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Prominent nasal bridge

MedGen UID:
343051
Concept ID:
C1854113
Finding
Synonyms: Elevated nasal bridge; High nasal bridge; High-bridged nose; Prominent nasal root
 
HPO: HP:0000426

Definition

Anterior positioning of the nasal root in comparison to the usual positioning for age. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVProminent nasal bridge

Conditions with this feature

Hallermann-Streiff syndrome
MedGen UID:
5414
Concept ID:
C0018522
Disease or Syndrome
Hallermann-Streiff syndrome is characterized by a typical skull shape (brachycephaly with frontal bossing), hypotrichosis, microphthalmia, cataracts, beaked nose, micrognathia, skin atrophy, dental anomalies, and proportionate short stature (Hallermann, 1948; Streiff, 1950; Francois, 1958). Mental retardation is present in a minority of cases (Gorlin et al., 1990).
Waardenburg syndrome type 3
MedGen UID:
86948
Concept ID:
C0079661
Disease or Syndrome
Waardenburg syndrome type 3 is an auditory-pigmentary syndrome characterized by pigmentary abnormalities of the hair, skin, and eyes; congenital sensorineural hearing loss; presence of 'dystopia canthorum,' the lateral displacement of the ocular inner canthi; and upper limb abnormalities (reviews by Read and Newton, 1997 and Pingault et al., 2010). WS type 3 is also referred to as 'Klein-Waardenburg syndrome' (Gorlin et al., 1976). Clinical Variability of Waardenburg Syndrome Types 1-4 Waardenburg syndrome has been classified into 4 main phenotypes. Type I Waardenburg syndrome (WS1; 193500) is characterized by pigmentary abnormalities of the hair, including a white forelock and premature graying; pigmentary changes of the iris, such as heterochromia iridis and brilliant blue eyes; congenital sensorineural hearing loss; and 'dystopia canthorum.' WS type II (WS2) is distinguished from type I by the absence of dystopia canthorum. WS type III has dystopia canthorum and is distinguished by the presence of upper limb abnormalities. WS type IV (WS4; 277580), also known as Waardenburg-Shah syndrome, has the additional feature of Hirschsprung disease (reviews by Read and Newton, 1997 and Pingault et al., 2010).
Dubowitz syndrome
MedGen UID:
59797
Concept ID:
C0175691
Disease or Syndrome
Dubowitz syndrome (DS) is a rare multiple congenital syndrome characterized primarly by growth retardation, microcephaly, distinctive facial dysmorphism, cutaneous eczema, a mild to severe intellectual deficit and genital abnormalities.
KBG syndrome
MedGen UID:
66317
Concept ID:
C0220687
Disease or Syndrome
KBG syndrome is typically characterized by macrodontia (especially of the upper central incisors), characteristic facial features (triangular face, brachycephaly, synophrys, widely spaced eyes, broad or bushy eyebrows, prominent ears, prominent nasal bridge, bulbous nose, anteverted nares, long philtrum, and thin vermilion of the upper lip), short stature, developmental delay / intellectual disability, and behavioral issues. Affected individuals may have feeding difficulties (particularly in infancy), skeletal anomalies (brachydactyly, large anterior fontanelle with delayed closure, scoliosis), hearing loss (conductive, mixed, and sensorineural), seizure disorder, and brain malformations. There is significant variability in the clinical findings, even between affected members of the same family.
Cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
66320
Concept ID:
C0220722
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome is an autosomal recessive progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by microcephaly, congenital cataracts, severe mental retardation, facial dysmorphism, and arthrogryposis (summary by Jaakkola et al., 2010). Genetic Heterogeneity of Cerebrooculofacioskeletal Syndrome See also COFS2 (610756), caused by mutation in the ERCC2 gene (126340); COFS3 (616570), caused by mutation in the ERCC5 gene (133530); and COFS4 (610758), caused by mutation in the ERCC1 gene (126380).
Cohen syndrome
MedGen UID:
78539
Concept ID:
C0265223
Congenital Abnormality
Cohen syndrome is characterized by failure to thrive in infancy and childhood; truncal obesity in the teen years; early-onset hypotonia and developmental delays; microcephaly developing during the first year of life; moderate to profound psychomotor retardation; progressive retinochoroidal dystrophy and high myopia; neutropenia in many with recurrent infections and aphthous ulcers in some; a cheerful disposition; joint hypermobility; and characteristic facial features.
Nager syndrome
MedGen UID:
120519
Concept ID:
C0265245
Disease or Syndrome
Nager syndrome is the prototype for a group of disorders collectively referred to as the acrofacial dysostoses (AFDs), which are characterized by malformation of the craniofacial skeleton and the limbs. The major facial features of Nager syndrome include downslanted palpebral fissures, midface retrusion, and micrognathia, the latter of which often requires the placement of a tracheostomy in early childhood. Limb defects typically involve the anterior (radial) elements of the upper limbs and manifest as small or absent thumbs, triphalangeal thumbs, radial hypoplasia or aplasia, and radioulnar synostosis. Phocomelia of the upper limbs and, occasionally, lower-limb defects have also been reported. The presence of anterior upper-limb defects and the typical lack of lower-limb involvement distinguishes Nager syndrome from Miller syndrome (263750), another rare AFD; however, distinguishing Nager syndrome from other AFDs, including Miller syndrome, can be challenging (summary by Bernier et al., 2012).
Baller-Gerold syndrome
MedGen UID:
120532
Concept ID:
C0265308
Disease or Syndrome
Baller-Gerold syndrome (BGS) can be suspected at birth in an infant with craniosynostosis and upper limb abnormality. The coronal suture is most commonly affected; the metopic, lambdoid, and sagittal sutures may also be involved alone or in combination. Upper limb abnormality can include a combination of thumb hypo- or aplasia and radial hypo- or aplasia and may be asymmetric. Malformation or absence of carpal or metacarpal bones has also been described. Skin lesions may appear anytime within the first few years after birth, typically beginning with erythema of the face and extremities and evolving into poikiloderma. Slow growth is apparent in infancy with eventual height and length typically at 4 SD below the mean.
Woodhouse-Sakati syndrome
MedGen UID:
83337
Concept ID:
C0342286
Disease or Syndrome
Virtually all individuals with Woodhouse-Sakati syndrome (WSS) have the endocrine findings of hypogonadism (evident at puberty) and progressive childhood-onset hair thinning that often progresses to alopecia totalis in adulthood. More than half of individuals have the neurologic findings of progressive extrapyramidal movements (dystonic spasms with dystonic posturing with dysarthria and dysphagia), moderate bilateral postlingual sensorineural hearing loss, and mild intellectual disability. To date, more than 40 families (including 33 with a molecularly confirmed diagnosis) with a total of 88 affected individuals have been reported in the literature.
Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II
MedGen UID:
96587
Concept ID:
C0432246
Disease or Syndrome
Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPDII), the most common form of microcephalic primordial dwarfism, is characterized by extreme short stature and microcephaly along with distinctive facial features. Associated features that differentiate it from other forms of primordial dwarfism and that may necessitate treatment include: abnormal dentition, a slender bone skeletal dysplasia with hip deformity and/or scoliosis, insulin resistance / diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, cardiac malformations, and global vascular disease. The latter includes neurovascular disease such as moyamoya vasculopathy and intracranial aneurysms (which can lead to strokes), coronary artery disease (which can lead to premature myocardial infarctions), and renal vascular disease. Hypertension, which is also common, can have multiple underlying causes given the complex comorbidities.
Floating-Harbor syndrome
MedGen UID:
152667
Concept ID:
C0729582
Disease or Syndrome
Floating-Harbor syndrome (FHS) is characterized by typical craniofacial features; low birth weight, normal head circumference, and short stature; bone age delay that normalizes between ages six and 12 years; skeletal anomalies (brachydactyly, clubbing, clinodactyly, short thumbs, prominent joints, clavicular abnormalities); severe receptive and expressive language impairment; hypernasality and high-pitched voice; and intellectual disability that is typically mild to moderate. Difficulties with temperament and behavior that are present in many children tend to improve in adulthood. Other features can include hyperopia and/or strabismus, conductive hearing loss, seizures, gastroesophageal reflux, renal anomalies (e.g., hydronephrosis / renal pelviectasis, cysts, and/or agenesis), and genital anomalies (e.g., hypospadias and/or undescended testes).
Cockayne syndrome type 2
MedGen UID:
155487
Concept ID:
C0751038
Disease or Syndrome
Cockayne syndrome (referred to as CS in this GeneReview) spans a continuous phenotypic spectrum that includes: CS type I, the "classic" or "moderate" form; CS type II, a more severe form with symptoms present at birth; this form overlaps with cerebrooculofacioskeletal (COFS) syndrome; CS type III, a milder and later-onset form; COFS syndrome, a fetal form of CS. CS type I is characterized by normal prenatal growth with the onset of growth and developmental abnormalities in the first two years. By the time the disease has become fully manifest, height, weight, and head circumference are far below the fifth percentile. Progressive impairment of vision, hearing, and central and peripheral nervous system function leads to severe disability; death typically occurs in the first or second decade. CS type II is characterized by growth failure at birth, with little or no postnatal neurologic development. Congenital cataracts or other structural anomalies of the eye may be present. Affected children have early postnatal contractures of the spine (kyphosis, scoliosis) and joints. Death usually occurs by age five years. CS type III is a phenotype in which major clinical features associated with CS only become apparent after age two years; growth and/or cognition exceeds the expectations for CS type I. COFS syndrome is characterized by very severe prenatal developmental anomalies (arthrogryposis and microphthalmia).
FRAXE
MedGen UID:
155512
Concept ID:
C0751157
Disease or Syndrome
Intellectual developmental disorder-109 (MRX109) is characterized by mildly to moderately impaired intellectual development associated with learning difficulties, communication deficits, attention problems, hyperactivity, and autistic behavior (summary by Bensaid et al., 2009). The disorder, which is associated with a fragile site on chromosome Xq28 (FRAXE), can be caused either by silencing of the FMR2 gene as a consequence of a CCG expansion located upstream of this gene or by deletion within the gene (Stettner et al., 2011).
X-linked intellectual disability with marfanoid habitus
MedGen UID:
167096
Concept ID:
C0796022
Disease or Syndrome
MED12-related disorders include the phenotypes of FG syndrome type 1 (FGS1), Lujan syndrome (LS), X-linked Ohdo syndrome (XLOS), Hardikar syndrome (HS), and nonspecific intellectual disability (NSID). FGS1 and LS share the clinical findings of cognitive impairment, hypotonia, and abnormalities of the corpus callosum. FGS1 is further characterized by absolute or relative macrocephaly, tall forehead, downslanted palpebral fissures, small and simple ears, constipation and/or anal anomalies, broad thumbs and halluces, and characteristic behavior. LS is further characterized by large head, tall thin body habitus, long thin face, prominent nasal bridge, high narrow palate, and short philtrum. Carrier females in families with FGS1 and LS are typically unaffected. XLOS is characterized by intellectual disability, blepharophimosis, and facial coarsening. HS has been described in females with cleft lip and/or cleft palate, biliary and liver anomalies, intestinal malrotation, pigmentary retinopathy, and coarctation of the aorta. Developmental and cognitive concerns have not been reported in females with HS. Pathogenic variants in MED12 have been reported in an increasing number of males and females with NSID, with affected individuals often having clinical features identified in other MED12-related disorders.
Myhre syndrome
MedGen UID:
167103
Concept ID:
C0796081
Disease or Syndrome
Myhre syndrome is a connective tissue disorder with multisystem involvement, progressive and proliferative fibrosis that may occur spontaneously or following trauma or surgery, mild-to-moderate intellectual disability, and in some instances, autistic-like behaviors. Organ systems primarily involved include: cardiovascular (congenital heart defects, long- and short-segment stenosis of the aorta and peripheral arteries, pericardial effusion, constrictive pericarditis, restrictive cardiomyopathy, and hypertension); respiratory (choanal stenosis, laryngotracheal narrowing, obstructive airway disease, or restrictive pulmonary disease), gastrointestinal (pyloric stenosis, duodenal strictures, severe constipation); and skin (thickened particularly on the hands and extensor surfaces). Additional findings include distinctive craniofacial features and skeletal involvement (intrauterine growth restriction, short stature, limited joint range of motion). To date, 55 individuals with molecularly confirmed Myhre syndrome have been reported.
Nance-Horan syndrome
MedGen UID:
208665
Concept ID:
C0796085
Disease or Syndrome
Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is an X-linked disorder characterized by congenital cataracts, dental anomalies, dysmorphic features, and, in some cases, mental retardation (summary by Burdon et al., 2003).
Norman-Roberts syndrome
MedGen UID:
163213
Concept ID:
C0796089
Disease or Syndrome
Lissencephaly ('smooth brain') is a severe disorder of brain development in which neuronal migration is impaired, leading to a thickened cerebral cortex in which the normally folded contour is simplified and smooth. Lissencephaly-2 (LIS2) is associated with severe abnormalities of the cerebellum and hippocampus (summary by Hong et al., 2000). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lissencephaly, see LIS1 (607432).
Syndromic X-linked intellectual disability Snyder type
MedGen UID:
162918
Concept ID:
C0796160
Disease or Syndrome
Snyder-Robinson syndrome (SRS) is an X-linked intellectual disability syndrome characterized by asthenic build, facial dysmorphism with a prominent lower lip, kyphoscoliosis, osteoporosis, speech abnormalities, and seizures. Developmental delay usually presents as failure to meet early developmental milestones and then evolves to moderate to profound intellectual disability (which appears to remain stable over time) and variable motor disability. Asthenic habitus and low muscle mass usually develop during the first year, even in males who are ambulatory. During the first decade, males with SRS develop osteoporosis, resulting in fractures in the absence of trauma.
Intellectual disability, X-linked 30
MedGen UID:
163235
Concept ID:
C0796237
Disease or Syndrome
Any non-syndromic X-linked intellectual disability in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the PAK3 gene.
3MC syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
167115
Concept ID:
C0796279
Disease or Syndrome
The term '3MC syndrome' encompasses 4 rare autosomal recessive disorders that were previously designated the Carnevale, Mingarelli, Malpuech, and Michels syndromes, respectively. The main features of these syndromes are facial dysmorphism that includes hypertelorism, blepharophimosis, blepharoptosis, and highly arched eyebrows, which are present in 70 to 95% of cases. Cleft lip and palate, postnatal growth deficiency, cognitive impairment, and hearing loss are also consistent findings, occurring in 40 to 68% of cases. Craniosynostosis, radioulnar synostosis, and genital and vesicorenal anomalies occur in 20 to 30% of cases. Rare features include anterior chamber defects, cardiac anomalies, caudal appendage, umbilical hernia (omphalocele), and diastasis recti (summary by Rooryck et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of 3MC syndrome, see 3MC1 (257920).
Congenital muscular hypertrophy-cerebral syndrome
MedGen UID:
315658
Concept ID:
C1802395
Disease or Syndrome
Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) encompasses a spectrum of findings from mild to severe. Severe (classic) CdLS is characterized by distinctive facial features, growth restriction (prenatal onset; <5th centile throughout life), hypertrichosis, and upper-limb reduction defects that range from subtle phalangeal abnormalities to oligodactyly (missing digits). Craniofacial features include synophrys, highly arched and/or thick eyebrows, long eyelashes, short nasal bridge with anteverted nares, small widely spaced teeth, and microcephaly. Individuals with a milder phenotype have less severe growth, cognitive, and limb involvement, but often have facial features consistent with CdLS. Across the CdLS spectrum IQ ranges from below 30 to 102 (mean: 53). Many individuals demonstrate autistic and self-destructive tendencies. Other frequent findings include cardiac septal defects, gastrointestinal dysfunction, hearing loss, myopia, and cryptorchidism or hypoplastic genitalia.
Facial dysmorphism-lens dislocation-anterior segment abnormalities-spontaneous filtering blebs syndrome
MedGen UID:
330396
Concept ID:
C1832167
Disease or Syndrome
Traboulsi syndrome is characterized by dislocated crystalline lenses and anterior segment abnormalities in association with a distinctive facies involving flat cheeks and a beaked nose. Some affected individuals develop highly unusual nontraumatic conjunctival cysts (filtering blebs), presumably caused by abnormal thinning of the sclera (Patel et al., 2014).
Goldberg-Shprintzen megacolon syndrome
MedGen UID:
332131
Concept ID:
C1836123
Disease or Syndrome
Goldberg-Shprintzen syndrome (GOSHS) is an autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by impaired intellectual development, microcephaly, and dysmorphic facial features. Most patients also have Hirschsprung disease and/or gyral abnormalities of the brain, consistent with defects in migration of neural crest cells and neurons. Other features, such as megalocornea or urogenital anomalies, may also be present. Goldberg-Shprintzen syndrome has some resemblance to Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MOWS; 235730) but is genetically distinct (summary by Drevillon et al., 2013).
AICA-ribosiduria
MedGen UID:
332474
Concept ID:
C1837530
Disease or Syndrome
AICA-ribosuria is characterized by severe to profound global neurodevelopmental impairment, severe visual impairment due to chorioretinal atrophy, ante-postnatal growth impairment, and severe scoliosis. Dysmorphic features include coarse facies and upturned nose. Early-onset epilepsy may occur. Less common features may include aortic coarctation, chronic hepatic cytolysis, minor genital malformations, and nephrocalcinosis (Ramond et al., 2020).
Intellectual disability-brachydactyly-Pierre Robin syndrome
MedGen UID:
325196
Concept ID:
C1837564
Disease or Syndrome
Intellectual disability-brachydactyly-Pierre Robin syndrome is a rare developmental defect during embryogenesis syndrome characterized by mild to moderate intellectual disability and phsychomotor delay, Robin sequence (incl. severe micrognathia and soft palate cleft) and distinct dysmorphic facial features (e.g. synophris, short palpebral fissures, hypertelorism, small, low-set, and posteriorly angulated ears, bulbous nose, long/flat philtrum, and bow-shaped upper lip). Skeletal anomalies, such as brachydactyly, clinodactyly, small hands and feet, and oral manifestations (e.g. bifid, short tongue, oligodontia) are also associated. Additional features reported include microcephaly, capillary hemangiomas on face and scalp, ventricular septal defect, corneal clouding, nystagmus and profound sensorineural deafness.
Choanal atresia-hearing loss-cardiac defects-craniofacial dysmorphism syndrome
MedGen UID:
325265
Concept ID:
C1837822
Disease or Syndrome
TXNL4A-related craniofacial disorders comprise a range of phenotypes that includes: isolated choanal atresia; choanal atresia with minor anomalies; and Burn-McKeown syndrome (BMKS), which is characterized by typical craniofacial features (bilateral choanal atresia/stenosis, short palpebral fissures, coloboma of the lower eyelids, prominent nasal bridge with widely spaced eyes, short philtrum, thin vermilion of the upper lip, and prominent ears). Hearing loss is common and cardiac defects and short stature have been reported. Intellectual disability is rare.
SCARF syndrome
MedGen UID:
326461
Concept ID:
C1839321
Disease or Syndrome
Syndrome with the association of skeletal abnormalities, cutis laxa, craniostenosis, ambiguous genitalia, psychomotor retardation and facial abnormalities. So far, it has been described in two males (maternal first cousins). The mode of inheritance was suggested to be X-linked recessive.
Craniolenticulosutural dysplasia
MedGen UID:
334671
Concept ID:
C1843042
Disease or Syndrome
Craniolenticulosutural dysplasia is characterized by facial dysmorphism, late-closing fontanels, cataract, and skeletal defects (summary by Boyadjiev et al., 2011).
Syndromic X-linked intellectual disability Claes-Jensen type
MedGen UID:
335139
Concept ID:
C1845243
Disease or Syndrome
Claes-Jensen type of X-linked syndromic intellectual developmental disorder (MRXSCJ) is characterized by impaired intellectual development with substantial clinical heterogeneity in affected males. However, males are usually reported to have short stature, microcephaly, hyperreflexia, and aggressive behavior. In rare cases, female carriers exhibit mildly impaired intellectual development or learning difficulties (summary by Guerra et al., 2020).
Intellectual disability, X-linked 45
MedGen UID:
375633
Concept ID:
C1845333
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Any non-syndromic X-linked intellectual disability in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the ZNF81 gene.
Corpus callosum agenesis-intellectual disability-coloboma-micrognathia syndrome
MedGen UID:
335185
Concept ID:
C1845446
Disease or Syndrome
Corpus callosum agenesis-intellectual disability-coloboma-micrognathia syndrome is a developmental anomalies syndrome characterized by coloboma of the iris and optic nerve, facial dysmorphism (high forehead, microretrognathia, low-set ears), intellectual deficit, agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC), sensorineural hearing loss, skeletal anomalies and short stature.
Syndromic X-linked intellectual disability Lubs type
MedGen UID:
337496
Concept ID:
C1846058
Disease or Syndrome
MECP2 duplication syndrome is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by early-onset hypotonia, feeding difficulty, gastrointestinal manifestations including gastroesophageal reflux and constipation, delayed psychomotor development leading to severe intellectual disability, poor speech development, progressive spasticity, recurrent respiratory infections (in ~75% of affected individuals), and seizures (in ~50%). MECP2 duplication syndrome is 100% penetrant in males. Occasionally females have been described with a MECP2 duplication and a range of findings from mild intellectual disability to a phenotype similar to that seen in males. In addition to the core features, autistic behaviors, nonspecific neuroradiologic findings on brain MRI, mottled skin, and urogenital anomalies have been observed in several affected boys.
X-linked lissencephaly with abnormal genitalia
MedGen UID:
375832
Concept ID:
C1846171
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked lissencephaly-2 (LISX2) is a developmental disorder characterized by structural brain anomalies, early-onset intractable seizures, severe psychomotor retardation, and ambiguous genitalia. Males are severely affected and often die within the first days or months of life, whereas females may be unaffected or have a milder phenotype (Bonneau et al., 2002). LISX2 is part of a phenotypic spectrum of disorders caused by mutation in the ARX gene comprising a nearly continuous series of developmental disorders ranging from hydranencephaly and lissencephaly to Proud syndrome (300004) to infantile spasms without brain malformations (DEE1; 308350) to syndromic (309510) and nonsyndromic (300419) mental retardation (Kato et al., 2004; Wallerstein et al., 2008). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lissencephaly, see LIS1 (607432).
Oculofaciocardiodental syndrome
MedGen UID:
337547
Concept ID:
C1846265
Disease or Syndrome
Oculofaciocardiodental (OFCD) syndrome is a condition that affects the development of the eyes (oculo-), facial features (facio-), heart (cardio-) and teeth (dental). This condition occurs only in females.\n\nThe eye abnormalities associated with OFCD syndrome can affect one or both eyes. Many people with this condition are born with eyeballs that are abnormally small (microphthalmia). Other eye problems can include clouding of the lens (cataract) and a higher risk of glaucoma, an eye disease that increases the pressure in the eye. These abnormalities can lead to vision loss or blindness.\n\nPeople with OFCD syndrome often have a long, narrow face with distinctive facial features, including deep-set eyes and a broad nasal tip that is divided by a cleft. Some affected people have an opening in the roof of the mouth called a cleft palate.\n\nHeart defects are another common feature of OFCD syndrome. Babies with this condition may be born with a hole between two chambers of the heart (an atrial or ventricular septal defect) or a leak in one of the valves that controls blood flow through the heart (mitral valve prolapse).\n\nTeeth with very large roots (radiculomegaly) are characteristic of OFCD syndrome. Additional dental abnormalities can include delayed loss of primary (baby) teeth, missing or abnormally small teeth, misaligned teeth, and defective tooth enamel.
Whistling face syndrome, recessive form
MedGen UID:
376364
Concept ID:
C1848470
Disease or Syndrome
Whistling face syndrome is characterized by an atypical facial appearance with anomalies of the hands and feet. Most cases show autosomal dominant inheritance: see distal arthrogryposis 2A (DA2A; 193700). There are rare reports of presumably autosomal recessive inheritance (summary by Altunhan et al., 2010).
Beare-Stevenson cutis gyrata syndrome
MedGen UID:
377668
Concept ID:
C1852406
Disease or Syndrome
Beare-Stevenson cutis gyrata syndrome (BSTVS) is an autosomal dominant condition characterized by the furrowed skin disorder of cutis gyrata, acanthosis nigricans, craniosynostosis, craniofacial dysmorphism, digital anomalies, umbilical and anogenital abnormalities, and early death (summary by Przylepa et al., 1996).
Cornelia de Lange syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
339902
Concept ID:
C1853099
Disease or Syndrome
Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) encompasses a spectrum of findings from mild to severe. Severe (classic) CdLS is characterized by distinctive facial features, growth restriction (prenatal onset; <5th centile throughout life), hypertrichosis, and upper-limb reduction defects that range from subtle phalangeal abnormalities to oligodactyly (missing digits). Craniofacial features include synophrys, highly arched and/or thick eyebrows, long eyelashes, short nasal bridge with anteverted nares, small widely spaced teeth, and microcephaly. Individuals with a milder phenotype have less severe growth, cognitive, and limb involvement, but often have facial features consistent with CdLS. Across the CdLS spectrum IQ ranges from below 30 to 102 (mean: 53). Many individuals demonstrate autistic and self-destructive tendencies. Other frequent findings include cardiac septal defects, gastrointestinal dysfunction, hearing loss, myopia, and cryptorchidism or hypoplastic genitalia.
Cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
342798
Concept ID:
C1853100
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome-4 is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by growth retardation, dysmorphic facial features, arthrogryposis, and neurologic abnormalities. Cellular studies show a defect in both transcription-coupled and global genome nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER and GG-NER) (summary by Jaspers et al., 2007 and Kashiyama et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome, see 214150.
Genitopatellar syndrome
MedGen UID:
381208
Concept ID:
C1853566
Disease or Syndrome
KAT6B disorders include genitopatellar syndrome (GPS) and Say-Barber-Biesecker-Young-Simpson variant of Ohdo syndrome (SBBYSS) which are part of a broad phenotypic spectrum with variable expressivity; individuals presenting with a phenotype intermediate between GPS and SBBYSS have been reported. Both phenotypes are characterized by some degree of global developmental delay / intellectual disability; hypotonia; genital abnormalities; and skeletal abnormalities including patellar hypoplasia/agenesis, flexion contractures of the knees and/or hips, and anomalies of the digits, spine, and/or ribs. Congenital heart defects, small bowel malrotation, feeding difficulties, slow growth, cleft palate, hearing loss, and dental anomalies have been observed in individuals with either phenotype.
Cerebrooculonasal syndrome
MedGen UID:
340138
Concept ID:
C1854108
Disease or Syndrome
A multisystem malformation syndrome that has been reported in about 10 patients. The clinical features include bilateral anophthalmia, abnormal nares, central nervous system anomalies, and neurodevelopmental delay. Additional features include brachycephaly and other facial anomalies. Non-facial anomalies have also been reported: postaxial polydactyly, genital hypoplasia. All cases reported so far have been sporadic, suggesting that the syndrome may be due to a new dominant mutation.
Frontoocular syndrome
MedGen UID:
344278
Concept ID:
C1854405
Disease or Syndrome
Stromme syndrome
MedGen UID:
340938
Concept ID:
C1855705
Disease or Syndrome
Stromme syndrome is an autosomal recessive congenital disorder affecting multiple systems with features of a ciliopathy. Affected individuals typically have some type of intestinal atresia, variable ocular abnormalities, microcephaly, and sometimes involvement of other systems, including renal and cardiac. In some cases, the condition is lethal in early life, whereas other patients show normal survival with or without mild cognitive impairment (summary by Filges et al., 2016).
Autosomal recessive faciodigitogenital syndrome
MedGen UID:
341637
Concept ID:
C1856871
Disease or Syndrome
A very rare syndrome including short stature, facial dysmorphism, hand abnormalities and shawl scrotum. It has been observed in 16 subjects from five distantly related sibships of a large Kuwaiti Bedouin tribe. The affected patients had no intellectual deficit. Transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait.
NDE1-related microhydranencephaly
MedGen UID:
341899
Concept ID:
C1857977
Disease or Syndrome
Microhydranencephaly (MHAC) is a severe neurodevelopmental defect characterized by extreme microcephaly, profound motor and mental retardation, spasticity, and incomplete cerebral formation. Radiologic studies show gross dilation of the ventricles resulting from the absence of cerebral hemispheres or severe delay in their development, as well as hypoplasia of the corpus callosum, cerebellum, and brainstem (summary by Guven et al., 2012).
Cooks syndrome
MedGen UID:
354848
Concept ID:
C1862841
Disease or Syndrome
Familial anonychia/onychodystrophy with hypoplasia or absence of distal phalanges (ODP) is a rare disorder characterized by onychodystrophy, anonychia, brachydactyly of the fifth finger, and digitalization of the thumbs, with absence or hypoplasia of the distal phalanges of the hands and feet. Generally the nails of the first to third digits are progressively deformed with total anonychia in the last 2 digits and in all toes (summary by Genzer-Nir et al., 2010). A syndrome has been described in which affected females display juvenile hypertrophy of the breast (JHB; 113670) in association with ODP, whereas males have only ODP (mammary-digital-nail syndrome; 613689).
Koolen-de Vries syndrome
MedGen UID:
355853
Concept ID:
C1864871
Disease or Syndrome
Koolen-de Vries syndrome (KdVS) is characterized by developmental delay / intellectual disability, neonatal/childhood hypotonia, dysmorphisms, congenital malformations, and behavioral features. Psychomotor developmental delay is noted in all individuals from an early age. The majority of individuals with KdVS function in the mild-to-moderate range of intellectual disability. Other findings include speech and language delay (100%), epilepsy (~33%), congenital heart defects (25%-50%), renal and urologic anomalies (25%-50%), and cryptorchidism (71% of males). Behavior in most is described as friendly, amiable, and cooperative.
Ectodermal dysplasia, sensorineural hearing loss, and distinctive facial features
MedGen UID:
355878
Concept ID:
C1864966
Disease or Syndrome
Acroosteolysis-keloid-like lesions-premature aging syndrome
MedGen UID:
400936
Concept ID:
C1866182
Disease or Syndrome
Penttinen syndrome (PENTT) is characterized by a prematurely aged appearance involving lipoatrophy and epidermal and dermal atrophy, as well as hypertrophic lesions that resemble scars, thin hair, proptosis, underdeveloped cheekbones, and marked acroosteolysis (Johnston et al., 2015).
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 6
MedGen UID:
370596
Concept ID:
C1969084
Congenital Abnormality
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH) is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by an abnormally small cerebellum and brainstem and associated with severe developmental delay (Edvardson et al., 2007). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PCH, see PCH1 (607596).
Intellectual disability, autosomal recessive 5
MedGen UID:
370849
Concept ID:
C1970199
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Any autosomal recessive non-syndromic intellectual disability in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the NSUN2 gene.
Syndromic X-linked intellectual disability 14
MedGen UID:
372646
Concept ID:
C1970822
Disease or Syndrome
Any X-linked syndromic intellectual disability in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the UPF3B gene.
Chromosome 3q29 microdeletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
393265
Concept ID:
C2674949
Disease or Syndrome
3q29 recurrent deletion is characterized by neurodevelopmental and/or psychiatric manifestations including mild-to-moderate intellectual disability (ID), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), anxiety disorders, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), executive function deficits, graphomotor weakness, and psychosis/schizophrenia. Age at onset for psychosis or prodrome can be younger than the typical age at onset in the general population. Neurodevelopmental and psychiatric conditions are responsible for the majority of the disability associated with the 3q29 deletion. Other common findings are failure to thrive and feeding problems in infancy that persist into childhood, gastrointestinal disorders (including constipation and gastroesophageal reflux disease [GERD]), ocular issues, dental anomalies, and congenital heart defects (especially patent ductus arteriosus). Structural anomalies of the posterior fossa may be seen on neuroimaging. To date more than 200 affected individuals have been identified.
Chromosome 1q21.1 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
393913
Concept ID:
C2675897
Congenital Abnormality
The 1q21.1 recurrent microdeletion itself does not appear to lead to a clinically recognizable syndrome as some persons with the deletion have no obvious clinical findings and others have variable findings that most commonly include microcephaly (50%), mild intellectual disability (30%), mildly dysmorphic facial features, and eye abnormalities (26%). Other findings can include cardiac defects, genitourinary anomalies, skeletal malformations, and seizures (~15%). Psychiatric and behavioral abnormalities can include autism spectrum disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autistic features, and sleep disturbances.
Chromosome 2q32-q33 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
436765
Concept ID:
C2676739
Disease or Syndrome
SATB2-associated syndrome (SAS) is a multisystem disorder characterized by significant neurodevelopmental compromise with limited to absent speech, behavioral issues, and craniofacial anomalies. All individuals described to date have manifest developmental delay / intellectual disability, with severe speech delay. Affected individuals often have hypotonia and feeding difficulties in infancy. Behavioral issues may include autistic features, hyperactivity, and aggressiveness. Craniofacial anomalies may include palatal abnormalities (cleft palate, high-arched palate, and bifid uvula), micrognathia, and abnormal shape or size of the upper central incisors. Less common features include skeletal anomalies (osteopenia, pectus deformities, kyphosis/lordosis, and scoliosis), growth restriction, strabismus/refractive errors, congenital heart defects, genitourinary anomalies, and epilepsy. While dysmorphic features have been described in individuals with this condition, these features are not typically distinctive enough to allow for a clinical diagnosis of SAS.
Syndromic X-linked intellectual disability Najm type
MedGen UID:
437070
Concept ID:
C2677903
Disease or Syndrome
CASK disorders include a spectrum of phenotypes in both females and males. Two main types of clinical presentation are seen: Microcephaly with pontine and cerebellar hypoplasia (MICPCH), generally associated with pathogenic loss-of-function variants in CASK. X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) with or without nystagmus, generally associated with hypomorphic CASK pathogenic variants. MICPCH is typically seen in females with moderate-to-severe intellectual disability, progressive microcephaly with or without ophthalmologic anomalies, and sensorineural hearing loss. Most are able to sit independently; 20%-25% attain the ability to walk; language is nearly absent in most. Neurologic features may include axial hypotonia, hypertonia/spasticity of the extremities, and dystonia or other movement disorders. Nearly 40% have seizures by age ten years. Behaviors may include sleep disturbances, hand stereotypies, and self biting. MICPCH in males may occur with or without severe epileptic encephalopathy in addition to severe-to-profound developmental delay. When seizures are present they occur early and may be intractable. In individuals and families with milder (i.e., hypomorphic) pathogenic variants, the clinical phenotype is usually that of XLID with or without nystagmus and additional clinical features. Males have mild-to-severe intellectual disability, with or without nystagmus and other ocular features. Females typically have normal intelligence with some displaying mild-to-severe intellectual disability with or without ocular features.
Chromosome Xp11.23-p11.22 duplication syndrome
MedGen UID:
440690
Concept ID:
C2749022
Disease or Syndrome
Familial and <i>de novo</i> recurrent Xp11.22-p11.23 microduplication has been recently identified in males and females.
Microcephaly-facio-cardio-skeletal syndrome, Hadziselimovic type
MedGen UID:
414129
Concept ID:
C2751878
Disease or Syndrome
A rare syndrome with characteristics of pre-natal onset growth retardation (low birth weight and short stature), hypotonia, developmental delay and intellectual disability associated with microcephaly and craniofacial (low anterior hairline, hypotelorism, thick lips with carp-shaped mouth, high-arched palate, low-set ears), cardiac (conotruncal heart malformations such as tetralogy of Fallot) and skeletal (hypoplastic thumbs and first metacarpals) abnormalities.
MGAT2-congenital disorder of glycosylation
MedGen UID:
443956
Concept ID:
C2931008
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) are a genetically heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders caused by enzymatic defects in the synthesis and processing of asparagine (N)-linked glycans or oligosaccharides on glycoproteins. These glycoconjugates play critical roles in metabolism, cell recognition and adhesion, cell migration, protease resistance, host defense, and antigenicity, among others. CDGs are divided into 2 main groups: type I CDGs (see, e.g., CDG1A, 212065) comprise defects in the assembly of the dolichol lipid-linked oligosaccharide (LLO) chain and its transfer to the nascent protein, whereas type II CDGs refer to defects in the trimming and processing of the protein-bound glycans either late in the endoplasmic reticulum or the Golgi compartments. The biochemical changes of CDGs are most readily observed in serum transferrin (TF; 190000), and the diagnosis is usually made by isoelectric focusing of this glycoprotein (reviews by Marquardt and Denecke, 2003; Grunewald et al., 2002). Genetic Heterogeneity of Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation Type II Multiple forms of CDG type II have been identified; see CDG2B (606056) through CDG2Z (620201), and CDG2AA (620454) to CDG2BB (620546).
Chromosome 6q11-q14 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
462140
Concept ID:
C3150790
Disease or Syndrome
The cardinal features of chromosome 6q11-q14 interstitial deletions include hypotonia, short stature, skeletal/limb anomalies, umbilical hernia, and urinary tract anomalies, as well as characteristic facial features including upslanting palpebral fissures, low-set and/or dysplastic ears, and high-arched palate (summary by Wang et al., 2009).
Forsythe-wakeling syndrome
MedGen UID:
462209
Concept ID:
C3150859
Disease or Syndrome
Chromosome 17p13.1 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
462419
Concept ID:
C3151069
Disease or Syndrome
Meier-Gorlin syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
462463
Concept ID:
C3151113
Disease or Syndrome
Meier-Gorlin syndrome is a condition primarily characterized by short stature. It is considered a form of primordial dwarfism because the growth problems begin before birth (intrauterine growth retardation). After birth, affected individuals continue to grow at a slow rate. Other characteristic features of this condition are underdeveloped or missing kneecaps (patellae), small ears, and, often, an abnormally small head (microcephaly). Despite a small head size, most people with Meier-Gorlin syndrome have normal intellect.\n\nSome people with Meier-Gorlin syndrome have other skeletal abnormalities, such as unusually narrow long bones in the arms and legs, a deformity of the knee joint that allows the knee to bend backwards (genu recurvatum), and slowed mineralization of bones (delayed bone age).\n\nMost people with Meier-Gorlin syndrome have distinctive facial features. In addition to being abnormally small, the ears may be low-set or rotated backward. Additional features can include a small mouth (microstomia), an underdeveloped lower jaw (micrognathia), full lips, and a narrow nose with a high nasal bridge.\n\nAdditional features of Meier-Gorlin syndrome can include difficulty feeding and a lung condition known as pulmonary emphysema or other breathing problems.\n\nAbnormalities in sexual development may also occur in Meier-Gorlin syndrome. In some males with this condition, the testes are small or undescended (cryptorchidism). Affected females may have unusually small external genital folds (hypoplasia of the labia majora) and small breasts. Both males and females with this condition can have sparse or absent underarm (axillary) hair.
Seckel syndrome 5
MedGen UID:
462537
Concept ID:
C3151187
Disease or Syndrome
Seckel syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by proportionate short stature, severe microcephaly, mental retardation, and a typical 'bird-head' facial appearance (summary by Kalay et al., 2011). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Seckel syndrome, see 210600.
Hirschsprung disease, cardiac defects, and autonomic dysfunction
MedGen UID:
462587
Concept ID:
C3151237
Disease or Syndrome
CK syndrome
MedGen UID:
463131
Concept ID:
C3151781
Disease or Syndrome
The NSDHL-related disorders include: CHILD (congenital hemidysplasia with ichthyosiform nevus and limb defects) syndrome, an X-linked condition that is usually male lethal during gestation and thus predominantly affects females; and CK syndrome, an X-linked disorder that affects males. CHILD syndrome is characterized by unilateral distribution of ichthyosiform (yellow scaly) skin lesions and ipsilateral limb defects that range from shortening of the metacarpals and phalanges to absence of the entire limb. Intellect is usually normal. The ichthyosiform skin lesions are usually present at birth or in the first weeks of life; new lesions can develop in later life. Nail changes are also common. The heart, lung, and kidneys can also be involved. CK syndrome (named for the initials of the original proband) is characterized by mild to severe cognitive impairment and behavior problems (aggression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and irritability). All affected males reported have developed seizures in infancy and have cerebral cortical malformations and microcephaly. All have distinctive facial features, a thin habitus, and relatively long, thin fingers and toes. Some have scoliosis and kyphosis. Strabismus is common. Optic atrophy is also reported.
Mitochondrial complex V (ATP synthase) deficiency, nuclear type 1
MedGen UID:
477906
Concept ID:
C3276276
Disease or Syndrome
A distinct group of inborn defects of complex V (ATP synthase) is represented by the enzyme deficiency due to nuclear genome mutations characterized by a selective inhibition of ATP synthase biogenesis. Biochemically, the patients show a generalized decrease in the content of ATP synthase complex which is less than 30% of normal. Most cases present with neonatal-onset hypotonia, lactic acidosis, hyperammonemia, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Many patients die within a few months or years (summary by Mayr et al., 2010). Genetic Heterogeneity of Mitochondrial Complex V Deficiency Other nuclear types of mitochondrial complex V deficiency include MC5DN2 (614052), caused by mutation in the TMEM70 gene (612418) on chromosome 8q21; MC5DN3 (614053), caused by mutation in the ATP5E gene (ATP5F1E; 606153) on chromosome 20q13; MC5DN4A (620358) and MC5DN4B (615228), both caused by mutation in the ATP5A1 gene (ATP5F1A; 164360) on chromosome 18q; MC5DN5 (618120), caused by mutation in the ATP5D gene (ATP5F1D; 603150) on chromosome 19p13; MC5DN6 (618683), caused by mutation in the USMG5 gene (ATP5MD; 615204) on chromosome 10q24; and MC5DN7 (620359), caused by mutation in the ATP5PO gene (600828) on chromosome 21q22. Mutations in the mitochondrial-encoded MTATP6 (516060) and MTATP8 (516070) genes can also cause mitochondrial complex V deficiency (see, e.g., 500015).
Warburg micro syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
481844
Concept ID:
C3280214
Disease or Syndrome
RAB18 deficiency is the molecular deficit underlying both Warburg micro syndrome (characterized by eye, nervous system, and endocrine abnormalities) and Martsolf syndrome (characterized by similar – but milder – findings). To date Warburg micro syndrome comprises >96% of reported individuals with genetically defined RAB18 deficiency. The hallmark ophthalmologic findings are bilateral congenital cataracts, usually accompanied by microphthalmia, microcornea (diameter <10), and small atonic pupils. Poor vision despite early cataract surgery likely results from progressive optic atrophy and cortical visual impairment. Individuals with Warburg micro syndrome have severe to profound intellectual disability (ID); those with Martsolf syndrome have mild to moderate ID. Some individuals with RAB18 deficiency also have epilepsy. In Warburg micro syndrome, a progressive ascending spastic paraplegia typically begins with spastic diplegia and contractures during the first year, followed by upper-limb involvement leading to spastic quadriplegia after about age five years, often eventually causing breathing difficulties. In Martsolf syndrome infantile hypotonia is followed primarily by slowly progressive lower-limb spasticity. Hypogonadism – when present – manifests in both syndromes, in males as micropenis and/or cryptorchidism and in females as hypoplastic labia minora, clitoral hypoplasia, and small introitus.
Joubert syndrome 14
MedGen UID:
482396
Concept ID:
C3280766
Disease or Syndrome
Classic Joubert syndrome (JS) is characterized by three primary findings: A distinctive cerebellar and brain stem malformation called the molar tooth sign (MTS). Hypotonia. Developmental delays. Often these findings are accompanied by episodic tachypnea or apnea and/or atypical eye movements. In general, the breathing abnormalities improve with age, truncal ataxia develops over time, and acquisition of gross motor milestones is delayed. Cognitive abilities are variable, ranging from severe intellectual disability to normal. Additional findings can include retinal dystrophy, renal disease, ocular colobomas, occipital encephalocele, hepatic fibrosis, polydactyly, oral hamartomas, and endocrine abnormalities. Both intra- and interfamilial variation are seen.
Cornelia de Lange syndrome 5
MedGen UID:
763817
Concept ID:
C3550903
Disease or Syndrome
Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) encompasses a spectrum of findings from mild to severe. Severe (classic) CdLS is characterized by distinctive facial features, growth restriction (prenatal onset; <5th centile throughout life), hypertrichosis, and upper-limb reduction defects that range from subtle phalangeal abnormalities to oligodactyly (missing digits). Craniofacial features include synophrys, highly arched and/or thick eyebrows, long eyelashes, short nasal bridge with anteverted nares, small widely spaced teeth, and microcephaly. Individuals with a milder phenotype have less severe growth, cognitive, and limb involvement, but often have facial features consistent with CdLS. Across the CdLS spectrum IQ ranges from below 30 to 102 (mean: 53). Many individuals demonstrate autistic and self-destructive tendencies. Other frequent findings include cardiac septal defects, gastrointestinal dysfunction, hearing loss, myopia, and cryptorchidism or hypoplastic genitalia.
Microcephalic primordial dwarfism due to ZNF335 deficiency
MedGen UID:
767413
Concept ID:
C3554499
Disease or Syndrome
Primary microcephaly-10 (MCPH10) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by extremely small head size (-9 SD) at birth and death usually by 1 year of age. Neuropathologic examination shows severe loss of neurons as well as neuronal loss of polarity and abnormal dendritic maturation (summary by Yang et al., 2012). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of primary microcephaly, see MCPH1 (251200).
X-linked intellectual disability, Cantagrel type
MedGen UID:
813060
Concept ID:
C3806730
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked intellectual developmental disorder-98 (XLID98) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, poor speech, behavioral abnormalities, poor overall growth, dysmorphic facial features, and often early-onset seizures. Some carrier females are unaffected, whereas other females with mutations are affected; males tend to be more severely affected than females. It is believed that the phenotypic variability and disease manifestations in female carriers results from skewed X-inactivation or cellular mosaicism (summary by de Lange et al., 2016).
Rienhoff syndrome
MedGen UID:
816342
Concept ID:
C3810012
Disease or Syndrome
Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is characterized by vascular findings (cerebral, thoracic, and abdominal arterial aneurysms and/or dissections), skeletal manifestations (pectus excavatum or pectus carinatum, scoliosis, joint laxity, arachnodactyly, talipes equinovarus, cervical spine malformation and/or instability), craniofacial features (widely spaced eyes, strabismus, bifid uvula / cleft palate, and craniosynostosis that can involve any sutures), and cutaneous findings (velvety and translucent skin, easy bruising, and dystrophic scars). Individuals with LDS are predisposed to widespread and aggressive arterial aneurysms and pregnancy-related complications including uterine rupture and death. Individuals with LDS can show a strong predisposition for allergic/inflammatory disease including asthma, eczema, and reactions to food or environmental allergens. There is also an increased incidence of gastrointestinal inflammation including eosinophilic esophagitis and gastritis or inflammatory bowel disease. Wide variation in the distribution and severity of clinical features can be seen in individuals with LDS, even among affected individuals within a family who have the same pathogenic variant.
Warburg micro syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
816595
Concept ID:
C3810265
Disease or Syndrome
RAB18 deficiency is the molecular deficit underlying both Warburg micro syndrome (characterized by eye, nervous system, and endocrine abnormalities) and Martsolf syndrome (characterized by similar – but milder – findings). To date Warburg micro syndrome comprises >96% of reported individuals with genetically defined RAB18 deficiency. The hallmark ophthalmologic findings are bilateral congenital cataracts, usually accompanied by microphthalmia, microcornea (diameter <10), and small atonic pupils. Poor vision despite early cataract surgery likely results from progressive optic atrophy and cortical visual impairment. Individuals with Warburg micro syndrome have severe to profound intellectual disability (ID); those with Martsolf syndrome have mild to moderate ID. Some individuals with RAB18 deficiency also have epilepsy. In Warburg micro syndrome, a progressive ascending spastic paraplegia typically begins with spastic diplegia and contractures during the first year, followed by upper-limb involvement leading to spastic quadriplegia after about age five years, often eventually causing breathing difficulties. In Martsolf syndrome infantile hypotonia is followed primarily by slowly progressive lower-limb spasticity. Hypogonadism – when present – manifests in both syndromes, in males as micropenis and/or cryptorchidism and in females as hypoplastic labia minora, clitoral hypoplasia, and small introitus.
Bosch-Boonstra-Schaaf optic atrophy syndrome
MedGen UID:
816693
Concept ID:
C3810363
Disease or Syndrome
Bosch-Boonstra-Schaaf optic atrophy syndrome (BBSOAS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by delayed development, moderately impaired intellectual development, and optic atrophy. Most patients also have evidence of cerebral visual impairment. Dysmorphic facial features are variable and nonspecific (summary by Bosch et al., 2014).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 23
MedGen UID:
862929
Concept ID:
C4014492
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-23 (DEE23) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by the onset of intractable seizures in the first months of life (range, 2-6 months). Affected individuals have severely impaired psychomotor development with poor or absent speech, cortical blindness, and dysmorphic facial features (summary by Perrault et al., 2014).
Progeroid features-hepatocellular carcinoma predisposition syndrome
MedGen UID:
863898
Concept ID:
C4015461
Disease or Syndrome
Ruijs et al. (2003) reported a Moroccan boy with a chromosomal breakage who died of hepatocellular carcinoma at age 17 years. The boy was noted to have growth retardation at age 3 years; at age 7 he was found to have thoracic kyphosis, frontal bossing, and a delayed bone age of approximately 3 years. He underwent surgery for severe bilateral posterior subcapsular cataracts at age 14. Examination at age 15 showed short stature and low weight, with premature graying of scalp hair, small frontotemporal diameter, small deep-set eyes, bulbous nose with high nasal bridge, small upper lip, and micrognathia. In addition, he had thoracic kyphoscoliosis, sloping shoulders, mild pectus excavatum, moderate bilateral contractures of both elbows, bilateral clinodactyly, and pes planus. At age 17, he developed abdominal pain, and ultrasonography revealed a liver mass; biopsy confirmed hepatocellular carcinoma. Because of the advanced stage, no treatment was possible, and he died 2 months later. Although his parents were not known to be consanguineous, they originated from the same small Moroccan village. Lessel et al. (2014) studied 2 brothers from a nonconsanguineous Australian family of European ancestry who exhibited low body weight, micrognathia, triangular face, muscular atrophy, lipodystrophy, bilateral simian creases, delayed bone age, and mild joint restrictions in the fingers and elbows. In addition, both brothers developed early-onset hepatocellular carcinoma, at ages 16 and 14 years, respectively. The older brother died at age 18 from complications of acute fulminant hepatic failure. Analysis of patient tumor biopsies showed strong focal accumulations of cancer biomarkers as well as a high proliferative index compared to healthy liver or to cells from idiopathic hepatocellular carcinoma.
MEND syndrome
MedGen UID:
905986
Concept ID:
C4085243
Disease or Syndrome
Male EBP disorder with neurologic defects (MEND) is an X-linked recessive disorder representing a continuous phenotypic spectrum with variable manifestations associated with a defect in sterol biosynthesis. Features include intellectual disability, short stature, scoliosis, digital abnormalities, cataracts, and dermatologic abnormalities. Not all patients show all features, and the severity is highly variable. Molecular studies indicate that affected males are hemizygous for a nonmosaic hypomorphic EBP allele. Carrier females are generally clinically asymptomatic, but may show biochemical abnormalities (summary by Arnold et al., 2012 and Barboza-Cerda et al., 2014).
Hypotonia, infantile, with psychomotor retardation and characteristic facies 2
MedGen UID:
907651
Concept ID:
C4225203
Disease or Syndrome
UNC80 deficiency is characterized by hypotonia, strabismus, oral motor dysfunction, postnatal growth deficiency, and developmental delay. The majority of individuals do not learn to walk. All individuals lack expressive language; however, many have expressive body language, and a few have used signs to communicate. Seizures may develop during infancy or childhood. Additional features can include nystagmus, extremity hypertonia, a high-pitched cry, repetitive and self-stimulatory behaviors, constipation, clubfeet, joint contractures, and scoliosis. For most individuals the UNC80 deficiency syndrome is not progressive. Individuals have slow acquisition of skills and do not have a loss of skills suggestive of neurodegeneration.
Neurodevelopmental disorder-craniofacial dysmorphism-cardiac defect-hip dysplasia syndrome due to a point mutation
MedGen UID:
900671
Concept ID:
C4225274
Disease or Syndrome
Au-Kline syndrome is characterized by developmental delay and hypotonia with moderate-to-severe intellectual disability, and typical facial features that include long palpebral fissures, ptosis, shallow orbits, large and deeply grooved tongue, broad nose with a wide nasal bridge, and downturned mouth. There is frequently variable autonomic dysfunction (gastrointestinal dysmotility, high pain threshold, heat intolerance, recurrent fevers, abnormal sweating). Congenital heart disease, hydronephrosis, palate abnormalities, and oligodontia are also reported in the majority of affected individuals. Additional complications can include craniosynostosis, feeding difficulty, vision issues, osteopenia, and other skeletal anomalies.
Short stature, microcephaly, and endocrine dysfunction
MedGen UID:
895448
Concept ID:
C4225288
Disease or Syndrome
In patients with SSMED, short stature and microcephaly are apparent at birth, and there is progressive postnatal growth failure. Endocrine dysfunction, including hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, multinodular goiter, and diabetes mellitus, is present in affected adults. Progressive ataxia has been reported in some patients, with onset ranging from the second to fifth decade of life. In addition, a few patients have developed tumors, suggesting that there may be a predisposition to tumorigenesis. In contrast to syndromes involving defects in other components of the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) complex (see, e.g., 606593), no clinically overt immunodeficiency has been observed in SSMED, although laboratory analysis has revealed lymphopenia or borderline leukopenia in some patients (Murray et al., 2015; Bee et al., 2015; de Bruin et al., 2015; Guo et al., 2015).
Autosomal dominant intellectual disability-craniofacial anomalies-cardiac defects syndrome
MedGen UID:
903767
Concept ID:
C4225396
Disease or Syndrome
Arboleda-Tham syndrome (ARTHS) is an autosomal dominant disorder with the core features of impaired intellectual development, speech delay, microcephaly, cardiac anomalies, and gastrointestinal complications (summary by Kennedy et al., 2019).
Intellectual disability, X-linked 61
MedGen UID:
924419
Concept ID:
C4283894
Disease or Syndrome
Tonne-Kalscheuer syndrome (TOKAS) is an X-linked recessive multiple congenital anomaly disorder with 2 main presentations. Most patients exhibit global developmental delay apparent from early infancy, impaired intellectual development, speech delay, behavioral abnormalities, and abnormal gait. Affected individuals also have dysmorphic facial features that evolve with age, anomalies of the hands, feet, and nails, and urogenital abnormalities with hypogenitalism. A subset of more severely affected males develop congenital diaphragmatic hernia in utero, which may result in perinatal or premature death. Carrier females may have very mild skeletal or hormonal abnormalities (summary by Frints et al., 2019). Also see Fryns syndrome (229850), an autosomal recessive disorder with overlapping features.
Hypotonia, ataxia, and delayed development syndrome
MedGen UID:
934585
Concept ID:
C4310618
Disease or Syndrome
EBF3 neurodevelopmental disorder (EBF3-NDD) is associated with developmental delay (DD) / intellectual disability (ID), speech delay, gait or truncal ataxia, hypotonia, behavioral problems, and facial dysmorphism. Variability between individuals with EBF3-NDD is significant. Although all affected children have DD noted in early infancy, intellect generally ranges from mild to severe ID, with two individuals functioning in the low normal range. Less common issues can include genitourinary abnormalities and gastrointestinal and/or musculoskeletal involvement. To date, 42 symptomatic individuals from 39 families have been reported.
Alazami-Yuan syndrome
MedGen UID:
934669
Concept ID:
C4310702
Disease or Syndrome
Macrocephaly, dysmorphic facies, and psychomotor retardation
MedGen UID:
934733
Concept ID:
C4310766
Disease or Syndrome
Macrocephaly, dysmorphic facies, and psychomotor retardation (MDFPMR) is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by large head and somatic overgrowth apparent at birth followed by global developmental delay. Affected individuals have characteristic dysmorphic facial features and persistently large head, but increased birth weight normalizes with age. Additional neurologic features, including seizures, hypotonia, and gait ataxia, may also occur. Patients show severe intellectual impairment (summary by Ortega-Recalde et al., 2015).
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 43
MedGen UID:
934738
Concept ID:
C4310771
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
HIVEP2-related intellectual disability is a neurological disorder characterized by moderate to severe developmental delay and intellectual disability and mild physical abnormalities (dysmorphic features). Early symptoms of the condition include weak muscle tone (hypotonia) and delayed development of motor skills, such as sitting, standing, and walking. After learning to walk, many affected individuals continue to have difficulty with this activity; their walking style (gait) is often unbalanced and wide-based. Speech is also delayed, and some people with this condition never learn to talk. Most people with HIVEP2-related intellectual disability also have unusual physical features, such as widely spaced eyes (hypertelorism), a broad nasal bridge, or fingers with tapered ends, although there is no characteristic pattern of such features among affected individuals. Many people with the condition exhibit neurodevelopmental disorders, such as hyperactivity, attention deficit disorder, aggression, anxiety, and autism spectrum disorder, which is a group of developmental disorders characterized by impaired communication and social interaction.\n\nOther features of HIVEP2-related intellectual disability include mild abnormalities in the structure of the brain and an abnormally small brain and head size (microcephaly). Less common health problems include seizures; recurrent ear infections; and eye disorders, such as eyes that do not look in the same direction (strabismus), "lazy eye" (amblyopia), and farsightedness (hyperopia). Some people with HIVEP2-related intellectual disability have gastrointestinal problems, which can include backflow of acidic stomach contents into the esophagus (gastroesophageal reflux) and constipation.
Progeroid and marfanoid aspect-lipodystrophy syndrome
MedGen UID:
934763
Concept ID:
C4310796
Disease or Syndrome
The marfanoid-progeroid-lipodystrophy syndrome (MFLS) is characterized by congenital lipodystrophy, premature birth with an accelerated linear growth disproportionate to weight gain, and progeroid appearance with distinct facial features, including proptosis, downslanting palpebral fissures, and retrognathia. Other characteristic features include arachnodactyly, digital hyperextensibility, myopia, dural ectasia, and normal psychomotor development (Takenouchi et al., 2013). Takenouchi et al. (2013) noted phenotypic overlap with Marfan syndrome (154700) and Shprintzen-Goldberg craniosynostosis syndrome (182212).
SIN3A-related intellectual disability syndrome due to a point mutation
MedGen UID:
934771
Concept ID:
C4310804
Disease or Syndrome
Witteveen-Kolk syndrome (WITKOS) is an autosomal dominant disorder with characteristic distinctive facial features, microcephaly, short stature, and mildly impaired intellectual development with delayed cognitive and motor development and subtle anomalies on MRI-brain imaging (summary by Balasubramanian et al., 2021).
Hypotrichosis-lymphedema-telangiectasia-renal defect syndrome
MedGen UID:
1373459
Concept ID:
C4317151
Disease or Syndrome
Hypotrichosis-lymphedema-telangiectasia-renal defect syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by these 4 features, which begin in early childhood and are progressive (summary by Moalem et al., 2015).
Congenital heart defects, dysmorphic facial features, and intellectual developmental disorder
MedGen UID:
1385307
Concept ID:
C4479246
Disease or Syndrome
CDK13-related disorder, reported in 43 individuals to date, is characterized in all individuals by developmental delay / intellectual disability (DD/ID); nearly all individuals older than age one year display impaired verbal language skills (either absent or restricted speech). Other common findings are recognizable facial features in some individuals, behavioral problems (autism spectrum disorder or autistic traits/stereotypies, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder), feeding difficulties in infancy, structural cardiac defects, and seizures.
Congenital heart defects and ectodermal dysplasia
MedGen UID:
1387409
Concept ID:
C4479250
Disease or Syndrome
Intellectual developmental disorder with dysmorphic facies, seizures, and distal limb anomalies
MedGen UID:
1375601
Concept ID:
C4479520
Disease or Syndrome
IDDFSDA is an autosomal recessive severe multisystem disorder characterized by poor overall growth, developmental delay, early-onset seizures, intellectual disability, and dysmorphic features. There is phenotypic variability. The most severely affected patients have a neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly, absent speech, and inability to walk, and they require feeding tubes. Some patients have congenital heart defects or nonspecific abnormalities on brain imaging. Less severely affected individuals have mild to moderate intellectual disability with normal speech and motor development (summary by Santiago-Sim et al., 2017).
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 47
MedGen UID:
1622196
Concept ID:
C4539951
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
A rare genetic multiple congenital anomalies/dysmorphic syndrome characterized by global developmental delay, variable degrees of intellectual disability, and facial dysmorphism (including high nasal bridge, deep-set eyes, and wide mouth), often associated with feeding difficulties and/or gastroesophageal reflux. Additional reported manifestations are seizures, hypotonia, autistic features, and joint laxity. Brain imaging may show non-specific features (such as cerebral atrophy).
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 48
MedGen UID:
1619532
Concept ID:
C4540321
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
A rare genetic multiple congenital anomalies/dysmorphic syndrome characterized by global developmental delay and moderate to severe intellectual disability, as well as variable other manifestations, such as macro- or microcephaly, epilepsy, hypotonia, behavioral problems, stereotypic movements, and facial dysmorphism (including arched eyebrows, long palpebral fissures, prominent nasal bridge, upturned nose, dysplastic ears, and broad mouth), among others. Brain imaging may show cerebellar anomalies, hypoplastic corpus callosum, enlarged ventricles, polymicrogyria, or white matter abnormalities.
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 52
MedGen UID:
1615839
Concept ID:
C4540478
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Fanconi anemia, complementation group S
MedGen UID:
1632414
Concept ID:
C4554406
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
3p- syndrome
MedGen UID:
1643555
Concept ID:
C4706503
Disease or Syndrome
Characteristic features of the distal 3p- syndrome include low birth weight, microcephaly, trigonocephaly, hypotonia, psychomotor and growth retardation, ptosis, telecanthus, downslanting palpebral fissures, and micrognathia. Postaxial polydactyly, renal anomalies, cleft palate, congenital heart defects (especially atrioventricular septal defects), preauricular pits, sacral dimple, and gastrointestinal anomalies are variable features. Although intellectual deficits are almost invariably associated with cytogenetically visible 3p deletions, rare patients with a 3p26-p25 deletion and normal intelligence or only mild abnormalities have been described (summary by Shuib et al., 2009).
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 57
MedGen UID:
1648280
Concept ID:
C4748003
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
MRD57 is an autosomal dominant neurodevelopmental disorder with a highly variable phenotype. Most affected individuals have delayed psychomotor development apparent in infancy or early childhood, language delay, and behavioral abnormalities. Additional features may include hypotonia, feeding problems, gastrointestinal issues, and dysmorphic facial features (summary by Reijnders et al., 2018).
Intellectual disability, autosomal recessive 65
MedGen UID:
1648401
Concept ID:
C4748219
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Severe feeding difficulties-failure to thrive-microcephaly due to ASXL3 deficiency syndrome
MedGen UID:
1656239
Concept ID:
C4750837
Disease or Syndrome
ASXL3-related disorder is characterized by developmental delay or intellectual disability, typically in the moderate to severe range, with speech and language delay and/or absent speech. Affected individuals may also display autistic features. There may be issues with feeding. While dysmorphic facial features have been described, they are typically nonspecific. Affected individuals may also have hypotonia that can transition to spasticity resulting in unusual posture with flexion contractions of the elbows, wrists, and fingers. Other findings may include poor postnatal growth, strabismus, seizures, sleep disturbance, and dental anomalies.
Neurodevelopmental disorder with central and peripheral motor dysfunction
MedGen UID:
1674767
Concept ID:
C5193049
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with central and peripheral motor dysfunction (NEDCPMD) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder with a highly variable phenotype. At the severe end of the spectrum, patients may have hypotonia apparent from birth, necessitating mechanical respiration and tube-feeding, and global developmental delay with absence of reaction to touch and no eye contact. At the mild end of the spectrum, patients may present with infantile-onset progressive ataxia and demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. The disorder is caused by mutation in the NFASC gene, which has several neuronal- and glial-specific transcripts. The variable clinical phenotype may be caused by several factors, including the severity of the mutation, the selective involvement of distinct isoforms by pathogenic variants, and the presence of genetic modifiers (summary by Monfrini et al., 2019).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with or without variable brain abnormalities; NEDBA
MedGen UID:
1675664
Concept ID:
C5193102
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with or without variable brain abnormalities (NEDBA) is characterized by global developmental delay apparent from infancy or early childhood, resulting in mildly delayed walking, variably impaired intellectual development, and poor or absent speech. Additional features may include hypotonia, spasticity, or ataxia. About half of patients have abnormal findings on brain imaging, including cerebral or cerebellar atrophy, loss of white matter volume, thin corpus callosum, and perisylvian polymicrogyria. Seizures are not a prominent finding, and although some patients may have nonspecific dysmorphic facial features, there is no common or consistent gestalt (summary by Platzer et al., 2019).
Developmental delay with or without dysmorphic facies and autism
MedGen UID:
1679263
Concept ID:
C5193106
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental delay with or without dysmorphic facies and autism (DEDDFA) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder apparent from infancy or early childhood and associated with variably impaired intellectual development. Some patients may be severely affected with no speech and inability to walk, whereas others may be able to attend special schools or have normal intellectual function associated with autism spectrum disorder and mild speech delay. Genetic analysis has suggested that the phenotype can be broadly categorized into 2 main groups. Patients with TRRAP mutations affecting residues 1031-1159 have a more severe disorder, often with multisystem involvement, including renal, cardiac, and genitourinary systems, as well as structural brain abnormalities. Patients with mutations outside of that region tend to have a less severe phenotype with a higher incidence of autism and usually no systemic involvement. Patients in both groups usually have somewhat similar dysmorphic facial features, such as upslanting palpebral fissures, hypertelorism, low-set ears, and broad or depressed nasal bridge, although these features are highly variable (summary by Cogne et al., 2019).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with seizures and speech and walking impairment
MedGen UID:
1672912
Concept ID:
C5193119
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with seizures and speech and walking impairment (NEDSSWI) is an autosomal recessive disorder with onset in infancy. Patients show global developmental delay, particularly of speech acquisition, as well as walking difficulties due to hypotonia, hypertonia, spasticity, or poor coordination. Other features include seizures, mild dysmorphic features, and variable short stature. The pregnancies tend to be complicated by hyper- or hypotension (summary by Ganapathi et al., 2019).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with coarse facies and mild distal skeletal abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1682403
Concept ID:
C5193134
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with coarse facies and mild distal skeletal abnormalities (NEDCFSA) is a developmental disorder characterized by mildly impaired global development apparent from infancy, poor speech acquisition, hypotonia with early feeding difficulties, mildly delayed walking, and variable behavioral abnormalities, such as autistic features, hyperactivity, or attention deficits. Most individuals have coarse facial features, including prominent forehead, large ears, and wide mouth. Other features may include wide hands, thickened fingers, and cutaneous toe syndactyly, as well as joint hyperlaxity. Mutations occur de novo, such that the disorder occurs sporadically in patients with no family history of a similar disorder (summary by Stolerman et al., 2019).
Intellectual developmental disorder 61
MedGen UID:
1684867
Concept ID:
C5231400
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant intellectual developmental disorder-61 (MRD61) is characterized by global developmental delay apparent in infancy with mildly impaired intellectual development, expressive speech delay, and behavioral abnormalities, including autism spectrum disorder and attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Most affected individuals learn to walk on time or with some mild delay. Additional features are highly variable and may include nonspecific dysmorphic features, obstipation, ocular anomalies, and poor overall growth (Snijders Blok et al., 2018).
Neurooculocardiogenitourinary syndrome
MedGen UID:
1684841
Concept ID:
C5231443
Disease or Syndrome
Neurooculocardiogenitourinary syndrome (NOCGUS) is a multisystem disorder characterized by poor growth and anomalies of the ocular, craniofacial, neurologic, cardiovascular, genitourinary, skeletal, and gastrointestinal systems. Lethality before 2 years of age has been observed (Reis et al., 2019).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with dysmorphic facies and distal skeletal anomalies
MedGen UID:
1684792
Concept ID:
C5231448
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with dysmorphic facies and distal skeletal anomalies (NEDDFSA) is a global neurodevelopmental disorder with highly variable features. Patients often show poor feeding, poor overall growth, and hypotonia from early infancy, followed by mildly delayed motor development, poor language acquisition, and behavioral abnormalities. Intellectual development varies from severe with absent speech to mild with the ability to attend special schools. Common features include dysmorphic facial features with notable eye anomalies, joint hypermobility, and mild skeletal anomalies of the hands and feet (summary by Carapito et al., 2019).
Intellectual developmental disorder, autosomal dominant 63, with macrocephaly
MedGen UID:
1716581
Concept ID:
C5394205
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly and dysmorphic facies
MedGen UID:
1719418
Concept ID:
C5394218
Disease or Syndrome
Nabais Sa-de Vries syndrome type 1 (NSDVS1) is characterized by global developmental delay apparent from infancy, variable behavioral abnormalities, microcephaly, and dysmorphic facial features, including round face, small palpebral fissures, highly arched eyebrows, and short nose. The severity is variable (summary by Nabais Sa et al., 2020).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with relative macrocephaly and with or without cardiac or endocrine anomalies
MedGen UID:
1714169
Concept ID:
C5394221
Disease or Syndrome
Nabais Sa-de Vries syndrome type 2 (NSDVS2) is characterized by global developmental delay apparent from birth and distinctive dysmorphic facial features. Most patients have additional anomalies, including congenital heart defects, sleep disturbances, hypotonia, and variable endocrine abnormalities, such as hypothyroidism (summary by Nabais Sa et al., 2020).
Nizon-Isidor syndrome
MedGen UID:
1715748
Concept ID:
C5394350
Disease or Syndrome
Nizon-Isidor syndrome (NIZIDS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay, mildly delayed walking, poor speech and language, variably impaired intellectual development, and behavioral abnormalities, such as autistic features or attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Some patients may have additional features, including nonspecific facial dysmorphism, gastrointestinal difficulties, distal hand anomalies, and thin corpus callosum on brain imaging (summary by Nizon et al., 2019).
Congenital disorder of glycosylation, type iit
MedGen UID:
1709627
Concept ID:
C5394387
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital disorder of glycosylation type IIt (CDG2t) is an autosomal recessive multisystemic metabolic disorder characterized by global developmental delay, poor overall growth, severely impaired intellectual development with absent language, and behavioral abnormalities. Most patients develop early-onset seizures; brain imaging tends to show white matter abnormalities. Variable dysmorphic features, including long face, almond-shaped eyes, protruding maxilla, and short philtrum, are also present. The disorder, which is associated with low levels of HDL cholesterol, results from defective posttranslational O-linked glycosylation of certain plasma lipids and proteins (summary by Zilmer et al., 2020). For an overview of congenital disorders of glycosylation, see CDG1A (212065) and CDG2A (212066).
Li-Ghorbani-Weisz-Hubshman syndrome
MedGen UID:
1763263
Concept ID:
C5436525
Disease or Syndrome
Li-Ghorbani-Weisz-Hubshman syndrome (LIGOWS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay, mild to moderately impaired intellectual development with language delay, and mild dysmorphic features. Affected individuals may have behavioral abnormalities and difficulties with numbers and understanding certain concepts, such as money. Some patients have seizures. Brain imaging often shows enlarged ventricles, thin corpus callosum, and gray matter nodular heterotopia, suggesting abnormal cortical brain development. More variable additional features may be present (summary by Li et al., 2020).
Mitochondrial complex 4 deficiency, nuclear type 16
MedGen UID:
1762514
Concept ID:
C5436714
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency nuclear type 16 (MC4DN16) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder with highly variable manifestations. Common features include failure to thrive with poor overall growth, short stature, and microcephaly. Some patients additionally have neurologic involvement, including developmental regression with severe hypotonia, feeding difficulties, and seizures. Brain imaging in the more severely affected patients shows cerebral and cerebellar atrophy and abnormal lesions in the basal ganglia. In all cases, patient tissues show variably decreased levels and activity of mitochondrial respiratory complex IV (summary by Pillai et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) deficiency, see 220110.
Coffin-Siris syndrome 12
MedGen UID:
1782096
Concept ID:
C5444111
Disease or Syndrome
Coffin-Siris syndrome-12 (CSS12) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay with variably impaired intellectual development, speech and language delay, and behavioral abnormalities, such as autism or hyperactivity. Affected individuals may have hypotonia and poor feeding in infancy. There are variable dysmorphic facial features, although most patients do not have the classic hypoplastic fifth digit/nail abnormalities that are often observed in other forms of CSS (Barish et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Coffin-Siris syndrome, see CSS1 (135900).
Microcephaly 26, primary, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1779629
Concept ID:
C5543048
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant primary microcephaly-26 (MCPH26) is characterized by progressive microcephaly beginning at birth and associated with global developmental delay with variably impaired intellectual development. Some patients may have only mild learning difficulties or speech delay, whereas other are more severely affected with the inability to walk or speak. Additional features may include short stature, spasticity, feeding difficulties requiring tube feeding, and nonspecific dysmorphic facial features. Brain imaging in some patients shows a simplified gyral pattern or dysgenesis of the corpus callosum, suggesting abnormal neuronal migration (summary by Cristofoli et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of primary microcephaly, see MCPH1 (251200).
Short stature, facial dysmorphism, and skeletal anomalies with or without cardiac anomalies 2
MedGen UID:
1782253
Concept ID:
C5543057
Disease or Syndrome
Short stature, facial dysmorphism, and skeletal anomalies with or without cardiac anomalies-2 (SSFSC2) is characterized by thin and short long bones, distinctive facial dysmorphism, and dental and skeletal abnormalities, in the absence of developmental delay or intellectual disability. Cardiac anomalies have been reported in some patients (Lin et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of SSFSC, see SSFSC1 (617877).
Odontochondrodysplasia 2 with hearing loss and diabetes
MedGen UID:
1782909
Concept ID:
C5543275
Disease or Syndrome
Odontochondrodysplasia-2 with hearing loss and diabetes (ODCD2) is characterized by growth retardation with proportionate short stature, dentinogenesis imperfecta, sensorineural hearing loss, insulin-dependent diabetes, and mild intellectual disability (Cauwels et al., 2005; Lekszas et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of ODCD, see ODCD1 (184260).
Radio-Tartaglia syndrome
MedGen UID:
1778557
Concept ID:
C5543339
Disease or Syndrome
Radio-Tartaglia syndrome (RATARS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development, speech delay, and variable behavioral abnormalities. Affected individuals show hypotonia, mild motor difficulties, and craniofacial dysmorphism. Brain imaging may show nonspecific defects; rare patients have seizures or pyramidal signs. A subset of individuals may have congenital heart defects, precocious puberty, and obesity in females. Some of the features are similar to those observed in patients with chromosome 1p36 deletion syndrome (607872) (summary by Radio et al., 2021).
VISS syndrome
MedGen UID:
1794165
Concept ID:
C5561955
Disease or Syndrome
VISS syndrome is a generalized connective tissue disorder characterized by early-onset thoracic aortic aneurysm and other connective tissue findings, such as aneurysm and tortuosity of other arteries, joint hypermobility, skin laxity, and hernias, as well as craniofacial dysmorphic features, structural cardiac defects, skeletal anomalies, and motor developmental delay (Van Gucht et al., 2021). Immune dysregulation has been observed in some patients (Ziegler et al., 2021).
DEGCAGS syndrome
MedGen UID:
1794177
Concept ID:
C5561967
Disease or Syndrome
DEGCAGS syndrome is an autosomal recessive syndromic neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay, coarse and dysmorphic facial features, and poor growth and feeding apparent from infancy. Affected individuals have variable systemic manifestations often with significant structural defects of the cardiovascular, genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and/or skeletal systems. Additional features may include sensorineural hearing loss, hypotonia, anemia or pancytopenia, and immunodeficiency with recurrent infections. Death in childhood may occur (summary by Bertoli-Avella et al., 2021).
Intellectual developmental disorder with hypotonia, impaired speech, and dysmorphic facies
MedGen UID:
1794207
Concept ID:
C5561997
Disease or Syndrome
Intellectual developmental disorder with hypotonia, impaired speech, and dysmorphic facies (IDDHISD) is characterized by global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development and poor or absent speech, hypotonia, ophthalmologic abnormalities, and nonspecific dysmorphic features. Some affected individuals have seizures, and a few have involvement of other organ systems (Goodman et al., 2021).
Cerebellar ataxia, brain abnormalities, and cardiac conduction defects
MedGen UID:
1794215
Concept ID:
C5562005
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebellar ataxia, brain abnormalities, and cardiac conduction defects (CABAC) is an autosomal recessive primarily neurologic disorder with variable manifestations. Common features included infantile-onset hypotonia, poor motor development, poor feeding and overall growth, and ataxic gait due to cerebellar ataxia. Other features include dysarthria, nystagmus, variable ocular anomalies, spasticity, hyperreflexia, and nonspecific dysmorphic features. Most, but not all, patients have global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development and speech delay. Brain imaging shows cerebellar hypoplasia, often with brainstem hypoplasia, enlarged ventricles, delayed myelination, and thin corpus callosum. A significant number of patients develop cardiac conduction defects in childhood or adolescence, often requiring pacemaker placement (summary by Slavotinek et al., 2020).
Hypotonia, infantile, with psychomotor retardation and characteristic facies 3
MedGen UID:
1798903
Concept ID:
C5567480
Disease or Syndrome
Infantile hypotonia with psychomotor retardation and characteristic facies-3 is a severe autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder with onset at birth or in early infancy. Most affected individuals show very poor, if any, normal psychomotor development, poor speech, and inability to walk independently (summary by Bhoj et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of infantile hypotonia with psychomotor retardation and characteristic facies, see IHPRF1 (615419).
Orofaciodigital syndrome 18
MedGen UID:
1799326
Concept ID:
C5567903
Disease or Syndrome
Orofaciodigital syndrome-18 is characterized by short stature, brachymesophalangy, pre- and postaxial polysyndactyly, and stocky femoral necks, as well as oral anomalies and dysmorphic facial features (Thevenon et al., 2016).
Noonan syndrome 14
MedGen UID:
1807988
Concept ID:
C5676916
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome-14 (NS14) is a recessive developmental disorder within the RASopathy clinical spectrum. Patients exhibit developmental delay, impaired intellectual development, and short stature, as well as distinctive dysmorphic features including bitemporal narrowing, hypertelorism, low-set posteriorly rotated ears, prominent nasal bridge, low posterior hairline with a short webbed neck, and pectus excavatum (Motta et al., 2021). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Noonan syndrome, see NS1 (163950).
Parenti-mignot neurodevelopmental syndrome
MedGen UID:
1808333
Concept ID:
C5676984
Disease or Syndrome
Parenti-Mignot neurodevelopmental syndrome (PMNDS) is an autosomal dominant neurodevelopmental disorder frequently characterized by impaired intellectual development, speech delay, motor delay, behavioral problems, and epilepsy (Parenti et al., 2021).
Dentici-Novelli neurodevelopmental syndrome
MedGen UID:
1810366
Concept ID:
C5676987
Disease or Syndrome
Dentici-Novelli neurodevelopmental syndrome (DENNED) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development apparent from infancy. The severity of the phenotype is highly variable: more severely affected individuals have axial hypotonia, peripheral spasticity, microcephaly, early-onset seizures, brain imaging abnormalities, and are unable to walk or speak. Those with a less severe phenotype may achieve some developmental goals and show less severe intellectual disability (Dentici et al., 2022).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with poor growth and skeletal anomalies
MedGen UID:
1804653
Concept ID:
C5676990
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with poor growth and skeletal anomalies (NEDGS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by global developmental delay and impaired intellectual development apparent from infancy. Affected individuals have hypotonia, delayed walking, poor or absent speech, and variable skeletal anomalies. More variable features include seizures, nonspecific dysmorphic facial features, oculomotor apraxia, and nonspecific brain imaging abnormalities (Iqbal et al., 2021).
Tessadori-Van Haaften neurodevelopmental syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
1804234
Concept ID:
C5677016
Disease or Syndrome
Tessadori-Bicknell-van Haaften neurodevelopmental syndrome-4 (TEBIVANED4) is characterized by global developmental delay with poor overall growth, variably impaired intellectual development, learning difficulties, distal skeletal anomalies, and dysmorphic facies. Some patients have visual or hearing deficits. The severity and manifestations of the disorder are highly variable (Tessadori et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of TEBIVANED, see TEBIVANED1 (619758).
Chilton-Okur-Chung neurodevelopmental syndrome
MedGen UID:
1803276
Concept ID:
C5677022
Disease or Syndrome
Chilton-Okur-Chung neurodevelopmental syndrome (CHOCNS) is characterized mainly by global developmental delay with variably impaired intellectual development and occasional speech delay. Most patients have behavioral abnormalities, including autism spectrum disorder, ADHD, and aggression. About half of patients have dysmorphic facial features, and about half have nonspecific brain abnormalities, including thin corpus callosum. Rare involvement of other organ systems may be present. At least 1 child with normal development at age 2.5 years has been reported (Chilton et al., 2020).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly and speech delay, with or without brain abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1841049
Concept ID:
C5830413
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly and speech delay, with or without brain abnormalities (NEDMSBA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by global developmental delay, hypotonia, delayed or absent walking, impaired intellectual development, and poor or absent speech, apparent from early infancy. Affected individuals have postnatal progressive microcephaly and may show poor overall growth and dysmorphic facial features. Additional more variable features include cortical visual impairment, seizures, hypotonia, spasticity, and sensorineural deafness. Brain imaging is abnormal in most patients, showing myelination defects, cortical atrophy, or thin corpus callosum. There is phenotypic variability, even within families (Bogershausen et al., 2022; Lin et al., 2022).
RECON progeroid syndrome
MedGen UID:
1841140
Concept ID:
C5830504
Disease or Syndrome
RECON progeroid syndrome (RECON) is a chromosomal instability disorder characterized by postnatal growth retardation, progeroid facial appearance, hypoplastic nose, prominent premaxilla, skin photosensitivity and xeroderma, muscle wasting with reduced subcutaneous fat, and slender elongated thumbs (Abu-Libdeh et al., 2022).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Reijnders MRF, Miller KA, Alvi M, Goos JAC, Lees MM, de Burca A, Henderson A, Kraus A, Mikat B, de Vries BBA, Isidor B, Kerr B, Marcelis C, Schluth-Bolard C, Deshpande C, Ruivenkamp CAL, Wieczorek D; Deciphering Developmental Disorders Study, Baralle D, Blair EM, Engels H, Lüdecke HJ, Eason J, Santen GWE, Clayton-Smith J, Chandler K, Tatton-Brown K, Payne K, Helbig K, Radtke K, Nugent KM, Cremer K, Strom TM, Bird LM, Sinnema M, Bitner-Glindzicz M, van Dooren MF, Alders M, Koopmans M, Brick L, Kozenko M, Harline ML, Klaassens M, Steinraths M, Cooper NS, Edery P, Yap P, Terhal PA, van der Spek PJ, Lakeman P, Taylor RL, Littlejohn RO, Pfundt R, Mercimek-Andrews S, Stegmann APA, Kant SG, McLean S, Joss S, Swagemakers SMA, Douzgou S, Wall SA, Küry S, Calpena E, Koelling N, McGowan SJ, Twigg SRF, Mathijssen IMJ, Nellaker C, Brunner HG, Wilkie AOM
Am J Hum Genet 2018 Jun 7;102(6):1195-1203. Epub 2018 May 31 doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2018.04.014. PMID: 29861108Free PMC Article

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Alam MS, Tongbram A, Noronha OV
Curr Eye Res 2021 Apr;46(4):592-595. Epub 2020 Sep 7 doi: 10.1080/02713683.2020.1817492. PMID: 32857945
Pelc A, Mikulewicz M
Dent Med Probl 2018 Apr-Jun;55(2):217-225. doi: 10.17219/dmp/91050. PMID: 30152628
Ullah A, Kalsoom UE, Umair M, John P, Ansar M, Basit S, Ahmad W
Clin Genet 2017 Mar;91(3):494-498. Epub 2016 Jul 12 doi: 10.1111/cge.12822. PMID: 27324866
Ries M, Moore DF, Robinson CJ, Tifft CJ, Rosenbaum KN, Brady RO, Schiffmann R, Krasnewich D
Genet Med 2006 Feb;8(2):96-101. doi: 10.1097/01.gim.0000200950.25118.dd. PMID: 16481892
Allderdice PW, Eales B, Onyett H, Sprague W, Henderson K, Lefeuvre PA, Pal G
Am J Hum Genet 1983 Sep;35(5):1005-19. PMID: 6613995Free PMC Article

Diagnosis

Alam MS, Tongbram A, Noronha OV
Curr Eye Res 2021 Apr;46(4):592-595. Epub 2020 Sep 7 doi: 10.1080/02713683.2020.1817492. PMID: 32857945
Pelc A, Mikulewicz M
Dent Med Probl 2018 Apr-Jun;55(2):217-225. doi: 10.17219/dmp/91050. PMID: 30152628
Rohatgi S, Clark D, Kline AD, Jackson LG, Pie J, Siu V, Ramos FJ, Krantz ID, Deardorff MA
Am J Med Genet A 2010 Jul;152A(7):1641-53. doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.33441. PMID: 20583156Free PMC Article
Iannetti P, Schwartz CE, Dietz-Band J, Light E, Timmerman J, Chessa L
Am J Med Genet 1993 Aug 1;47(1):95-9. doi: 10.1002/ajmg.1320470120. PMID: 8368261
Allderdice PW, Eales B, Onyett H, Sprague W, Henderson K, Lefeuvre PA, Pal G
Am J Hum Genet 1983 Sep;35(5):1005-19. PMID: 6613995Free PMC Article

Therapy

Fujii-Abe K, Sasao M, Fukayama H
J Oral Sci 2008 Dec;50(4):493-5. doi: 10.2334/josnusd.50.493. PMID: 19106480

Prognosis

Abuelo DN, Ahsanuddin AN, Mark HF
Am J Med Genet 2000 Oct 23;94(5):392-9. doi: 10.1002/1096-8628(20001023)94:5<392::aid-ajmg10>3.0.co;2-h. PMID: 11050625
Allderdice PW, Eales B, Onyett H, Sprague W, Henderson K, Lefeuvre PA, Pal G
Am J Hum Genet 1983 Sep;35(5):1005-19. PMID: 6613995Free PMC Article

Clinical prediction guides

Singh M, Kaur M, Mehta A, Sharma M, Gupta P
Semin Ophthalmol 2023 May;38(4):380-386. Epub 2022 Jul 24 doi: 10.1080/08820538.2022.2102931. PMID: 35876053
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