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Increased circulating IgM level

MedGen UID:
333454
Concept ID:
C1839972
Finding
Synonym: Increased IgM level
 
HPO: HP:0003496

Definition

An abnormally increased level of immunoglobulin M in blood. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Hyper-IgM syndrome type 1
MedGen UID:
96019
Concept ID:
C0398689
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked hyper IgM syndrome (HIGM1), a disorder of abnormal T- and B-cell function, is characterized by low serum concentrations of IgG, IgA, and IgE with normal or elevated serum concentrations of IgM. Mitogen proliferation may be normal, but NK- and T-cell cytotoxicity can be impaired. Antigen-specific responses are usually decreased or absent. Total numbers of B cells are normal but there is a marked reduction of class-switched memory B cells. Defective oxidative burst of both neutrophils and macrophages has been reported. The range of clinical findings varies, even within the same family. More than 50% of males with HIGM1 develop symptoms by age one year, and more than 90% are symptomatic by age four years. HIGM1 usually presents in infancy with recurrent upper- and lower-respiratory tract bacterial infections, opportunistic infections including Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, and recurrent or protracted diarrhea that can be infectious or noninfectious and is associated with failure to thrive. Neutropenia is common; thrombocytopenia and anemia are less commonly seen. Autoimmune and/or inflammatory disorders (such as sclerosing cholangitis) as well as increased risk for neoplasms have been reported as medical complications of this disorder. Significant neurologic complications, often the result of a CNS infection, are seen in 5%-15% of affected males. Liver disease, a serious complication of HIGM1 once observed in more than 80% of affected males by age 20 years, may be decreasing with adequate screening and treatment of Cryptosporidium infection.
Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome type 1
MedGen UID:
231300
Concept ID:
C1328840
Disease or Syndrome
Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), caused by defective lymphocyte homeostasis, is characterized by the following: Non-malignant lymphoproliferation (lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly with or without hypersplenism) that often improves with age. Autoimmune disease, mostly directed toward blood cells. Lifelong increased risk for both Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. In ALPS-FAS (the most common and best-characterized type of ALPS, associated with heterozygous germline pathogenic variants in FAS), non-malignant lymphoproliferation typically manifests in the first years of life, inexplicably waxes and wanes, and then often decreases without treatment in the second decade of life; in many affected individuals, however, neither splenomegaly nor the overall expansion of lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood decreases. Although autoimmunity is often not present at the time of diagnosis or at the time of the most extensive lymphoproliferation, autoantibodies can be detected before autoimmune disease manifests clinically. In ALPS-FAS caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous (biallelic) pathogenic variants in FAS, severe lymphoproliferation occurs before, at, or shortly after birth, and usually results in death at an early age. ALPS-sFAS, resulting from somatic FAS pathogenic variants in selected cell populations, notably the alpha/beta double-negative T cells (a/ß-DNT cells), appears to be similar to ALPS-FAS resulting from heterozygous germline pathogenic variants in FAS, although lower incidence of splenectomy and lower lymphocyte counts have been reported in ALPS-sFAS and no cases of lymphoma have yet been published.
Hyper-IgM syndrome type 2
MedGen UID:
354548
Concept ID:
C1720956
Disease or Syndrome
Hyper-IgM syndrome type 2 (HIGM2) is a rare immunodeficiency characterized by normal or elevated serum IgM levels with absence of IgG, IgA, and IgE, resulting in a profound susceptibility to bacterial infections. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of immunodeficiency with hyper-IgM, see HIGM1 (308230).
Hyper-IgM syndrome type 3
MedGen UID:
328419
Concept ID:
C1720957
Disease or Syndrome
Type 3 immunodeficiency with hyper-IgM (HIGM3), first described in humans by Ferrari et al. (2001), is characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia with normal or elevated levels of IgM. For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of immunodeficiency with hyper-IgM, see HIGM1 (308230).
Hyper-IgM syndrome type 5
MedGen UID:
328420
Concept ID:
C1720958
Disease or Syndrome
Hyper-IgM syndrome is a condition characterized by normal or increased serum IgM concentrations associated with low or absent serum IgG, IgA, and IgE concentrations, indicating a defect in the class-switch recombination (CSR) process. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of immunodeficiency with hyper-IgM, see HIGM1 (308230).
Ectodermal dysplasia and immunodeficiency 1
MedGen UID:
375787
Concept ID:
C1846008
Disease or Syndrome
Ectodermal dysplasia with immunodeficiency-1 (EDAID1) is an X-linked recessive disorder that characteristically affects only males. Affected individuals have onset of recurrent severe infections due to immunodeficiency in early infancy or in the first years of life. There is increased susceptibility to bacterial, pneumococcal, mycobacterial, and fungal infections. Laboratory studies usually show dysgammaglobulinemia with low IgG subsets and normal or increased IgA and IgM, consistent with impaired 'class-switching' of B cells, although immunologic abnormalities may be subtle compared to the clinical picture, and B- and T-cell numbers are usually normal. There is a poor antibody response to polysaccharide vaccinations, particularly pneumococcus; response to other vaccinations is variable. Patients also have features of ectodermal dysplasia, including conical incisors, hypo/anhidrosis, and thin skin or hair. Severely affected individuals may also show lymphedema, osteopetrosis, and, rarely, hematologic abnormalities. The phenotype is highly variable, likely due to different hypomorphic mutations, and may be fatal in childhood. Intravenous immunoglobulins and prophylactic antibiotics are used as treatment; some patients may benefit from bone marrow transplantation. Although only males tend to be affected with immunodeficiency, many patients inherit a mutation from a mother who has mild features of IP or conical teeth (summary by Doffinger et al., 2001, Orange et al., 2004, Roberts et al., 2010, Heller et al., 2020). Genetic Heterogeneity of Ectodermal Dysplasia and Immune Deficiency Also see EDAID2 (612132), caused by mutation in the NFKBIA gene (164008).
Immunodeficiency 25
MedGen UID:
346666
Concept ID:
C1857798
Disease or Syndrome
Any severe combined immunodeficiency in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the CD247 gene.
Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome type 2A
MedGen UID:
349065
Concept ID:
C1858968
Disease or Syndrome
Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), caused by defective lymphocyte homeostasis, is characterized by the following: Non-malignant lymphoproliferation (lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly with or without hypersplenism) that often improves with age. Autoimmune disease, mostly directed toward blood cells. Lifelong increased risk for both Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. In ALPS-FAS (the most common and best-characterized type of ALPS, associated with heterozygous germline pathogenic variants in FAS), non-malignant lymphoproliferation typically manifests in the first years of life, inexplicably waxes and wanes, and then often decreases without treatment in the second decade of life; in many affected individuals, however, neither splenomegaly nor the overall expansion of lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood decreases. Although autoimmunity is often not present at the time of diagnosis or at the time of the most extensive lymphoproliferation, autoantibodies can be detected before autoimmune disease manifests clinically. In ALPS-FAS caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous (biallelic) pathogenic variants in FAS, severe lymphoproliferation occurs before, at, or shortly after birth, and usually results in death at an early age. ALPS-sFAS, resulting from somatic FAS pathogenic variants in selected cell populations, notably the alpha/beta double-negative T cells (a/ß-DNT cells), appears to be similar to ALPS-FAS resulting from heterozygous germline pathogenic variants in FAS, although lower incidence of splenectomy and lower lymphocyte counts have been reported in ALPS-sFAS and no cases of lymphoma have yet been published.
Immunodeficiency 14
MedGen UID:
811535
Concept ID:
C3714976
Disease or Syndrome
Activated PI3K-delta syndrome (also known as APDS) is a disorder that impairs the immune system. Individuals with this condition often have low numbers of white blood cells (lymphopenia), particularly B cells and T cells. Normally, these cells recognize and attack foreign invaders, such as viruses and bacteria, to prevent infection. The severity of activated PI3K-delta syndrome varies widely. Some people may have multiple, severe infections while others show mild symptoms to none at all.\n\nThere are two types of activated PI3K-delta syndrome, each with different genetic causes.\n\nMost commonly, people with activated PI3K-delta syndrome develop recurrent infections that begin in childhood, particularly in the lungs, sinuses, and ears. Over time, recurrent respiratory tract infections can lead to a condition called bronchiectasis, which damages the passages leading from the windpipe to the lungs (bronchi) and can cause breathing problems. People with activated PI3K-delta syndrome may also have chronic active viral infections, such as Epstein-Barr virus, herpes simplex virus, or cytomegalovirus infections.\n\nAnother possible feature of activated PI3K-delta syndrome is abnormal clumping of white blood cells. These clumps can lead to enlarged lymph nodes (lymphadenopathy) or an enlarged spleen (splenomegaly). The white blood cells can also build up to form solid masses (nodular lymphoid hyperplasia), usually in the moist lining of the airways or intestines. While nodular lymphoid hyperplasia is not cancerous (benign), activated PI3K-delta syndrome increases the risk of developing forms of blood cancer called Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma.\n\nSome people with activated PI3K-delta syndrome develop autoimmunity, which occurs when the body attacks its own tissues and organs by mistake.
Immunodeficiency 27A
MedGen UID:
860386
Concept ID:
C4011949
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-27A (IMD27A) results from autosomal recessive (AR) IFNGR1 deficiency. Patients with complete IFNGR1 deficiency have a severe clinical phenotype characterized by early and often fatal mycobacterial infections. The disorder can thus be categorized as a form of mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD). Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and environmental mycobacteria are the most frequent pathogens, and infection typically begins before the age of 3 years. Plasma from patients with complete AR IFNGR1 deficiency usually contains large amounts of IFNG (147570), and their cells do not respond to IFNG in vitro. In contrast, cells from patients with partial AR IFNGR1 deficiency, which is caused by a specific mutation in IFNGR1, retain residual responses to high IFNG concentrations. Patients with partial AR IFNGR1 deficiency are susceptible to BCG and environmental mycobacteria, but they have a milder clinical disease and better prognosis than patients with complete AR IFNGR1 deficiency. The clinical features of children with complete AR IFNGR1 deficiency are usually more severe than those in individuals with AD IFNGR1 deficiency (IMD27B), and mycobacterial infection often occurs earlier (mean age of 1.3 years vs 13.4 years), with patients having shorter mean disease-free survival. Salmonellosis is present in about 5% of patients with AR or AD IFNGR1 deficiency, and other infections have been reported in single patients (review by Al-Muhsen and Casanova, 2008).
Immunodeficiency 23
MedGen UID:
862808
Concept ID:
C4014371
Disease or Syndrome
IMD23 is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency syndrome characterized by onset of recurrent infections, usually respiratory or cutaneous, in early childhood. Immune workup usually shows neutropenia, lymphopenia, eosinophilia, and increased serum IgE or IgA. Neutrophil chemotactic defects have also been reported. Infectious agents include bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Many patients develop atopic dermatitis, eczema, and other signs of autoinflammation. Affected individuals may also show developmental delay or cognitive impairment of varying severity (summary by Bjorksten and Lundmark, 1976 and Zhang et al., 2014).
Immunodeficiency 36
MedGen UID:
863371
Concept ID:
C4014934
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-36 with lymphoproliferation (IMD36) is an autosomal dominant primary immunodeficiency with a highly heterogeneous clinical phenotype, characterized primarily by recurrent respiratory tract infections, lymphoproliferation, and antibody deficiency. Other features include growth retardation, mild neurodevelopmental delay, and autoimmunity. The major complication is development of B-cell lymphoma (Elkaim et al., 2016).
Infantile-onset periodic fever-panniculitis-dermatosis syndrome
MedGen UID:
934581
Concept ID:
C4310614
Disease or Syndrome
Autoinflammation, panniculitis, and dermatosis syndrome (AIPDS) is an autosomal recessive autoinflammatory disease characterized by neonatal onset of recurrent fever, erythematous rash with painful nodules, painful joints, and lipodystrophy. Additional features may include diarrhea, increased serum C-reactive protein (CRP), leukocytosis, and neutrophilia in the absence of any infection. Patients exhibit no overt primary immunodeficiency (Damgaard et al., 2016 and Zhou et al., 2016).
Mucopolysaccharidosis-plus syndrome
MedGen UID:
934594
Concept ID:
C4310627
Disease or Syndrome
MPSPS is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism resulting in a multisystem disorder with features of the mucopolysaccharidosis lysosomal storage diseases (see, e.g., 607016). Patients present in infancy or early childhood with respiratory difficulties, cardiac problems, anemia, dysostosis multiplex, renal involvement, coarse facies, and delayed psychomotor development. Most patients die of cardiorespiratory failure in the first years of life (summary by Kondo et al., 2017).
Lung disease, immunodeficiency, and chromosome breakage syndrome;
MedGen UID:
934620
Concept ID:
C4310653
Disease or Syndrome
LICS is an autosomal recessive chromosome breakage syndrome characterized by failure to thrive in infancy, immune deficiency, and fatal progressive pediatric lung disease induced by viral infection. Some patients may have mild dysmorphic features (summary by van der Crabben et al., 2016).
Immunodeficiency-centromeric instability-facial anomalies syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1636193
Concept ID:
C4551557
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency, centromeric instability, and facial dysmorphism (ICF) syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by facial dysmorphism, immunoglobulin deficiency, and branching of chromosomes 1, 9, and 16 after phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation of lymphocytes. Hypomethylation of DNA of a small fraction of the genome is an unusual feature of ICF patients that is explained by mutations in the DNMT3B gene in some, but not all, ICF patients (Hagleitner et al., 2008). Genetic Heterogeneity of Immunodeficiency-Centromeric Instability-Facial Anomalies Syndrome See also ICF2 (614069), caused by mutation in the ZBTB24 gene (614064) on chromosome 6q21; ICF3 (616910), caused by mutation in the CDCA7 gene (609937) on chromosome 2q31; and ICF4 (616911), caused by mutation in the HELLS gene (603946) on chromosome 10q23.
Immunodeficiency 64
MedGen UID:
1684716
Concept ID:
C5231402
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-64 with lymphoproliferation (IMD64) is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency characterized by onset of recurrent bacterial, viral, and fungal infections in early childhood. Laboratory studies show variably decreased numbers of T cells, with lesser deficiencies of B and NK cells. There is impaired T-cell proliferation and activation; functional defects in B cells and NK cells may also be observed. Patients have increased susceptibility to EBV infection and may develop lymphoproliferation or EBV-associated lymphoma. Some patients may develop features of autoimmunity (summary by Salzer et al., 2016, Mao et al., 2018, and Winter et al., 2018).
X-linked lymphoproliferative disease due to SH2D1A deficiency
MedGen UID:
1770239
Concept ID:
C5399825
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) has two recognizable subtypes, XLP1 and XLP2. XLP1 is characterized predominantly by one of three commonly recognized phenotypes: Inappropriate immune response to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection leading to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) or severe mononucleosis. Dysgammaglobulinemia. Lymphoproliferative disease (malignant lymphoma). XLP2 is most often characterized by HLH (often associated with EBV), dysgammaglobulinemia, and inflammatory bowel disease. HLH resulting from EBV infection is associated with an unregulated and exaggerated immune response with widespread proliferation of cytotoxic T cells, EBV-infected B cells, and macrophages. Dysgammaglobulinemia is typically hypogammaglobulinemia of one or more immunoglobulin subclasses. The malignant lymphomas are typically B-cell lymphomas, non-Hodgkin type, often extranodal, and in particular involving the intestine.
Immunodeficiency 78 with autoimmunity and developmental delay
MedGen UID:
1785772
Concept ID:
C5543159
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-78 with autoimmunity and developmental delay (IMD78) is an autosomal recessive systemic disorder characterized by onset of symptoms in early childhood. Affected individuals present with features of immune deficiency, such as recurrent sinopulmonary or skin infections, as well as autoimmunity, including autoimmune cytopenias, hemolytic anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Autoimmune hepatitis or thyroid disease and central nervous system vasculitis with stroke may also occur. There is increased susceptibility to bacterial, viral, and fungal infections. Laboratory studies show lymphopenia with advanced differentiation and premature senescence of CD8+ T cells and B cells; some patients may have hypergammaglobulinemia. The findings indicate immune dysregulation. Patients also have global developmental delay with speech delay and variable intellectual disability. Many patients die prematurely, but successful hematopoietic bone marrow transplant may be curative (summary by Lu et al., 2014 and Atallah et al., 2021).
Immunodeficiency 86
MedGen UID:
1794205
Concept ID:
C5561995
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-86 (IMD86) is an autosomal recessive immunologic disorder characterized by susceptibility to mycobacterial disease after exposure to BCG vaccine. Affected individuals usually develop localized mycobacterial lymphadenopathy that can be successfully treated without subsequent episodes (summary by Kong et al., 2018).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

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Diagnosis

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Therapy

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Prognosis

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Clinical prediction guides

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Nielsen CT
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Recent systematic reviews

Baccarelli A, Mocarelli P, Patterson DG Jr, Bonzini M, Pesatori AC, Caporaso N, Landi MT
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