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Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome(SMMCI)

MedGen UID:
326686
Concept ID:
C1840235
Congenital Abnormality
Synonyms: Fused incisors; Single Central Incisor Syndrome; SMMCI SYNDROME; Solitary median maxillary central incisor
SNOMED CT: Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome (707609006)
 
Gene (location): SHH (7q36.3)
 
HPO: HP:0006315
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0007819
OMIM®: 147250

Definition

A single maxillary central incisor positioned in the midline with morphological symmetry of the crown and bordered by lateral incisors. [from HPO]

Clinical features

From HPO
Short stature
MedGen UID:
87607
Concept ID:
C0349588
Finding
A height below that which is expected according to age and gender norms. Although there is no universally accepted definition of short stature, many refer to "short stature" as height more than 2 standard deviations below the mean for age and gender (or below the 3rd percentile for age and gender dependent norms).
Anosmia
MedGen UID:
1950
Concept ID:
C0003126
Finding
An inability to perceive odors. This is a general term describing inability to smell arising in any part of the process of smelling from absorption of odorants into the nasal mucous overlying the olfactory epithelium, diffusion to the cilia, binding to olfactory receptor sites, generation of action potentials in olfactory neurons, and perception of a smell.
Intellectual disability, mild
MedGen UID:
10044
Concept ID:
C0026106
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Mild intellectual disability is defined as an intelligence quotient (IQ) in the range of 50-69.
Holoprosencephaly sequence
MedGen UID:
38214
Concept ID:
C0079541
Congenital Abnormality
Nonsyndromic holoprosencephaly is an abnormality of brain development that also affects the head and face. Normally, the brain divides into two halves (hemispheres) during early development. Holoprosencephaly occurs when the brain fails to divide properly into the right and left hemispheres. This condition is called nonsyndromic to distinguish it from other types of holoprosencephaly caused by genetic syndromes, chromosome abnormalities, or substances that cause birth defects (teratogens). The severity of nonsyndromic holoprosencephaly varies widely among affected individuals, even within the same family.\n\nNonsyndromic holoprosencephaly can be grouped into four types according to the degree of brain division. From most to least severe, the types are known as alobar, semi-lobar, lobar, and middle interhemispheric variant (MIHV). In the most severe forms of nonsyndromic holoprosencephaly, the brain does not divide at all. These affected individuals have one central eye (cyclopia) and a tubular nasal structure (proboscis) located above the eye. Most babies with severe nonsyndromic holoprosencephaly die before birth or soon after. In the less severe forms, the brain is partially divided and the eyes are usually set close together (hypotelorism). The life expectancy of these affected individuals varies depending on the severity of symptoms.\n\nPeople with nonsyndromic holoprosencephaly often have a small head (microcephaly), although they can develop a buildup of fluid in the brain (hydrocephalus) that causes increased head size (macrocephaly). Other features may include an opening in the roof of the mouth (cleft palate) with or without a split in the upper lip (cleft lip), one central front tooth instead of two (a single maxillary central incisor), and a flat nasal bridge. The eyeballs may be abnormally small (microphthalmia) or absent (anophthalmia).\n\nSome individuals with nonsyndromic holoprosencephaly have a distinctive pattern of facial features, including a narrowing of the head at the temples, outside corners of the eyes that point upward (upslanting palpebral fissures), large ears, a short nose with upturned nostrils, and a broad and deep space between the nose and mouth (philtrum). In general, the severity of facial features is directly related to the severity of the brain abnormalities. However, individuals with mildly affected facial features can have severe brain abnormalities. Some people do not have apparent structural brain abnormalities but have some of the facial features associated with this condition. These individuals are considered to have a form of the disorder known as microform holoprosencephaly and are typically identified after the birth of a severely affected family member.\n\nMost people with nonsyndromic holoprosencephaly have developmental delay and intellectual disability. Affected individuals also frequently have a malfunctioning pituitary gland, which is a gland located at the base of the brain that produces several hormones. Because pituitary dysfunction leads to the partial or complete absence of these hormones, it can cause a variety of disorders. Most commonly, people with nonsyndromic holoprosencephaly and pituitary dysfunction develop diabetes insipidus, a condition that disrupts the balance between fluid intake and urine excretion. Dysfunction in other parts of the brain can cause seizures, feeding difficulties, and problems regulating body temperature, heart rate, and breathing. The sense of smell may be diminished (hyposmia) or completely absent (anosmia) if the part of the brain that processes smells is underdeveloped or missing.
Specific learning disability
MedGen UID:
871302
Concept ID:
C4025790
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Impairment of certain skills such as reading or writing, coordination, self-control, or attention that interfere with the ability to learn. The impairment is not related to a global deficiency of intelligence.
Anterior hypopituitarism
MedGen UID:
871333
Concept ID:
C4025821
Disease or Syndrome
A condition of reduced function of the anterior pituitary gland characterized by decreased secretion of one or more of the pituitary hormones growth hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone, prolactin, luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone.
Microcephaly
MedGen UID:
1644158
Concept ID:
C4551563
Finding
Head circumference below 2 standard deviations below the mean for age and gender.
Abnormal nasopharynx morphology
MedGen UID:
871265
Concept ID:
C4025750
Anatomical Abnormality
A structural anomaly of the nasopharynx.
Choanal atresia
MedGen UID:
3395
Concept ID:
C0008297
Congenital Abnormality
Absence or abnormal closure of the choana (the posterior nasal aperture). Most embryologists believe that posterior choanal atresia results from a failure of rupture between the 35th and 38th day of fetal life of the partition which separates the bucconasal or buccopharyngeal membranes. The resultant choanal atresia may be unilateral or bilateral, bony or membranous, complete or incomplete. In over 90 per cent of cases the obstruction is bony, while in the remainder it is membranous. The bony type of atresia is commonly located 1-2 mm. anterior to the posterior edge of the hard palate, and the osseous septum varies in thickness from 1 to 10 mm. In the membranous form of choanal atresia the obstruction usually occurs further posteriorly. In approximately one third of cases the atresia is bilateral.
Cleft upper lip
MedGen UID:
40327
Concept ID:
C0008924
Congenital Abnormality
A gap or groove in the upper lip. This is a congenital defect resulting from nonfusion of tissues of the lip during embryonal development.
Torus palatinus
MedGen UID:
120594
Concept ID:
C0266981
Finding
A bony protrusion present on the midline of the hard palate.
Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome
MedGen UID:
326686
Concept ID:
C1840235
Congenital Abnormality
A single maxillary central incisor positioned in the midline with morphological symmetry of the crown and bordered by lateral incisors.
Midnasal stenosis
MedGen UID:
333516
Concept ID:
C1840238
Finding
Abnormal narrowing (stenosis) of the midnasal cavity, i.e., of the middle nasal meatus, which in neonates can cause respiratory distress.
Prominent median palatal raphe
MedGen UID:
335101
Concept ID:
C1845108
Finding
Unusual prominence of the median palatal raphe, which is the ridge formed by the fusion of the two plates of the skull that form the hard palate.
Pyriform aperture stenosis
MedGen UID:
825835
Concept ID:
C3839990
Congenital Abnormality
Narrowing of the anterior nasal aperture (piriform or pyriform aperture), which is a pear-shaped opening in the skull that forms the bony inlet of the nose.
Decreased response to growth hormone stimulation test
MedGen UID:
1784655
Concept ID:
C5539399
Finding
Insufficient responses to growth hormone (GH) provocation tests. GH deficiency is defined as a serum peak GH concentration less than 10 ng/mL on provocation with a combination of at least two separate stimulation tests.
Anophthalmia
MedGen UID:
314
Concept ID:
C0003119
Congenital Abnormality
Absence of the globe or eyeball.
Congenital ocular coloboma
MedGen UID:
1046
Concept ID:
C0009363
Congenital Abnormality
Coloboma is an eye abnormality that occurs before birth. Colobomas are missing pieces of tissue in structures that form the eye. They may appear as notches or gaps in one of several parts of the eye, including the colored part of the eye called the iris; the retina, which is the specialized light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye; the blood vessel layer under the retina called the choroid; or the optic nerves, which carry information from the eyes to the brain.\n\nColobomas may be present in one or both eyes and, depending on their size and location, can affect a person's vision. Colobomas affecting the iris, which result in a "keyhole" appearance of the pupil, generally do not lead to vision loss. Colobomas involving the retina result in vision loss in specific parts of the visual field. Large retinal colobomas or those affecting the optic nerve can cause low vision, which means vision loss that cannot be completely corrected with glasses or contact lenses.\n\nSome people with coloboma also have a condition called microphthalmia. In this condition, one or both eyeballs are abnormally small. In some affected individuals, the eyeball may appear to be completely missing; however, even in these cases some remaining eye tissue is generally present. Such severe microphthalmia should be distinguished from another condition called anophthalmia, in which no eyeball forms at all. However, the terms anophthalmia and severe microphthalmia are often used interchangeably. Microphthalmia may or may not result in significant vision loss.\n\nPeople with coloboma may also have other eye abnormalities, including clouding of the lens of the eye (cataract), increased pressure inside the eye (glaucoma) that can damage the optic nerve, vision problems such as nearsightedness (myopia), involuntary back-and-forth eye movements (nystagmus), or separation of the retina from the back of the eye (retinal detachment).\n\nColobomas involving the eyeball should be distinguished from gaps that occur in the eyelids. While these eyelid gaps are also called colobomas, they arise from abnormalities in different structures during early development.\n\nSome individuals have coloboma as part of a syndrome that affects other organs and tissues in the body. These forms of the condition are described as syndromic. When coloboma occurs by itself, it is described as nonsyndromic or isolated.
Microphthalmia
MedGen UID:
10033
Concept ID:
C0026010
Congenital Abnormality
Microphthalmia is an eye abnormality that arises before birth. In this condition, one or both eyeballs are abnormally small. In some affected individuals, the eyeball may appear to be completely missing; however, even in these cases some remaining eye tissue is generally present. Such severe microphthalmia should be distinguished from another condition called anophthalmia, in which no eyeball forms at all. However, the terms anophthalmia and severe microphthalmia are often used interchangeably. Microphthalmia may or may not result in significant vision loss.\n\nPeople with microphthalmia may also have a condition called coloboma. Colobomas are missing pieces of tissue in structures that form the eye. They may appear as notches or gaps in the colored part of the eye called the iris; the retina, which is the specialized light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye; the blood vessel layer under the retina called the choroid; or in the optic nerves, which carry information from the eyes to the brain. Colobomas may be present in one or both eyes and, depending on their size and location, can affect a person's vision.\n\nPeople with microphthalmia may also have other eye abnormalities, including clouding of the lens of the eye (cataract) and a narrowed opening of the eye (narrowed palpebral fissure). Additionally, affected individuals may have an abnormality called microcornea, in which the clear front covering of the eye (cornea) is small and abnormally curved.\n\nBetween one-third and one-half of affected individuals have microphthalmia as part of a syndrome that affects other organs and tissues in the body. These forms of the condition are described as syndromic. When microphthalmia occurs by itself, it is described as nonsyndromic or isolated.
Holoprosencephaly 1
MedGen UID:
78617
Concept ID:
C0266667
Congenital Abnormality
Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is the most common structural malformation of the human forebrain and occurs after failed or abbreviated midline cleavage of the developing brain during the third and fourth weeks of gestation. HPE occurs in up to 1 in 250 gestations, but only 1 in 8,000 live births (Lacbawan et al., 2009). Classically, 3 degrees of severity defined by the extent of brain malformation have been described. In the most severe form, 'alobar HPE,' there is a single ventricle and no interhemispheric fissure. The olfactory bulbs and tracts and the corpus callosum are typically absent. In 'semilobar HPE,' the most common type of HPE in neonates who survive, there is partial cortical separation with rudimentary cerebral hemispheres and a single ventricle. In 'lobar HPE,' the ventricles are separated, but there is incomplete frontal cortical separation (Corsello et al., 1990). An additional milder form, called 'middle interhemispheric variant' (MIHV) has also been delineated, in which the posterior frontal and parietal lobes are incompletely separated and the corpus callosum may be hypoplastic (Lacbawan et al., 2009). Finally, microforms of HPE include a single maxillary median incisor or hypotelorism without the typical brain malformations (summary by Mercier et al., 2011). Cohen (2001) discussed problems in the definition of holoprosencephaly, which can be viewed from 2 different perspectives: anatomic (fixed) and genetic (broad). When the main interest is description, the anatomic perspective is appropriate. In genetic perspective, a fixed definition of holoprosencephaly is not appropriate because the same mutational cause may result in either holoprosencephaly or some microform of holoprosencephaly. Cohen (2001) concluded that both fixed and broad definitions are equally valid and depend on context. Munke (1989) provided an extensive review of the etiology and pathogenesis of holoprosencephaly, emphasizing heterogeneity. See also schizencephaly (269160), which may be part of the phenotypic spectrum of HPE. Genetic Heterogeneity of Holoprosencephaly Several loci for holoprosencephaly have been mapped to specific chromosomal sites and the molecular defects in some cases of HPE have been identified. Holoprosencephaly-1 (HPE1) maps to chromosome 21q22. See also HPE2 (157170), caused by mutation in the SIX3 gene (603714) on 2p21; HPE3 (142945), caused by mutation in the SHH gene (600725) on 7q36; HPE4 (142946), caused by mutation in the TGIF gene (602630) on 18p11; HPE5 (609637), caused by mutation in the ZIC2 gene (603073) on 13q32; HPE6 (605934), mapped to 2q37; HPE7 (610828), caused by mutation in the PTCH1 gene (601309) on 9q22; HPE8 (609408), mapped to 14q13; HPE9 (610829), caused by mutation in the GLI2 gene (165230) on 2q14; HPE10 (612530), mapped to 1q41-q42; HPE11 (614226), caused by mutation in the CDON gene (608707) on 11q24; HPE12 (618500), caused by mutation in the CNOT1 gene (604917) on 16q21; HPE13 (301043), caused by mutation in the STAG2 gene (300826) on Xq25; and HPE14 (619895), caused by mutation in the PLCH1 gene (612835) on 3q25. Wallis and Muenke (2000) gave an overview of mutations in holoprosencephaly. They indicated that at least 12 different loci had been associated with HPE. Mutations in genes involved in the multiprotein cohesin complex, including STAG2, have been shown to be involved in midline brain defects such as HPE. Mutations in some of those genes cause Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CDLS; see 122470), and some patients with severe forms of CDLS may have midline brain defects. See, for example, CDLS2 (300590), CDLS3 (610759), and CDLS4 (614701).
Hypotelorism
MedGen UID:
96107
Concept ID:
C0424711
Finding
Interpupillary distance less than 2 SD below the mean (alternatively, the appearance of an decreased interpupillary distance or closely spaced eyes).
Abnormality of chromosome segregation
MedGen UID:
871193
Concept ID:
C4025670
Finding
An abnormality of chromosome segregation.

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVSolitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome
Follow this link to review classifications for Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome in Orphanet.

Conditions with this feature

Curry-Hall syndrome
MedGen UID:
141594
Concept ID:
C0457013
Disease or Syndrome
Weyers acrofacial dysostosis (WAD) is an autosomal dominant disorder with dental anomalies, nail dystrophy, postaxial polydactyly, and mild short stature. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome is a similar disorder, with autosomal recessive inheritance and the additional features of disproportionate dwarfism, thoracic dysplasia, and congenital heart disease (summary by Howard et al., 1997).
Holoprosencephaly 2
MedGen UID:
322517
Concept ID:
C1834877
Disease or Syndrome
A rare disorder characterized by the partial separation of the cerebral hemispheres. It is associated with mutations in the SIX3 gene.
Holoprosencephaly 9
MedGen UID:
324369
Concept ID:
C1835819
Disease or Syndrome
Holoprosencephaly-9 refers to a disorder characterized by a wide phenotypic spectrum of brain developmental defects, with or without overt forebrain cleavage abnormalities. It usually includes midline craniofacial anomalies involving the first branchial arch and/or orbits, pituitary hypoplasia with panhypopituitarism, and postaxial polydactyly. The disorder shows incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity (summary by Roessler et al., 2003 and Bertolacini et al., 2012). For general phenotypic information and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of holoprosencephaly, see HPE1 (236100).
Holoprosencephaly 7
MedGen UID:
372134
Concept ID:
C1835820
Disease or Syndrome
Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is the most commonly occurring congenital structural forebrain anomaly in humans. HPE is associated with mental retardation and craniofacial malformations. Considerable heterogeneity in the genetic causes of HPE has been demonstrated (Ming et al., 2002). For general phenotypic information and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of holoprosencephaly, see HPE1 (236100).
Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome
MedGen UID:
326686
Concept ID:
C1840235
Congenital Abnormality
A single maxillary central incisor positioned in the midline with morphological symmetry of the crown and bordered by lateral incisors.
Holoprosencephaly 3
MedGen UID:
327125
Concept ID:
C1840529
Disease or Syndrome
Any holoprosencephaly in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the SHH gene.
Cerebrooculonasal syndrome
MedGen UID:
340138
Concept ID:
C1854108
Disease or Syndrome
A multisystem malformation syndrome that has been reported in about 10 patients. The clinical features include bilateral anophthalmia, abnormal nares, central nervous system anomalies, and neurodevelopmental delay. Additional features include brachycephaly and other facial anomalies. Non-facial anomalies have also been reported: postaxial polydactyly, genital hypoplasia. All cases reported so far have been sporadic, suggesting that the syndrome may be due to a new dominant mutation.
Thumb deformity-alopecia-pigmentation anomaly syndrome
MedGen UID:
348284
Concept ID:
C1861168
Disease or Syndrome
Thumb deformity-alopecia-pigmentation anomaly syndrome is a rare, genetic, congenital limb malformation syndrome characterized by short stature, sparse scalp hair, hypoplastic, proximally-placed thumbs, and skin hyperpigmentation with areas of 'raindrop' depigmentation. Presence of a single, upper central incisor has also been reported. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1988.
Weyers ulnar ray/oligodactyly syndrome
MedGen UID:
356030
Concept ID:
C1865566
Disease or Syndrome
Microcephaly 7, primary, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
436370
Concept ID:
C2675187
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (often shortened to MCPH, which stands for "microcephaly primary hereditary") is a condition in which infants are born with a very small head and a small brain. The term "microcephaly" comes from the Greek words for "small head."\n\nInfants with MCPH have an unusually small head circumference compared to other infants of the same sex and age. Head circumference is the distance around the widest part of the head, measured by placing a measuring tape above the eyebrows and ears and around the back of the head. Affected infants' brain volume is also smaller than usual, although they usually do not have any major abnormalities in the structure of the brain. The head and brain grow throughout childhood and adolescence, but they continue to be much smaller than normal.\n\nPeople with MCPH usually have few or no other features associated with the condition. Some have a narrow, sloping forehead; mild seizures; problems with attention or behavior; or short stature compared to others in their family. The condition typically does not affect any other major organ systems or cause other health problems.\n\nMCPH causes intellectual disability, which is typically mild to moderate and does not become more severe with age. Most affected individuals have delayed speech and language skills. Motor skills, such as sitting, standing, and walking, may also be mildly delayed.
X-linked Opitz G/BBB syndrome
MedGen UID:
424842
Concept ID:
C2936904
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked Opitz G/BBB syndrome (X-OS) is a multiple-congenital-anomaly disorder characterized by facial anomalies (hypertelorism, prominent forehead, widow's peak, broad nasal bridge, anteverted nares), genitourinary abnormalities (hypospadias, cryptorchidism, and hypoplastic/bifid scrotum), and laryngotracheoesophageal defects. Developmental delay and intellectual disability are observed in about 50% of affected males. Cleft lip and/or palate are present in approximately 50% of affected individuals. Other malformations (present in <50% of individuals) include congenital heart defects, imperforate or ectopic anus, and midline brain defects (Dandy-Walker malformation and agenesis or hypoplasia of the corpus callosum and/or cerebellar vermis). Wide clinical variability occurs even among members of the same family. Female heterozygotes usually manifest hypertelorism only.
Chromosome 19q13.11 deletion syndrome, distal
MedGen UID:
935015
Concept ID:
C4311048
Disease or Syndrome
Distal chromosome 19q13.11 deletion syndrome is an autosomal dominant neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by poor overall growth, slender habitus, microcephaly, delayed development, intellectual disability with poor or absent speech, and feeding difficulties. Additional features include dysmorphic facies, signs of ectodermal dysplasia, hand and foot anomalies, and genitourinary anomalies, particularly in males (summary by Chowdhury et al., 2014).
Holoprosencephaly 13, X-linked
MedGen UID:
1714826
Concept ID:
C5393308
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked holoprosencephaly-13 (HPE13) is a neurologic disorder characterized by midline developmental defects that mainly affect the brain and craniofacial structure. The severity and manifestations are variable: some patients may have full alobar HPE with cyclopia, whereas others have semilobar HPE or septooptic dysplasia. Dysmorphic features include microcephaly, hypotelorism, low-set ears, micrognathia, and cleft lip/palate. Patients with a more severe phenotype may die in the newborn period, whereas those with a less severe phenotype show global developmental delay. Additional variable features include congenital heart defects and vertebral anomalies. Phenotypic variability may be related to the type of mutation, X-inactivation status, and possible incomplete penetrance. The STAG2 protein is part of the multiprotein cohesin complex involved in chromatid cohesion during DNA replication and transcriptional regulation; HPE13 can thus be classified as a 'cohesinopathy' (summary by Kruszka et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of holoprosencephaly, see HPE1 (236100).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 85, with or without midline brain defects
MedGen UID:
1708832
Concept ID:
C5393312
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-85 with or without midline brain defects (DEE85) is an X-linked neurologic disorder characterized by onset of severe refractory seizures in the first year of life, global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development and poor or absent speech, and dysmorphic facial features. The seizures tend to show a cyclic pattern with clustering. Many patients have midline brain defects on brain imaging, including thin corpus callosum and/or variable forms of holoprosencephaly (HPE). The severity and clinical manifestations are variable. Almost all reported patients are females with de novo mutations predicted to result in a loss of function (LOF). However, some patients may show skewed X inactivation, and the pathogenic mechanism may be due to a dominant-negative effect. The SMC1A protein is part of the multiprotein cohesin complex involved in chromatid cohesion during DNA replication and transcriptional regulation; DEE85 can thus be classified as a 'cohesinopathy' (summary by Symonds et al., 2017 and Kruszka et al., 2019). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Congenital heart defects, multiple types, 8, with or without heterotaxy
MedGen UID:
1794252
Concept ID:
C5562042
Disease or Syndrome
Multiple types of congenital heart defects-8 (CHTD8) is characterized by cardiac septal defects, double-outlet right ventricle, unbalanced complete atrioventricular canal, and valvular anomalies, as well as vascular anomalies including dextroposition of the great arteries, anomalous pulmonary venous return, and superior vena cava to left atrium defect. Patients may also exhibit laterality defects, including dextrocardia, atrial isomerism, dextrogastria, left-sided gallbladder, and intestinal malrotation (Zaidi et al., 2013; Granadillo et al., 2018).

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Ludwików K, Zadurska M, Czochrowska E
Orthod Craniofac Res 2022 Nov;25(4):459-467. Epub 2021 Dec 20 doi: 10.1111/ocr.12557. PMID: 34910850Free PMC Article
Lygidakis NN, Chatzidimitriou K, Petrou N, Lygidakis NA
Eur Arch Paediatr Dent 2013 Dec;14(6):417-23. Epub 2013 Jun 18 doi: 10.1007/s40368-013-0044-5. PMID: 23775592

Diagnosis

Ginat DT, Robson CD
Pediatr Radiol 2015 Jul;45(7):1056-65. Epub 2015 Jan 9 doi: 10.1007/s00247-014-3239-y. PMID: 25573243
Lygidakis NN, Chatzidimitriou K, Petrou N, Lygidakis NA
Eur Arch Paediatr Dent 2013 Dec;14(6):417-23. Epub 2013 Jun 18 doi: 10.1007/s40368-013-0044-5. PMID: 23775592
Kjaer I, Balslev-Olesen M
Eur J Paediatr Dent 2012 Mar;13(1):73-5. PMID: 22455533
Viana Eda S, Kramer PF, Closs LQ, Scalco G
Pediatr Dent 2010 Sep-Oct;32(5):424-7. PMID: 21070710
Hall RK
Orphanet J Rare Dis 2006 Apr 9;1:12. doi: 10.1186/1750-1172-1-12. PMID: 16722608Free PMC Article

Prognosis

Lygidakis NN, Chatzidimitriou K, Petrou N, Lygidakis NA
Eur Arch Paediatr Dent 2013 Dec;14(6):417-23. Epub 2013 Jun 18 doi: 10.1007/s40368-013-0044-5. PMID: 23775592
Blackmore K, Wynne DM
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 2010 Aug;74(8):967-9. PMID: 20626079
Hall RK
Orphanet J Rare Dis 2006 Apr 9;1:12. doi: 10.1186/1750-1172-1-12. PMID: 16722608Free PMC Article
Hall RK, Bankier A, Aldred MJ, Kan K, Lucas JO, Perks AG
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod 1997 Dec;84(6):651-62. doi: 10.1016/s1079-2104(97)90368-1. PMID: 9431535

Clinical prediction guides

Nota A, Ehsani S, Pittari L, Gastaldi G, Tecco S
Head Face Med 2021 Nov 23;17(1):49. doi: 10.1186/s13005-021-00300-3. PMID: 34814931Free PMC Article
Kjaer I, Balslev-Olesen M
Eur J Paediatr Dent 2012 Mar;13(1):73-5. PMID: 22455533
Hall RK
Orphanet J Rare Dis 2006 Apr 9;1:12. doi: 10.1186/1750-1172-1-12. PMID: 16722608Free PMC Article
Hall RK, Bankier A, Aldred MJ, Kan K, Lucas JO, Perks AG
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod 1997 Dec;84(6):651-62. doi: 10.1016/s1079-2104(97)90368-1. PMID: 9431535

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