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Impaired distal vibration sensation

MedGen UID:
381262
Concept ID:
C1853767
Finding
Synonym: Decreased distal vibration sense
 
HPO: HP:0006886

Definition

A decrease in the ability to perceive vibration in the distal portions of the limbs. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVImpaired distal vibration sensation

Conditions with this feature

Dejerine-Sottas disease
MedGen UID:
3710
Concept ID:
C0011195
Disease or Syndrome
Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy is a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy with onset in infancy. It can show autosomal dominant or recessive inheritance. Affected individuals have delayed motor development due to severe distal motor and sensory impairment, resulting in difficulties in gait. Some patients have generalized hypotonia in infancy. Other features may include pes cavus, scoliosis, and sensory ataxia. Nerve conduction velocities are severely decreased (sometimes less than 10 m/s), and sural nerve biopsy shows severe loss of myelinated fibers (summary by Baets et al., 2011).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4D
MedGen UID:
371304
Concept ID:
C1832334
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4D (CMT4D) is an autosomal recessive disorder of the peripheral nervous system characterized by early-onset distal muscle weakness and atrophy, foot deformities, and sensory loss affecting all modalities. Affected individuals develop deafness by the third decade of life (summary by Okamoto et al., 2014). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, see CMT4A (214400).
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal dominant 1
MedGen UID:
371919
Concept ID:
C1834846
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life and about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called "chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus," or "CPEO+").
Autosomal dominant sensory ataxia 1
MedGen UID:
332346
Concept ID:
C1837015
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant sensory ataxia-1 (SNAX1) is a peripheral neuropathy resulting from the degeneration of dorsal root ganglia that affects both central and peripheral neurites of sensory neurons. Affected individuals show adult onset of slowly progressive clumsiness, gait ataxia, walking difficulties, and distal sensory loss which may be associated with abnormal sensory nerve conduction values. Some patients have vestibular ocular dysfunction. Muscle weakness and atrophy are not observed, and brain imaging is normal (summary by Cortese et al., 2020).
Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome
MedGen UID:
333403
Concept ID:
C1839780
Disease or Syndrome
FMR1 disorders include fragile X syndrome (FXS), fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), and fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI). Fragile X syndrome occurs in individuals with an FMR1 full mutation or other loss-of-function variant and is nearly always characterized in affected males by developmental delay and intellectual disability along with a variety of behavioral issues. Autism spectrum disorder is present in 50%-70% of individuals with FXS. Affected males may have characteristic craniofacial features (which become more obvious with age) and medical problems including hypotonia, gastroesophageal reflux, strabismus, seizures, sleep disorders, joint laxity, pes planus, scoliosis, and recurrent otitis media. Adults may have mitral valve prolapse or aortic root dilatation. The physical and behavioral features seen in males with FXS have been reported in females heterozygous for the FMR1 full mutation, but with lower frequency and milder involvement. FXTAS occurs in individuals who have an FMR1 premutation and is characterized by late-onset, progressive cerebellar ataxia and intention tremor followed by cognitive impairment. Psychiatric disorders are common. Age of onset is typically between 60 and 65 years and is more common among males who are hemizygous for the premutation (40%) than among females who are heterozygous for the premutation (16%-20%). FXPOI, defined as hypergonadotropic hypogonadism before age 40 years, has been observed in 20% of women who carry a premutation allele compared to 1% in the general population.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, axonal, with vocal cord paresis, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
375113
Concept ID:
C1843183
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2E
MedGen UID:
375127
Concept ID:
C1843225
Disease or Syndrome
A form of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease a peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy. Onset is in the first to sixth decade with a gait anomaly and a leg weakness that reaches the arms secondarily. Tendon reflexes are reduced or absent and after years all patients have a pes cavus. Other signs may be present including hearing loss and postural tremor.
Sensory ataxic neuropathy, dysarthria, and ophthalmoparesis
MedGen UID:
375302
Concept ID:
C1843851
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life and about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called "chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus," or "CPEO+").
Dystonia 5
MedGen UID:
342121
Concept ID:
C1851920
Disease or Syndrome
GTP cyclohydrolase 1-deficient dopa-responsive dystonia (GTPCH1-deficient DRD) is characterized by childhood-onset dystonia and a dramatic and sustained response to low doses of oral administration of levodopa. This disorder typically presents with gait disturbance caused by foot dystonia, later development of parkinsonism, and diurnal fluctuation of symptoms (aggravation of symptoms toward the evening and alleviation of symptoms in the morning after sleep). Initial symptoms are often gait difficulties attributable to flexion-inversion (equinovarus posture) of the foot. Occasionally, initial symptoms are arm dystonia, postural tremor of the hand, or slowness of movements. Brisk deep-tendon reflexes in the legs, ankle clonus, and/or the striatal toe (dystonic extension of the big toe) are present in many affected individuals. In general, gradual progression to generalized dystonia is observed. Intellectual, cerebellar, sensory, and autonomic disturbances generally do not occur.
Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive, with axonal neuropathy 2
MedGen UID:
340052
Concept ID:
C1853761
Disease or Syndrome
Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2) is characterized by onset of ataxia between age three and 30 years after initial normal development, axonal sensorimotor neuropathy, oculomotor apraxia, cerebellar atrophy, and elevated serum concentration of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP).
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 13
MedGen UID:
344297
Concept ID:
C1854488
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13) is a phenotypic spectrum that includes both non-progressive infantile-onset ataxia and progressive childhood-onset and adult-onset cerebellar ataxia. Three phenotypes are seen: Cerebellar hypoplasia with non-progressive infantile-onset limb, truncal, and gait ataxia with mild-to-moderate intellectual disability and occasionally seizures and/or psychiatric manifestations. Cognition and motor skills improve over time. Childhood-onset slowly progressive cerebellar atrophy with slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia and dysarthria, delayed motor milestones, and mild-to-moderate intellectual disability. Adult-onset progressive cerebellar atrophy with progressive ataxia and spasticity.
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 11
MedGen UID:
388073
Concept ID:
C1858479
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia 11 (SPG11) is characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs frequently associated with the following: mild intellectual disability with learning difficulties in childhood and/or progressive cognitive decline; peripheral neuropathy; pseudobulbar involvement; and increased reflexes in the upper limbs. Less frequent findings include: cerebellar signs (ataxia, nystagmus, saccadic pursuit); retinal degeneration; pes cavus; scoliosis; and parkinsonism with characteristic brain MRI features that include thinning of the corpus callosum. Onset occurs mainly during infancy or adolescence (range: age 1-31 years) and in rare cases as late as age 60 years. Most affected individuals become wheelchair bound one or two decades after disease onset.
Ataxia, early-onset, with oculomotor apraxia and hypoalbuminemia
MedGen UID:
395301
Concept ID:
C1859598
Disease or Syndrome
Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 1 (AOA1) is characterized by childhood onset of slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia, followed by oculomotor apraxia and a severe primary motor peripheral axonal motor neuropathy. The first manifestation is progressive gait imbalance (mean age of onset: 4.3 years; range: 2-10 years), followed by dysarthria, then upper-limb dysmetria with mild intention tremor. Oculomotor apraxia, usually noticed a few years after the onset of ataxia, progresses to external ophthalmoplegia. All affected individuals have generalized areflexia followed by a peripheral neuropathy and quadriplegia with loss of ambulation about seven to ten years after onset. Hands and feet are short and atrophic. Chorea and upper-limb dystonia are common. Intellect remains normal in some individuals; in others, different degrees of cognitive impairment have been observed.
Giant axonal neuropathy 2
MedGen UID:
400593
Concept ID:
C1864695
Disease or Syndrome
Giant axonal neuropathy-2 is an autosomal dominant peripheral axonal neuropathy characterized by onset of distal sensory impairment and lower extremity muscle weakness and atrophy after the second decade. Foot deformities may be present in childhood. More severely affected individuals may develop cardiomyopathy. Sural nerve biopsy shows giant axonal swelling with neurofilament accumulation (summary by Klein et al., 2014).
Neuropathy, hereditary sensory, type 2C
MedGen UID:
481798
Concept ID:
C3280168
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II (HSAN2) is characterized by progressively reduced sensation to pain, temperature, and touch. Onset can be at birth and is often before puberty. The sensory deficit is predominantly distal with the lower limbs more severely affected than the upper limbs. Over time sensory function becomes severely reduced. Unnoticed injuries and neuropathic skin promote ulcerations and infections that result in spontaneous amputation of digits or the need for surgical amputation. Osteomyelitis is common. Painless fractures can complicate the disease. Autonomic disturbances are variable and can include hyperhidrosis, tonic pupils, and urinary incontinence in those with more advanced disease.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2P
MedGen UID:
482427
Concept ID:
C3280797
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic axonal hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy disorder with characteristics of adulthood-onset of slowly progressive, occasionally asymmetrical, distal muscle weakness and atrophy (predominantly in the lower limbs), pan-modal sensory loss, muscle cramping in extremities and/or trunk, pes cavus and absent or reduced deep tendon reflexes. Gait anomalies and variable autonomic disturbances, such as erectile dysfunction and urinary urgency, may be associated. The disease can be caused by homozygous or heterozygous mutation in the LRSAM1 gene on chromosome 9q33.
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 55
MedGen UID:
761342
Concept ID:
C3539506
Disease or Syndrome
A rare complex type of hereditary spastic paraplegia with characteristics of childhood onset of progressive spastic paraplegia associated with optic atrophy (with reduced visual acuity and central scotoma), ophthalmoplegia, reduced upper-extremity strength and dexterity, muscular atrophy in the lower extremities and sensorimotor neuropathy. Caused by mutations in the C12ORF65 gene (12q24.31) encoding probable peptide chain release factor C12ORF65, mitochondrial.
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 6B
MedGen UID:
766862
Concept ID:
C3553948
Disease or Syndrome
The overlapping phenotypes of neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD) and infantile Refsum disease (IRD) represent the milder manifestations of the Zellweger syndrome spectrum (ZSS) of peroxisome biogenesis disorders. The clinical course of patients with the NALD and IRD presentation is variable and may include developmental delay, hypotonia, liver dysfunction, sensorineural hearing loss, retinal dystrophy, and visual impairment. Children with the NALD presentation may reach their teens, and those with the IRD presentation may reach adulthood. Some patients with PEX10 mutations have a milder disorder characterized by childhood-onset cerebellar ataxia and neuropathy without mental retardation (summary by Waterham and Ebberink, 2012). For a complete phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PBD(NALD/IRD), see 601539. Individuals with mutations in the PEX10 gene have cells of complementation group 7 (CG7, equivalent to CGB). For information on the history of PBD complementation groups, see 214100.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2Q
MedGen UID:
767280
Concept ID:
C3554366
Disease or Syndrome
A rare subtype of autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 with characteristics of adolescent to adulthood-onset of symmetrical, slowly progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy (with a predominant weakness of the distal lower limbs) associated with reduced or absent deep tendon reflexes, pes cavus and mild to moderated deep sensory impairment. There is evidence this disease is caused by a heterozygous loss-of-function mutation in the DHTKD1 gene on chromosome 10p14.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease X-linked dominant 6
MedGen UID:
813032
Concept ID:
C3806702
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic principally axonal peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy with an X-linked dominant inheritance pattern and the childhood-onset of slowly progressive, moderate to severe, distal muscle weakness and atrophy of the lower extremities, as well as distal, pan modal sensory abnormalities, bilateral foot deformities (pes cavus, clawed toes), absent ankle reflexes and gait abnormalities (steppage gait). Females are usually asymptomatic or only present mild manifestations (mild postural hand tremor, mild wasting of hand intrinsic muscles).
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal recessive 1
MedGen UID:
897191
Concept ID:
C4225153
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life and about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called "chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus," or "CPEO+").
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 75
MedGen UID:
896387
Concept ID:
C4225250
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia-75 (SPG75) is an autosomal recessive, slowly progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by onset of spastic paraplegia and cognitive impairment in childhood (summary by Lossos et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive SPG, see SPG5A (270800).
Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 26
MedGen UID:
1617917
Concept ID:
C4539948
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-marie-tooth disease, axonal, type 2DD
MedGen UID:
1648475
Concept ID:
C4747974
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2DD is an autosomal dominant peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy mainly affecting the lower limbs. Affected individuals have gait impairment due to distal muscle weakness and atrophy. Some patients may also have involvement of the distal upper limbs, resulting in atrophy of the intrinsic hand muscles. The age at onset and severity of the disorder is highly variable, even within families, and those with earlier onset in late childhood or the teenage years tend to have a more severe disease course. Patients remain ambulatory even late in the disease, although some may require orthotic devices (summary by Lassuthova et al., 2018). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT type 2, see CMT2A (118210).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, demyelinating, type 1G
MedGen UID:
1648290
Concept ID:
C4748940
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1G is an autosomal dominant progressive peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy characterized by distal muscle weakness and atrophy with onset in the first or second decade. Affected individuals have difficulty walking, distal sensory impairment with decreased or absent reflexes, and often have foot deformities. Median motor nerve conduction velocities (NCV) are decreased (less than 38 m/s) and sural nerve biopsy shows myelin defects and onion bulb formation (summary by Hong et al., 2016 and Motley et al., 2016). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1, see CMT1B (118200).
Spastic ataxia 9, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
1680026
Concept ID:
C5193100
Disease or Syndrome
Neuropathy, hereditary motor and sensory, type VIc, with optic atrophy
MedGen UID:
1680245
Concept ID:
C5193137
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type VIC with optic atrophy (HMSN6C) is an autosomal recessive axonal sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy characterized by progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy primarily affecting the lower limbs. Onset of neuropathy is in the first decade, manifest by difficulty walking and running and followed by similar involvement of the upper limbs and hands. The disorder is associated with distal sensory impairment, particularly of position and vibration sense, as well as areflexia; individuals usually have pes cavus, hammertoes, and atrophy of the intrinsic hand muscles. In addition, progressive optic atrophy and visual impairment occur during adulthood. Treatment with pyridoxal 5-prime phosphate supplementation (vitamin B6) may result in amelioration of symptoms and slow progression of the disease (summary by Chelban et al., 2019). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HMSN6, see HMSN6A (601152).
46,XY gonadal dysgenesis-motor and sensory neuropathy syndrome
MedGen UID:
1727162
Concept ID:
C5436061
Disease or Syndrome
46,XY gonadal dysgenesis-motor and sensory neuropathy syndrome is a rare, genetic, developmental defect during embryogenesis disorder characterized by partial (unilateral testis, persistence of Müllerian duct structures) or complete (streak gonads only) gonadal dysgenesis, usually manifesting with primary amenorrhea in individuals with female phenotype but 46,XY karyotype, and sensorimotor dysmyelinating minifascicular polyneuropathy, which presents with numbness, weakness, exercise-induced muscle cramps, sensory disturbances and reduced/absent deep tendon reflexes. Germ cell tumors (seminoma, dysgerminoma, gonadoblastoma) may develop from the gonadal tissue.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, axonal, type 2FF
MedGen UID:
1794191
Concept ID:
C5561981
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2FF (CMT2FF) is an autosomal dominant progressive axonal sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy characterized by early-childhood onset of difficulties walking or running due to atrophy and weakness of the lower limbs. Most patients have foot and ankle deformities, requiring surgery or walking aids. Some patients lose independent ambulation. There is also prominent involvement of the upper limbs, with weakness and atrophy of the forearm, wrist, and intrinsic hand muscles. Proximal muscle function is preserved. Affected individuals have variable distal sensory impairment. Most patients have hyporeflexia, although brisk reflexes, suggesting upper motor involvement, have been described in 1 family. Sural nerve biopsy showed abnormal myelination (Rebelo et al., 2021). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT type 2, see CMT2A (118210).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, axonal, Type 2HH
MedGen UID:
1794213
Concept ID:
C5562003
Disease or Syndrome
Axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2HH (CMT2HH) is an autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy characterized predominantly by onset of vocal cord weakness resulting in stridor in infancy or early childhood. The vocal cord paresis remains throughout life and may be severe enough to require tracheostomy. Additional features of the disorder usually include pes cavus and scoliosis. Some patients have mild distal muscle weakness and atrophy primarily affecting the lower limbs, although the upper limbs may also be involved, and distal sensory impairment, often with hyporeflexia (Sullivan et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT, see CMT2A1 (118210).
Autosomal recessive complex spastic paraplegia type 9B
MedGen UID:
1800403
Concept ID:
C5568980
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive SPG9B is a neurologic disorder characterized by early-onset complex spastic paraplegia. Affected individuals had delayed psychomotor development, intellectual disability, and severe motor impairment. More variable features include dysmorphic facial features, tremor, and urinary incontinence (summary by Coutelier et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive SPG, see SPG5A (270800).
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 73
MedGen UID:
1800404
Concept ID:
C5568981
Disease or Syndrome
A pure form of hereditary spastic paraplegia with characteristics of adult onset of crural spastic paraparesis, hyperreflexia, extensor plantar responses, proximal muscle weakness, mild muscle atrophy, decreased vibration sensation at ankles and mild urinary dysfunction. Foot deformities have been reported to eventually occur in some patients. No abnormalities are noted on brain magnetic resonance imaging and peripheral nerve conduction velocity studies.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2Z
MedGen UID:
1800448
Concept ID:
C5569025
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2Z (CMT2Z) is an autosomal dominant axonal peripheral neuropathy characterized by onset, usually in the first decade, of distal lower limb muscle weakness and sensory impairment. The disorder is progressive, and affected individuals tend to develop upper limb and proximal muscle involvement in an asymmetric pattern, resulting in severe disability late in adulthood. Rare occurrence of global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development or learning difficulties has been observed. In some instances, the same mutation may result in different phenotypic manifestations (CMT2Z or DIGFAN), which highlights the clinical spectrum associated with MORC2 mutations and may render the classification of patients into one or the other disorder challenging (summary by Sevilla et al., 2016, Ando et al., 2017, Guillen Sacoto et al., 2020). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT, see CMT2A1 (118210).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2Y
MedGen UID:
1800449
Concept ID:
C5569026
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2Y is an autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy characterized by distal muscle weakness and atrophy associated with length-dependent sensory loss. Most patients have involvement of both the lower and upper limbs. The age at onset and the severity of the disorder are highly variable (summary by Gonzalez et al., 2014). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT, see CMT2A1 (118210).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, demyelinating, IIA 1I
MedGen UID:
1811493
Concept ID:
C5676914
Disease or Syndrome
Demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1I (CMT1I) is a neurologic disorder characterized predominantly by delayed motor development in the first years of life associated with gait abnormalities, sensory ataxia, hyporeflexia, and distal sensory impairment due to a sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy that mainly affects the lower limbs. The disorder is progressive, and some may have upper limb involvement. A subset of patients has central nervous system involvement that manifests as global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development and speech difficulties. Other features may include spasticity, hyperreflexia, tremor, dysmetria, seizures, or cerebellar findings. Brain imaging may be normal or show nonspecific abnormalities, such as white matter signal changes and delayed myelination (summary by Djordjevic et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1, see CMT1B (118200).

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Chandrashekhar R, Wang H, Dionne C, James S, Burzycki J
Int J Environ Res Public Health 2021 Mar 2;18(5) doi: 10.3390/ijerph18052415. PMID: 33801216Free PMC Article
Nagarajan E, Kang SA, Holmes C, Govindarajan R
BMC Neurol 2021 Feb 15;21(1):74. doi: 10.1186/s12883-021-02090-2. PMID: 33588772Free PMC Article
Wong RMY, Ho WT, Tang N, Tso CY, Ng WKR, Chow SK, Cheung WH
Trials 2020 Jan 16;21(1):95. doi: 10.1186/s13063-019-4013-0. PMID: 31948477Free PMC Article
Ramdharry G
Handb Clin Neurol 2018;159:403-415. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-444-63916-5.00026-4. PMID: 30482330
Bongaerts BW, Rathmann W, Kowall B, Herder C, Stöckl D, Meisinger C, Ziegler D
Diabetes Care 2012 Sep;35(9):1891-3. Epub 2012 Jun 29 doi: 10.2337/dc11-2028. PMID: 22751964Free PMC Article

Diagnosis

Papachristou S, Pafili K, Trypsianis G, Papazoglou D, Vadikolias K, Papanas N
J Diabetes Res 2021;2021:6045677. Epub 2021 Nov 28 doi: 10.1155/2021/6045677. PMID: 34877359Free PMC Article
Nagarajan E, Kang SA, Holmes C, Govindarajan R
BMC Neurol 2021 Feb 15;21(1):74. doi: 10.1186/s12883-021-02090-2. PMID: 33588772Free PMC Article
Singh JR, Ibraheem K, Jain D, Yogendra K
J Assoc Physicians India 2019 Mar;67(3):93-95. PMID: 31304721
Güneş HN, Bilecenoğlu NT, Şener U, Yoldaş TK
Neurologist 2015 Apr;19(4):101-3. doi: 10.1097/NRL.0000000000000017. PMID: 25888197
Pourhamidi K, Dahlin LB, Englund E, Rolandsson O
Prim Care Diabetes 2014 Apr;8(1):77-84. Epub 2013 May 9 doi: 10.1016/j.pcd.2013.04.004. PMID: 23664849

Therapy

Chandrashekhar R, Wang H, Dionne C, James S, Burzycki J
Int J Environ Res Public Health 2021 Mar 2;18(5) doi: 10.3390/ijerph18052415. PMID: 33801216Free PMC Article
Wong RMY, Ho WT, Tang N, Tso CY, Ng WKR, Chow SK, Cheung WH
Trials 2020 Jan 16;21(1):95. doi: 10.1186/s13063-019-4013-0. PMID: 31948477Free PMC Article
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Clinical prediction guides

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