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Postural instability

MedGen UID:
334529
Concept ID:
C1843921
Finding
Synonyms: Abnormal retropulsion test; Balance impairment; Imbalance
 
HPO: HP:0002172

Definition

A tendency to fall or the inability to keep oneself from falling; imbalance. The retropulsion test is widely regarded as the gold standard to evaluate postural instability, Use of the retropulsion test includes a rapid balance perturbation in the backward direction, and the number of balance correcting steps (or total absence thereof) is used to rate the degree of postural instability. Healthy subjects correct such perturbations with either one or two large steps, or without taking any steps, hinging rapidly at the hips while swinging the arms forward as a counterweight. In patients with balance impairment, balance correcting steps are often too small, forcing patients to take more than two steps. Taking three or more steps is generally considered to be abnormal, and taking more than five steps is regarded as being clearly abnormal. Markedly affected patients continue to step backward without ever regaining their balance and must be caught by the examiner (this would be called true retropulsion). Even more severely affected patients fail to correct entirely, and fall backward like a pushed toy soldier, without taking any corrective steps. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

Conditions with this feature

Azorean disease
MedGen UID:
9841
Concept ID:
C0024408
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), also known as Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), is characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia and variable findings including pyramidal signs, a dystonic-rigid extrapyramidal syndrome, significant peripheral amyotrophy and generalized areflexia, progressive external ophthalmoplegia, action-induced facial and lingual fasciculations, and bulging eyes. Neurologic findings tend to evolve as the disorder progresses.
Weaver syndrome
MedGen UID:
120511
Concept ID:
C0265210
Disease or Syndrome
EZH2-related overgrowth includes EZH2-related Weaver syndrome at one end of the spectrum and tall stature at the other. Although most individuals diagnosed with a heterozygous EZH2 pathogenic variant have been identified because of a clinical suspicion of Weaver syndrome, a minority have been identified through molecular genetic testing of family members of probands or individuals with overgrowth who did not have a clinical diagnosis of Weaver syndrome. Thus, the extent of the phenotypic spectrum associated with a heterozygous EZH2 pathogenic variant is not yet known. Weaver syndrome is characterized by tall stature, variable intellect (ranging from normal intellect to severe intellectual disability), characteristic facial appearance, and a range of associated clinical features including advanced bone age, poor coordination, soft doughy skin, camptodactyly of the fingers and/or toes, umbilical hernia, abnormal tone, and hoarse low cry in infancy. Brain MRI has identified abnormalities in a few individuals with EZH2-related overgrowth. Neuroblastoma occurs at a slightly increased frequency in individuals with a heterozygous EZH2 pathogenic variant but data are insufficient to determine absolute risk. There is currently no evidence that additional malignancies (including hematologic malignancies) occur with increased frequency.
Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy
MedGen UID:
155630
Concept ID:
C0751781
Disease or Syndrome
Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is a progressive disorder of ataxia, myoclonus, epilepsy, and progressive intellectual deterioration in children and ataxia, choreoathetosis, and dementia or character changes in adults. Onset ranges from before age one year to age 72 years; mean age of onset is 31.5 years. The clinical presentation varies depending on the age of onset. The cardinal features in adults are ataxia, choreoathetosis, and dementia. Cardinal features in children are progressive intellectual deterioration, behavioral changes, myoclonus, and epilepsy.
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2
MedGen UID:
155704
Concept ID:
C0752121
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia, including nystagmus, slow saccadic eye movements, and in some individuals, ophthalmoparesis or parkinsonism. Pyramidal findings are present; deep tendon reflexes are brisk early on and absent later in the course. Age of onset is typically in the fourth decade with a ten- to 15-year disease duration.
Early-onset parkinsonism-intellectual disability syndrome
MedGen UID:
208674
Concept ID:
C0796195
Disease or Syndrome
Waisman syndrome is an X-linked neurologic disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, impaired intellectual development, and early-onset Parkinson disease (summary by Wilson et al., 2014).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2D
MedGen UID:
316946
Concept ID:
C1832274
Disease or Syndrome
The phenotypic spectrum of GARS1-associated axonal neuropathy ranges from GARS1 infantile-onset SMA (GARS1-iSMA) to GARS1 adolescent- or early adult-onset hereditary motor/sensory neuropathy (GARS1-HMSN). GARS1-iSMA. Age of onset ranges from the neonatal period to the toddler years. Initial manifestations are typically respiratory distress, poor feeding, and muscle weakness (distal greater than proximal). Weakness is slowly progressive, ultimately requiring mechanical ventilation and feeding via gastrostomy tube. GARS1-HMSN. Age of onset is most commonly during the second decade (range eight to 36 years). Initial manifestations are typically muscle weakness in the hands sometimes with sensory deficits. Lower limb involvement (seen in ~50% of individuals) ranges from weakness and atrophy of the extensor digitorum brevis and weakness of toe dorsiflexors to classic peroneal muscular atrophy with foot drop and a high steppage gait.
Cerebellar ataxia-areflexia-pes cavus-optic atrophy-sensorineural hearing loss syndrome
MedGen UID:
318633
Concept ID:
C1832466
Disease or Syndrome
ATP1A3-related neurologic disorders represent a clinical continuum in which at least three distinct phenotypes have been delineated: rapid-onset dystonia-parkinsonism (RDP); alternating hemiplegia of childhood (ACH); and cerebellar ataxia, areflexia, pes cavus, optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss (CAPOS). However, some affected individuals have intermediate phenotypes or only a few features that do not fit well into one of these major phenotypes. RDP has been characterized by: abrupt onset of dystonia over days to weeks with parkinsonism (primarily bradykinesia and postural instability); common bulbar involvement; and absence or minimal response to an adequate trial of L-dopa therapy, with few exceptions. Often fever, physiologic stress, or alcoholic binges trigger the onset of symptoms. After their initial appearance, symptoms often stabilize with little improvement; occasionally second episodes occur with abrupt worsening of symptoms. Rarely, affected individuals have reported a more gradual onset of symptoms over weeks to months. Anxiety, depression, and seizures have been reported. Age of onset ranges from four to 55 years, although a childhood variation of RDP with onset between ages nine and 14 months has been reported. AHC is a complex neurodevelopmental syndrome most frequently manifesting in infancy or early childhood with paroxysmal episodic neurologic dysfunction including alternating hemiparesis or dystonia, quadriparesis, seizure-like episodes, and oculomotor abnormalities. Episodes can last for minutes, hours, days, or even weeks. Remission of symptoms occurs with sleep and immediately after awakening. Over time, persistent neurologic deficits including oculomotor apraxia, ataxia, choreoathetosis, dystonia, parkinsonism, and cognitive and behavioral dysfunction develop in the majority of those affected; more than 50% develop epilepsy in addition to their episodic movement disorder phenotype. CAPOS (cerebellar ataxia, areflexia, pes cavus, optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss) syndrome is characterized by episodes of ataxic encephalopathy and/or weakness during and after a febrile illness. Onset is between ages six months and four years. Some acute symptoms resolve; progression of sensory losses and severity vary.
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 7
MedGen UID:
339552
Concept ID:
C1846564
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia 7 (SPG7) is characterized by insidiously progressive bilateral leg weakness and spasticity. Most affected individuals have decreased vibration sense and cerebellar signs. Onset is mostly in adulthood, although symptoms may start as early as age 11 years and as late as age 72 years. Additional features including ataxia (gait and limbs), spastic dysarthria, dysphagia, pale optic disks, ataxia, nystagmus, strabismus, ptosis, hearing loss, motor and sensory neuropathy, amyotrophy, scoliosis, pes cavus, and urinary sphincter disturbances may be observed.
Joubert syndrome with renal defect
MedGen UID:
335526
Concept ID:
C1846790
Disease or Syndrome
Classic Joubert syndrome (JS) is characterized by three primary findings: A distinctive cerebellar and brain stem malformation called the molar tooth sign (MTS). Hypotonia. Developmental delays. Often these findings are accompanied by episodic tachypnea or apnea and/or atypical eye movements. In general, the breathing abnormalities improve with age, truncal ataxia develops over time, and acquisition of gross motor milestones is delayed. Cognitive abilities are variable, ranging from severe intellectual disability to normal. Additional findings can include retinal dystrophy, renal disease, ocular colobomas, occipital encephalocele, hepatic fibrosis, polydactyly, oral hamartomas, and endocrine abnormalities. Both intra- and interfamilial variation are seen.
Autosomal dominant Parkinson disease 8
MedGen UID:
339628
Concept ID:
C1846862
Disease or Syndrome
LRRK2 Parkinson disease (PD) is characterized by features consistent with idiopathic PD: initial motor features of slowly progressive asymmetric tremor at rest and/or bradykinesia, cogwheel muscle rigidity, postural instability, and gait abnormalities that may include festination and freezing. Certain nonmotor symptoms in LRRK2-PD, especially REM sleep behavior disorder and cognitive decline, may occur at similar or slightly reduced frequency compared to typical idiopathic* PD. Onset is generally after age 50, although early-onset (in the 20s) and late-onset (in the 90s) disease has been described. * Idiopathic PD refers to the presence of signs and symptoms of PD for which the etiology is currently unknown and in which there is no known family history of PD.
Kufor-Rakeb syndrome
MedGen UID:
338281
Concept ID:
C1847640
Disease or Syndrome
Kufor-Rakeb syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive form of juvenile-onset atypical Parkinson disease (PARK9) associated with supranuclear gaze palsy, spasticity, and dementia. Some patients have neuroradiologic evidence of iron deposition in the basal ganglia, indicating that the pathogenesis of PARK9 can be considered among the syndromes of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA; see 234200) (summary by Bruggemann et al., 2010). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Parkinson disease (PD), see 168600. Biallelic mutation in the ATP13A2 gene also causes autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia-78 (SPG78; 617225), an adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder with overlapping features. Patients with SPG78 have later onset and prominent spasticity, but rarely parkinsonism. Loss of ATP13A2 function results in a multidimensional spectrum of neurologic features reflecting various regions of the brain and nervous system, including cortical, pyramidal, extrapyramidal, brainstem, cerebellar, and peripheral (summary by Estrada-Cuzcano et al., 2017).
Parkinsonian-pyramidal syndrome
MedGen UID:
337969
Concept ID:
C1850100
Disease or Syndrome
Parkinson's disease is a progressive disorder of the nervous system. The disorder affects several regions of the brain, especially an area called the substantia nigra that controls balance and movement.\n\nOften the first symptom of Parkinson's disease is trembling or shaking (tremor) of a limb, especially when the body is at rest. Typically, the tremor begins on one side of the body, usually in one hand. Tremors can also affect the arms, legs, feet, and face. Other characteristic symptoms of Parkinson's disease include rigidity or stiffness of the limbs and torso, slow movement (bradykinesia) or an inability to move (akinesia), and impaired balance and coordination (postural instability). These symptoms worsen slowly over time.\n\nParkinson's disease can also affect emotions and thinking ability (cognition). Some affected individuals develop psychiatric conditions such as depression and visual hallucinations. People with Parkinson's disease also have an increased risk of developing dementia, which is a decline in intellectual functions including judgment and memory.\n\nGenerally, Parkinson's disease that begins after age 50 is called late-onset disease. The condition is described as early-onset disease if signs and symptoms begin before age 50. Early-onset cases that begin before age 20 are sometimes referred to as juvenile-onset Parkinson's disease.
Autosomal recessive early-onset Parkinson disease 6
MedGen UID:
342982
Concept ID:
C1853833
Disease or Syndrome
PINK1 type of young-onset Parkinson disease is characterized by early onset (mean age 33 years) of tremor, bradykinesia, and rigidity that are often indistinguishable from other causes of Parkinson disease. Lower-limb dystonia may be a presenting sign. Postural instability, hyperreflexia, abnormal behavior, and psychiatric manifestations have been described. The disease is usually slowly progressive. Individuals have a marked and sustained response to oral administration of levodopa (L-dopa), frequently associated with L-dopa-induced fluctuations and dyskinesias.
Episodic ataxia type 5
MedGen UID:
356142
Concept ID:
C1866039
Disease or Syndrome
An extremely rare form of hereditary episodic ataxia with characteristics of recurrent episodes of vertigo and ataxia lasting several hours.
Autosomal dominant Parkinson disease 1
MedGen UID:
357008
Concept ID:
C1868595
Disease or Syndrome
Parkinson disease is the second most common neurogenic disorder after Alzheimer disease (AD; 104300), affecting approximately 1% of the population over age 50. Clinical manifestations include resting tremor, muscular rigidity, bradykinesia, and postural instability. Additional features are characteristic postural abnormalities, dysautonomia, dystonic cramps, and dementia (Polymeropoulos et al., 1996). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Parkinson disease, see 168600.
Autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinson disease 2
MedGen UID:
401500
Concept ID:
C1868675
Disease or Syndrome
Parkin type of early-onset Parkinson disease (PARK-Parkin) is characterized by the cardinal signs of Parkinson disease (PD): bradykinesia, resting tremor, and rigidity. The median age at onset is 31 years (range: 3-81 years). The disease is slowly progressive: disease duration of more than 50 years has been reported. Clinical findings vary; hyperreflexia is common. Lower-limb dystonia may be a presenting sign and cognitive decline appears to be no more frequent than in the general population. Dyskinesia as a result of treatment with levodopa frequently occurs.
Dystonia 12
MedGen UID:
358384
Concept ID:
C1868681
Disease or Syndrome
ATP1A3-related neurologic disorders represent a clinical continuum in which at least three distinct phenotypes have been delineated: rapid-onset dystonia-parkinsonism (RDP); alternating hemiplegia of childhood (ACH); and cerebellar ataxia, areflexia, pes cavus, optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss (CAPOS). However, some affected individuals have intermediate phenotypes or only a few features that do not fit well into one of these major phenotypes. RDP has been characterized by: abrupt onset of dystonia over days to weeks with parkinsonism (primarily bradykinesia and postural instability); common bulbar involvement; and absence or minimal response to an adequate trial of L-dopa therapy, with few exceptions. Often fever, physiologic stress, or alcoholic binges trigger the onset of symptoms. After their initial appearance, symptoms often stabilize with little improvement; occasionally second episodes occur with abrupt worsening of symptoms. Rarely, affected individuals have reported a more gradual onset of symptoms over weeks to months. Anxiety, depression, and seizures have been reported. Age of onset ranges from four to 55 years, although a childhood variation of RDP with onset between ages nine and 14 months has been reported. AHC is a complex neurodevelopmental syndrome most frequently manifesting in infancy or early childhood with paroxysmal episodic neurologic dysfunction including alternating hemiparesis or dystonia, quadriparesis, seizure-like episodes, and oculomotor abnormalities. Episodes can last for minutes, hours, days, or even weeks. Remission of symptoms occurs with sleep and immediately after awakening. Over time, persistent neurologic deficits including oculomotor apraxia, ataxia, choreoathetosis, dystonia, parkinsonism, and cognitive and behavioral dysfunction develop in the majority of those affected; more than 50% develop epilepsy in addition to their episodic movement disorder phenotype. CAPOS (cerebellar ataxia, areflexia, pes cavus, optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss) syndrome is characterized by episodes of ataxic encephalopathy and/or weakness during and after a febrile illness. Onset is between ages six months and four years. Some acute symptoms resolve; progression of sensory losses and severity vary.
Hypermanganesemia with dystonia, polycythemia, and cirrhosis
MedGen UID:
412958
Concept ID:
C2750442
Disease or Syndrome
Hypermanganesemia with dystonia 1 (HMNDYT1) is characterized by the following: A movement disorder resulting from manganese accumulation in the basal ganglia. Whole-blood manganese concentrations that often exceed 2000 nmol/L (normal: <320 nmol/L). Polycythemia. Hepatomegaly with variable hepatic fibrosis/cirrhosis. Neurologic findings can manifest in childhood (ages 2-15 years) as four-limb dystonia, leading to a characteristic high-stepping gait ("cock-walk gait"), dysarthria, fine tremor, and bradykinesia or on occasion spastic paraplegia; or in adulthood as parkinsonism (shuffling gait, rigidity, bradykinesia, hypomimia, and monotone speech) unresponsive to L-dopa treatment.
Epilepsy, idiopathic generalized, susceptibility to, 9
MedGen UID:
413424
Concept ID:
C2750887
Finding
For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of idiopathic generalized epilepsy, see 600669. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is a subtype of idiopathic generalized epilepsy; see 254770 for a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of JME.
Autosomal recessive Parkinson disease 14
MedGen UID:
414488
Concept ID:
C2751842
Disease or Syndrome
Generally, Parkinson's disease that begins after age 50 is called late-onset disease. The condition is described as early-onset disease if signs and symptoms begin before age 50. Early-onset cases that begin before age 20 are sometimes referred to as juvenile-onset Parkinson's disease.\n\nParkinson's disease can also affect emotions and thinking ability (cognition). Some affected individuals develop psychiatric conditions such as depression and visual hallucinations. People with Parkinson's disease also have an increased risk of developing dementia, which is a decline in intellectual functions including judgment and memory.\n\nOften the first symptom of Parkinson's disease is trembling or shaking (tremor) of a limb, especially when the body is at rest. Typically, the tremor begins on one side of the body, usually in one hand. Tremors can also affect the arms, legs, feet, and face. Other characteristic symptoms of Parkinson's disease include rigidity or stiffness of the limbs and torso, slow movement (bradykinesia) or an inability to move (akinesia), and impaired balance and coordination (postural instability). These symptoms worsen slowly over time.\n\nParkinson's disease is a progressive disorder of the nervous system. The disorder affects several regions of the brain, especially an area called the substantia nigra that controls balance and movement.
Parkinson disease 5, autosomal dominant, susceptibility to
MedGen UID:
462249
Concept ID:
C3150899
Finding
Parkinson's disease is a progressive disorder of the nervous system. The disorder affects several regions of the brain, especially an area called the substantia nigra that controls balance and movement.\n\nOften the first symptom of Parkinson's disease is trembling or shaking (tremor) of a limb, especially when the body is at rest. Typically, the tremor begins on one side of the body, usually in one hand. Tremors can also affect the arms, legs, feet, and face. Other characteristic symptoms of Parkinson's disease include rigidity or stiffness of the limbs and torso, slow movement (bradykinesia) or an inability to move (akinesia), and impaired balance and coordination (postural instability). These symptoms worsen slowly over time.\n\nParkinson's disease can also affect emotions and thinking ability (cognition). Some affected individuals develop psychiatric conditions such as depression and visual hallucinations. People with Parkinson's disease also have an increased risk of developing dementia, which is a decline in intellectual functions including judgment and memory.\n\nGenerally, Parkinson's disease that begins after age 50 is called late-onset disease. The condition is described as early-onset disease if signs and symptoms begin before age 50. Early-onset cases that begin before age 20 are sometimes referred to as juvenile-onset Parkinson's disease.
Parkinson disease, late-onset
MedGen UID:
463618
Concept ID:
C3160718
Disease or Syndrome
Generally, Parkinson's disease that begins after age 50 is called late-onset disease. The condition is described as early-onset disease if signs and symptoms begin before age 50. Early-onset cases that begin before age 20 are sometimes referred to as juvenile-onset Parkinson's disease.\n\nParkinson's disease can also affect emotions and thinking ability (cognition). Some affected individuals develop psychiatric conditions such as depression and visual hallucinations. People with Parkinson's disease also have an increased risk of developing dementia, which is a decline in intellectual functions including judgment and memory.\n\nOften the first symptom of Parkinson's disease is trembling or shaking (tremor) of a limb, especially when the body is at rest. Typically, the tremor begins on one side of the body, usually in one hand. Tremors can also affect the arms, legs, feet, and face. Other characteristic symptoms of Parkinson's disease include rigidity or stiffness of the limbs and torso, slow movement (bradykinesia) or an inability to move (akinesia), and impaired balance and coordination (postural instability). These symptoms worsen slowly over time.\n\nParkinson's disease is a progressive disorder of the nervous system. The disorder affects several regions of the brain, especially an area called the substantia nigra that controls balance and movement.
Parkinson disease 17
MedGen UID:
481763
Concept ID:
C3280133
Disease or Syndrome
VPS35-related Parkinson disease (VPS35-PD) is defined as Parkinson disease caused by heterozygous VPS35 pathogenic variants. Currently, the only known VPS35 variant with confirmed pathogenicity is c.1858G>A (p.Asp620Asn). Except for a younger age of onset, VPS35-PD is clinically indistinguishable from Parkinson disease of unknown cause (so-called sporadic Parkinson disease). Variability among 50 individuals reported with molecularly confirmed VPS35-PD includes age of onset (mean: 51.0±8.7 years; range: 34-68 years), Parkinson subtype (tremor, akinetic rigid, mixed), first motor symptom, course of the disease (unilateral onset and slow disease progression are typical; dyskinesia and motor fluctuations may occur), and presence/absence of neuropsychiatric manifestations (including depression, schizophrenia, learning difficulties, mild cognitive impairment, and dementia).
Cerebellar ataxia with neuropathy and bilateral vestibular areflexia syndrome
MedGen UID:
482853
Concept ID:
C3281223
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebellar ataxia, neuropathy, and vestibular areflexia syndrome (CANVAS) is an autosomal recessive adult-onset, slowly progressive neurologic disorder characterized by imbalance due to cerebellar gait and limb ataxia, impaired vestibular function bilaterally, and non-length-dependent sensory neuropathy (summary by Szmulewicz et al., 2011).
Coenzyme Q10 deficiency, primary, 1
MedGen UID:
764868
Concept ID:
C3551954
Disease or Syndrome
Primary coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency is usually associated with multisystem involvement, including neurologic manifestations such as fatal neonatal encephalopathy with hypotonia; a late-onset slowly progressive multiple-system atrophy-like phenotype (neurodegeneration with autonomic failure and various combinations of parkinsonism and cerebellar ataxia, and pyramidal dysfunction); and dystonia, spasticity, seizures, and intellectual disability. Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS), the hallmark renal manifestation, is often the initial manifestation either as isolated renal involvement that progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), or associated with encephalopathy (seizures, stroke-like episodes, severe neurologic impairment) resulting in early death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), retinopathy or optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss can also be seen.
Multiple system atrophy 1, susceptibility to
MedGen UID:
811503
Concept ID:
C3714927
Finding
Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a distinct clinicopathologic entity that manifests as a progressive adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder causing parkinsonism, cerebellar ataxia, and autonomic, urogenital, and pyramidal dysfunction in various combinations. Two main subtypes are recognized: 'subtype C,' characterized predominantly by cerebellar ataxia, and 'subtype P,' characterized predominantly by parkinsonism. MSA is characterized pathologically by the degeneration of striatonigral and olivopontocerebellar structures and glial cytoplasmic inclusions (GCIs) that consist of abnormally phosphorylated alpha-synuclein (SNCA; 163890) or tau (MAPT; 157140) (Gilman et al., 1998; Gilman et al., 2008; Scholz et al., 2009). 'Subtype C' of MSA has been reported to be more prevalent than 'subtype P' in the Japanese population (65-67% vs 33-35%), whereas 'subtype P' has been reported to be more prevalent than 'subtype C' in Europe (63% vs 34%) and North America (60% vs 13%, with 27% of cases unclassified) (summary by The Multiple-System Atrophy Research Collaboration, 2013). MSA is similar clinically and pathologically to Parkinson disease (PD; 168600) and Lewy body dementia (127750). See also PARK1 (168601), which is specifically caused by mutation in the SNCA gene. Pure autonomic failure manifests as orthostatic hypotension and other autonomic abnormalities without other neurologic involvement. Although there is some phenotypic overlap, the relationship of pure autonomic failure to MSA is unclear (Vanderhaeghen et al., 1970; Schatz, 1996).
Juvenile onset Parkinson disease 19A
MedGen UID:
816141
Concept ID:
C3809811
Disease or Syndrome
DNAJC6 Parkinson disease is a complex early-onset neurologic disorder whose core features are typical parkinsonian symptoms including bradykinesia, resting tremor, rigidity, and postural instability. The majority of individuals have juvenile onset and develop symptoms before age 21 years. Developmental delay, intellectual disability, seizures, other movement disorders (e.g., dystonia, spasticity, myoclonus), and neuropsychiatric features occur in the majority of individuals with juvenile onset and often precede parkinsonism. The onset of parkinsonian features usually occurs toward the end of the first or beginning of the second decade and the disease course is rapidly progressive with loss of ambulation in mid-adolescence in the majority of individuals. Additional features include gastrointestinal manifestations and bulbar dysfunction. A minority of individuals with DNAJC6 Parkinson disease develop early-onset parkinsonism with symptom onset in the third to fourth decade and absence of additional neurologic features.
Early-onset Parkinson disease 20
MedGen UID:
816154
Concept ID:
C3809824
Disease or Syndrome
Parkinson disease-20 is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by young adult-onset of parkinsonism. Additional features may include seizures, cognitive decline, abnormal eye movements, and dystonia (summary by Krebs et al., 2013 and Quadri et al., 2013). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Parkinson disease, see PD (168600).
Parkinson disease 11, autosomal dominant, susceptibility to
MedGen UID:
896658
Concept ID:
C4083045
Finding
Parkinson's disease is a progressive disorder of the nervous system. The disorder affects several regions of the brain, especially an area called the substantia nigra that controls balance and movement.\n\nOften the first symptom of Parkinson's disease is trembling or shaking (tremor) of a limb, especially when the body is at rest. Typically, the tremor begins on one side of the body, usually in one hand. Tremors can also affect the arms, legs, feet, and face. Other characteristic symptoms of Parkinson's disease include rigidity or stiffness of the limbs and torso, slow movement (bradykinesia) or an inability to move (akinesia), and impaired balance and coordination (postural instability). These symptoms worsen slowly over time.\n\nParkinson's disease can also affect emotions and thinking ability (cognition). Some affected individuals develop psychiatric conditions such as depression and visual hallucinations. People with Parkinson's disease also have an increased risk of developing dementia, which is a decline in intellectual functions including judgment and memory.\n\nGenerally, Parkinson's disease that begins after age 50 is called late-onset disease. The condition is described as early-onset disease if signs and symptoms begin before age 50. Early-onset cases that begin before age 20 are sometimes referred to as juvenile-onset Parkinson's disease.
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 41
MedGen UID:
908281
Concept ID:
C4225158
Disease or Syndrome
A rare autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type III disorder with characteristics of adult-onset progressive imbalance and loss of coordination associated with an ataxic gait. Mild atrophy of the cerebellar vermis has been reported on brain magnetic resonance imaging.
Parkinson disease 22, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
907886
Concept ID:
C4225238
Disease or Syndrome
Any Parkinson disease in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the CHCHD2 gene.
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal recessive 2
MedGen UID:
901897
Concept ID:
C4225312
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions-2 (PEOB2) is a mitochondrial disorder characterized by adult onset of progressive external ophthalmoplegia, exercise intolerance, muscle weakness, and signs and symptoms of spinocerebellar ataxia, such as impaired gait and dysarthria. Some patients may have respiratory insufficiency. Laboratory studies are consistent with a defect in mtDNA replication (summary by Reyes et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive PEO, see PEOB1 (258450).
Parkinson disease 21
MedGen UID:
903105
Concept ID:
C4225353
Disease or Syndrome
Parkinson disease-21 (PARK21) is an autosomal dominant form of typical adult-onset Parkinson disease characterized by tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, postural instability, and good response to levodopa treatment (summary by Vilarino-Guell et al., 2014). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Parkinson disease, see PD (168600).
Spinocerebellar ataxia 43
MedGen UID:
934730
Concept ID:
C4310763
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia-43 is an autosomal dominant, slowly progressive neurologic disorder characterized by adult-onset gait and limb ataxia and often associated with peripheral neuropathy mainly affecting the motor system, although some patients may have distal sensory impairment (summary by Depondt et al., 2016). For a general discussion of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia, see SCA1 (164400).
Idiopathic basal ganglia calcification 1
MedGen UID:
1637664
Concept ID:
C4551624
Disease or Syndrome
Primary familial brain calcification (PFBC) is a neurodegenerative disorder with characteristic calcium deposits in the basal ganglia and other brain areas visualized on neuroimaging. Most affected individuals are in good health during childhood and young adulthood and typically present in the fourth to fifth decade with a gradually progressive movement disorder and neuropsychiatric symptoms. The movement disorder first manifests as clumsiness, fatigability, unsteady gait, slow or slurred speech, dysphagia, involuntary movements, or muscle cramping. Neuropsychiatric symptoms, often the first or most prominent manifestations, range from mild difficulty with concentration and memory to changes in personality and/or behavior, to psychosis and dementia. Seizures of various types occur frequently, some individuals experience chronic headache and vertigo; urinary urgency or incontinence may be present.
Supranuclear palsy, progressive, 1
MedGen UID:
1640811
Concept ID:
C4551863
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of clinical manifestations of MAPT-related frontotemporal dementia (MAPT-FTD) has expanded from its original description of frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonian manifestations to include changes in behavior, motor function, memory, and/or language. A recent retrospective study suggested that the majority of affected individuals have either behavioral changes consistent with a diagnosis of behavioral variant FTD (bvFTD) or, less commonly, a parkinsonian syndrome (i.e., progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal syndrome, or Parkinson disease). Fewer than 5% of people with MAPT-FTD have primary progressive aphasia or Alzheimer disease. Clinical presentation may differ between and within families with the same MAPT variant. MAPT-FTD is a progressive disorder that commonly ends with a relatively global dementia in which some affected individuals become mute. Progression of motor impairment in affected individuals results in some becoming chairbound and others bedbound. Mean disease duration is 9.3 (SD: 6.4) years but is individually variable and can be more than 30 years in some instances.
Microangiopathy and leukoencephalopathy, pontine, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1684781
Concept ID:
C5231411
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant pontine microangiopathy and leukoencephalopathy (PADMAL) is a form of cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) resulting in the onset of recurrent ischemic strokes in the thirties or forties. Affected individuals develop progressive, but variable, cognitive and motor impairment, consistent with progressive multi-infarct dementia. Brain imaging shows lacunar infarcts, often with a pontine predilection, as well as diffuse leukoencephalopathy affecting various brain regions. Although there are overlapping clinical features, the disorder is genetically and pathologically distinct from CADASIL (125310) (summary by Verdura et al., 2016).
Snijders blok-fisher syndrome
MedGen UID:
1684801
Concept ID:
C5231424
Disease or Syndrome
Snijders Blok-Fisher syndrome (SNIBFIS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay, hypotonia, variable impaired intellectual development, and specifically impaired speech and language acquisition. Patients achieve independent ambulation and most have mildly to moderately impaired cognition with autistic features, although a few may develop seizures and have a more severe phenotype. Dysmorphic features include abnormal, cupped, or prominent ears and ocular anomalies. Mutations usually occur de novo, although 1 family with autosomal dominant inheritance has been reported (summary by Snijders Blok et al., 2019).
Neurodegeneration with ataxia and late-onset optic atrophy
MedGen UID:
1779901
Concept ID:
C5543254
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodegeneration with ataxia and late-onset optic atrophy (NDAXOA) is an autosomal dominant disorder with somewhat variable manifestations. Most affected individuals present in mid-adulthood with slowly progressive cerebellar and gait ataxia, optic atrophy, and myopathy or myalgia. Some patients may have a childhood history of neurologic features, including limited extraocular movements. Additional features can include cardiomyopathy, psychiatric disturbances, and peripheral sensory impairment (summary by Taylor et al., 1996 and Courage et al., 2017).
Leukoencephalopathy, diffuse hereditary, with spheroids 1
MedGen UID:
1794139
Concept ID:
C5561929
Disease or Syndrome
CSF1R-related adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP) is characterized by executive dysfunction, memory decline, personality changes, motor impairments, and seizures. A frontal lobe syndrome (e.g., loss of judgment, lack of social inhibitors, lack of insight, and motor persistence) usually appears early in the disease course. The mean age of onset is usually in the fourth decade. Affected individuals eventually become bedridden with spasticity and rigidity. The disease course ranges from two to 30 or more years (mean: 8 years).
Intellectual disability and myopathy syndrome
MedGen UID:
1808193
Concept ID:
C5676904
Disease or Syndrome
Intellectual disability and myopathy syndrome (IDMYS) is an autosomal recessive developmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay with mildly impaired intellectual development, hypotonia, muscle weakness and fatigue, and white matter abnormalities on brain imaging. Variable additional features may include sensorineural hearing loss, dysmorphic facies, and progressive heart disease (summary by Smeland et al., 2019).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia, language delay, and skeletal defects with or without seizures
MedGen UID:
1823986
Concept ID:
C5774213
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia, language delay, and skeletal defects with or without seizures (NEDHLSS) is characterized by global developmental delay apparent from infancy. Affected individuals show severe hypotonia with delayed walking or inability to walk, poor or absent speech, and impaired intellectual development with behavioral abnormalities. Most patients have early-onset seizures, mild skeletal defects that are usually distal, and nonspecific dysmorphic features. More severely affected individuals have additional congenital abnormalities; however, cardiac involvement is rare (summary by Rodan et al., 2021).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Raza C, Anjum R, Shakeel NUA
Life Sci 2019 Jun 1;226:77-90. Epub 2019 Apr 10 doi: 10.1016/j.lfs.2019.03.057. PMID: 30980848
Höglinger GU, Respondek G, Stamelou M, Kurz C, Josephs KA, Lang AE, Mollenhauer B, Müller U, Nilsson C, Whitwell JL, Arzberger T, Englund E, Gelpi E, Giese A, Irwin DJ, Meissner WG, Pantelyat A, Rajput A, van Swieten JC, Troakes C, Antonini A, Bhatia KP, Bordelon Y, Compta Y, Corvol JC, Colosimo C, Dickson DW, Dodel R, Ferguson L, Grossman M, Kassubek J, Krismer F, Levin J, Lorenzl S, Morris HR, Nestor P, Oertel WH, Poewe W, Rabinovici G, Rowe JB, Schellenberg GD, Seppi K, van Eimeren T, Wenning GK, Boxer AL, Golbe LI, Litvan I; Movement Disorder Society-endorsed PSP Study Group
Mov Disord 2017 Jun;32(6):853-864. Epub 2017 May 3 doi: 10.1002/mds.26987. PMID: 28467028Free PMC Article
Levin J, Kurz A, Arzberger T, Giese A, Höglinger GU
Dtsch Arztebl Int 2016 Feb 5;113(5):61-9. doi: 10.3238/arztebl.2016.0061. PMID: 26900156Free PMC Article

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Pantelyat A
Continuum (Minneap Minn) 2022 Oct 1;28(5):1364-1378. doi: 10.1212/CON.0000000000001158. PMID: 36222770
Dickson DW
Parkinsonism Relat Disord 2018 Jan;46 Suppl 1(Suppl 1):S30-S33. Epub 2017 Aug 1 doi: 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2017.07.033. PMID: 28780180Free PMC Article
Gandolfi M, Geroin C, Dimitrova E, Boldrini P, Waldner A, Bonadiman S, Picelli A, Regazzo S, Stirbu E, Primon D, Bosello C, Gravina AR, Peron L, Trevisan M, Garcia AC, Menel A, Bloccari L, Valè N, Saltuari L, Tinazzi M, Smania N
Biomed Res Int 2017;2017:7962826. Epub 2017 Nov 26 doi: 10.1155/2017/7962826. PMID: 29333454Free PMC Article
Tysnes OB, Storstein A
J Neural Transm (Vienna) 2017 Aug;124(8):901-905. Epub 2017 Feb 1 doi: 10.1007/s00702-017-1686-y. PMID: 28150045
Jankovic J
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2008 Apr;79(4):368-76. doi: 10.1136/jnnp.2007.131045. PMID: 18344392

Diagnosis

Balestrino R, Schapira AHV
Eur J Neurol 2020 Jan;27(1):27-42. Epub 2019 Nov 27 doi: 10.1111/ene.14108. PMID: 31631455
Debû B, De Oliveira Godeiro C, Lino JC, Moro E
Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep 2018 Apr 6;18(5):23. doi: 10.1007/s11910-018-0828-4. PMID: 29623455
Tysnes OB, Storstein A
J Neural Transm (Vienna) 2017 Aug;124(8):901-905. Epub 2017 Feb 1 doi: 10.1007/s00702-017-1686-y. PMID: 28150045
Thenganatt MA, Jankovic J
JAMA Neurol 2014 Apr;71(4):499-504. doi: 10.1001/jamaneurol.2013.6233. PMID: 24514863
Jankovic J
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2008 Apr;79(4):368-76. doi: 10.1136/jnnp.2007.131045. PMID: 18344392

Therapy

Deuel LM, Seeberger LC
Neurotherapeutics 2020 Oct;17(4):1434-1455. doi: 10.1007/s13311-020-00900-y. PMID: 32785848Free PMC Article
Koch A, Cascorbi I, Westhofen M, Dafotakis M, Klapa S, Kuhtz-Buschbeck JP
Dtsch Arztebl Int 2018 Oct 12;115(41):687-696. doi: 10.3238/arztebl.2018.0687. PMID: 30406755Free PMC Article
Giardini M, Nardone A, Godi M, Guglielmetti S, Arcolin I, Pisano F, Schieppati M
Neural Plast 2018;2018:5614242. Epub 2018 Mar 7 doi: 10.1155/2018/5614242. PMID: 29706993Free PMC Article
Thenganatt MA, Jankovic J
JAMA Neurol 2014 Apr;71(4):499-504. doi: 10.1001/jamaneurol.2013.6233. PMID: 24514863
Lew M
Pharmacotherapy 2007 Dec;27(12 Pt 2):155S-160S. doi: 10.1592/phco.27.12part2.155S. PMID: 18041935

Prognosis

Pantelyat A
Continuum (Minneap Minn) 2022 Oct 1;28(5):1364-1378. doi: 10.1212/CON.0000000000001158. PMID: 36222770
Balestrino R, Schapira AHV
Eur J Neurol 2020 Jan;27(1):27-42. Epub 2019 Nov 27 doi: 10.1111/ene.14108. PMID: 31631455
Raza C, Anjum R, Shakeel NUA
Life Sci 2019 Jun 1;226:77-90. Epub 2019 Apr 10 doi: 10.1016/j.lfs.2019.03.057. PMID: 30980848
Opara J, Małecki A, Małecka E, Socha T
Ann Agric Environ Med 2017 Sep 21;24(3):411-415. Epub 2017 May 11 doi: 10.5604/12321966.1232774. PMID: 28954481
Thenganatt MA, Jankovic J
JAMA Neurol 2014 Apr;71(4):499-504. doi: 10.1001/jamaneurol.2013.6233. PMID: 24514863

Clinical prediction guides

Wang L, Wu P, Brown P, Zhang W, Liu F, Han Y, Zuo CT, Cheng W, Feng J
Neurology 2022 Sep 5;99(10):e977-e988. doi: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000200814. PMID: 35667838Free PMC Article
Sarasso E, Agosta F, Piramide N, Gardoni A, Canu E, Leocadi M, Castelnovo V, Basaia S, Tettamanti A, Volontè MA, Filippi M
Mov Disord 2021 Nov;36(11):2569-2582. Epub 2021 Jul 19 doi: 10.1002/mds.28717. PMID: 34286884
Bloem BR, Marinus J, Almeida Q, Dibble L, Nieuwboer A, Post B, Ruzicka E, Goetz C, Stebbins G, Martinez-Martin P, Schrag A; Movement Disorders Society Rating Scales Committee
Mov Disord 2016 Sep;31(9):1342-55. Epub 2016 Mar 4 doi: 10.1002/mds.26572. PMID: 26945525
Thenganatt MA, Jankovic J
JAMA Neurol 2014 Apr;71(4):499-504. doi: 10.1001/jamaneurol.2013.6233. PMID: 24514863
Brandt T, Dieterich M
J Vestib Res 1993 Spring;3(1):3-14. PMID: 8275242

Recent systematic reviews

Qian Y, Fu X, Zhang H, Yang Y, Wang G
BMC Geriatr 2023 Aug 28;23(1):522. doi: 10.1186/s12877-023-04239-9. PMID: 37641007Free PMC Article
Nila IS, Sumsuzzman DM, Khan ZA, Jung JH, Kazema AS, Kim SJ, Hong Y
Ageing Res Rev 2022 Dec;82:101764. Epub 2022 Oct 20 doi: 10.1016/j.arr.2022.101764. PMID: 36273807
Sarasso E, Gardoni A, Tettamanti A, Agosta F, Filippi M, Corbetta D
J Neurol 2022 Apr;269(4):1873-1888. Epub 2021 Oct 28 doi: 10.1007/s00415-021-10857-3. PMID: 34713324
Thukral N, Kaur J, Malik M
Curr Diabetes Rev 2021;17(3):332-344. doi: 10.2174/1573399816666200703190437. PMID: 32619175
Thenganatt MA, Jankovic J
JAMA Neurol 2014 Apr;71(4):499-504. doi: 10.1001/jamaneurol.2013.6233. PMID: 24514863

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