomal recessive severe neuromuscular disorder characterized by onset of severe hypotonia with fetal hypokinesia in utero. This results in congenital contractures, consistent with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, and increased incidence of prenatal fracture of the long bones. Affected infants have difficulty breathing and feeding and often die in the first days or months of life (summary by Knierim et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of spinal muscular atrophy with congenital bone fractures, see SMABF1 (616866).
Spinal muscular atrophy with congenital bone fractures 1
MedGen UID:
896011
Concept ID:
C4225177
Disease or Syndrome
Spinal muscular atrophy with congenital bone fractures is an autosomal recessive severe neuromuscular disorder characterized by onset of severe hypotonia with fetal hypokinesia in utero. This results in congenital contractures, consistent with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, and increased incidence of prenatal fracture of the long bones. Affected infants have difficulty breathing and feeding and often die in the first days or months of life (summary by Knierim et al., 2016). Genetic Heterogeneity of Spinal Muscular Atrophy With Congenital Bone Fractures See also SMABF2 (616867), caused by mutation in the ASCC1 gene (614215) on chromosome 10q22.
Polymicrogyria, perisylvian, with cerebellar hypoplasia and arthrogryposis
MedGen UID:
899982
Concept ID:
C4225295
Disease or Syndrome
PI4KA-related disorder is a clinically variable disorder characterized primarily by neurologic dysfunction (limb spasticity, developmental delay, intellectual disability, seizures, ataxia, nystagmus), gastrointestinal manifestations (multiple intestinal atresia, inflammatory bowel disease), and combined immunodeficiency (leukopenia, variable immunoglobulin defects). Age of onset is typically antenatal or in early childhood; individuals can present with any combination of these features. Rare individuals present with later-onset hereditary spastic paraplegia. Brain MRI findings can include hypomyelinating leukodystrophy, cerebellar hypoplasia/atrophy, thin or dysplastic corpus callosum, and/or perisylvian polymicrogyria.
Lissencephaly 7 with cerebellar hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
895680
Concept ID:
C4225359
Disease or Syndrome
Lissencephaly-7 with cerebellar hypoplasia (LIS7) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by lack of psychomotor development, facial dysmorphism, arthrogryposis, and early-onset intractable seizures resulting in death in infancy (Magen et al., 2015). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lissencephaly, see LIS1 (607432).
Congenital myasthenic syndrome 11
MedGen UID:
902189
Concept ID:
C4225367
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myasthenic syndrome associated with AChR deficiency is a disorder of the postsynaptic neuromuscular junction (NMJ) clinically characterized by early-onset muscle weakness with variable severity. Electrophysiologic studies show low amplitude of the miniature endplate potential (MEPP) and current (MEPC) resulting from deficiency of AChR at the endplate. Treatment with cholinesterase inhibitors or amifampridine may be helpful (summary by Engel et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMS, see CMS1A (601462).
Lethal congenital contracture syndrome 8
MedGen UID:
896058
Concept ID:
C4225385
Disease or Syndrome
Lethal congenital contracture syndrome-8 (LCCS8), an axoglial form of arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, is characterized by congenital distal joint contractures, reduced fetal movements, and severe motor paralysis leading to death early in the neonatal period (Laquerriere et al., 2014). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lethal congenital contracture syndrome, see LCCS1 (253310).
Lethal congenital contracture syndrome 7
MedGen UID:
894160
Concept ID:
C4225386
Disease or Syndrome
Lethal congenital contracture syndrome-7, an axoglial form of arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC), is characterized by congenital distal joint contractures, polyhydramnios, reduced fetal movements, and severe motor paralysis leading to death early in the neonatal period (Laquerriere et al., 2014). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lethal congenital contracture syndrome, see LCCS1 (253310).
Myasthenic syndrome, congenital, 1B, fast-channel
MedGen UID:
909200
Concept ID:
C4225405
Disease or Syndrome
Fast-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome (FCCMS) is a disorder of the postsynaptic neuromuscular junction (NMJ) characterized by early-onset progressive muscle weakness. The disorder results from kinetic abnormalities of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) channel, specifically from abnormally brief opening and activity of the channel, with a rapid decay in endplate current and a failure to reach the threshold for depolarization. Treatment with pyridostigmine or amifampridine may be helpful; quinine, quinidine, and fluoxetine should be avoided (summary by Sine et al., 2003 and Engel et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMS, see CMS1A (601462).
Early-onset progressive diffuse brain atrophy-microcephaly-muscle weakness-optic atrophy syndrome
MedGen UID:
934638
Concept ID:
C4310671
Disease or Syndrome
PEBAT is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severely delayed psychomotor development apparent soon after birth or in infancy, profound intellectual disability, poor or absent speech, and seizures. Most patients are never able to walk due to hypotonia or spasticity. Brain imaging shows cerebral and cerebellar atrophy, thin corpus callosum, and secondary hypomyelination. The disorder shows progressive features, including microcephaly, consistent with a neurodegenerative process (summary by Miyake et al., 2016; Flex et al., 2016).
Congenital myasthenic syndrome 20
MedGen UID:
934661
Concept ID:
C4310694
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myasthenic syndrome-20 is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized by severe hypotonia associated with episodic apnea soon after birth. Patients have muscle weakness resulting in delayed walking, ptosis, poor sucking and swallowing, and generalized limb fatigability and weakness. EMG studies usually show a decremental response to repetitive nerve stimulation, and some patients may show a good response to AChE inhibitors (summary by Bauche et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMS, see CMS1A (601462).
Atypical glycine encephalopathy
MedGen UID:
934910
Concept ID:
C4310943
Disease or Syndrome
GLYT1 encephalopathy is characterized in neonates by severe hypotonia, respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation, and absent neonatal reflexes; encephalopathy, including impaired consciousness and unresponsiveness, may be present. Arthrogryposis or joint laxity can be observed. Generalized hypotonia develops later into axial hypotonia with limb hypertonicity and a startle-like response to vocal and visual stimuli which should not be confused with seizures. To date, three of the six affected children reported from three families died between ages two days and seven months; the oldest reported living child is severely globally impaired at age three years. Because of the limited number of affected individuals reported to date, the phenotype has not yet been completely described.
Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita 1, neurogenic, with myelin defect
MedGen UID:
1373185
Concept ID:
C4479539
Disease or Syndrome
AMC1 is an autosomal recessive severe neurologic disorder with onset in utero. Most affected individuals die in utero or are subject to pregnancy termination because of lack of fetal movements and prenatal evidence of contractures of virtually all joints. Those who survive have generalized contractures and hypotonia. The disorder is caused by a neurogenic defect and poor or absent myelin formation around peripheral nerves rather than by a muscular defect (summary by Xue et al., 2017). <Genetic Heterogeneity of Arthrogryposis Multiplex Congenita Also see AMC2 (208100), caused by mutation in the ERGIC1 gene (617946); AMC3 (618484), caused by mutation in the SYNE1 gene (608441); AMC4 (618776), caused by mutation in the SCYL2 gene (616365); AMC5 (618947), caused by mutation in the TOR1A gene (605204), and AMC6 (619334), caused by mutation in the NEB gene (161650)
Mosaic variegated aneuploidy syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
1616382
Concept ID:
C4539839
Disease or Syndrome
MVA3 is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from errors in chromosome segregation. Most affected individuals develop early-onset Wilms tumor and show either aneuploidy or premature chromatid separation in cells. Some patients may have additional developmental features, such as microcephaly, growth retardation, or developmental delay (summary by Yost et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of MVA, see MVA1 (257300).
Alkuraya-Kucinskas syndrome
MedGen UID:
1634304
Concept ID:
C4693347
Disease or Syndrome
ALKKUCS is an autosomal recessive severe neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by arthrogryposis, brain abnormalities associated with cerebral parenchymal underdevelopment, and global developmental delay. Most affected individuals die in utero or soon after birth. Additional abnormalities may include hypotonia, dysmorphic facial features, and involvement of other organ systems, such as cardiac or renal. The few patients who survive have variable intellectual disability and may have seizures (summary by Gueneau et al., 2018).
Glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis defect 18
MedGen UID:
1648478
Concept ID:
C4748357
Disease or Syndrome
DEE95 is a severe autosomal recessive developmental disorder characterized by severely impaired global development, hypotonia, weakness, ataxia, coarse facial features, and intractable seizures. More variable features may include abnormalities of the hands and feet, inguinal hernia, and feeding difficulties. The disorder is part of a group of similar neurologic disorders resulting from biochemical defects in the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthetic pathway (summary by Nguyen et al., 2018). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293).
Neuropathy, congenital hypomyelinating, 3
MedGen UID:
1648417
Concept ID:
C4748608
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy-3 is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by onset of neurogenic muscle impairment in utero. Affected individuals present at birth with severe hypotonia, often causing respiratory insufficiency or failure and inability to swallow or feed properly. They have profoundly impaired psychomotor development and may die in infancy or early childhood. Those that survive are unable to sit or walk. Sural nerve biopsy shows hypomyelination of the nerve fibers, and brain imaging often shows impaired myelination and cerebral and cerebellar atrophy. Nerve conduction velocities are severely decreased (about 10 m/s) or absent due to improper myelination (summary by Vallat et al., 2016 and Low et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CHN, see CHN1 (605253).
Arthrogryposis, cleft palate, craniosynostosis, and impaired intellectual development
MedGen UID:
1648372
Concept ID:
C4748872
Disease or Syndrome
ACCIID is characterized by arthrogryposis, cleft palate, craniosynostosis, micrognathia, short stature, and impaired intellectual development. Seizures and bony abnormalities (severe slenderness of the ribs and tubular bones and perinatal fractures) have been observed (Mizuguchi et al., 2018).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 69
MedGen UID:
1648381
Concept ID:
C4748988
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-69 (DEE69) is an autosomal dominant severe neurodevelopmental encephalopathic disorder characterized by early-onset refractory seizures, hypotonia, and profoundly impaired development often associated with macrocephaly, hyperkinetic movements, and contractures. The disorder can sometimes result in early death. Some patients may have a favorable seizure response to topiramate medication (summary by Helbig et al., 2018). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Spinal muscular atrophy, lower extremity-predominant, 2b, prenatal onset, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1648362
Concept ID:
C4749003
Disease or Syndrome
SMALED2B is a severe neuromuscular disorder with onset in utero. Affected individuals show decreased fetal movements and are usually born with congenital contractures consistent with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC). After birth, they have severe hypotonia and muscle atrophy as well as respiratory insufficiency due to muscle weakness. Some patients may have dysmorphic facial features and/or abnormalities on brain imaging. Many patients die in early childhood (summary by Storbeck et al., 2017) For discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lower extremity-predominant spinal muscular atrophy, see SMALED1 (158600).
Fetal akinesia deformation sequence 4
MedGen UID:
1675450
Concept ID:
C4760578
Disease or Syndrome
Fetal akinesia deformation sequence-4 (FADS4) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by decreased fetal movements due to impaired neuromuscular function, resulting in significant congenital contractures and death in utero or soon after birth (summary by Bonnin et al., 2018). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of FADS, see 208150.
Distal arthrogryposis type 2B1
MedGen UID:
1676961
Concept ID:
C5193014
Disease or Syndrome
Distal arthrogryposis is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by clenched fist, overlapping fingers, camptodactyly, ulnar deviation, and positional foot deformities from birth. It is a disorder of primary limb malformation without primary neurologic or muscle disease. DA1 is not associated with other abnormalities, whereas other forms of DA have additional phenotypic features (Bamshad et al., 1996). The congenital contractures in DA2B (Sheldon-Hall syndrome, SHS) are similar to those observed in DA1, but affected individuals tend to have more prominent nasolabial folds, downslanting palpebral fissures, and a small mouth. DA2B is thought to be the most common of the distal arthrogryposis disorders (summary by Bamshad et al., 2009). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of distal arthrogryposis, see DA1 (108120).
Lethal arthrogryposis-anterior horn cell disease syndrome
MedGen UID:
1677784
Concept ID:
C5193016
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital arthrogryposis with anterior horn cell disease (CAAHD) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder with highly variable severity. Affected individuals are usually noted to have contractures in utero on prenatal ultrasound studies, and present at birth with generalized contractures manifest as arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC). Patients have severe hypotonia with respiratory insufficiency, often resulting in death in infancy or early childhood. Some patients may survive into later childhood with supportive care, but may be unable to walk or sit independently due to a combination of muscle weakness and contractures. Cognition may be normal. The disorder also includes multiple congenital anomalies associated with AMC and hypotonia, including high-arched palate, myopathic facies, and bulbar weakness. Neuropathologic studies demonstrate severe loss of anterior horn cells in the spinal cord, as well as diffuse motor neuron axonopathy (summary by Smith et al., 2017 and Tan et al., 2017). Distinction from Lethal Congenital Contracture Syndrome 1 Biallelic mutation in the GLE1 gene can also cause LCCS1, which is lethal in utero. However, distinguishing between LCCS1 and CAAHD is controversial. Smith et al. (2017) suggested that differentiating between the 2 disorders has limited utility, and that they may represent a genotype/phenotype correlation rather than 2 different disease entities. In contrast, Said et al. (2017) concluded that LCCS1 represents a distinct clinical entity in which all affected individuals die prenatally and exhibit no fetal movements. Vuopala et al. (1995) differentiated CAAHD from LCCS1, noting that both are prevalent in Finland. LCCS1 is always fatal during the fetal period, presenting with severe hydrops and intrauterine growth retardation. In LCCS1, the spinal cord is macroscopically thinned because of an early reduction of the anterior horn and a paucity of anterior horn cells. The skeletal muscles are extremely hypoplastic, even difficult to locate. Infants with CAAHD survive longer than those with LCCS1, and when present, hydrops and intrauterine growth retardation are mild. The macroscopic findings of the central nervous system and skeletal muscles are closer to normal, although microscopic analysis also shows degeneration of anterior horn cells. In addition, birthplaces of ancestors of affected individuals do not show clustering in the northeast part of Finland, as is the case with LCCS1.
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 39
MedGen UID:
1683958
Concept ID:
C5193075
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-39 (COXPD39) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder resulting from a defect in mitochondrial energy metabolism. Affected individuals show global developmental delay, sometimes with regression after normal early development, axial hypotonia with limb spasticity or abnormal involuntary movements, and impaired intellectual development with poor speech. More variable features may include hypotonia, seizures, and features of Leigh syndrome (256000) on brain imaging. There are variable deficiencies of the mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme complexes in patient tissues (summary by Glasgow et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita 3, myogenic type
MedGen UID:
1680655
Concept ID:
C5193121
Disease or Syndrome
Myogenic-type arthrogryposis multiplex congenita-3 (AMC3) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by decreased fetal movements, hypotonia, variable skeletal defects, including clubfoot and scoliosis, and delayed motor milestones with difficulty walking (summary by Baumann et al., 2017).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly, arthrogryposis, and structural brain anomalies
MedGen UID:
1684840
Concept ID:
C5231431
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly, arthrogryposis, and structural brain anomalies (NEDMABA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe global developmental delay, usually with hypotonia and absence of spontaneous movements other than head control, impaired intellectual development with absent speech, distal contractures, progressive microcephaly, dysmorphic features, and distal skeletal abnormalities, such as rocker-bottom feet and clenched hands with camptodactyly. Brain imaging tends to show a simplified gyral pattern of the cerebral cortex, delayed myelination, thin corpus callosum, and hypoplasia of the brainstem and cerebellum. The disorder may be complicated by feeding and/or breathing difficulties, often resulting in death in infancy (summary by Magini et al., 2019).
Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita 4, neurogenic, with agenesis of the corpus callosum
MedGen UID:
1684706
Concept ID:
C5231494
Disease or Syndrome
Neurogenic arthrogryposis multiplex congenita-4 with agenesis of the corpus callosum (AMC4) is a severe neurologic disorder with onset in utero. Affected individuals show little or no fetal movements and are born with significant contractures affecting the upper and lower limbs, as well as dysmorphic facial features. Other abnormalities include globally impaired development, optic atrophy, agenesis of the corpus callosum, seizures, and peripheral neuropathy. Many patients die in early childhood (summary by Seidahmed et al., 2020).
Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita 2, neurogenic type
MedGen UID:
1725686
Concept ID:
C5435650
Disease or Syndrome
Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy resulting from progressive degeneration and irreversible loss of the anterior horn cells in the spinal cord (i.e., lower motor neurons) and the brain stem nuclei. The onset of weakness ranges from before birth to adulthood. The weakness is symmetric, proximal > distal, and progressive. Before the genetic basis of SMA was understood, it was classified into clinical subtypes based on maximum motor function achieved; however, it is now apparent that the phenotype of SMN1-associated SMA spans a continuum without clear delineation of subtypes. With supportive care only, poor weight gain with growth failure, restrictive lung disease, scoliosis, and joint contractures are common complications; however, newly available targeted treatment options are changing the natural history of this disease.
Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita 5
MedGen UID:
1731112
Concept ID:
C5436453
Disease or Syndrome
Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita-5 (AMC5) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe joint contractures apparent at birth. Affected individuals usually have hypertonia and abnormal movements suggestive of dystonia, as well as feeding and/or breathing difficulties. More variable features may include poor overall growth, strabismus, dysmorphic facies, and global developmental delay with impaired speech (summary by Kariminejad et al., 2017).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with seizures and brain atrophy
MedGen UID:
1748227
Concept ID:
C5436732
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with seizures and brain atrophy (NEDSEBA) is an autosomal recessive disorder with highly variable manifestations and severity of these core features. The most severely affected individuals develop symptoms in utero, which may lead to spontaneous abortion or planned termination. Those that survive may present with severe seizures at birth, have poor overall growth with small head circumference, achieve no developmental progress, and show significant brain atrophy and other brain abnormalities. Patients at the mildest end of the phenotypic spectrum have onset of seizures later in childhood and show developmental delay with mildly impaired intellectual development and minimal brain atrophy (summary by Coulter et al., 2020).
Multiple congenital anomalies-neurodevelopmental syndrome, x-linked
MedGen UID:
1788942
Concept ID:
C5542341
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked multiple congenital anomalies-neurodevelopmental syndrome (MCAND) is an X-linked recessive congenital multisystemic disorder characterized by poor growth, global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development, and variable abnormalities of the cardiac, skeletal, and genitourinary systems. Most affected individuals also have hypotonia and dysmorphic craniofacial features. Brain imaging typically shows enlarged ventricles and thin corpus callosum; some have microcephaly, whereas others have hydrocephalus. The severity of the disorder is highly variable, ranging from death in early infancy to survival into the second or third decade. Pathogenetically, the disorder results from disrupted gene expression and signaling during embryogenesis, thus affecting multiple systems (summary by Tripolszki et al., 2021 and Beck et al., 2021). Beck et al. (2021) referred to the disorder as LINKED syndrome (LINKage-specific deubiquitylation deficiency-induced Embryonic Defects).
Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita 6
MedGen UID:
1786758
Concept ID:
C5543431
Disease or Syndrome
Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita-6 (AMC6) is a severe autosomal recessive disorder of skeletal muscle with onset of symptoms in utero. The pregnancies are usually complicated by polyhydramnios and reduced fetal movements. Affected individuals have congenital joint contractures, dysmorphic facial features, distal skeletal anomalies with clenched hands and clubfeet, and edema with fetal hydrops. Fetal demise or termination of pregnancy often occurs after ultrasound detection of abnormalities. Those that survive to birth have significant hypotonia with absent spontaneous movements, respiratory insufficiency, arthrogryposis, and multiple pterygia. Skeletal muscle is hypoplastic, immature, and underdeveloped, with nemaline rods, poorly developed sarcomeres, and poor cross-striation. Death in infancy usually occurs (summary by Ahmed et al., 2018, Rocha et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of AMC, see AMC1 (617468).
VENTRICULOMEGALY AND ARTHROGRYPOSIS
MedGen UID:
1794183
Concept ID:
C5561973
Disease or Syndrome
Ventriculomegaly and arthrogryposis (VENARG) is a severe autosomal recessive congenital disorder characterized by the onset of features in utero that are not compatible with life. Affected pregnancies are terminated spontaneously or by plan due to the severity of the defects. Prenatal ultrasound and autopsy show limb contractures consistent with arthrogryposis and enlarged brain ventricles that may be associated with hydrocephalus, abnormalities of the corpus callosum, and cerebellar hypoplasia. Some affected fetuses may also have congenital heart disease and hydrops fetalis (summary by Mero et al., 2017 and El-Dessouky et al., 2020).
NEURODEVELOPMENTAL DISORDER WITH HYPOTONIA AND DYSMORPHIC FACIES
MedGen UID:
1794184
Concept ID:
C5561974
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia and dysmorphic facies (NEDHYDF) is characterized by global developmental delay and hypotonia apparent from birth. Affected individuals have variably impaired intellectual development, often with speech delay and delayed walking. Seizures are generally not observed, although some patients may have single seizures or late-onset epilepsy. Most patients have prominent dysmorphic facial features. Additional features may include congenital cardiac defects (without arrhythmia), nonspecific renal anomalies, joint contractures or joint hyperextensibility, dry skin, and cryptorchidism. There is significant phenotypic variability in both the neurologic and extraneurologic manifestations (summary by Tan et al., 2022).
NEURODEVELOPMENTAL DISORDER WITH HYPOTONIA AND BRAIN ABNORMALITIES
MedGen UID:
1794187
Concept ID:
C5561977
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia and brain abnormalities (NEDHYBA) is characterized by impaired development of motor skills, cognitive function, and speech acquisition beginning in infancy or early childhood. Some affected individuals may have feeding difficulties, seizures, behavioral abnormalities, and nonspecific dysmorphic facial features. Brain imaging shows variable abnormalities, including corpus callosum defects, cerebellar defects, and decreased white matter volume. There is significant phenotypic variability (summary by Duncan et al., 2021).
Junctional epidermolysis bullosa with pyloric atresia
MedGen UID:
1810975
Concept ID:
C5676875
Disease or Syndrome
Epidermolysis bullosa with pyloric atresia (EB-PA) is characterized by fragility of the skin and mucous membranes, manifested by blistering with little or no trauma; congenital pyloric atresia; and ureteral and renal anomalies (dysplastic/multicystic kidney, hydronephrosis/hydroureter, ureterocele, duplicated renal collecting system, absent bladder). The course of EB-PA is usually severe and often lethal in the neonatal period. Most affected children succumb as neonates; those who survive may have severe blistering with formation of granulation tissue on the skin around the mouth, nose, fingers, and toes, and internally around the trachea. However, some affected individuals have little or no blistering later in life. Additional features shared by EB-PA and the other major forms of EB include congenital localized absence of skin (aplasia cutis congenita) affecting the extremities and/or head, milia, nail dystrophy, scarring alopecia, hypotrichosis, contractures, and dilated cardiomyopathy.
Visceral neuropathy, familial, 1, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
987050
Concept ID:
CN305358
Disease or Syndrome
Neuronal intestinal pseudoobstruction is a form of chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction caused by a developmental failure of the enteric neurons to differentiate or migrate properly and manifests as a bowel obstruction.

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Sevencan A, Akdogan A, Ucpunar H, Ozyalvac ON, Akpinar E, Bayhan AI
Foot Ankle Int 2022 Oct;43(10):1346-1353. Epub 2022 Jun 14 doi: 10.1177/10711007221104076. PMID: 35699522
Sarıkaya E, Özçelik F, Gül Şiraz Ü, Hatipoglu N, Güneş T, Dündar M
J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab 2022 Jun 27;35(6):845-850. Epub 2022 Mar 16 doi: 10.1515/jpem-2021-0766. PMID: 35303767
Sions JM, Donohoe M, Beisheim-Ryan EH, Pohlig RT, Shank TM, Nichols LR
BMC Musculoskelet Disord 2022 Feb 5;23(1):121. doi: 10.1186/s12891-022-05070-w. PMID: 35123456Free PMC Article
Elfassy C, Darsaklis VB, Snider L, Gagnon C, Hamdy R, Dahan-Oliel N
Disabil Rehabil 2020 Aug;42(16):2318-2324. Epub 2019 Feb 11 doi: 10.1080/09638288.2018.1559364. PMID: 30741031
Xu L, Chen Z, Qiu Y, Chen X, Li S, Du C, Zhou Q, Sun X
J Neurosurg Pediatr 2018 Oct 12;23(1):22-29. doi: 10.3171/2018.7.PEDS18347. PMID: 30485184

Diagnosis

Pereira-Nunes J, Vilan A, Grangeia A, d'Oliveira R
J Investig Med High Impact Case Rep 2023 Jan-Dec;11:23247096221150637. doi: 10.1177/23247096221150637. PMID: 36691917
Kamal NM, Alzeky AM, Omair MR, Attar RA, Alotaibi AM, Safar A, Alosaimi NS, Abosabie SAS
Ital J Pediatr 2022 Jun 23;48(1):107. doi: 10.1186/s13052-022-01301-x. PMID: 35739559Free PMC Article
Sevencan A, Akdogan A, Ucpunar H, Ozyalvac ON, Akpinar E, Bayhan AI
Foot Ankle Int 2022 Oct;43(10):1346-1353. Epub 2022 Jun 14 doi: 10.1177/10711007221104076. PMID: 35699522
Sions JM, Donohoe M, Beisheim-Ryan EH, Pohlig RT, Shank TM, Nichols LR
BMC Musculoskelet Disord 2022 Feb 5;23(1):121. doi: 10.1186/s12891-022-05070-w. PMID: 35123456Free PMC Article
Pawar N, Ravindran M, Chakravarthy S, Ramakrishnan R
Strabismus 2021 Mar;29(1):34-36. Epub 2021 Jan 22 doi: 10.1080/09273972.2020.1871380. PMID: 33480805

Therapy

Sions JM, Donohoe M, Beisheim-Ryan EH, Pohlig RT, Shank TM, Nichols LR
BMC Musculoskelet Disord 2022 Feb 5;23(1):121. doi: 10.1186/s12891-022-05070-w. PMID: 35123456Free PMC Article
Coutinho E, Jacobson L, Shock A, Smith B, Vernon A, Vincent A
Neurol Neuroimmunol Neuroinflamm 2021 Jul;8(4) Epub 2021 May 27 doi: 10.1212/NXI.0000000000001011. PMID: 34045306Free PMC Article
Xu L, Chen Z, Qiu Y, Chen X, Li S, Du C, Zhou Q, Sun X
J Neurosurg Pediatr 2018 Oct 12;23(1):22-29. doi: 10.3171/2018.7.PEDS18347. PMID: 30485184
Ponde V, Desai AP, Shah D
Paediatr Anaesth 2013 Jan;23(1):74-8. Epub 2012 Sep 25 doi: 10.1111/pan.12022. PMID: 23004225
Reimann J, Jacobson L, Vincent A, Kornblum C
Neurology 2009 Nov 24;73(21):1806-8. doi: 10.1212/WNL.0b013e3181c34a65. PMID: 19933984

Prognosis

Kamal NM, Alzeky AM, Omair MR, Attar RA, Alotaibi AM, Safar A, Alosaimi NS, Abosabie SAS
Ital J Pediatr 2022 Jun 23;48(1):107. doi: 10.1186/s13052-022-01301-x. PMID: 35739559Free PMC Article
Xu L, Luan W, Wang Y, Sun X, Liu Z, Qian B, Qiu Y, Zhu Z
World Neurosurg 2022 Jan;157:e424-e431. Epub 2021 Oct 20 doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2021.10.115. PMID: 34687931
Hansen-Jaumard D, Elfassy C, Montpetit K, Ghalimah B, Hamdy R, Dahan-Oliel N
J Pediatr Rehabil Med 2020;13(3):263-271. doi: 10.3233/PRM-190657. PMID: 33104047
Oleas-Santillán G, Bowen JR
J Pediatr Orthop B 2020 Jan;29(1):62-64. doi: 10.1097/BPB.0000000000000612. PMID: 31305362
Kondo D, Noguchi A, Takahashi I, Kubota H, Yano T, Sato Y, Toyono M, Sawaishi Y, Takahashi T
Brain Dev 2018 Oct;40(9):760-767. Epub 2018 May 24 doi: 10.1016/j.braindev.2018.05.003. PMID: 29803542

Clinical prediction guides

Pereira-Nunes J, Vilan A, Grangeia A, d'Oliveira R
J Investig Med High Impact Case Rep 2023 Jan-Dec;11:23247096221150637. doi: 10.1177/23247096221150637. PMID: 36691917
Kamal NM, Alzeky AM, Omair MR, Attar RA, Alotaibi AM, Safar A, Alosaimi NS, Abosabie SAS
Ital J Pediatr 2022 Jun 23;48(1):107. doi: 10.1186/s13052-022-01301-x. PMID: 35739559Free PMC Article
Sevencan A, Akdogan A, Ucpunar H, Ozyalvac ON, Akpinar E, Bayhan AI
Foot Ankle Int 2022 Oct;43(10):1346-1353. Epub 2022 Jun 14 doi: 10.1177/10711007221104076. PMID: 35699522
Sions JM, Donohoe M, Beisheim-Ryan EH, Pohlig RT, Shank TM, Nichols LR
Pediatr Phys Ther 2022 Jul 1;34(3):288-295. Epub 2022 May 30 doi: 10.1097/PEP.0000000000000913. PMID: 35639545Free PMC Article
Valdés-Flores M, Casas-Avila L, Hernández-Zamora E, Kofman S, Hidalgo-Bravo A
J Pediatr (Rio J) 2016 Jan-Feb;92(1):58-64. Epub 2015 Oct 9 doi: 10.1016/j.jped.2015.04.008. PMID: 26453511

Recent systematic reviews

Chergui S, Al-Ali H, Marwan Y, Abu Dalu K, Dahan-Oliel N, Hamdy RC
Foot Ankle Surg 2023 Jan;29(1):15-21. Epub 2022 Oct 15 doi: 10.1016/j.fas.2022.10.002. PMID: 36266132

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