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Elevated hepatic transaminase

MedGen UID:
338525
Concept ID:
C1848701
Finding
Synonym: Elevated hepatic transaminases
 
HPO: HP:0002910

Definition

Elevations of the levels of SGOT and SGPT in the serum. SGOT (serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase) and SGPT (serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase) are transaminases primarily found in the liver and heart and are released into the bloodstream as the result of liver or heart damage. SGOT and SGPT are used clinically mainly as markers of liver damage. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Hereditary fructosuria
MedGen UID:
42105
Concept ID:
C0016751
Disease or Syndrome
Following dietary exposure to fructose, sucrose, or sorbitol, untreated hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is characterized by metabolic disturbances (hypoglycemia, lactic acidemia, hypophosphatemia, hyperuricemia, hypermagnesemia, hyperalaninemia) and clinical findings (nausea, vomiting, and abdominal distress; chronic growth restriction / failure to thrive). While untreated HFI typically first manifested when fructose- and sucrose-containing foods were introduced in the course of weaning young infants from breast milk, it is now presenting earlier, due to the addition of fructose-containing nutrients in infant formulas. If the infant ingests large quantities of fructose, the infant may acutely develop lethargy, seizures, and/or progressive coma. Untreated HFI may result in renal and hepatic failure. If identified and treated before permanent organ injury occurs, individuals with HFI can experience a normal quality of life and life expectancy.
Gilbert syndrome
MedGen UID:
4891
Concept ID:
C0017551
Disease or Syndrome
The hereditary hyperbilirubinemias (Wolkoff et al., 1983) include (1) those resulting in predominantly unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia: Gilbert or Arias syndrome, Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I (218800), and Crigler-Najjar syndrome type II (606785); and (2) those resulting in predominantly conjugated hyperbilirubinemia: Dubin-Johnson syndrome (237500), Rotor syndrome (237450), and several forms of intrahepatic cholestasis (147480, 211600, 214950, 243300). Detailed studies show that patients with Gilbert syndrome have reduced activity of bilirubin glucuronosyltransferase (Bosma et al., 1995, Koiwai et al., 1995). Genetic Heterogeneity of Hyperbilirubinemia See also Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I (HBLRCN1; 218800), Crigler-Najjar syndrome type II (HBLRCN2; 606785), and transient familial neonatal hyperbilirubinemia (HBLRTFN; 237900), all caused by mutation in the UGT1A1 gene (191740) on chromosome 2q37; Dubin-Johnson syndrome (DJS, HBLRDJ; 237500), caused by mutation in the ABCC2 gene (601107) on chromosome 10q24; and Rotor syndrome (HBLRR; 237450), caused by digenic mutation in the SLCO1B1 (604843) and SLCOB3 (605495) genes, both on chromosome 12p.
Glycogen storage disease type III
MedGen UID:
6641
Concept ID:
C0017922
Disease or Syndrome
Glycogen storage disease type III (GSD III) is characterized by variable liver, cardiac muscle, and skeletal muscle involvement. GSD IIIa is the most common subtype, present in about 85% of affected individuals; it manifests with liver and muscle involvement. GSD IIIb, with liver involvement only, comprises about 15% of all affected individuals. In infancy and early childhood, liver involvement presents as hepatomegaly and failure to thrive, with fasting ketotic hypoglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and elevated hepatic transaminases. In adolescence and adulthood, liver disease becomes less prominent. Most individuals develop cardiac involvement with cardiac hypertrophy and/or cardiomyopathy. Skeletal myopathy manifesting as weakness may be evident in childhood and slowly progresses, typically becoming prominent in the third to fourth decade. The overall prognosis is favorable but cannot be predicted on an individual basis. Long-term complications such as muscular and cardiac symptoms as well as liver fibrosis/cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma may have a severe impact on prognosis and quality of life. To date, it is unknown if long-term complications can be alleviated and/or avoided by dietary interventions.
Glycogen storage disease, type VI
MedGen UID:
6643
Concept ID:
C0017925
Disease or Syndrome
Glycogen storage disease type VI (GSD VI) is a disorder of glycogenolysis caused by deficiency of hepatic glycogen phosphorylase. This critical enzyme catalyzes the rate-limiting step in glycogen degradation, and deficiency of the enzyme in the untreated child is characterized by hepatomegaly, poor growth, ketotic hypoglycemia, elevated hepatic transaminases, hyperlipidemia, and low prealbumin level. GSD VI is usually a relatively mild disorder that presents in infancy and childhood; rare cases of more severe disease manifesting with recurrent hypoglycemia and marked hepatomegaly have been described. More common complications in the setting of suboptimal metabolic control include short stature, delayed puberty, osteopenia, and osteoporosis. Hepatic fibrosis commonly develops in GSD VI, but cirrhosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are rare. Clinical and biochemical abnormalities may decrease with age, but ketosis and hypoglycemia can continue to occur.
Progressive sclerosing poliodystrophy
MedGen UID:
60012
Concept ID:
C0205710
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life and about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called "chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus," or "CPEO+").
Medium-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency
MedGen UID:
65086
Concept ID:
C0220710
Disease or Syndrome
Medium-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (MCAD) is one of the enzymes involved in mitochondrial fatty acid ß-oxidation. Fatty acid ß-oxidation fuels hepatic ketogenesis, which provides a major source of energy once hepatic glycogen stores become depleted during prolonged fasting and periods of higher energy demands. MCAD deficiency is the most common disorder of fatty acid ß-oxidation and one of the most common inborn errors of metabolism. Most children are now diagnosed through newborn screening. Clinical symptoms in a previously apparently healthy child with MCAD deficiency include hypoketotic hypoglycemia and vomiting that may progress to lethargy, seizures, and coma triggered by a common illness. Hepatomegaly and liver disease are often present during an acute episode. Children appear normal at birth and – if not identified through newborn screening – typically present between age three and 24 months, although presentation even as late as adulthood is possible. The prognosis is excellent once the diagnosis is established and frequent feedings are instituted to avoid any prolonged periods of fasting.
Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency
MedGen UID:
67461
Concept ID:
C0221757
Disease or Syndrome
Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) can present with hepatic dysfunction in individuals from infancy to adulthood and with chronic obstructive lung disease (emphysema and/or bronchiectasis), characteristically in individuals older than age 30 years. Individuals with AATD are also at increased risk for panniculitis (migratory, inflammatory, tender skin nodules which may ulcerate on legs and lower abdomen) and C-ANCA-positive vasculitis (granulomatosis with polyangiitis). Phenotypic expression varies within and between families. In adults, smoking is the major factor in accelerating the development of COPD; nonsmokers may have a normal life span, but can also develop lung and/or liver disease. Although reported, emphysema in children with AATD is extremely rare. AATD-associated liver disease, which is present in only a small portion of affected children, manifests as neonatal cholestasis. The incidence of liver disease increases with age. Liver disease in adults (manifesting as cirrhosis and fibrosis) may occur in the absence of a history of neonatal or childhood liver disease. The risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is increased in individuals with AATD.
Glucose-6-phosphate transport defect
MedGen UID:
78644
Concept ID:
C0268146
Disease or Syndrome
Glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI) is characterized by accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver and kidneys resulting in hepatomegaly and nephromegaly. Severely affected infants present in the neonatal period with severe hypoglycemia due to fasting intolerance. More commonly, untreated infants present at age three to four months with hepatomegaly, severe hypoglycemia with or without seizures, lactic acidosis, hyperuricemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. Affected children typically have doll-like faces with full cheeks, relatively thin extremities, short stature, and a protuberant abdomen. Xanthoma and diarrhea may be present. Impaired platelet function and development of reduced or dysfunctional von Willebrand factor can lead to a bleeding tendency with frequent epistaxis and menorrhagia in females. Individuals with untreated GSDIb are more likely to develop impaired neutrophil and monocyte function as well as chronic neutropenia resulting in recurrent bacterial infections, gingivitis, periodontitis, and genital and intestinal ulcers. Long-term complications of untreated GSDI include short stature, osteoporosis, delayed puberty, renal disease (including proximal and distal renal tubular acidosis, renal stones, and renal failure), gout, systemic hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, hepatic adenomas with potential for malignancy, pancreatitis, and polycystic ovaries. Seizures and cognitive impairment may occur in individuals with prolonged periods of hypoglycemia. Normal growth and puberty are expected in treated children. Most affected individuals live into adulthood.
Cholestasis-edema syndrome, Norwegian type
MedGen UID:
78658
Concept ID:
C0268314
Disease or Syndrome
Cholestasis-lymphedema syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis, often lessening and becoming intermittent with age, and severe chronic lymphedema which mainly affects the lower limbs. Patients often present with fat malabsorption leading to failure to thrive, fat soluble vitamin deficiency with bleeding, rickets, and neuropathy. In 25% of cases, cirrhosis occurs during childhood or later in life.
Alstrom syndrome
MedGen UID:
78675
Concept ID:
C0268425
Disease or Syndrome
Alström syndrome is characterized by cone-rod dystrophy, obesity, progressive bilateral sensorineural hearing impairment, acute infantile-onset cardiomyopathy and/or adolescent- or adult-onset restrictive cardiomyopathy, insulin resistance / type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and chronic progressive kidney disease. Cone-rod dystrophy presents as progressive visual impairment, photophobia, and nystagmus usually starting between birth and age 15 months. Many individuals lose all perception of light by the end of the second decade, but a minority retain the ability to read large print into the third decade. Children usually have normal birth weight but develop truncal obesity during their first year. Sensorineural hearing loss presents in the first decade in as many as 70% of individuals and may progress to the severe or moderately severe range (40-70 db) by the end of the first to second decade. Insulin resistance is typically accompanied by the skin changes of acanthosis nigricans, and proceeds to T2DM in the majority by the third decade. Nearly all demonstrate hypertriglyceridemia. Other findings can include endocrine abnormalities (hypothyroidism, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in males, and hyperandrogenism in females), urologic dysfunction / detrusor instability, progressive decrease in renal function, and hepatic disease (ranging from elevated transaminases to steatohepatitis/NAFLD). Approximately 20% of affected individuals have delay in early developmental milestones, most commonly in gross and fine motor skills. About 30% have a learning disability. Cognitive impairment (IQ <70) is very rare. Wide clinical variability is observed among affected individuals, even within the same family.
Tyrosinemia type I
MedGen UID:
75688
Concept ID:
C0268490
Disease or Syndrome
Untreated tyrosinemia type I usually presents either in young infants with severe liver involvement or later in the first year with liver dysfunction and renal tubular dysfunction associated with growth failure and rickets. Untreated children may have repeated, often unrecognized, neurologic crises lasting one to seven days that can include change in mental status, abdominal pain, peripheral neuropathy, and/or respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. Death in the untreated child usually occurs before age ten years, typically from liver failure, neurologic crisis, or hepatocellular carcinoma. Combined treatment with nitisinone and a low-tyrosine diet has resulted in a greater than 90% survival rate, normal growth, improved liver function, prevention of cirrhosis, correction of renal tubular acidosis, and improvement in secondary rickets.
Pearson syndrome
MedGen UID:
87459
Concept ID:
C0342784
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion syndromes predominantly comprise three overlapping phenotypes that are usually simplex (i.e., a single occurrence in a family), but rarely may be observed in different members of the same family or may evolve from one clinical syndrome to another in a given individual over time. The three classic phenotypes caused by mtDNA deletions are Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS), Pearson syndrome, and progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO). KSS is a progressive multisystem disorder defined by onset before age 20 years, pigmentary retinopathy, and PEO; additional features include cerebellar ataxia, impaired intellect (intellectual disability, dementia, or both), sensorineural hearing loss, ptosis, oropharyngeal and esophageal dysfunction, exercise intolerance, muscle weakness, cardiac conduction block, and endocrinopathy. Pearson syndrome is characterized by sideroblastic anemia and exocrine pancreas dysfunction and may be fatal in infancy without appropriate hematologic management. PEO is characterized by ptosis, impaired eye movements due to paralysis of the extraocular muscles (ophthalmoplegia), oropharyngeal weakness, and variably severe proximal limb weakness with exercise intolerance. Rarely, a mtDNA deletion can manifest as Leigh syndrome.
Carnitine acylcarnitine translocase deficiency
MedGen UID:
91000
Concept ID:
C0342791
Disease or Syndrome
Carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase (CACT) is a critical component of the carnitine shuttle, which facilitates the transfer of long-chain fatty acylcarnitines across the inner mitochondrial membrane. CACT deficiency causes a defect in mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid ß-oxidation, with variable clinical severity. Severe neonatal-onset disease is most common, with symptoms evident within two days after birth; attenuated cases may present in the first months of life. Hyperammonemia and cardiac arrhythmia are prominent in early-onset disease, with high rates of cardiac arrest. Other clinical features are typical for disorders of long-chain fatty acid oxidation: poor feeding, lethargy, hypoketotic hypoglycemia, hypotonia, transaminitis, liver dysfunction with hepatomegaly, and rhabdomyolysis. Univentricular or biventricular hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, ranging from mild to severe, may respond to appropriate dietary and medical therapies. Hyperammonemia is difficult to treat and is an important determinant of long-term neurocognitive outcome. Affected individuals with early-onset disease typically experience brain injury at presentation, and have recurrent hyperammonemia leading to developmental delay / intellectual disability. Affected individuals with later-onset disease have milder symptoms and are less likely to experience recurrent hyperammonemia, allowing a better developmental outcome. Prompt treatment of the presenting episode to prevent hypoglycemic, hypoxic, or hyperammonemic brain injury may allow normal growth and development.
Bifunctional peroxisomal enzyme deficiency
MedGen UID:
137982
Concept ID:
C0342870
Pathologic Function
D-bifunctional protein deficiency is a disorder of peroxisomal fatty acid beta-oxidation. See also peroxisomal acyl-CoA oxidase deficiency (264470), caused by mutation in the ACOX1 gene (609751) on chromosome 17q25. The clinical manifestations of these 2 deficiencies are similar to those of disorders of peroxisomal assembly, including X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD; 300100), Zellweger cerebrohepatorenal syndrome (see 214100) and neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD; see 601539) (Watkins et al., 1995). DBP deficiency has been classified into 3 subtypes depending upon the deficient enzyme activity. Type I is a deficiency of both 2-enoyl-CoA hydratase and 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase; type II is a deficiency of hydratase activity alone; and type III is a deficiency of dehydrogenase activity alone. Virtually all patients with types I, II, and III have a severe phenotype characterized by infantile-onset of hypotonia, seizures, and abnormal facial features, and most die before age 2 years. McMillan et al. (2012) proposed a type IV deficiency on the basis of less severe features; these patients have a phenotype reminiscent of Perrault syndrome (PRLTS1; 233400). Pierce et al. (2010) noted that Perrault syndrome and DBP deficiency overlap clinically and suggested that DBP deficiency may be underdiagnosed.
PMM2-congenital disorder of glycosylation
MedGen UID:
138111
Concept ID:
C0349653
Disease or Syndrome
PMM2-CDG, the most common of a group of disorders of abnormal glycosylation of N-linked oligosaccharides, is divided into three clinical stages: infantile multisystem, late-infantile and childhood ataxia–intellectual disability, and adult stable disability. The clinical manifestations and course are highly variable, ranging from infants who die in the first year of life to mildly affected adults. Clinical findings tend to be similar in sibs. In the infantile multisystem presentation, infants show axial hypotonia, hyporeflexia, esotropia, and developmental delay. Feeding problems, vomiting, faltering growth, and developmental delay are frequently seen. Subcutaneous fat may be excessive over the buttocks and suprapubic region. Two distinct clinical courses are observed: (1) a nonfatal neurologic course with faltering growth, strabismus, developmental delay, cerebellar hypoplasia, and hepatopathy in infancy followed by neuropathy and retinitis pigmentosa in the first or second decade; and (2) a more severe neurologic-multivisceral course with approximately 20% mortality in the first year of life. The late-infantile and childhood ataxia–intellectual disability stage, which begins between ages three and ten years, is characterized by hypotonia, ataxia, severely delayed language and motor development, inability to walk, and IQ of 40 to 70; other findings include seizures, stroke-like episodes or transient unilateral loss of function, coagulopathy, retinitis pigmentosa, joint contractures, and skeletal deformities. In the adult stable disability stage, intellectual ability is stable; peripheral neuropathy is variable, progressive retinitis pigmentosa and myopia are seen, thoracic and spinal deformities with osteoporosis worsen, and premature aging is observed; females may lack secondary sexual development and males may exhibit decreased testicular volume. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and coagulopathy may occur. The risk for deep venous thrombosis is increased.
Severe X-linked myotubular myopathy
MedGen UID:
98374
Concept ID:
C0410203
Congenital Abnormality
X-linked myotubular myopathy (X-MTM), also known as myotubular myopathy (MTM), is characterized by muscle weakness that ranges from severe to mild. Approximately 80% of affected males present with severe (classic) X-MTM characterized by polyhydramnios, decreased fetal movement, and neonatal weakness, hypotonia, and respiratory failure. Motor milestones are significantly delayed and most individuals fail to achieve independent ambulation. Weakness is profound and often involves facial and extraocular muscles. Respiratory failure is nearly uniform, with most individuals requiring 24-hour ventilatory assistance. It is estimated that at least 25% of boys with severe X-MTM die in the first year of life, and those who survive rarely live into adulthood. Males with mild or moderate X-MTM (~20%) achieve motor milestones more quickly than males with the severe form; many ambulate independently, and may live into adulthood. Most require gastrostomy tubes and/or ventilator support. In all subtypes of X-MTM, the muscle disease is not obviously progressive. Female carriers of X-MTM are generally asymptomatic, although manifesting heterozygotes are increasingly being identified. In affected females, symptoms range from severe, generalized weakness presenting in childhood, with infantile onset similar to affected male patients, to mild (often asymmetric) weakness manifesting in adulthood. Affected adult females may experience progressive respiratory decline and ultimately require ventilatory support.
Renal cysts and diabetes syndrome
MedGen UID:
96569
Concept ID:
C0431693
Disease or Syndrome
The 17q12 recurrent deletion syndrome is characterized by variable combinations of the three following findings: structural or functional abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract, maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 5 (MODY5), and neurodevelopmental or neuropsychiatric disorders (e.g., developmental delay, intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, anxiety, and bipolar disorder). Using a method of data analysis that avoids ascertainment bias, the authors determined that multicystic kidneys and other structural and functional kidney anomalies occur in 85% to 90% of affected individuals, MODY5 in approximately 40%, and some degree of developmental delay or learning disability in approximately 50%. MODY5 is most often diagnosed before age 25 years (range: age 10-50 years).
Reynolds syndrome
MedGen UID:
450547
Concept ID:
C0748397
Disease or Syndrome
An autoimmune disorder characterized by the association of primary biliary cirrhosis with limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis. Onset occurs between 30-65 years. Occurs sporadically, but rare familial cases with an unknown inheritance pattern have been observed. There is no cure and management is mainly supportive.
Cholestasis-pigmentary retinopathy-cleft palate syndrome
MedGen UID:
208652
Concept ID:
C0795969
Disease or Syndrome
MED12-related disorders include the phenotypes of FG syndrome type 1 (FGS1), Lujan syndrome (LS), X-linked Ohdo syndrome (XLOS), Hardikar syndrome (HS), and nonspecific intellectual disability (NSID). FGS1 and LS share the clinical findings of cognitive impairment, hypotonia, and abnormalities of the corpus callosum. FGS1 is further characterized by absolute or relative macrocephaly, tall forehead, downslanted palpebral fissures, small and simple ears, constipation and/or anal anomalies, broad thumbs and halluces, and characteristic behavior. LS is further characterized by large head, tall thin body habitus, long thin face, prominent nasal bridge, high narrow palate, and short philtrum. Carrier females in families with FGS1 and LS are typically unaffected. XLOS is characterized by intellectual disability, blepharophimosis, and facial coarsening. HS has been described in females with cleft lip and/or cleft palate, biliary and liver anomalies, intestinal malrotation, pigmentary retinopathy, and coarctation of the aorta. Developmental and cognitive concerns have not been reported in females with HS. Pathogenic variants in MED12 have been reported in an increasing number of males and females with NSID, with affected individuals often having clinical features identified in other MED12-related disorders.
Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
162912
Concept ID:
C0796126
Disease or Syndrome
Most characteristically, Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) manifests as an early-onset encephalopathy that usually, but not always, results in severe intellectual and physical disability. A subgroup of infants with AGS present at birth with abnormal neurologic findings, hepatosplenomegaly, elevated liver enzymes, and thrombocytopenia, a picture highly suggestive of congenital infection. Otherwise, most affected infants present at variable times after the first few weeks of life, frequently after a period of apparently normal development. Typically, they demonstrate the subacute onset of a severe encephalopathy characterized by extreme irritability, intermittent sterile pyrexias, loss of skills, and slowing of head growth. Over time, as many as 40% develop chilblain skin lesions on the fingers, toes, and ears. It is becoming apparent that atypical, sometimes milder, cases of AGS exist, and thus the true extent of the phenotype associated with pathogenic variants in the AGS-related genes is not yet known.
Autosomal recessive keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome
MedGen UID:
224809
Concept ID:
C1275089
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome (KIDAR) is characterized by neonatal-onset ichthyotic erythroderma and profound sensorineural deafness, with failure to thrive and developmental delay in childhood. Severe corneal scarring with vision loss has been observed in adulthood. Low plasma copper and ceruloplasmin levels have been reported in some patients (Alsaif et al., 2019; Boyden et al., 2019). An autosomal dominant form of KID syndrome (KIDAD; 148210) is caused by mutation in the GJB2 gene (121011) on chromosome 13q12. Mutation in the AP1S1 gene (603531) causes a disorder with overlapping features (MEDNIK; 609313).
Congenital generalized lipodystrophy type 1
MedGen UID:
318592
Concept ID:
C1720862
Disease or Syndrome
Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy (BSCL) is usually diagnosed at birth or soon thereafter. Because of the absence of functional adipocytes, lipid is stored in other tissues, including muscle and liver. Affected individuals develop insulin resistance and approximately 25%-35% develop diabetes mellitus between ages 15 and 20 years. Hepatomegaly secondary to hepatic steatosis and skeletal muscle hypertrophy occur in all affected individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is reported in 20%-25% of affected individuals and is a significant cause of morbidity from cardiac failure and early mortality.
Congenital generalized lipodystrophy type 2
MedGen UID:
318593
Concept ID:
C1720863
Congenital Abnormality
Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy (BSCL) is usually diagnosed at birth or soon thereafter. Because of the absence of functional adipocytes, lipid is stored in other tissues, including muscle and liver. Affected individuals develop insulin resistance and approximately 25%-35% develop diabetes mellitus between ages 15 and 20 years. Hepatomegaly secondary to hepatic steatosis and skeletal muscle hypertrophy occur in all affected individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is reported in 20%-25% of affected individuals and is a significant cause of morbidity from cardiac failure and early mortality.
Carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1A deficiency
MedGen UID:
316820
Concept ID:
C1829703
Disease or Syndrome
Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A) deficiency is a disorder of long-chain fatty acid oxidation. Clinical manifestations usually occur in an individual with a concurrent febrile or gastrointestinal illness when energy demands are increased; onset of symptoms is usually rapid. The recognized phenotypes are: acute fatty liver of pregnancy, in which the fetus has biallelic pathogenic variants in CPT1A that causes CPT1A deficiency; and hepatic encephalopathy, in which individuals (typically children) present with hypoketotic hypoglycemia and sudden onset of liver failure. Individuals with hepatic encephalopathy typically present with hypoglycemia, absent or low levels of ketones, and elevated serum concentrations of liver transaminases, ammonia, and total carnitine. Between episodes of hepatic encephalopathy, individuals appear developmentally and cognitively normal unless previous metabolic decompensation has resulted in neurologic damage.
Carnitine palmitoyl transferase II deficiency, severe infantile form
MedGen UID:
322211
Concept ID:
C1833511
Disease or Syndrome
Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is a disorder of long-chain fatty-acid oxidation. The three clinical presentations are lethal neonatal form, severe infantile hepatocardiomuscular form, and myopathic form (which is usually mild and can manifest from infancy to adulthood). While the former two are severe multisystemic diseases characterized by liver failure with hypoketotic hypoglycemia, cardiomyopathy, seizures, and early death, the latter is characterized by exercise-induced muscle pain and weakness, sometimes associated with myoglobinuria. The myopathic form of CPT II deficiency is the most common disorder of lipid metabolism affecting skeletal muscle and the most frequent cause of hereditary myoglobinuria. Males are more likely to be affected than females.
Carnitine palmitoyl transferase II deficiency, neonatal form
MedGen UID:
318896
Concept ID:
C1833518
Disease or Syndrome
Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is a disorder of long-chain fatty-acid oxidation. The three clinical presentations are lethal neonatal form, severe infantile hepatocardiomuscular form, and myopathic form (which is usually mild and can manifest from infancy to adulthood). While the former two are severe multisystemic diseases characterized by liver failure with hypoketotic hypoglycemia, cardiomyopathy, seizures, and early death, the latter is characterized by exercise-induced muscle pain and weakness, sometimes associated with myoglobinuria. The myopathic form of CPT II deficiency is the most common disorder of lipid metabolism affecting skeletal muscle and the most frequent cause of hereditary myoglobinuria. Males are more likely to be affected than females.
Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
332084
Concept ID:
C1835912
Disease or Syndrome
Most characteristically, Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) manifests as an early-onset encephalopathy that usually, but not always, results in severe intellectual and physical disability. A subgroup of infants with AGS present at birth with abnormal neurologic findings, hepatosplenomegaly, elevated liver enzymes, and thrombocytopenia, a picture highly suggestive of congenital infection. Otherwise, most affected infants present at variable times after the first few weeks of life, frequently after a period of apparently normal development. Typically, they demonstrate the subacute onset of a severe encephalopathy characterized by extreme irritability, intermittent sterile pyrexias, loss of skills, and slowing of head growth. Over time, as many as 40% develop chilblain skin lesions on the fingers, toes, and ears. It is becoming apparent that atypical, sometimes milder, cases of AGS exist, and thus the true extent of the phenotype associated with pathogenic variants in the AGS-related genes is not yet known.
Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
324389
Concept ID:
C1835916
Disease or Syndrome
Most characteristically, Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) manifests as an early-onset encephalopathy that usually, but not always, results in severe intellectual and physical disability. A subgroup of infants with AGS present at birth with abnormal neurologic findings, hepatosplenomegaly, elevated liver enzymes, and thrombocytopenia, a picture highly suggestive of congenital infection. Otherwise, most affected infants present at variable times after the first few weeks of life, frequently after a period of apparently normal development. Typically, they demonstrate the subacute onset of a severe encephalopathy characterized by extreme irritability, intermittent sterile pyrexias, loss of skills, and slowing of head growth. Over time, as many as 40% develop chilblain skin lesions on the fingers, toes, and ears. It is becoming apparent that atypical, sometimes milder, cases of AGS exist, and thus the true extent of the phenotype associated with pathogenic variants in the AGS-related genes is not yet known.
Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1E
MedGen UID:
324784
Concept ID:
C1837396
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) are metabolic deficiencies in glycoprotein biosynthesis that usually cause severe mental and psychomotor retardation. Different forms of CDGs can be recognized by altered isoelectric focusing (IEF) patterns of serum transferrin. For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG Ia (212065) and CDG Ib (602579).
Congenital bile acid synthesis defect 1
MedGen UID:
335883
Concept ID:
C1843116
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital defects of bile acid synthesis are autosomal recessive disorders characterized by neonatal onset of progressive liver disease with cholestatic jaundice and malabsorption of lipids and lipid-soluble vitamins from the gastrointestinal tract resulting from a primary failure to synthesize bile acids. Affected infants show failure to thrive and secondary coagulopathy. In most forms of the disorder, there is a favorable response to oral bile acid therapy (summary by Cheng et al., 2003). Genetic Heterogeneity of Congenital Defects in Bile Acid Synthesis There are several disorders that result from defects in bile acid synthesis. See CBAS2 (235555), caused by mutation in the delta(4)-3-oxosteroid 5-beta-reductase gene (AKR1D1; 604741) on chromosome 7q33; CBAS3 (613812), caused by mutation in the 7-alpha hydroxylase gene (CYP7B1; 603711) on chromosome 8q12; CBAS4 (214950), caused by mutation in the AMACR gene (604489) on chromosome 5p13; CBAS5 (616278), caused by mutation in the ABCD3 gene (170995) on chromosome 1p21; and CBAS6 (617308), caused by mutation in the ACOX2 gene (601641) on chromosome 3p14. See also progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC1; 211600), which has a similar phenotype.
Lathosterolosis
MedGen UID:
375885
Concept ID:
C1846421
Disease or Syndrome
Lathosterolosis (LATHOS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a recognizable pattern of multiple congenital anomalies involving axial and appendicular skeleton, liver, central nervous and urogenital systems, and lysosomal storage. It is caused by a defect of cholesterol biosynthesis due to sterol C5-desaturase deficiency (summary by Rossi et al., 2007).
Glycine N-methyltransferase deficiency
MedGen UID:
338300
Concept ID:
C1847720
Disease or Syndrome
Hypermethioninemia can occur with other metabolic disorders, such as homocystinuria, tyrosinemia, and galactosemia, which also involve the faulty breakdown of particular molecules. It can also result from liver disease or excessive dietary intake of methionine from consuming large amounts of protein or a methionine-enriched infant formula. The condition is called primary hypermethioninemia when it is not associated with other metabolic disorders or excess methionine in the diet.\n\nPeople with hypermethioninemia often do not show any symptoms. Some individuals with hypermethioninemia exhibit intellectual disability and other neurological problems; delays in motor skills such as standing or walking; sluggishness; muscle weakness; liver problems; unusual facial features; and their breath, sweat, or urine may have a smell resembling boiled cabbage.\n\nHypermethioninemia is an excess of a particular protein building block (amino acid), called methionine, in the blood. This condition can occur when methionine is not broken down (metabolized) properly in the body.
Vitamin K-dependent clotting factors, combined deficiency of, type 1
MedGen UID:
376381
Concept ID:
C1848534
Disease or Syndrome
Deficiency of all vitamin K-dependent clotting factors leads to a bleeding tendency that is usually reversed by oral administration of vitamin K. Acquired forms of the disorder can be caused by intestinal malabsorption of vitamin K. Familial multiple coagulation factor deficiency is rare. Clinical symptoms of the disease include episodes of intracranial hemorrhage in the first weeks of life, sometimes leading to a fatal outcome. The pathomechanism is based on a reduced hepatic gamma-carboxylation of glutamic acid residues of all vitamin K-dependent blood coagulation factors, as well as the anticoagulant factors protein C (612283) and protein S (176880). Posttranslational gamma-carboxylation of proteins enables the calcium-dependent attachment of the proteins to the phospholipid bilayer of membranes, an essential prerequisite for blood coagulation. Vitamin K1 acts as a cofactor for the vitamin K-dependent carboxylase in liver microsomes, GGCX. Genetic Heterogeneity of Combined Deficiency of Vitamin K-Dependent Clotting Factors Combined deficiency of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors-2 (VKFCD2; 607473) is caused by mutation in the gene encoding vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKORC1; 608547) on chromosome 16p11.
Infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia
MedGen UID:
338613
Concept ID:
C1849096
Disease or Syndrome
Infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia (IOSCA) is a severe, progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by normal development until age one year, followed by onset of ataxia, muscle hypotonia, loss of deep-tendon reflexes, and athetosis. Ophthalmoplegia and sensorineural deafness develop by age seven years. By adolescence, affected individuals are profoundly deaf and no longer ambulatory; sensory axonal neuropathy, optic atrophy, autonomic nervous system dysfunction, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism in females become evident. Epilepsy can develop into a serious and often fatal encephalopathy: myoclonic jerks or focal clonic seizures that progress to epilepsia partialis continua followed by status epilepticus with loss of consciousness.
Retinitis pigmentosa-intellectual disability-deafness-hypogenitalism syndrome
MedGen UID:
340317
Concept ID:
C1849401
Disease or Syndrome
A rare syndromic retinitis pigmentosa characterized by pigmentary retinopathy, diabetes mellitus with hyperinsulinism, acanthosis nigricans, secondary cataracts, neurogenic deafness, short stature mild hypogonadism in males and polycystic ovaries with oligomenorrhea in females. Inheritance is thought to be autosomal recessive. It can be distinguished from Alstrom syndrome (see this term) by the presence of intellectual disability and the absence of renal insufficiency. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1993.
Acyl-CoA oxidase deficiency
MedGen UID:
376636
Concept ID:
C1849678
Disease or Syndrome
Peroxisomal acyl-CoA oxidase deficiency is a disorder of peroxisomal fatty acid beta-oxidation. See also D-bifunctional protein deficiency (261515), caused by mutation in the HSD17B4 gene (601860) on chromosome 5q2. The clinical manifestations of these 2 deficiencies are similar to those of disorders of peroxisomal assembly, including Zellweger cerebrohepatorenal syndrome (see 214100) and neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (see 601539) (Watkins et al., 1995).
Neutral lipid storage myopathy
MedGen UID:
339913
Concept ID:
C1853136
Disease or Syndrome
Neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy is an autosomal recessive muscle disorder characterized by adult onset of slowly progressive proximal muscle weakness affecting the upper and lower limbs and associated with increased serum creatine kinase; distal muscle weakness may also occur. About half of patients develop cardiomyopathy later in the disease course. Other variable features include diabetes mellitus, hepatic steatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, and possibly sensorineural hearing loss. Leukocytes and muscle cells show cytoplasmic accumulation of triglycerides (summary by Reilich et al., 2011). Neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy belongs to a group of disorders termed neutral lipid storage disorders (NLSDs). These disorders are characterized by the presence of triglyceride-containing cytoplasmic droplets in leukocytes and in other tissues, including bone marrow, skin, and muscle. Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome (CDS; 275630) is defined as NLSD with ichthyosis (NLSDI). Patients with NLSDM present with myopathy but without ichthyosis (summary by Fischer et al., 2007).
Congenital bile acid synthesis defect 2
MedGen UID:
383840
Concept ID:
C1856127
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 2 is a disorder characterized by cholestasis, a condition that impairs the production and release of a digestive fluid called bile from liver cells. Bile is used during digestion to absorb fats and fat-soluble vitamins, such as vitamins A, D, E, and K. People with congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 2 cannot produce (synthesize) bile acids, which are a component of bile that stimulate bile flow and help it absorb fats and fat-soluble vitamins. As a result, an abnormal form of bile is produced.\n\nThe signs and symptoms of congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 2 often develop in infancy. Affected infants usually have a failure to gain weight and grow at the expected rate (failure to thrive) and yellowing of the skin and eyes (jaundice) due to impaired bile flow and a buildup of partially formed bile. Excess fat in the feces (steatorrhea) is another feature of congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 2. As the condition progresses, affected individuals can develop liver abnormalities including inflammation or chronic liver disease (cirrhosis). Some individuals with congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 2 cannot absorb certain fat-soluble vitamins, which can result in softening and weakening of the bones (rickets) or problems with blood clotting that lead to prolonged bleeding.\n\nIf left untreated, congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 2 typically leads to cirrhosis and death in childhood.
Congenital bile acid synthesis defect 4
MedGen UID:
388039
Concept ID:
C1858328
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 4 (BAS defect type 4) is an anomaly of bile acid synthesis (see this term) characterized by mild cholestatic liver disease, fat malabsorption and/or neurological disease.
Hemochromatosis type 3
MedGen UID:
388114
Concept ID:
C1858664
Disease or Syndrome
TFR2-related hereditary hemochromatosis (TFR2-HHC) is characterized by increased intestinal iron absorption resulting in iron accumulation in the liver, heart, pancreas, and endocrine organs. Age of onset is earlier than in HFE-HHC. The majority of individuals present with signs and symptoms of iron overload in the third decade (e.g., weakness, fatigue, abdominal pain, hepatomegaly, arthritis, arthralgia, progressive increase in skin pigmentation). Others present as young adults with nonspecific symptoms and abnormal serum iron studies or as adults with abnormal serum iron studies and signs of organ involvement including cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, and arthropathy.
Celiac disease, susceptibility to, 1
MedGen UID:
395227
Concept ID:
C1859310
Finding
Celiac disease is a systemic autoimmune disease that can be associated with gastrointestinal findings (diarrhea, malabsorption, abdominal pain and distension, bloating, vomiting, and weight loss) and/or highly variable non-gastrointestinal findings (dermatitis herpetiformis, chronic fatigue, joint pain/inflammation, iron deficiency anemia, migraines, depression, attention-deficit disorder, epilepsy, osteoporosis/osteopenia, infertility and/or recurrent fetal loss, vitamin deficiencies, short stature, failure to thrive, delayed puberty, dental enamel defects, and autoimmune disorders). Classic celiac disease, characterized by mild to severe gastrointestinal symptoms, is less common than non-classic celiac disease, characterized by absence of gastrointestinal symptoms.
Arthrogryposis, renal dysfunction, and cholestasis 1
MedGen UID:
347219
Concept ID:
C1859722
Disease or Syndrome
Any arthrogryposis-renal dysfunction-cholestasis syndrome in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the VPS33B gene.
Retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukoencephalopathy and systemic manifestations
MedGen UID:
348124
Concept ID:
C1860518
Disease or Syndrome
Retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukoencephalopathy and systemic manifestations (RVCL-S) is a small-vessel disease that affects highly vascularized tissues including the retina, brain, liver, and kidneys. Age of onset is often between 35 and 50 years. The most common presenting finding is decreased visual acuity and/or visual field defects. Neurologic manifestations may include hemiparesis, facial weakness, aphasia, and hemianopsia. Migraines and seizures are less frequently described. Renal manifestations may include mild-to-moderate increase in serum creatinine and mild proteinuria; progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is uncommon. Hepatic manifestations frequently include mildly elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT). Less common findings include psychiatric disorders, hypertension, mild-to-moderate anemia, and Raynaud phenomenon.
Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis 2
MedGen UID:
400366
Concept ID:
C1863727
Disease or Syndrome
Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis-2 (FHL2) is an autosomal recessive disorder of immune dysregulation with onset in infancy or early childhood. It is characterized clinically by fever, edema, hepatosplenomegaly, and liver dysfunction. Neurologic impairment, seizures, and ataxia are frequent. Laboratory studies show pancytopenia, coagulation abnormalities, hypofibrinogenemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. There is increased production of cytokines, such as gamma-interferon (IFNG; 147570) and TNF-alpha (191160), by hyperactivation and proliferation of T cells and macrophages. Activity of cytotoxic T cells and NK cells is reduced, consistent with a defect in cellular cytotoxicity. Bone marrow, lymph nodes, spleen, and liver show features of hemophagocytosis. Chemotherapy and/or immunosuppressant therapy may result in symptomatic remission, but the disorder is fatal without bone marrow transplantation (summary by Dufourcq-Lagelouse et al., 1999, Stepp et al., 1999, and Molleran Lee et al., 2004). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of FHL, see 267700.
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal dominant 4
MedGen UID:
350480
Concept ID:
C1864668
Disease or Syndrome
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia-4 is an autosomal dominant form of mitochondrial disease that variably affects skeletal muscle, the nervous system, the liver, and the gastrointestinal tract. Age at onset ranges from infancy to adulthood. The phenotype ranges from relatively mild, with adult-onset skeletal muscle weakness and weakness of the external eye muscles, to severe, with a multisystem disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, lactic acidosis, constipation, and liver involvement (summary by Young et al., 2011). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia, see PEOA1 (157640).
Combined oxidative phosphorylation defect type 2
MedGen UID:
400626
Concept ID:
C1864843
Disease or Syndrome
A rare mitochondrial disorder due to a defect in mitochondrial protein synthesis characterized by severe intrauterine growth retardation, neonatal limb edema and redundant skin on the neck (hydrops), developmental brain defects (corpus callosum agenesis, ventriculomegaly), brachydactyly, dysmorphic facial features with low set ears, severe intractable neonatal lactic acidosis with lethargy, hypotonia, absent spontaneous movements and fatal outcome. Markedly decreased activity of complex I, II + III and IV in muscle and liver have been determined.
Hemochromatosis type 2B
MedGen UID:
356040
Concept ID:
C1865616
Disease or Syndrome
Juvenile hemochromatosis is characterized by onset of severe iron overload occurring typically in the first to third decades of life. Males and females are equally affected. Prominent clinical features include hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, cardiomyopathy, glucose intolerance and diabetes, arthropathy, and liver fibrosis or cirrhosis. Hepatocellular cancer has been reported occasionally. The main cause of death is cardiac disease. If juvenile hemochromatosis is detected early enough and if blood is removed regularly through the process of phlebotomy to achieve iron depletion, morbidity and mortality are greatly reduced.
Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 3
MedGen UID:
356333
Concept ID:
C1865643
Disease or Syndrome
The signs and symptoms of PFIC2 are typically related to liver disease only; however, these signs and symptoms tend to be more severe than those experienced by people with PFIC1. People with PFIC2 often develop liver failure within the first few years of life. Additionally, affected individuals are at increased risk of developing a type of liver cancer called hepatocellular carcinoma.\n\nMost people with PFIC3 have signs and symptoms related to liver disease only. Signs and symptoms of PFIC3 usually do not appear until later in infancy or early childhood; rarely, people are diagnosed in early adulthood. Liver failure can occur in childhood or adulthood in people with PFIC3.\n\nIn addition to signs and symptoms related to liver disease, people with PFIC1 may have short stature, deafness, diarrhea, inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), and low levels of fat-soluble vitamins (vitamins A, D, E, and K) in the blood. Affected individuals typically develop liver failure before adulthood.\n\nThere are three known types of PFIC: PFIC1, PFIC2, and PFIC3. The types are also sometimes described as shortages of particular proteins needed for normal liver function. Each type has a different genetic cause.\n\nSigns and symptoms of PFIC typically begin in infancy and are related to bile buildup and liver disease. Specifically, affected individuals experience severe itching, yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes (jaundice), failure to gain weight and grow at the expected rate (failure to thrive), high blood pressure in the vein that supplies blood to the liver (portal hypertension), and an enlarged liver and spleen (hepatosplenomegaly).\n\nProgressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) is a disorder that causes progressive liver disease, which typically leads to liver failure. In people with PFIC, liver cells are less able to secrete a digestive fluid called bile. The buildup of bile in liver cells causes liver disease in affected individuals.
Nephropathy, progressive tubulointerstitial, with cholestatic liver disease
MedGen UID:
355562
Concept ID:
C1865831
Disease or Syndrome
Alagille syndrome due to a JAG1 point mutation
MedGen UID:
365434
Concept ID:
C1956125
Disease or Syndrome
Alagille syndrome (ALGS) is a multisystem disorder with a wide spectrum of clinical variability; this variability is seen even among individuals from the same family. The major clinical manifestations of ALGS are bile duct paucity on liver biopsy, cholestasis, congenital cardiac defects (primarily involving the pulmonary arteries), butterfly vertebrae, ophthalmologic abnormalities (most commonly posterior embryotoxon), and characteristic facial features. Renal abnormalities, growth failure, developmental delays, splenomegaly, and vascular abnormalities may also occur.
Mevalonic aciduria
MedGen UID:
368373
Concept ID:
C1959626
Disease or Syndrome
Mevalonic aciduria (MEVA), the first recognized defect in the biosynthesis of cholesterol and isoprenoids, is a consequence of a deficiency of mevalonate kinase (ATP:mevalonate 5-phosphotransferase; EC 2.7.1.36). Mevalonic acid accumulates because of failure of conversion to 5-phosphomevalonic acid, which is catalyzed by mevalonate kinase. Mevalonic acid is synthesized from 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA, a reaction catalyzed by HMG-CoA reductase (142910). Mevalonic aciduria is characterized by dysmorphology, psychomotor retardation, progressive cerebellar ataxia, and recurrent febrile crises, usually manifesting in early infancy, accompanied by hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, arthralgia, and skin rash. The febrile crises are similar to those observed in hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and to periodic fever syndrome (HIDS; 260920), which is also caused by mutation in the MVK gene (summary by Prietsch et al., 2003).
Mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency
MedGen UID:
370665
Concept ID:
C1969443
Disease or Syndrome
Long-chain hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) deficiency and trifunctional protein (TFP) deficiency are caused by impairment of mitochondrial TFP. TFP has three enzymatic activities – long-chain enoyl-CoA hydratase, long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, and long-chain 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase. In individuals with LCHAD deficiency, there is isolated deficiency of long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, while deficiency of all three enzymes occurs in individuals with TFP deficiency. Individuals with TFP deficiency can present with a severe-to-mild phenotype, while individuals with LCHAD deficiency typically present with a severe-to-intermediate phenotype. Neonates with the severe phenotype present within a few days of birth with hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, encephalopathy, and often cardiomyopathy. The intermediate phenotype is characterized by hypoketotic hypoglycemia precipitated by infection or fasting in infancy. The mild (late-onset) phenotype is characterized by myopathy and/or neuropathy. Long-term complications include peripheral neuropathy and retinopathy.
XFE progeroid syndrome
MedGen UID:
410064
Concept ID:
C1970416
Disease or Syndrome
An autosomal recessive condition caused by mutation(s) in the ERCC4 gene, encoding DNA repair endonuclease XPF. it is characterized by characterized by cutaneous photosensitivity and progeroid features in multiple organ systems.
Low phospholipid associated cholelithiasis
MedGen UID:
760527
Concept ID:
C2609268
Disease or Syndrome
In general, gallbladder disease (GBD) is one of the major digestive diseases. GBD prevalence is particularly high in some minority populations in the United States, including Native and Mexican Americans. Gallstones composed of cholesterol (cholelithiasis) are the common manifestations of GBD in western countries, including the United States. Most people with gallstones remain asymptomatic through their lifetimes; however, it is estimated that approximately 10 to 50% of individuals eventually develop symptoms. Significant risk factors associated with GBD are age, female sex, obesity (especially central obesity), lipids, diet, parity, type 2 diabetes (125853), medications, and Mexican American ethnicity. GBD appears to be strongly related to the metabolic syndrome (605552) and/or its major components, such as hyperinsulinism, dyslipidemia, and abdominal adiposity (Boland et al., 2002; Tsai et al., 2004). Infection, specifically by Helicobacter, has been implicated in cholelithiasis and cholecystitis (Silva et al., 2003; Maurer et al., 2005). Low phospholipid-associated cholelithiasis is a specific form of gallbladder disease characterized by young-adult onset of chronic cholestasis with intrahepatic sludge and cholesterol cholelithiasis. Affected individuals have recurrence of the disorder after cholecystectomy and show a favorable response to treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) (summary by Pasmant et al., 2012). Mutation in the ABCB4 gene can cause a spectrum of related diseases, including the more severe progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis-3 (PFIC3; 602347), intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy-3 (ICP3; 614972), andoral contraceptive-induced cholestasis (OCIC; see 614972). Genetic Heterogeneity of Gallbladder Disease Two major susceptibility loci for symptomatic gallbladder disease have been identified on chromosome 1p in Mexican Americans (GBD2, 609918; GBD3, 609919). In addition, variations in the ABCG8 gene (605460) on chromosome 2p21 confer susceptibility to gallbladder disease (GBD4; 611465).
X-linked erythropoietic protoporphyria
MedGen UID:
394385
Concept ID:
C2677889
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked protoporphyria (XLP) is characterized in affected males by cutaneous photosensitivity (usually beginning in infancy or childhood) that results in tingling, burning, pain, and itching within minutes of sun/light exposure and may be accompanied by swelling and redness. Blistering lesions are uncommon. Pain, which may seem out of proportion to the visible skin lesions, may persist for hours or days after the initial phototoxic reaction. Photosensitivity is lifelong. Multiple episodes of acute photosensitivity may lead to chronic changes of sun-exposed skin (lichenification, leathery pseudovesicles, grooving around the lips) and loss of lunulae of the nails. An unknown proportion of individuals with XLP develop liver disease. Except for those with advanced liver disease, life expectancy is not reduced. The phenotype in heterozygous females ranges from asymptomatic to as severe as in affected males.
Congenital generalized lipodystrophy type 4
MedGen UID:
412871
Concept ID:
C2750069
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital generalized lipodystrophy type 4 combines the phenotype of classic Berardinelli-Seip lipodystrophy (608594) with muscular dystrophy and cardiac conduction anomalies (Hayashi et al., 2009). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital generalized lipodystrophy, see CGL1 (608594).
Hypermanganesemia with dystonia, polycythemia, and cirrhosis
MedGen UID:
412958
Concept ID:
C2750442
Disease or Syndrome
Hypermanganesemia with dystonia 1 (HMNDYT1) is characterized by the following: A movement disorder resulting from manganese accumulation in the basal ganglia. Whole-blood manganese concentrations that often exceed 2000 nmol/L (normal: <320 nmol/L). Polycythemia. Hepatomegaly with variable hepatic fibrosis/cirrhosis. Neurologic findings can manifest in childhood (ages 2-15 years) as four-limb dystonia, leading to a characteristic high-stepping gait ("cock-walk gait"), dysarthria, fine tremor, and bradykinesia or on occasion spastic paraplegia; or in adulthood as parkinsonism (shuffling gait, rigidity, bradykinesia, hypomimia, and monotone speech) unresponsive to L-dopa treatment.
Glycogen storage disease IXc
MedGen UID:
442778
Concept ID:
C2751643
Disease or Syndrome
Phosphorylase kinase (PhK) deficiency causing glycogen storage disease type IX (GSD IX) results from deficiency of the enzyme phosphorylase b kinase, which has a major regulatory role in the breakdown of glycogen. The two types of PhK deficiency are liver PhK deficiency (characterized by early childhood onset of hepatomegaly and growth restriction, and often, but not always, fasting ketosis and hypoglycemia) and muscle PhK deficiency, which is considerably rarer (characterized by any of the following: exercise intolerance, myalgia, muscle cramps, myoglobinuria, and progressive muscle weakness). While symptoms and biochemical abnormalities of liver PhK deficiency were thought to improve with age, it is becoming evident that affected individuals need to be monitored for long-term complications such as liver fibrosis and cirrhosis.
DPM3-congenital disorder of glycosylation
MedGen UID:
414534
Concept ID:
C2752007
Disease or Syndrome
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type C15 (MDDGC15) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive proximal muscle weakness, manifest initially as unsteady gait, but later including more distal muscles, and dilated cardiomyopathy. The age at onset varies widely from the first decade to adulthood; those with earlier onset may have delayed motor development. Laboratory studies show increased serum creatine kinase and muscle biopsy shows dystrophic features with decreased alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239). Biochemical studies often show evidence of abnormal N-glycosylation of serum proteins, consistent with a congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG) (summary by Svahn et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy- dystroglycanopathy type C, see MDDGC1 (609308). For a discussion of the classification of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065).
PGM1-congenital disorder of glycosylation
MedGen UID:
414536
Concept ID:
C2752015
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital disorder of glycosylation type It (CDG1T) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a wide range of clinical manifestations and severity. The most common features include cleft lip and bifid uvula, apparent at birth, followed by hepatopathy, intermittent hypoglycemia, short stature, and exercise intolerance, often accompanied by increased serum creatine kinase. Less common features include rhabdomyolysis, dilated cardiomyopathy, and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (summary by Tegtmeyer et al., 2014). For a discussion of the classification of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065).
Glycogen storage disease due to glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency type IA
MedGen UID:
415885
Concept ID:
C2919796
Disease or Syndrome
Glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI) is characterized by accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver and kidneys resulting in hepatomegaly and nephromegaly. Severely affected infants present in the neonatal period with severe hypoglycemia due to fasting intolerance. More commonly, untreated infants present at age three to four months with hepatomegaly, severe hypoglycemia with or without seizures, lactic acidosis, hyperuricemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. Affected children typically have doll-like faces with full cheeks, relatively thin extremities, short stature, and a protuberant abdomen. Xanthoma and diarrhea may be present. Impaired platelet function and development of reduced or dysfunctional von Willebrand factor can lead to a bleeding tendency with frequent epistaxis and menorrhagia in females. Individuals with untreated GSDIb are more likely to develop impaired neutrophil and monocyte function as well as chronic neutropenia resulting in recurrent bacterial infections, gingivitis, periodontitis, and genital and intestinal ulcers. Long-term complications of untreated GSDI include short stature, osteoporosis, delayed puberty, renal disease (including proximal and distal renal tubular acidosis, renal stones, and renal failure), gout, systemic hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, hepatic adenomas with potential for malignancy, pancreatitis, and polycystic ovaries. Seizures and cognitive impairment may occur in individuals with prolonged periods of hypoglycemia. Normal growth and puberty are expected in treated children. Most affected individuals live into adulthood.
DPAGT1-congenital disorder of glycosylation
MedGen UID:
419694
Concept ID:
C2931004
Disease or Syndrome
Like all CDGs, which are caused by a shortage of precursor monosaccharide phosphate or deficiencies in the glycosyltransferases required for lipid-linked oligosaccharide precursor (LLO) synthesis, CDG Ij is caused by a defect in the formation of DPAGT1, the first dolichyl-linked intermediate of the protein N-glycosylation pathway. For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065).
COG7 congenital disorder of glycosylation
MedGen UID:
419311
Concept ID:
C2931010
Disease or Syndrome
CDG IIe is caused by a mutation that impairs the integrity of the conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex and alters Golgi trafficking, resulting in the disruption of multiple glycosylation pathways. For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065).
Arthrogryposis, renal dysfunction, and cholestasis 2
MedGen UID:
462022
Concept ID:
C3150672
Disease or Syndrome
Arthrogryposis, renal dysfunction, and cholestasis-2 (ARCS2) is a multisystem disorder associated with abnormalities in polarized liver and kidney cells (Qiu et al., 2019). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of ARCS, see ARCS1 (208085).
Myopathy, lactic acidosis, and sideroblastic anemia 2
MedGen UID:
462152
Concept ID:
C3150802
Disease or Syndrome
Myopathy, lactic acidosis, and sideroblastic anemia-2 is an autosomal recessive disorder of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The disorder shows marked phenotypic variability: some patients have a severe multisystem disorder from infancy, including cardiomyopathy and respiratory insufficiency resulting in early death, whereas others present in the second or third decade of life with sideroblastic anemia and mild muscle weakness (summary by Riley et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of MLASA, see MLASA1 (600462).
Cranioectodermal dysplasia 2
MedGen UID:
462224
Concept ID:
C3150874
Disease or Syndrome
Cranioectodermal dysplasia (CED) is a ciliopathy with skeletal involvement (narrow thorax, shortened proximal limbs, syndactyly, polydactyly, brachydactyly), ectodermal features (widely spaced hypoplastic teeth, hypodontia, sparse hair, skin laxity, abnormal nails), joint laxity, growth deficiency, and characteristic facial features (frontal bossing, low-set simple ears, high forehead, telecanthus, epicanthal folds, full cheeks, everted lower lip). Most affected children develop nephronophthisis that often leads to end-stage kidney disease in infancy or childhood, a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Hepatic fibrosis and retinal dystrophy are also observed. Dolichocephaly, often secondary to sagittal craniosynostosis, is a primary manifestation that distinguishes CED from most other ciliopathies. Brain malformations and developmental delay may also occur.
Retinitis pigmentosa 59
MedGen UID:
462577
Concept ID:
C3151227
Disease or Syndrome
Any retinitis pigmentosa in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the DHDDS gene.
Acute infantile liver failure due to synthesis defect of mtDNA-encoded proteins
MedGen UID:
480294
Concept ID:
C3278664
Disease or Syndrome
Acute infantile liver failure resulting from TRMU mutation is a transient disorder of hepatic function. In addition to elevated liver enzymes, jaundice, vomiting, coagulopathy, and hyperbilirubinemia, the presence of increased serum lactate is consistent with a defect in mitochondrial respiratory function. With supportive care, patients who survive the initial acute episode can recover and show normal development (Zeharia et al., 2009). See also transient infantile mitochondrial myopathy (MMIT; 500009), which is a similar disorder. A more severe, permanent disorder with some overlapping features is associated with mitochondrial DNA depletion (251880). See ILFS1 (615438) for information on syndromic infantile liver failure.
Microcephaly, epilepsy, and diabetes syndrome
MedGen UID:
481870
Concept ID:
C3280240
Disease or Syndrome
Microcephaly, epilepsy, and diabetes syndrome-1 (MEDS1) is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by microcephaly, simplified gyral pattern, severe epilepsy, and infantile diabetes (summary by Poulton et al., 2011). Genetic Heterogeneity of Microcephaly, Epilepsy, and Diabetes Syndrome MEDS2 (619278) is caused by mutation in the YIPF5 gene (611483) on chromosome 5q31.
Transient infantile hypertriglyceridemia and hepatosteatosis
MedGen UID:
482583
Concept ID:
C3280953
Disease or Syndrome
Transient infantile hypertriglyceridemia is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by onset of moderate to severe transient hypertriglyceridemia in infancy that normalizes with age. The hypertriglyceridemia is associated with hepatomegaly, moderately elevated transaminases, persistent fatty liver, and the development of hepatic fibrosis. The long-term outcome of affected individuals is unclear (summary by Basel-Vanagaite et al., 2012).
Chromosome 17q12 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
482768
Concept ID:
C3281138
Disease or Syndrome
The 17q12 recurrent deletion syndrome is characterized by variable combinations of the three following findings: structural or functional abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract, maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 5 (MODY5), and neurodevelopmental or neuropsychiatric disorders (e.g., developmental delay, intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, anxiety, and bipolar disorder). Using a method of data analysis that avoids ascertainment bias, the authors determined that multicystic kidneys and other structural and functional kidney anomalies occur in 85% to 90% of affected individuals, MODY5 in approximately 40%, and some degree of developmental delay or learning disability in approximately 50%. MODY5 is most often diagnosed before age 25 years (range: age 10-50 years).
Hemochromatosis type 1
MedGen UID:
854011
Concept ID:
C3469186
Disease or Syndrome
HFE hemochromatosis is characterized by inappropriately high absorption of iron by the small intestinal mucosa. The phenotypic spectrum of HFE hemochromatosis includes: Persons with clinical HFE hemochromatosis, in whom manifestations of end-organ damage secondary to iron overload are present; Individuals with biochemical HFE hemochromatosis, in whom transferrin-iron saturation is increased and the only evidence of iron overload is increased serum ferritin concentration; and Non-expressing p.Cys282Tyr homozygotes, in whom neither clinical manifestations of HFE hemochromatosis nor iron overload are present. Clinical HFE hemochromatosis is characterized by excessive storage of iron in the liver, skin, pancreas, heart, joints, and anterior pituitary gland. In untreated individuals, early symptoms include: abdominal pain, weakness, lethargy, weight loss, arthralgias, diabetes mellitus; and increased risk of cirrhosis when the serum ferritin is higher than 1,000 ng/mL. Other findings may include progressive increase in skin pigmentation, congestive heart failure, and/or arrhythmias, arthritis, and hypogonadism. Clinical HFE hemochromatosis is more common in men than women.
Mitochondrial complex III deficiency nuclear type 1
MedGen UID:
762097
Concept ID:
C3541471
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive mitochondrial complex III deficiency is a severe multisystem disorder with onset at birth of lactic acidosis, hypotonia, hypoglycemia, failure to thrive, encephalopathy, and delayed psychomotor development. Visceral involvement, including hepatopathy and renal tubulopathy, may also occur. Many patients die in early childhood, but some may show longer survival (de Lonlay et al., 2001; De Meirleir et al., 2003). Genetic Heterogeneity of Mitochondrial Complex III Deficiency Mitochondrial complex III deficiency can be caused by mutation in several different nuclear-encoded genes. See MC3DN2 (615157), caused by mutation in the TTC19 gene (613814) on chromosome 17p12; MC3DN3 (615158), caused by mutation in the UQCRB gene (191330) on chromosome 8q; MC3DN4 (615159), caused by mutation in the UQCRQ gene (612080) on chromosome 5q31; MC3DN5 (615160), caused by mutation in the UQCRC2 gene (191329) on chromosome 16p12; MC3DN6 (615453), caused by mutation in the CYC1 gene (123980) on chromosome 8q24; MC3DN7 (615824), caused by mutation in the UQCC2 gene (614461) on chromosome 6p21; MC3DN8 (615838), caused by mutation in the LYRM7 gene (615831) on chromosome 5q23; MC3DN9 (616111), caused by mutation in the UQCC3 gene (616097) on chromosome 11q12; and MC3DN10 (618775), caused by mutation in the UQCRFS1 gene (191327) on chromosome 19q12. See also MTYCB (516020) for a discussion of a milder phenotype associated with isolated mitochondrial complex III deficiency and mutations in a mitochondrial-encoded gene.
Cholestasis, intrahepatic, of pregnancy, 1
MedGen UID:
762759
Concept ID:
C3549845
Disease or Syndrome
Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy is a reversible form of cholestasis that occurs most often in the third trimester of pregnancy and recurs in 45 to 70% of subsequent pregnancies. Symptoms include pruritus, jaundice, increased serum bile salts, and abnormal liver enzymes, all of which resolve rapidly after delivery. However, the condition is associated with fetal complications, including placental insufficiency, premature labor, fetal distress, and intrauterine death. Some women with ICP may also be susceptible to oral contraceptive-induced cholestasis (OCIC) (summary by Pasmant et al., 2012). Genetic Heterogeneity of Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy See also ICP3 (614972), caused by mutation in the ABCB4 gene (171060).
COG6-ongenital disorder of glycosylation
MedGen UID:
766144
Concept ID:
C3553230
Disease or Syndrome
CDG2L is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder apparent from birth or early infancy. It is characterized by poor growth, gastrointestinal and liver abnormalities, delayed psychomotor development, hypotonia, recurrent infections, hematologic abnormalities, increased bleeding tendency, and hyperhidrosis or hyperkeratosis. More variable features include nonspecific dysmorphic facial features and cardiac septal defects. The disorder often results in death in infancy or the first years of life (summary by Rymen et al., 2015). For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065) and CDG2A (212066).
Karyomegalic interstitial nephritis
MedGen UID:
766688
Concept ID:
C3553774
Disease or Syndrome
Karyomegalic tubulointerstitial nephritis (KMIN) is a rare kidney disease characterized clinically by onset in the third decade of progressive renal failure. Renal biopsy shows chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis and interstitial fibrosis associated with enlarged and atypical tubular epithelial cell nuclei (summary by Baba et al., 2006).
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 11A (Zellweger)
MedGen UID:
766914
Concept ID:
C3554000
Disease or Syndrome
Zellweger syndrome (ZS) is an autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly syndrome resulting from disordered peroxisome biogenesis. Affected children present in the newborn period with profound hypotonia, seizures, and inability to feed. Characteristic craniofacial anomalies, eye abnormalities, neuronal migration defects, hepatomegaly, and chondrodysplasia punctata are present. Children with this condition do not show any significant development and usually die in the first year of life (summary by Steinberg et al., 2006). For a complete phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Zellweger syndrome, see 214100. Individuals with PBDs of complementation group 13 (CG13, equivalent to CGH) have mutations in the PEX13 gene. For information on the history of PBD complementation groups, see 214100.
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 12A (Zellweger)
MedGen UID:
766916
Concept ID:
C3554002
Disease or Syndrome
Zellweger syndrome (ZS) is an autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly syndrome resulting from disordered peroxisome biogenesis. Affected children present in the newborn period with profound hypotonia, seizures, and inability to feed. Characteristic craniofacial anomalies, eye abnormalities, neuronal migration defects, hepatomegaly, and chondrodysplasia punctata are present. Children with this condition do not show any significant development and usually die in the first year of life (summary by Steinberg et al., 2006). For a complete phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Zellweger syndrome, see 214100. Individuals with PBDs of complementation group 14 (CG14, equivalent to CGJ) have mutations in the PEX19 gene. For information on the history of PBD complementation groups, see 214100.
Mitochondrial complex III deficiency nuclear type 5
MedGen UID:
767522
Concept ID:
C3554608
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex III deficiency is a genetic condition that can affect several parts of the body, including the brain, kidneys, liver, heart, and the muscles used for movement (skeletal muscles). Signs and symptoms of mitochondrial complex III deficiency usually begin in infancy but can appear later.\n\nThe severity of mitochondrial complex III deficiency varies widely among affected individuals. People who are mildly affected tend to have muscle weakness (myopathy) and extreme tiredness (fatigue), particularly during exercise (exercise intolerance). More severely affected individuals have problems with multiple body systems, such as liver disease that can lead to liver failure, kidney abnormalities (tubulopathy), and brain dysfunction (encephalopathy). Encephalopathy can cause delayed development of mental and motor skills (psychomotor delay), movement problems, weak muscle tone (hypotonia), and difficulty with communication. Some affected individuals have a form of heart disease called cardiomyopathy, which can lead to heart failure. Most people with mitochondrial complex III deficiency have a buildup of a chemical called lactic acid in the body (lactic acidosis). Some affected individuals also have buildup of molecules called ketones (ketoacidosis) or high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia). Abnormally high levels of these chemicals in the body can be life-threatening.\n\nMitochondrial complex III deficiency can be fatal in childhood, although individuals with mild signs and symptoms can survive into adolescence or adulthood.
Glycogen storage disease IXa1
MedGen UID:
854172
Concept ID:
C3694531
Disease or Syndrome
Phosphorylase kinase (PhK) deficiency causing glycogen storage disease type IX (GSD IX) results from deficiency of the enzyme phosphorylase b kinase, which has a major regulatory role in the breakdown of glycogen. The two types of PhK deficiency are liver PhK deficiency (characterized by early childhood onset of hepatomegaly and growth restriction, and often, but not always, fasting ketosis and hypoglycemia) and muscle PhK deficiency, which is considerably rarer (characterized by any of the following: exercise intolerance, myalgia, muscle cramps, myoglobinuria, and progressive muscle weakness). While symptoms and biochemical abnormalities of liver PhK deficiency were thought to improve with age, it is becoming evident that affected individuals need to be monitored for long-term complications such as liver fibrosis and cirrhosis.
Mandibular hypoplasia-deafness-progeroid syndrome
MedGen UID:
811623
Concept ID:
C3715192
Disease or Syndrome
Mandibular hypoplasia, deafness, progeroid features, and lipodystrophy syndrome (MDPL) is an autosomal dominant systemic disorder characterized by prominent loss of subcutaneous fat, a characteristic facial appearance, and metabolic abnormalities including insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus. Sensorineural deafness occurs late in the first or second decades of life (summary by Weedon et al., 2013).
Infantile liver failure syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
815852
Concept ID:
C3809522
Disease or Syndrome
A rare, genetic, parenchymal hepatic disease characterized by acute liver failure, that occurs in the first year of life, which manifests with failure to thrive, hypotonia, moderate global developmental delay, seizures, abnormal liver function tests, microcytic anemia and elevated serum lactate. Other associated features include hepatosteatosis and fibrosis, abnormal brain morphology, and renal tubulopathy. Minor illness exacerbates deterioration of liver failure.
Mitochondrial complex III deficiency nuclear type 6
MedGen UID:
815883
Concept ID:
C3809553
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex III deficiency nuclear type 6 (MC3DN6) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. It is characterized by onset in early childhood of episodic acute lactic acidosis, ketoacidosis, and insulin-responsive hyperglycemia, usually associated with infection. Laboratory studies show decreased activity of mitochondrial complex III. Psychomotor development is normal (summary by Gaignard et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial complex III deficiency, see MC3DN1 (124000).
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 13
MedGen UID:
815922
Concept ID:
C3809592
Disease or Syndrome
FBXL4-related encephalomyopathic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome is a multi-system disorder characterized primarily by congenital or early-onset lactic acidosis and growth failure, feeding difficulty, hypotonia, and developmental delay. Other neurologic manifestations can include seizures, movement disorders, ataxia, autonomic dysfunction, and stroke-like episodes. All affected individuals alive at the time they were reported (median age: 3.5 years) demonstrated significant developmental delay. Other findings can involve the heart (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, congenital heart malformations, arrhythmias), liver (mildly elevated transaminases), eyes (cataract, strabismus, nystagmus, optic atrophy), hearing (sensorineural hearing loss), and bone marrow (neutropenia, lymphopenia). Survival varies; the median age of reported deaths was two years (range 2 days – 75 months), although surviving individuals as old as 36 years have been reported. To date FBXL4-related mtDNA depletion syndrome has been reported in 50 individuals.
Infantile liver failure syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
815981
Concept ID:
C3809651
Disease or Syndrome
Infantile liver failure syndrome-2 is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of acute liver failure during intercurrent febrile illness. Patients first present in infancy or early childhood, and there is complete recovery between episodes with conservative treatment (summary by Haack et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of infantile liver failure syndrome, see ILFS1 (615438).
Telangiectasia, hereditary hemorrhagic, type 5
MedGen UID:
816040
Concept ID:
C3809710
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is characterized by the presence of multiple arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) that lack intervening capillaries and result in direct connections between arteries and veins. The most common clinical manifestation is spontaneous and recurrent nosebleeds (epistaxis) beginning on average at age 12 years. Telangiectases (small AVMs) are characteristically found on the lips, tongue, buccal and gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa, face, and fingers. The appearance of telangiectases is generally later than epistaxis but may be during childhood. Large AVMs occur most often in the lungs, liver, or brain; complications from bleeding or shunting may be sudden and catastrophic. A minority of individuals with HHT have GI bleeding, which is rarely seen before age 50 years.
Proximal myopathy with extrapyramidal signs
MedGen UID:
816615
Concept ID:
C3810285
Disease or Syndrome
Myopathy with extrapyramidal signs is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early childhood onset of proximal muscle weakness and learning disabilities. While the muscle weakness is static, most patients develop progressive extrapyramidal signs that may become disabling (summary by Logan et al., 2014). Brain MRI in 1 patient showed congenital malformations, including polymicrogyria and cerebellar dysplasia (Wilton et al., 2020).
Vasculitis due to ADA2 deficiency
MedGen UID:
854497
Concept ID:
C3887654
Disease or Syndrome
Adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency (DADA2) is a complex systemic autoinflammatory disorder in which vasculopathy/vasculitis, dysregulated immune function, and/or hematologic abnormalities may predominate. Inflammatory features include intermittent fevers, rash (often livedo racemosa/reticularis), and musculoskeletal involvement (myalgia/arthralgia, arthritis, myositis). Vasculitis, which usually begins before age ten years, may manifest as early-onset ischemic (lacunar) and/or hemorrhagic strokes, or as cutaneous or systemic polyarteritis nodosa. Hypertension and hepatosplenomegaly are often found. More severe involvement may lead to progressive central neurologic deficits (dysarthria, ataxia, cranial nerve palsies, cognitive impairment) or to ischemic injury to the kidney, intestine, and/or digits. Dysregulation of immune function can lead to immunodeficiency or autoimmunity of varying severity; lymphadenopathy may be present and some affected individuals have had lymphoproliferative disease. Hematologic disorders may begin early in life or in late adulthood, and can include lymphopenia, neutropenia, pure red cell aplasia, thrombocytopenia, or pancytopenia. Of note, both interfamilial and intrafamilial phenotypic variability (e.g., in age of onset, frequency and severity of manifestations) can be observed; also, individuals with biallelic ADA2 pathogenic variants may remain asymptomatic until adulthood or may never develop clinical manifestations of DADA2.
Polyglucosan body myopathy type 1
MedGen UID:
863042
Concept ID:
C4014605
Disease or Syndrome
Polyglucosan body myopathy-1 (PGBM1) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by onset in childhood of progressive proximal muscle weakness, resulting in difficulties in ambulation. Most patients also develop progressive dilated cardiomyopathy, which may necessitate cardiac transplant in severe cases. A small subset of patients present with severe immunodeficiency and a hyperinflammatory state in very early childhood (summary by Boisson et al., 2012 and Nilsson et al., 2013). Genetic Heterogeneity of Polyglucosan Body Myopathy See also PGBM2 (616199), caused by mutation in the GYG1 gene (603942) on chromosome 3q24.
Fanconi renotubular syndrome 4 with maturity-onset diabetes of the young
MedGen UID:
863399
Concept ID:
C4014962
Disease or Syndrome
Any Fanconi syndrome in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the HNF4A gene.
Sideroblastic anemia 3
MedGen UID:
895975
Concept ID:
C4225155
Disease or Syndrome
Sideroblastic anemia-3 is an autosomal recessive hematologic disorder characterized by onset of anemia in adulthood. Affected individuals show signs of systemic iron overload, and iron chelation therapy may be of clinical benefit (summary by Liu et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of sideroblastic anemia, see SIDBA1 (300751).
TMEM199-CDG
MedGen UID:
895025
Concept ID:
C4225190
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital disorder of glycosylation type IIp (CDG2P) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by mild liver dysfunction, which may be found incidentally during adolescence. Laboratory abnormalities include elevated liver enzymes and alkaline phosphatase, coagulation factor deficiencies, hypercholesterolemia, and low ceruloplasmin. Serum isoelectric focusing of proteins shows a combined defect of N- and O-glycosylation, suggestive of a Golgi defect (summary by Jansen et al., 2016). For an overview of congenital disorders of glycosylation, see CDG1A (212065) and CDG2A (212066).
CCDC115-CDG
MedGen UID:
906792
Concept ID:
C4225191
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital disorder of glycosylation type IIo (CDG2O) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by infantile onset of progressive liver failure, hypotonia, and delayed psychomotor development. Laboratory abnormalities include elevated liver enzymes, coagulation factor deficiencies, hypercholesterolemia, and low ceruloplasmin. Serum isoelectric focusing of proteins shows a combined defect of N- and O-glycosylation, suggestive of a Golgi defect (summary by Jansen et al., 2016). For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065).
Lipoyl transferase 1 deficiency
MedGen UID:
904073
Concept ID:
C4225379
Disease or Syndrome
Lipoyl transferase 1 deficiency is a very rare inborn error of metabolism disorder, with a highly variable phenotype, typically characterized by neonatal to infancy-onset of seizures, psychomotor delay, and abnormal muscle tone that may include hypo- and/or hypertonia, resulting in generalized weakness, dystonic movements, and/or progressive respiratory distress, associated with severe lactic acidosis and elevated lactate, ketoglutarate and 2-oxoacids in urine. Additional manifestations may include dehydration, vomiting, signs of liver dysfunction, extrapyramidal signs, spastic tetraparesis, brisk deep tendon reflexes, speech impairment, swallowing difficulties, and pulmonary hypertension.
Congenital bile acid synthesis defect 5
MedGen UID:
904751
Concept ID:
C4225390
Congenital Abnormality
Any congenital bile acid synthesis defect in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the ABCD3 gene.
COG4-congenital disorder of glycosylation
MedGen UID:
929221
Concept ID:
C4303552
Disease or Syndrome
An extremely rare form of carbohydrate deficient glycoprotein syndrome with, in the single reported case to date, seizures, some dysmorphic features, axial hypotonia, slight peripheral hypertonia and hyperreflexia.
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 15 (hepatocerebral type);
MedGen UID:
934657
Concept ID:
C4310690
Disease or Syndrome
Any mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the TFAM gene.
Bardet-Biedl syndrome 20
MedGen UID:
934674
Concept ID:
C4310707
Disease or Syndrome
Growth retardation, intellectual developmental disorder, hypotonia, and hepatopathy
MedGen UID:
934687
Concept ID:
C4310720
Disease or Syndrome
GRIDHH is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by poor overall growth, impaired intellectual development, hypotonia, and variable liver dysfunction. Additional features, such as seizures and hearing loss, may also be present (summary by Kopajtich et al., 2016).
Portal hypertension, noncirrhotic
MedGen UID:
934702
Concept ID:
C4310735
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency 47
MedGen UID:
934786
Concept ID:
C4310819
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-47 (IMD47) is an X-linked recessive complex syndrome characterized by liver dysfunction, recurrent bacterial infections, hypogammaglobulinemia, and defective glycosylation of serum proteins. Some patients also have neurologic abnormalities (summary by Jansen et al., 2016).
SRD5A3-congenital disorder of glycosylation
MedGen UID:
1392124
Concept ID:
C4317224
Disease or Syndrome
SRD5A3-congenital disorder of glycosylation (SRD5A3-CDG, formerly known as congenital disorder of glycosylation type Iq) is an inherited condition that causes neurological and vision problems and other signs and symptoms. The pattern and severity of this condition's features vary widely among affected individuals.\n\nIndividuals with SRD5A3-CDG typically develop signs and symptoms of the condition during infancy or early childhood. Most individuals with SRD5A3-CDG have intellectual disability, vision problems, unusual facial features,low muscle tone (hypotonia), and problems with coordination and balance (ataxia). \n\nVision problems in SRD5A3-CDG often include  involuntary side-side movements of the eyes (nystagmus), a gap or hole in one of the structures of the eye (coloboma), underdevelopment of the nerves that carry signals between the eyes and the brain(optic nerve hypoplasia), or vision loss early in life (early-onset severe retinal dystrophy). Over time, affected individuals may develop clouding of the lenses of the eyes (cataracts) or increased pressure in the eyes (glaucoma).\n\nOther features of SRD5A3-CDG can include skin rash, unusually small red blood cells (microcytic anemia),and liver problems.
Bardet-biedl syndrome 21
MedGen UID:
1374358
Concept ID:
C4319932
Disease or Syndrome
BBS21 is an autosomal recessive ciliopathy characterized by obesity, postaxial polydactyly, retinal degeneration, and mild cognitive impairment (Heon et al., 2016; Khan et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bardet-Biedl syndrome, see BBS1 (209900).
Congenital disorder of glycosylation, type IIq
MedGen UID:
1390458
Concept ID:
C4479353
Disease or Syndrome
A rare congenital disorder of glycosylation caused by mutations in the COG2 gene and with characteristics of normal presentation at birth, followed by progressive deterioration with postnatal microcephaly, developmental delay, intellectual disability, seizures, spastic quadriplegia, liver dysfunction, hypocupremia and hypoceruloplasminemia in the first year of life. Diffuse cerebral atrophy and thin corpus callosum may be observed on brain MRI.
Pseudo-TORCH syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
1373355
Concept ID:
C4479376
Disease or Syndrome
Pseudo-TORCH syndrome-2 (PTORCH2) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by antenatal onset of intracranial hemorrhage, calcification, brain malformations, liver dysfunction, and often thrombocytopenia. Affected individuals tend to have respiratory insufficiency and seizures, and die in infancy. The phenotype resembles the sequelae of intrauterine infection, but there is no evidence of an infectious agent. The disorder results from inappropriate activation of the interferon (IFN) immunologic pathway (summary by Meuwissen et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PTORCH, see PTORCH1 (251290).
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type R18
MedGen UID:
1385598
Concept ID:
C4517996
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-18 (LGMD18) is characterized by childhood-onset of proximal muscle weakness resulting in gait abnormalities and scapular winging. Serum creatine kinase is increased. A subset of patients may show a hyperkinetic movement disorder with chorea, ataxia, or dystonia and global developmental delay (summary by Bogershausen et al., 2013). Additional more variable features include alacrima, achalasia, cataracts, or hepatic steatosis (Liang et al., 2015; Koehler et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, see LGMDR1 (253600).
Extrahepatic biliary atresia
MedGen UID:
1621383
Concept ID:
C4520983
Congenital Abnormality
Biliary atresia is a disorder of infants in which there is progressive obliteration or discontinuity of the extrahepatic biliary system, resulting in obstruction of bile flow. Untreated, the resulting cholestasis leads to progressive conjugated hyperbilirubinemia, cirrhosis, and hepatic failure (Bates et al., 1998). Most patients require liver transplantation within the first year of life (Leyva-Vega et al., 2010). See also Alagille syndrome (118450), which includes biliary atresia as a feature.
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 33
MedGen UID:
1623699
Concept ID:
C4540209
Disease or Syndrome
COXPD33 is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder resulting from a defect in mitochondrial energy metabolism. The phenotype is highly variable, ranging from death in infancy to adult-onset progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO) and myopathy. A common finding is cardiomyopathy and increased serum lactate (summary by Feichtinger et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Pseudo-TORCH syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1639355
Concept ID:
C4552078
Disease or Syndrome
Shwachman-Diamond syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1640046
Concept ID:
C4692625
Disease or Syndrome
Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) is characterized by: exocrine pancreatic dysfunction with malabsorption, malnutrition, and growth failure; hematologic abnormalities with single- or multilineage cytopenias and susceptibility to myelodysplasia syndrome (MDS) and acute myelogeneous leukemia (AML); and bone abnormalities. In almost all affected children, persistent or intermittent neutropenia is a common presenting finding, often before the diagnosis of SDS is made. Short stature and recurrent infections are common.
Proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1648310
Concept ID:
C4746851
Disease or Syndrome
This autosomal recessive systemic autoinflammatory disorder is characterized by early childhood onset of annular erythematous plaques on the face and extremities with subsequent development of partial lipodystrophy and laboratory evidence of immune dysregulation. More variable features include recurrent fever, severe joint contractures, muscle weakness and atrophy, hepatosplenomegaly, basal ganglia calcifications, and microcytic anemia (summary by Agarwal et al., 2010; Kitamura et al., 2011; Arima et al., 2011). This disorder encompasses Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome (NKJO); joint contractures, muscular atrophy, microcytic anemia, and panniculitis-induced lipodystrophy (JMP syndrome); and chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature syndrome (CANDLE). Among Japanese patients, this disorder is best described as Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome, since both Nakajo (1939) and Nishimura et al. (1950) contributed to the original phenotypic descriptions. Genetic Heterogeneity of Proteasome-Associated Autoinflammatory Syndrome See also PRAAS2 (618048), caused by mutation in the POMP gene (613386) on chromosome 13q12; PRAAS3 (617591), caused by mutation in the PSMB4 gene (602177) on chromosome 1q21; PRAAS4 (619183), caused by mutation in the PSMG2 gene (609702) on chromosome 18p11; and PRAAS5 (619175), caused by mutation in the PSMB10 gene (176847) on chromosome 16q22.
Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9 deficiency
MedGen UID:
1648400
Concept ID:
C4747517
Disease or Syndrome
MC1DN20 is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by infantile onset of acute metabolic acidosis, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and muscle weakness associated with a deficiency of mitochondrial complex I activity in muscle, liver, and fibroblasts (summary by Haack et al., 2010). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial complex I deficiency, see 252010.
Proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
1648456
Concept ID:
C4747850
Disease or Syndrome
Proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome-3 is an autosomal recessive syndrome with onset in early infancy. Affected individuals present with nodular dermatitis, recurrent fever, myositis, panniculitis-induced lipodystrophy, lymphadenopathy, and dysregulation of the immune response, particularly associated with abnormal type I interferon-induced gene expression patterns. Additional features are highly variable, but may include joint contractures, hepatosplenomegaly, anemia, thrombocytopenia, recurrent infections, autoantibodies, and hypergammaglobulinemia. Some patients may have intracranial calcifications (summary by Brehm et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PRAAS, see PRAAS1 (256040).
Congenital muscular dystrophy with intellectual disability and severe epilepsy
MedGen UID:
1682844
Concept ID:
C5190603
Disease or Syndrome
A rare fatal inborn error of metabolism disorder with characteristics of respiratory distress and severe hypotonia at birth, severe global developmental delay, early-onset intractable seizures, myopathic facies with craniofacial dysmorphism (trigonocephaly/progressive microcephaly, low anterior hairline, arched eyebrows, hypotelorism, strabismus, small nose, prominent philtrum, thin upper lip, high-arched palate, micrognathia, malocclusion), severe, congenital flexion joint contractures and elevated serum creatine kinase levels. Scoliosis, optic atrophy, mild hepatomegaly, and hypoplastic genitalia may also be associated. There is evidence the disease is caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutation in the DPM2 gene on chromosome 9q34.
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
1682503
Concept ID:
C5191055
Disease or Syndrome
The two forms of deoxyguanosine kinase (DGUOK) deficiency are a neonatal multisystem disorder and an isolated hepatic disorder that presents later in infancy or childhood. The majority of affected individuals have the multisystem illness with hepatic disease (jaundice, cholestasis, hepatomegaly, and elevated transaminases) and neurologic manifestations (hypotonia, nystagmus, and psychomotor retardation) evident within weeks of birth. Those with isolated liver disease may also have renal involvement and some later develop mild hypotonia. Progressive hepatic disease is the most common cause of death in both forms.
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 37
MedGen UID:
1675208
Concept ID:
C5193031
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-37 is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder apparent at birth or in the first months of life. Affected individuals have hypotonia, failure to thrive, and neurodegeneration with loss of developmental milestones, as well as liver dysfunction. Some patients may have hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, loss of vision and hearing, and/or seizures. Mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction is apparent in liver and skeletal muscle tissue. Most patients die in childhood (summary by Zeharia et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, axonal, type 2EE
MedGen UID:
1677426
Concept ID:
C5193076
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2EE (CMT2EE) is an autosomal recessive sensorimotor peripheral axonal neuropathy with onset in the first or second decades of life. The disorder primarily affects the lower limbs and is slowly progressive, sometimes resulting in loss of ambulation, with later onset of upper limb involvement. There is significant distal muscle weakness and atrophy, usually with foot or hand deformities. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows findings of disturbed mitochondrial maintenance. Cognition is unaffected, and chronic liver disease is absent (summary by Baumann et al., 2019). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT type 2, see CMT2A (118210).
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 16 (hepatic type)
MedGen UID:
1684495
Concept ID:
C5193142
Disease or Syndrome
Neutropenia, severe congenital, 8, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1684816
Concept ID:
C5203411
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant severe congenital neutropenia-8 (SCN8) is a pleiotropic disorder with the consistent feature of decreased neutrophils associated with recurrent bacterial infections apparent from early infancy. Other hematologic parameters are usually normal, although some patients may have mild anemia. Bone marrow examination shows hypocellularity with arrested maturation of the granulocyte lineage at the level of promyelocytes or myeloblasts. Treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF; 138970) is usually ineffective or only partially effective, whereas hematopoietic bone marrow transplantation is effective. A subset of patients have additional features, including exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, which resembles Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (see SDS1, 260400), and/or neurologic deficits, including developmental delay, impaired intellectual development, speech delay, and/or autistic features (summary by Carapito et al., 2017 and Bellanne-Chantelot et al., 2018). For discussion of genetic heterogeneity of severe congenital neutropenia, see SCN1 (202700).
Hepatitis, fulminant viral, susceptibility to
MedGen UID:
1684882
Concept ID:
C5231406
Finding
Infantile liver failure syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
1684678
Concept ID:
C5231437
Disease or Syndrome
Infantile liver failure syndrome-3 is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of acute liver failure during intercurrent febrile illness. Patients first present in infancy or early childhood, and there usually is complete recovery between episodes with conservative treatment. Affected individuals also have skeletal anomalies of the vertebral bodies and femoral heads (summary by Cousin et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of infantile liver failure syndrome, see ILFS1 (615438).
Congenital disorder of glycosylation, type IIr
MedGen UID:
1717186
Concept ID:
C5393313
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 2R (CDG2R) is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by infantile onset of liver failure, recurrent infections due to hypogammaglobulinemia, and cutis laxa. Some patients may also have mild intellectual impairment and dysmorphic features. Laboratory studies showed defective glycosylation of serum transferrin in a type 2 pattern (summary by Rujano et al., 2017). For an overview of congenital disorders of glycosylation, see CDG1A (212065) and CDG2A (212066).
COACH syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1769861
Concept ID:
C5435651
Disease or Syndrome
Any COACH syndrome in which the cause of the disease is a variation in the TMEM67 gene.
Rajab interstitial lung disease with brain calcifications 1
MedGen UID:
1750003
Concept ID:
C5436276
Disease or Syndrome
A rare, inherited disorder characterized by widespread calcifications of basal ganglia and cortex, developmental delay, small stature, retinopathy and microcephaly. The absence of progressive deterioration of the neurological functions is characteristic of the disease.
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 47
MedGen UID:
1775535
Concept ID:
C5436476
Disease or Syndrome
Rajab interstitial lung disease with brain calcifications 2
MedGen UID:
1770895
Concept ID:
C5436603
Disease or Syndrome
Rajab interstitial lung disease with brain calcifications-2 (RILDBC2) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by growth delay, interstitial lung disease, liver disease, and abnormal brain MRI findings, including brain calcifications and periventricular cysts (Krenke et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of RILDBC, see RILDBC1 (613658).
Mitochondrial complex 4 deficiency, nuclear type 20
MedGen UID:
1771040
Concept ID:
C5436726
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency nuclear type 20 (MC4DN20) is an autosomal recessive multisystem metabolic disorder characterized by the onset of symptoms in infancy. Affected individuals show hypotonia, failure to thrive, and global developmental delay. Additional features include elevated liver enzymes, increased serum lactate, metabolic acidosis, and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), which may result in cardiorespiratory failure and early death. Patient tissues show variably decreased levels and activity of mitochondrial respiratory complex IV (Baertling et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) deficiency, see 220110.
COACH syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
1752166
Concept ID:
C5436837
Disease or Syndrome
COACH syndrome is classically defined as Cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, Oligophrenia, Ataxia, Colobomas, and Hepatic fibrosis (Verloes and Lambotte, 1989). Brain MRI demonstrates the molar tooth sign, which is a feature of Joubert syndrome. The disorder has been described as a Joubert syndrome-related disorder with liver disease (summary by Doherty et al., 2010). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of COACH syndrome, see 216360.
Mandibuloacral dysplasia progeroid syndrome
MedGen UID:
1741713
Concept ID:
C5436867
Disease or Syndrome
Mandibuloacral dysplasia progeroid syndrome (MDPS) is an autosomal recessive severe laminopathy-like disorder characterized by growth retardation, bone resorption, arterial calcification, renal glomerulosclerosis, and hypertension (Elouej et al., 2020).
Coffin-Siris syndrome 12
MedGen UID:
1782096
Concept ID:
C5444111
Disease or Syndrome
Coffin-Siris syndrome-12 (CSS12) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay with variably impaired intellectual development, speech and language delay, and behavioral abnormalities, such as autism or hyperactivity. Affected individuals may have hypotonia and poor feeding in infancy. There are variable dysmorphic facial features, although most patients do not have the classic hypoplastic fifth digit/nail abnormalities that are often observed in other forms of CSS (Barish et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Coffin-Siris syndrome, see CSS1 (135900).
Multiple congenital anomalies-neurodevelopmental syndrome, x-linked
MedGen UID:
1788942
Concept ID:
C5542341
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked multiple congenital anomalies-neurodevelopmental syndrome (MCAND) is an X-linked recessive congenital multisystemic disorder characterized by poor growth, global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development, and variable abnormalities of the cardiac, skeletal, and genitourinary systems. Most affected individuals also have hypotonia and dysmorphic craniofacial features. Brain imaging typically shows enlarged ventricles and thin corpus callosum; some have microcephaly, whereas others have hydrocephalus. The severity of the disorder is highly variable, ranging from death in early infancy to survival into the second or third decade. Pathogenetically, the disorder results from disrupted gene expression and signaling during embryogenesis, thus affecting multiple systems (summary by Tripolszki et al., 2021 and Beck et al., 2021). Beck et al. (2021) referred to the disorder as LINKED syndrome (LINKage-specific deubiquitylation deficiency-induced Embryonic Defects).
MITOCHONDRIAL COMPLEX IV DEFICIENCY, NUCLEAR TYPE 22
MedGen UID:
1786100
Concept ID:
C5543491
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency nuclear type 22 (MC4DN22) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by neonatal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, encephalopathy, and severe lactic acidosis with fatal outcome (Wintjes et al., 2021).
Portal hypertension, noncirrhotic, 2
MedGen UID:
1794158
Concept ID:
C5561948
Disease or Syndrome
Noncirrhotic portal hypertension-2 (NCPH2) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by signs of liver dysfunction that become apparent in the first decades of life. Affected individuals have jaundice, hyperbilirubinemia, pancytopenia, including neutropenia, lymphopenia, and thrombocytopenia, hepatosplenomegaly, and esophageal varices. Some patients may have recurrent infections or features suggestive of an immunodeficiency. Liver biopsy is notable for the absence of cirrhosis and the presence of nodular regeneration. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) have abnormal expression of CD34 (142230) (summary by Drzewiecki et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of NCPH, see 617068.
DEVELOPMENTAL DELAY, IMPAIRED SPEECH, AND BEHAVIORAL ABNORMALITIES
MedGen UID:
1794167
Concept ID:
C5561957
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental delay, impaired speech, and behavioral abnormalities (DDISBA) is characterized by global developmental delay apparent from early childhood. Intellectual disability can range from mild to severe. Additional variable features may include dysmorphic facial features, seizures, hypotonia, motor abnormalities such as Tourette syndrome or dystonia, and hearing loss (summary by Cousin et al., 2021).
Cholestasis, progressive familial intrahepatic, 6
MedGen UID:
1794175
Concept ID:
C5561965
Disease or Syndrome
Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis-6 (PFIC6) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by elevated liver transaminases, cholestasis, and congenital diarrhea (Gao et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PFIC, see PFIC1 (211600).
Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 9
MedGen UID:
1794176
Concept ID:
C5561966
Disease or Syndrome
Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome-9 (AGS9) is a type I interferonopathy characterized by severe developmental delay and progressive neurologic deterioration. Patients present in infancy with irritability and spasticity. Brain imaging shows diffusely abnormal white matter, cerebral atrophy, and intracranial calcification. Premature death has been associated with renal and/or hepatic failure (Uggenti et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome, see AGS1 (225750).
Congenital disorder of glycosylation, type IIw
MedGen UID:
1794196
Concept ID:
C5561986
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital disorder of glycosylation type IIw (CDG2W) is an autosomal dominant metabolic disorder characterized by liver dysfunction, coagulation deficiencies, and profound abnormalities in N-glycosylation of serum specific proteins. All reported patients carry the same mutation (602671.0017) (summary by Ng et al., 2021). For an overview of congenital disorders of glycosylation, see CDG1A (212065) and CDG2A (212066).
Immunodeficiency 91 and hyperinflammation
MedGen UID:
1794283
Concept ID:
C5562073
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-91 and hyperinflammation (IMD91) is an autosomal recessive complex immunologic disorder characterized by both immunodeficiency and recurrent infections, often to viruses or mycobacteria, as well as by hyperinflammation with systemic involvement. Affected individuals present in infancy with variable features, including fever, infection, thrombocytopenia, renal or hepatic dysfunction, recurrent infections, or seizures. Most patients eventually develop hepatic or renal failure, compromised neurologic function, lymphadenopathy or hepatosplenomegaly, and multiorgan failure resulting in death. More variable features may include intermittent monocytosis, features of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), and serologic evidence of hyperinflammation. The disorder is thought to result from dysregulation of the interferon response to viral stimulation in the innate immune system (summary by Le Voyer et al., 2021; Vavassori et al., 2021).
Leukodystrophy, hypomyelinating, 23, with ataxia, deafness, liver dysfunction, and dilated cardiomyopathy
MedGen UID:
1794284
Concept ID:
C5562074
Disease or Syndrome
Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy-23 with ataxia, deafness, liver dysfunction, and dilated cardiomyopathy (HLD23) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder with systemic manifestations. Affected individuals show delayed motor development and ataxic gait in early childhood that progresses to spastic paraplegia with loss of ambulation in the first decades of life. Additional features include progressive sensorineural hearing loss resulting in deafness, hepatic dysfunction with elevated liver enzymes, and dilated cardiomyopathy that ultimately results in death in the first or second decades. Brain imaging shows hypomyelination, diffuse white matter abnormalities consistent with leukodystrophy, and thin corpus callosum (summary by Sferra et al., 2021). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HLD, see 312080.
Recurrent metabolic encephalomyopathic crises-rhabdomyolysis-cardiac arrhythmia-intellectual disability syndrome
MedGen UID:
1798947
Concept ID:
C5567524
Disease or Syndrome
Individuals with TANGO2-related metabolic encephalopathy and arrhythmias can present in acute metabolic crisis (hypoglycemia, elevated lactate, mild hyperammonemia) or with developmental delay, regression, and/or seizures. The acute presentation varies from profound muscle weakness, ataxia, and/or disorientation to a comatose state. Individuals can present with intermittent acute episodes of rhabdomyolysis. The first episode of myoglobinuria has been known to occur as early as age five months. Acute renal tubular damage due to myoglobinuria can result in acute kidney injury and renal failure. During acute illness, transient electrocardiogram changes can be seen; the most common is QT prolongation. Life-threatening recurrent ventricular tachycardia or torsade de pointes occurs primarily during times of acute illness. Individuals who do not present in metabolic crises may present with gait incoordination, progressively unsteady gait, difficulty with speech, or clumsiness. Intellectual disability of variable severity is observed in almost all individuals. Seizures are observed outside the periods of crises in more than 75% of individuals. Hypothyroidism has been reported in more than one third of individuals.
Combined oxidative phosphorylation defect type 30
MedGen UID:
1799028
Concept ID:
C5567605
Disease or Syndrome
A rare mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation disorder with characteristics of neonatal onset of hypotonia, feeding difficulties, deafness, and early fatal respiratory failure. Cardiac and liver involvement has been reported. Serum lactate is increased and metabolic studies show decreased activity of mitochondrial respiratory complexes I and IV in skeletal muscle.
Preeclampsia/eclampsia 1
MedGen UID:
1807479
Concept ID:
C5574918
Pathologic Function
HEPATORENOCARDIAC DEGENERATIVE FIBROSIS
MedGen UID:
1808950
Concept ID:
C5676996
Disease or Syndrome
Hepatorenocardiac degenerative fibrosis (HRCDF) is a primarily fibrotic disease affecting the liver, kidney, and heart, with considerable variability in disease onset and expression. Affected individuals develop degenerative hepatic fibrosis in childhood or early adulthood, with variable later onset of fibrocystic kidney disease and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (Devane et al., 2022).
Pyruvate dehydrogenase E3 deficiency
MedGen UID:
449386
Concept ID:
CN043137
Disease or Syndrome
The phenotypes of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLD) deficiency are an overlapping continuum that ranges from early-onset neurologic manifestations to adult-onset liver involvement and, rarely, a myopathic presentation. Early-onset DLD deficiency typically manifests in infancy as hypotonia with lactic acidosis. Affected infants frequently do not survive their initial metabolic decompensation, or die within the first few years of life during a recurrent metabolic decompensation. Children who live beyond the first two to three years frequently exhibit growth deficiencies and residual neurologic deficits (intellectual disability, spasticity, ataxia, and seizures). In contrast, isolated liver involvement can present as early as the neonatal period and as late as the third decade. Evidence of liver injury/failure is preceded by nausea and emesis and frequently associated with encephalopathy and/or coagulopathy. Acute metabolic episodes are frequently associated with lactate elevations, hyperammonemia, and hepatomegaly. With resolution of the acute episodes affected individuals frequently return to baseline with no residual neurologic deficit or intellectual disability. Liver failure can result in death, even in those with late-onset disease. Individuals with the myopathic presentation may experience muscle cramps, weakness, and an elevated creatine kinase.
Congenital disorder of deglycosylation 1
MedGen UID:
989503
Concept ID:
CN306977
Disease or Syndrome
Individuals with NGLY1-related congenital disorder of deglycosylation (NGLY1-CDDG) typically display a clinical tetrad of developmental delay / intellectual disability in the mild to profound range, hypo- or alacrima, elevated liver transaminases that may spontaneously resolve in childhood, and a complex hyperkinetic movement disorder that can include choreiform, athetoid, dystonic, myoclonic, action tremor, and dysmetric movements. About half of affected individuals will develop clinical seizures. Other findings may include obstructive and/or central sleep apnea, oral motor defects that affect feeding ability, auditory neuropathy, constipation, scoliosis, and peripheral neuropathy.

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Hutter T, Springe D, Ebnöther L, Delgado M
J Med Case Rep 2018 Jan 19;12(1):14. doi: 10.1186/s13256-017-1542-6. PMID: 29347961Free PMC Article
Jang YR, Shin Y, Jin CE, Koo B, Park SY, Kim MC, Kim T, Chong YP, Lee SO, Choi SH, Kim YS, Woo JH, Kim SH, Yu E
PLoS One 2017;12(7):e0180237. Epub 2017 Jul 3 doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0180237. PMID: 28672014Free PMC Article
Liu Y, Fernandez CA, Smith C, Yang W, Cheng C, Panetta JC, Kornegay N, Liu C, Ramsey LB, Karol SE, Janke LJ, Larsen EC, Winick N, Carroll WL, Loh ML, Raetz EA, Hunger SP, Devidas M, Yang JJ, Mullighan CG, Zhang J, Evans WE, Jeha S, Pui CH, Relling MV
Clin Pharmacol Ther 2017 Jul;102(1):131-140. Epub 2017 Apr 4 doi: 10.1002/cpt.629. PMID: 28090653Free PMC Article
Hladun O, Grau A, Esteban E, Jansà JM
J Travel Med 2014 Mar-Apr;21(2):92-8. Epub 2013 Nov 20 doi: 10.1111/jtm.12083. PMID: 24571720
Boxall EH, Sira J, Ballard AL, Davies P, Kelly DA
J Med Virol 2006 Jul;78(7):888-95. doi: 10.1002/jmv.20637. PMID: 16721856

Diagnosis

Chiu TL, Leung D, Chan KW, Yeung HM, Wong CY, Mao H, He J, Vignesh P, Liang W, Liew WK, Jiang LP, Chen TX, Chen XY, Tao YB, Xu YB, Yu HH, Terblanche A, Lung DC, Li CR, Chen J, Tian M, Eley B, Yang X, Yang J, Chiang WC, Lee BW, Suri D, Rawat A, Gupta A, Singh S, Wong WHS, Chua GT, Duque JSDR, Cheong KN, Chong PC, Ho MH, Lee TL, Yang W, Lee PP, Lau YL
Front Immunol 2021;12:803763. Epub 2022 Jan 24 doi: 10.3389/fimmu.2021.803763. PMID: 35140711Free PMC Article
Hutter T, Springe D, Ebnöther L, Delgado M
J Med Case Rep 2018 Jan 19;12(1):14. doi: 10.1186/s13256-017-1542-6. PMID: 29347961Free PMC Article
Jang YR, Shin Y, Jin CE, Koo B, Park SY, Kim MC, Kim T, Chong YP, Lee SO, Choi SH, Kim YS, Woo JH, Kim SH, Yu E
PLoS One 2017;12(7):e0180237. Epub 2017 Jul 3 doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0180237. PMID: 28672014Free PMC Article
Tolcher MC, Nitsche JF, Arendt KW, Rose CH
Obstet Gynecol Surv 2010 Aug;65(8):517-22. doi: 10.1097/OGX.0b013e3181f87eaf. PMID: 20955630
Shakil A, Church RJ, Rao SS
Am Fam Physician 2008 Jun 15;77(12):1697-702. PMID: 18619079

Therapy

Liu Y, Fernandez CA, Smith C, Yang W, Cheng C, Panetta JC, Kornegay N, Liu C, Ramsey LB, Karol SE, Janke LJ, Larsen EC, Winick N, Carroll WL, Loh ML, Raetz EA, Hunger SP, Devidas M, Yang JJ, Mullighan CG, Zhang J, Evans WE, Jeha S, Pui CH, Relling MV
Clin Pharmacol Ther 2017 Jul;102(1):131-140. Epub 2017 Apr 4 doi: 10.1002/cpt.629. PMID: 28090653Free PMC Article
Tobinai K, Ogura M, Maruyama D, Uchida T, Uike N, Choi I, Ishizawa K, Itoh K, Ando K, Taniwaki M, Shimada N, Kobayashi K
Int J Hematol 2010 Nov;92(4):563-70. Epub 2010 Oct 23 doi: 10.1007/s12185-010-0707-5. PMID: 20972652
Langleben D, Cacoub P
Eur J Clin Invest 2009 Jun;39 Suppl 2:27-31. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2362.2009.02118.x. PMID: 19335744
Kleppinger EL, Ragan AP
Am J Health Syst Pharm 2009 Mar 1;66(5):465-8. doi: 10.2146/ajhp080243. PMID: 19233994
Shakil A, Church RJ, Rao SS
Am Fam Physician 2008 Jun 15;77(12):1697-702. PMID: 18619079

Prognosis

Hladun O, Grau A, Esteban E, Jansà JM
J Travel Med 2014 Mar-Apr;21(2):92-8. Epub 2013 Nov 20 doi: 10.1111/jtm.12083. PMID: 24571720
Kleppinger EL, Ragan AP
Am J Health Syst Pharm 2009 Mar 1;66(5):465-8. doi: 10.2146/ajhp080243. PMID: 19233994
Boxall EH, Sira J, Ballard AL, Davies P, Kelly DA
J Med Virol 2006 Jul;78(7):888-95. doi: 10.1002/jmv.20637. PMID: 16721856
Hazra R, Gafni RI, Maldarelli F, Balis FM, Tullio AN, DeCarlo E, Worrell CJ, Steinberg SM, Flaherty J, Yale K, Kearney BP, Zeichner SL
Pediatrics 2005 Dec;116(6):e846-54. Epub 2005 Nov 15 doi: 10.1542/peds.2005-0975. PMID: 16291735
Halasz CL, Niedt GW, Kurtz CP, Scorpio DG, Bakken JS, Dumler JS
Arch Dermatol 2005 Jul;141(7):887-9. doi: 10.1001/archderm.141.7.887. PMID: 16027306

Clinical prediction guides

Jang YR, Shin Y, Jin CE, Koo B, Park SY, Kim MC, Kim T, Chong YP, Lee SO, Choi SH, Kim YS, Woo JH, Kim SH, Yu E
PLoS One 2017;12(7):e0180237. Epub 2017 Jul 3 doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0180237. PMID: 28672014Free PMC Article
Hladun O, Grau A, Esteban E, Jansà JM
J Travel Med 2014 Mar-Apr;21(2):92-8. Epub 2013 Nov 20 doi: 10.1111/jtm.12083. PMID: 24571720
Tobinai K, Ogura M, Maruyama D, Uchida T, Uike N, Choi I, Ishizawa K, Itoh K, Ando K, Taniwaki M, Shimada N, Kobayashi K
Int J Hematol 2010 Nov;92(4):563-70. Epub 2010 Oct 23 doi: 10.1007/s12185-010-0707-5. PMID: 20972652
Halasz CL, Niedt GW, Kurtz CP, Scorpio DG, Bakken JS, Dumler JS
Arch Dermatol 2005 Jul;141(7):887-9. doi: 10.1001/archderm.141.7.887. PMID: 16027306
Klein MB, Nelson CM, Goodman JL
Antimicrob Agents Chemother 1997 Jan;41(1):76-9. doi: 10.1128/AAC.41.1.76. PMID: 8980758Free PMC Article

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