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Hypermelanotic macule

MedGen UID:
375013
Concept ID:
C1842774
Finding
Synonyms: Hyperpigmented macules; Hyperpigmented patches of skin; Hyperpigmented spots
 
HPO: HP:0001034

Definition

A hyperpigmented circumscribed area of change in normal skin color without elevation or depression of any size. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Keratosis follicularis
MedGen UID:
5956
Concept ID:
C0022595
Disease or Syndrome
Darier-White disease (DAR), also known as keratosis follicularis, is an autosomal dominant skin disorder characterized by warty papules and plaques in seborrheic areas (central trunk, flexures, scalp, and forehead), palmoplantar pits, and distinctive nail abnormalities (Sakuntabhai et al., 1999). Onset is usually before the third decade, and penetrance is complete in adults, although expressivity is variable. Involvement may be severe, with widespread itchy malodorous crusted plaques, painful erosions, blistering, and mucosal lesions. Secondary infection is common. Sun, heat, and sweating exacerbate the symptoms. Darier disease never remits, but oral retinoids may reduce hyperkeratosis. Neuropsychiatric abnormalities, including mild mental retardation and epilepsy, have been described in association with Darier disease in a few families (Burge and Wilkinson, 1992); whether this is an association based on pleiotropism of the mutant gene or reflects coincidence is not clear. Histologic findings are (1) mild nonspecific perivascular infiltration in the dermis; (2) dermal villi protruding into the epidermis; (3) suprabasal detachment of the spinal layer leading to the formation of lacunae containing acantholytic cells; (4) in the more superficial epidermis, dyskeratotic round epidermal cells ('corps ronds'), the most distinctive feature; and (5) in the stratum corneum, 'grains' that resemble parakeratotic cells embedded in a hyperkeratotic horny layer. Electron microscopy reveals loss of desmosomal attachments, perinuclear aggregations of keratin filaments, and cytoplasmic vacuolization. Ultrastructural and immunologic studies suggest the disease results from an abnormality in the desmosome-keratin filament complex leading to a breakdown in cell adhesion.
Peutz-Jeghers syndrome
MedGen UID:
18404
Concept ID:
C0031269
Disease or Syndrome
Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is characterized by the association of gastrointestinal (GI) polyposis, mucocutaneous pigmentation, and cancer predisposition. PJS-type hamartomatous polyps are most common in the small intestine (in order of prevalence: jejunum, ileum, and duodenum) but can also occur in the stomach, large bowel, and extraintestinal sites including the renal pelvis, bronchus, gall bladder, nasal passages, urinary bladder, and ureters. GI polyps can result in chronic bleeding, anemia, and recurrent obstruction and intussusception requiring repeated laparotomy and bowel resection. Mucocutaneous hyperpigmentation presents in childhood as dark blue to dark brown macules around the mouth, eyes, and nostrils, in the perianal area, and on the buccal mucosa. Hyperpigmented macules on the fingers are common. The macules may fade in puberty and adulthood. Recognition of the distinctive skin manifestations is important especially in individuals who have PJS as the result of a de novo pathogenic variant as these skin findings often predate GI signs and symptoms. Individuals with PJS are at increased risk for a wide variety of epithelial malignancies (colorectal, gastric, pancreatic, breast, and ovarian cancers). Females are at risk for sex cord tumors with annular tubules (SCTAT), a benign neoplasm of the ovaries, and adenoma malignum of the cervix, a rare aggressive cancer. Males occasionally develop large calcifying Sertoli cell tumors of the testes, which secrete estrogen and can lead to gynecomastia, advanced skeletal age, and ultimately short stature, if untreated.
DE SANCTIS-CACCHIONE SYNDROME
MedGen UID:
75550
Concept ID:
C0265201
Disease or Syndrome
A rare autosomal recessive inherited syndrome. It is characterized by xeroderma pigmentosum, mental retardation, dwarfism, hypogonadism, and neurologic abnormalities.
Leprechaunism syndrome
MedGen UID:
82708
Concept ID:
C0265344
Disease or Syndrome
INSR-related severe syndromic insulin resistance comprises a phenotypic spectrum that is a continuum from the severe phenotype Donohue syndrome (DS) (also known as leprechaunism) to the milder phenotype Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome (RMS). DS at the severe end of the spectrum is characterized by severe insulin resistance (hyperinsulinemia with associated fasting hypoglycemia and postprandial hyperglycemia), severe prenatal growth restriction and postnatal growth failure, hypotonia and developmental delay, characteristic facies, and organomegaly involving heart, kidneys, liver, spleen, and ovaries. Death usually occurs before age one year. RMS at the milder end of the spectrum is characterized by severe insulin resistance that, although not as severe as that of DS, is nonetheless accompanied by fluctuations in blood glucose levels, diabetic ketoacidosis, and – in the second decade – microvascular complications. Findings can range from severe growth delay and intellectual disability to normal growth and development. Facial features can be milder than those of DS. Complications of longstanding hyperglycemia are the most common cause of death. While death usually occurs in the second decade, some affected individuals live longer.
Xeroderma pigmentosum group A
MedGen UID:
82775
Concept ID:
C0268135
Disease or Syndrome
Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by: Acute sun sensitivity (severe sunburn with blistering, persistent erythema on minimal sun exposure) with marked freckle-like pigmentation of the face before age two years; Sunlight-induced ocular involvement (photophobia, severe keratitis, atrophy of the skin of the lids, ocular surface neoplasms); Greatly increased risk of sunlight-induced cutaneous neoplasms (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma) within the first decade of life. Approximately 25% of affected individuals have neurologic manifestations (acquired microcephaly, diminished or absent deep tendon stretch reflexes, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, progressive cognitive impairment, and ataxia). The most common causes of death are skin cancer, neurologic degeneration, and internal cancer. The median age at death in persons with XP with neurodegeneration (29 years) was found to be younger than that in persons with XP without neurodegeneration (37 years).
Blue rubber bleb nevus
MedGen UID:
83401
Concept ID:
C0346072
Congenital Abnormality
A rare vascular malformation disorder with cutaneous and visceral lesions frequently associated with serious, potentially fatal bleeding and anemia.
Basan syndrome
MedGen UID:
140808
Concept ID:
C0406707
Disease or Syndrome
Complete congenital absence of dermatoglyphs is a rare syndrome characterized by autosomal dominant inheritance of the lack of ridges on palms and soles, neonatal acral blisters and facial milia, adult traumatic blistering and fissuring, absent or reduced sweating of palms and soles, and contracture of digits. Additional features may include single palmar transverse crease, palmoplantar keratoderma, and nail grooving (summary by Limova et al., 1993).
Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia
MedGen UID:
164078
Concept ID:
C0877024
Congenital Abnormality
Schimke immunoosseous dysplasia (SIOD) is characterized by spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED) resulting in short stature, nephropathy, and T-cell deficiency. Radiographic manifestations of SED include ovoid and mildly flattened vertebral bodies, small ilia with shallow dysplastic acetabular fossae, and small deformed capital femoral epiphyses. Nearly all affected individuals have progressive steroid-resistant nephropathy, usually developing within five years of the diagnosis of growth failure and terminating with end-stage renal disease. The majority of tested individuals have T-cell deficiency and an associated risk for opportunistic infection, a common cause of death. SIOD involves a spectrum that ranges from an infantile or severe early-onset form with a greater risk of death during childhood to a juvenile or milder later-onset form with likely survival into adulthood if renal disease is appropriately treated.
Cutaneous mastocytosis
MedGen UID:
210143
Concept ID:
C1136033
Finding
Mastocytosis, or mast cell disease, is a heterogeneous group of clinical disorders characterized by the abnormal accumulation of mast cells in various tissues, especially in the skin and hematopoietic organs. Mastocytosis usually appears in infancy or early adulthood. In most pediatric cases, the disease is limited to the skin, but it can be associated with systemic symptoms due to the release of mediators from mast cells, even when there is no systemic infiltration. It usually has a good prognosis, with substantial improvement or spontaneous resolution before puberty. In rare cases, the disease may remain active through adolescence as a systemic adult mastocytosis. Cutaneous mastocytosis is characterized by macules, papules, nodules, or diffuse infiltration of the skin, often associated with localized hyperpigmentation. Gentle rubbing of the lesions induces histamine release from mechanically activated mast cells, causing local wheals, erythema, and often pruritus, a phenomenon termed the 'Darier sign.' In contrast to childhood-onset mastocytosis, adult-onset mastocytosis often persists for the lifetime of the patient and is also more likely to be a severe and systemic disease involving numerous organs. In some cases, it is associated with a clonal hematologic non-mast-cell lineage disease, such as a myelodysplastic or myeloproliferative disorder. Adult-onset mastocytosis can also lead to the rare mast cell leukemia, which carries a high risk of mortality (summary by Bodemer et al., 2010 and Kambe et al., 2010).
GM3 synthase deficiency
MedGen UID:
323005
Concept ID:
C1836824
Disease or Syndrome
Salt and pepper developmental regression syndrome, also known as Amish infantile epilepsy syndrome, is an autosomal recessive neurocutaneous disorder characterized by infantile onset of refractory and recurrent seizures associated with profoundly delayed psychomotor development and/or developmental regression as well as abnormal movements and visual loss (summary by Fragaki et al., 2013). Affected individuals develop hypo- or hyperpigmented skin macules on the trunk, face, and extremities in early childhood (summary by Boccuto et al., 2014). Not all patients have overt seizures (Lee et al., 2016).
Hyperpigmentation with or without hypopigmentation, familial progressive
MedGen UID:
333550
Concept ID:
C1840392
Disease or Syndrome
Familial progressive hyperpigmentation with or without hypopigmentation (FPHH) is characterized by diffuse hyperpigmentation of variable intensity sometimes associated with cafe-au-lait macules and larger hypopigmented ash-leaf macules. These features, which involve the face, neck, trunk, and limbs, are seen at birth or develop early in infancy (summary by Wang et al., 2009 and Amyere et al., 2011). Also see familial progressive hyperpigmentation (FPH1; 614233).
Hairy palms and soles
MedGen UID:
330667
Concept ID:
C1841694
Congenital Abnormality
Spondyloenchondrodysplasia with immune dysregulation
MedGen UID:
375009
Concept ID:
C1842763
Disease or Syndrome
Spondyloenchondrodysplasia with immune dysregulation (SPENCDI) is an immunoosseous dysplasia combining the typical metaphyseal and vertebral bone lesions of spondyloenchondrodysplasia (SPENCD) with immune dysfunction and neurologic involvement. The skeletal dysplasia is characterized by radiolucent and irregular spondylar and metaphyseal lesions that represent islands of chondroid tissue within bone. The vertebral bodies show dorsally accentuated platyspondyly with disturbance of ossification. Clinical abnormalities such as short stature, rhizomelic micromelia, increased lumbar lordosis, barrel chest, facial anomalies, and clumsy movements may be present (Menger et al., 1989). Central nervous system involvement includes spasticity, mental retardation, and cerebral calcifications, and immune dysregulation ranges from autoimmunity to immunodeficiency. Neurologic and autoimmune manifestations have been observed in different combinations within a single family, suggesting that this disorder may be defined by specific radiographic features but has remarkably pleiotropic manifestations (Renella et al., 2006). Briggs et al. (2016) also noted variability in skeletal, neurologic, and immune phenotypes, which was sometimes marked between members of the same family. Classification of the Enchondromatoses In their classification of the enchondromatoses, Spranger et al. (1978) called Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome types I and II enchondromatosis, respectively; metachondromatosis (156250), type III; and spondyloenchondrodysplasia (SPENCD), also called spondyloenchondromatosis, type IV; enchondromatosis with irregular vertebral lesions, type V; and generalized enchondromatosis, type VI. Halal and Azouz (1991) added 3 tentative categories to the 6 in the classification of Spranger et al. (1978). Pansuriya et al. (2010) suggested a new classification of enchondromatosis (multiple enchondromas).
Multicentric osteolysis nodulosis arthropathy spectrum
MedGen UID:
342428
Concept ID:
C1850155
Disease or Syndrome
Multicentric osteolysis nodulosis and arthropathy (MONA) is a skeletal dysplasia characterized by progressive osteolysis (particularly of the carpal and tarsal bones), osteoporosis, subcutaneous nodules on the palms and soles, and progressive arthropathy (joint contractures, pain, swelling, and stiffness). Other manifestations include coarse facies, pigmented skin lesions, cardiac defects, and corneal opacities. Onset is usually between ages six months and six years (range: birth to 11 years).
Warsaw breakage syndrome
MedGen UID:
462008
Concept ID:
C3150658
Disease or Syndrome
Warsaw syndrome is characterized by the clinical triad of severe congenital microcephaly, growth restriction, and sensorineural hearing loss due to cochlear hypoplasia. Intellectual disability is typically in the mild-to-moderate range. Severe speech delay is common. Gross and fine motor milestones are usually attained at the usual time, although a few individuals have mild delays. Additional common features include skeletal anomalies and cardiovascular anomalies. Abnormal skin pigmentation and genitourinary malformations have also been reported. Some individuals have had increased chromosome breakage and radial forms on cytogenetic testing of lymphocytes treated with diepoxybutane and mitomycin C.
Familial generalized lentiginosis
MedGen UID:
486897
Concept ID:
C3492944
Disease or Syndrome
Familial generalized lentiginosis is a rare, inherited, skin hyperpigmentation disorder characterized by widespread lentigines without associated noncutaneous abnormalities. Patients present multiple brown to dark brown, non-elevated macula of 0.2 to 1 cm in diameter, spread over the entire body, sometimes including palms or soles, but never oral mucosa.
Kaposi sarcoma, susceptibility to
MedGen UID:
761233
Concept ID:
C3538945
Finding
Dyschromatosis universalis hereditaria 3
MedGen UID:
815724
Concept ID:
C3809394
Disease or Syndrome
Dyschromatosis universalis hereditaria (DUH) is a rare autosomal dominant genodermatosis characterized by irregularly shaped asymptomatic hyper- and hypopigmented macules that appear in infancy or early childhood and occur in a generalized distribution over the trunk, limbs, and sometimes the face. Involvement of the palms or soles is unusual. Abnormalities of hair and nails have been reported, and DUH may be associated with abnormalities of dermal connective tissue, nerve tissue, or other systemic complications (summary by Zhang et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DUH, see DUH1 (127500).
Microcephaly 16, primary, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
898705
Concept ID:
C4225249
Disease or Syndrome
Maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 20
MedGen UID:
909388
Concept ID:
C4275029
Congenital Abnormality
The Mulchandani-Bhoj-Conlin syndrome (MBCS) is characterized by prenatal growth restriction, severe short stature with proportional head circumference, and profound feeding difficulty (Mulchandani et al., 2016).
Galloway-Mowat syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
1613511
Concept ID:
C4540270
Disease or Syndrome
Galloway-Mowat syndrome is a renal-neurologic disease characterized by early-onset nephrotic syndrome associated with microcephaly, gyral abnormalities, and delayed psychomotor development. Most patients have dysmorphic facial features, often including hypertelorism, ear abnormalities, and micrognathia. Other features, such as arachnodactyly and visual impairment, are more variable. Most patients die in the first years of life (summary by Braun et al., 2017). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GAMOS, see GAMOS1 (251300).
Amyloidosis, primary localized cutaneous, 3
MedGen UID:
1640641
Concept ID:
C4554421
Disease or Syndrome
Amyloidosis cutis dyschromica (ACD), a rare form of primary localized cutaneous amyloidosis, is a pigmentary disorder in which keratinocyte-derived amyloid is deposited in the skin. Onset occurs before puberty and involves macular or reticulate hyperpigmentation admixed with symmetrically distributed guttate hypopigmented and hyperpigmented lesions. ACD can be distinguished from other conditions with similar clinical findings by a skin biopsy in which amyloid deposition in the papillary dermis is seen. Specific features that set ACD apart from the more common macular and lichenoid variants of primary cutaneous amyloidosis include dotted, reticular, or diffuse hyperpigmentation admixed with lentil-sized hypopigmented macules; mild or no associated pruritus; and, on histologic examination of skin from both hyper- and hypopigmented lesions, amyloid deposition confined to the papillary dermis, in close proximity to the epidermis (Huang et al. (2009); Mahon et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of primary localized cutaneous amyloidosis, see 105250.
Cancer, alopecia, pigment dyscrasia, onychodystrophy, and keratoderma
MedGen UID:
1678330
Concept ID:
C5193062
Disease or Syndrome
CAPOK syndrome (CAPOK) is characterized by onset of symptoms in the first year of life, with the development of progressive alopecia, hypo- and hyperpigmented macular skin lesions, palmoplantar keratoderma, and nail dystrophy. Beginning in the third decade of life, patients develop recurrent squamous cell carcinomas. Some patients may have brittle teeth resulting in tooth loss, and multinodular goiter has been observed (Courcet et al., 2015).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with coarse facies and mild distal skeletal abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1682403
Concept ID:
C5193134
Disease or Syndrome
Stolerman neurodevelopmental syndrome (NEDSST) is characterized by mildly impaired global development apparent from infancy, poor speech acquisition, hypotonia with early feeding difficulties, mildly delayed walking, and variable behavioral abnormalities, such as autistic features, hyperactivity, or attention deficits. Most individuals have coarse facial features, including prominent forehead, large ears, and wide mouth. Other features may include wide hands, thickened fingers, and cutaneous toe syndactyly, as well as joint hyperlaxity. Mutations occur de novo, such that the disorder occurs sporadically in patients with no family history of a similar disorder (Stolerman et al., 2019).
Waardenburg syndrome, IIa 2F
MedGen UID:
1809587
Concept ID:
C5677013
Disease or Syndrome
Waardenburg syndrome type 2F (WS2F) is characterized by congenital or neonatal-onset sensorineural hearing loss and altered pigmentation of the iris, hair, and skin. Variable expressivity has been reported, even among patients with the same mutation (Ogawa et al., 2017; Vona et al., 2022). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of WS2, as well as a brief description of other clinical variants of Waardenburg syndrome (WS1, 193500; WS3, 148820; and WS4, 277580), see WS2A (193510).

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Chang SE, Kim HW, Shin JM, Lee JH, Na JI, Roh MR, Lee JH, Lee GY, Ko JY
J Dermatol 2015 Nov;42(11):1053-7. Epub 2015 Jun 29 doi: 10.1111/1346-8138.13002. PMID: 26118942

Therapy

Katiyar S, Yadav D
Curr Pharm Des 2022;28(3):225-231. doi: 10.2174/1381612827666211104154928. PMID: 34736377

Clinical prediction guides

Chang SE, Kim HW, Shin JM, Lee JH, Na JI, Roh MR, Lee JH, Lee GY, Ko JY
J Dermatol 2015 Nov;42(11):1053-7. Epub 2015 Jun 29 doi: 10.1111/1346-8138.13002. PMID: 26118942

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