U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination

Hypoplasia of the ulna

MedGen UID:
395934
Concept ID:
C1860614
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: Fryns Hofkens Fabry syndrome; Ulna hypoplasia; Ulnar hypoplasia; Upper limb mesomelic dysplasia
 
HPO: HP:0003022

Definition

Underdevelopment of the ulna. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVHypoplasia of the ulna
Follow this link to review classifications for Hypoplasia of the ulna in Orphanet.

Conditions with this feature

Asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy 3
MedGen UID:
19860
Concept ID:
C0036069
Disease or Syndrome
Short-rib thoracic dysplasia (SRTD) with or without polydactyly refers to a group of autosomal recessive skeletal ciliopathies that are characterized by a constricted thoracic cage, short ribs, shortened tubular bones, and a 'trident' appearance of the acetabular roof. SRTD encompasses Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) and the disorders previously designated as Jeune syndrome or asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD), short rib-polydactyly syndrome (SRPS), and Mainzer-Saldino syndrome (MZSDS). Polydactyly is variably present, and there is phenotypic overlap in the various forms of SRTDs, which differ by visceral malformation and metaphyseal appearance. Nonskeletal involvement can include cleft lip/palate as well as anomalies of major organs such as the brain, eye, heart, kidneys, liver, pancreas, intestines, and genitalia. Some forms of SRTD are lethal in the neonatal period due to respiratory insufficiency secondary to a severely restricted thoracic cage, whereas others are compatible with life (summary by Huber and Cormier-Daire, 2012 and Schmidts et al., 2013). There is phenotypic overlap with the cranioectodermal dysplasias (Sensenbrenner syndrome; see CED1, 218330). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of short-rib thoracic dysplasia, see SRTD1 (208500).
Radial aplasia-thrombocytopenia syndrome
MedGen UID:
61235
Concept ID:
C0175703
Disease or Syndrome
Thrombocytopenia absent radius (TAR) syndrome is characterized by bilateral absence of the radii with the presence of both thumbs, and thrombocytopenia that is generally transient. Thrombocytopenia may be congenital or may develop within the first few weeks to months of life; in general, thrombocytopenic episodes decrease with age. Cow's milk allergy is common and can be associated with exacerbation of thrombocytopenia. Other anomalies of the skeleton (upper and lower limbs, ribs, and vertebrae), heart, and genitourinary system (renal anomalies and agenesis of uterus, cervix, and upper part of the vagina) can occur.
Miller syndrome
MedGen UID:
120522
Concept ID:
C0265257
Disease or Syndrome
Miller syndrome, or postaxial acrofacial dysostosis, is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized clinically by severe micrognathia, cleft lip and/or palate, hypoplasia or aplasia of the postaxial elements of the limbs, coloboma of the eyelids, and supernumerary nipples (summary by Ng et al., 2010).
Grebe syndrome
MedGen UID:
75557
Concept ID:
C0265260
Disease or Syndrome
Acromesomelic dysplasia-2A (AMD2A), or Grebe chondrodysplasia, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe abnormality of the limbs and limb joints. The severity of limb shortening progresses in a proximal-distal gradient, with the hands and feet being most affected. The fingers and toes lack articulation and appear as skin appendages. In contrast, axial skeletal structures and the craniofacial skeleton are not affected. Heterozygous individuals are of average stature and have mild skeletal abnormalities (summary by Thomas et al., 1997). Because Grebe syndrome exhibits increasing severity in a proximal-distal gradient, it is classified as a form of acromesomelic dysplasia (Costa et al., 1998). For discussion of the genetic heterogeneity of acromesomelic dysplasia, see AMD1 (602875).
Holt-Oram syndrome
MedGen UID:
120524
Concept ID:
C0265264
Disease or Syndrome
Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS) is characterized by upper-limb defects, congenital heart malformation, and cardiac conduction disease. Upper-limb malformations may be unilateral, bilateral/symmetric, or bilateral/asymmetric and can range from triphalangeal or absent thumb(s) to phocomelia. Other upper-limb malformations can include unequal arm length caused by aplasia or hypoplasia of the radius, fusion or anomalous development of the carpal and thenar bones, abnormal forearm pronation and supination, abnormal opposition of the thumb, sloping shoulders, and restriction of shoulder joint movement. An abnormal carpal bone is present in all affected individuals and may be the only evidence of disease. A congenital heart malformation is present in 75% of individuals with HOS and most commonly involves the septum. Atrial septal defect and ventricular septal defect can vary in number, size, and location. Complex congenital heart malformations can also occur in individuals with HOS. Individuals with HOS with or without a congenital heart malformation are at risk for cardiac conduction disease. While individuals may present at birth with sinus bradycardia and first-degree atrioventricular (AV) block, AV block can progress unpredictably to a higher grade including complete heart block with and without atrial fibrillation.
Levy-Hollister syndrome
MedGen UID:
78545
Concept ID:
C0265269
Disease or Syndrome
Lacrimoauriculodentodigital syndrome-1 (LADD1) is a multiple congenital anomaly disorder mainly affecting lacrimal glands and ducts, salivary glands and ducts, ears, teeth, and distal limb segments (summary by Rohmann et al., 2006). Genetic Heterogeneity of Lacrimoauriculodentodigital Syndrome LADD syndrome-2 (LADD2; 620192) is caused by mutation in the FGFR3 gene (134934) on chromosome 4p16, and LADD syndrome-3 (LADD3; 620193) is caused by mutation in the FGF10 gene, an FGFR ligand, on chromosome 5p12.
Baller-Gerold syndrome
MedGen UID:
120532
Concept ID:
C0265308
Disease or Syndrome
Baller-Gerold syndrome (BGS) can be suspected at birth in an infant with craniosynostosis and upper limb abnormality. The coronal suture is most commonly affected; the metopic, lambdoid, and sagittal sutures may also be involved alone or in combination. Upper limb abnormality can include a combination of thumb hypo- or aplasia and radial hypo- or aplasia and may be asymmetric. Malformation or absence of carpal or metacarpal bones has also been described. Skin lesions may appear anytime within the first few years after birth, typically beginning with erythema of the face and extremities and evolving into poikiloderma. Slow growth is apparent in infancy with eventual height and length typically at 4 SD below the mean.
Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis
MedGen UID:
75562
Concept ID:
C0265309
Disease or Syndrome
The phenotypic spectrum of SHOX deficiency disorders, caused by haploinsufficiency of the short stature homeobox-containing gene (SHOX), ranges from Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis (LWD) at the severe end of the spectrum to nonspecific short stature at the mild end of the spectrum. In adults with SHOX deficiency, the proportion of LWD versus short stature without features of LWD is not well defined. In LWD the classic clinical triad is short stature, mesomelia, and Madelung deformity. Mesomelia, in which the middle portion of a limb is shortened in relation to the proximal portion, can be evident first in school-aged children and increases with age in frequency and severity. Madelung deformity (abnormal alignment of the radius, ulna, and carpal bones at the wrist) typically develops in mid-to-late childhood and is more common and severe in females. The phenotype of short stature caused by SHOX deficiency in the absence of mesomelia and Madelung deformity (called SHOX-deficient short stature in this GeneReview) is highly variable, even within the same family.
CHARGE association
MedGen UID:
75567
Concept ID:
C0265354
Disease or Syndrome
CHD7 disorder encompasses the entire phenotypic spectrum of heterozygous CHD7 pathogenic variants that includes CHARGE syndrome as well as subsets of features that comprise the CHARGE syndrome phenotype. The mnemonic CHARGE syndrome, introduced in the premolecular era, stands for coloboma, heart defect, choanal atresia, retarded growth and development, genital hypoplasia, ear anomalies (including deafness). Following the identification of the genetic cause of CHD7 disorder, the phenotypic spectrum expanded to include cranial nerve anomalies, vestibular defects, cleft lip and/or palate, hypothyroidism, tracheoesophageal anomalies, brain anomalies, seizures, and renal anomalies. Life expectancy highly depends on the severity of manifestations; mortality can be high in the first few years when severe birth defects (particularly complex heart defects) are present and often complicated by airway and feeding issues. In childhood, adolescence, and adulthood, decreased life expectancy is likely related to a combination of residual heart defects, infections, aspiration or choking, respiratory issues including obstructive and central apnea, and possibly seizures. Despite these complications, the life expectancy for many individuals can be normal.
Symphalangism-brachydactyly syndrome
MedGen UID:
90977
Concept ID:
C0342282
Disease or Syndrome
Multiple synostoses syndrome is characterized by multiple joint fusions, usually commencing in the hands, conductive deafness, and characteristic facial features, including a broad, tubular-shaped nose and a thin upper vermilion. Other features include brachydactyly, hypoplastic or absent middle phalanges, radial head dislocation, and pectus carinatum (summary by Takahashi et al., 2001). Genetic Heterogeneity of Multiple Synostoses Syndrome Other forms of multiple synostoses syndrome include SYNS2 (610017), caused by mutation in the GDF5 gene (601146) on chromosome 20q11; SYNS3 (612961), caused by mutation in the FGF9 gene (600921) on chromosome 13q12; and SYNS4 (617898), caused by mutation in the GDF6 gene (601147) on chromosome 8q22.
Langer mesomelic dysplasia syndrome
MedGen UID:
96585
Concept ID:
C0432230
Disease or Syndrome
Langer mesomelic dysplasia (LMD) is characterized by severe limb aplasia or severe hypoplasia of the ulna and fibula, and a thickened and curved radius and tibia. These changes can result in displacement deformities of the hands and feet. Hypoplasia of the mandible is also observed (Langer, 1967). See also Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis (127300), a less severe phenotype that results from heterozygous defect in the SHOX or SHOXY genes.
Pallister-W syndrome
MedGen UID:
163215
Concept ID:
C0796110
Disease or Syndrome
A rare multiple congenital anomalies/dysmorphic syndrome with characteristics of moderate to severe intellectual disability, neurologic signs and symptoms (such as seizures, spasticity, strabismus), characteristic dysmorphic facial features (including broad forehead, hypertelorism, downslanting palpebral fissures, broad and flat nasal bridge, midline notch of upper lip, lack of upper central incisors, incomplete oral cleft, and prominent mandible), and acne scars. Hearing impairment, pseudo-bulbar palsy, growth retardation, and skeletal anomalies (camptodactyly, clinodactyly, bilateral cubitus valgus, pes cavus/planus) has also been described.
Spondyloperipheral dysplasia
MedGen UID:
163223
Concept ID:
C0796173
Disease or Syndrome
Spondyloperipheral dysplasia is a disorder that impairs bone growth. This condition is characterized by flattened bones of the spine (platyspondyly) and unusually short fingers and toes (brachydactyly), with the exception of the first (big) toes. Other skeletal abnormalities associated with spondyloperipheral dysplasia include short stature, shortened long bones of the arms and legs, exaggerated curvature of the lower back (lordosis), and an inward- and upward-turning foot (clubfoot). Additionally, some affected individuals have nearsightedness (myopia), hearing loss, and intellectual disability.
Oculootoradial syndrome
MedGen UID:
233003
Concept ID:
C1327918
Disease or Syndrome
IVIC syndrome (IVIC) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by upper limb anomalies (radial ray defects, carpal bone fusion), extraocular motor disturbances, and congenital bilateral nonprogressive mixed hearing loss. More variable features include heart involvement, mild thrombocytopenia and leukocytosis (before age 50), shoulder girdle hypoplasia, imperforate anus, kidney malrotation, and rectovaginal fistula (summary by Paradisi and Arias, 2007).
Duane-radial ray syndrome
MedGen UID:
301647
Concept ID:
C1623209
Disease or Syndrome
SALL4-related disorders include Duane-radial ray syndrome (DRRS, Okihiro syndrome), acro-renal-ocular syndrome (AROS), and SALL4-related Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS) – three phenotypes previously thought to be distinct entities. DRRS is characterized by uni- or bilateral Duane anomaly and radial ray malformation that can include thenar hypoplasia and/or hypoplasia or aplasia of the thumbs, hypoplasia or aplasia of the radii, shortening and radial deviation of the forearms, triphalangeal thumbs, and duplication of the thumb (preaxial polydactyly). AROS is characterized by radial ray malformations, renal abnormalities (mild malrotation, ectopia, horseshoe kidney, renal hypoplasia, vesicoureteral reflux, bladder diverticula), ocular coloboma, and Duane anomaly. Rarely, pathogenic variants in SALL4 may cause clinically typical HOS (i.e., radial ray malformations and cardiac malformations without additional features).
Lethal chondrodysplasia, Seller type
MedGen UID:
318622
Concept ID:
C1832410
Disease or Syndrome
Microgastria-limb reduction defect syndrome
MedGen UID:
322532
Concept ID:
C1834929
Disease or Syndrome
A rare multiple congenital anomalies syndrome characterized by congenital microgastria and a uni- or bilateral limb reduction defect, that can include absent or hypoplastic thumbs, radius, ulna and/or amelia. Association with other variable abnormalities, including intestinal malrotation, asplenia, dysplastic kidneys, hypoplastic lungs, dysplastic corpus collosum, and abnormal genitalia, has been reported.
Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia with congenital joint dislocations
MedGen UID:
373381
Concept ID:
C1837657
Disease or Syndrome
CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia is characterized by short stature of prenatal onset, joint dislocations (knees, hips, radial heads), clubfeet, and limitation of range of motion that can involve all large joints. Kyphosis and occasionally scoliosis with slight shortening of the trunk develop in childhood. Minor heart valve dysplasia has been described in several persons. Intellect and vision are normal.
Atrioventricular defect-blepharophimosis-radial and anal defect syndrome
MedGen UID:
374010
Concept ID:
C1838606
Disease or Syndrome
A rare, genetic multiple congenital anomalies syndrome characterized by atrioventricular septal defects and blepharophimosis, in addition to radial (e.g. aplastic radius, shortened ulna, fifth finger clinodactyly, absent first metacarpal and thumb) and anal (e.g. imperforate or anteriorly place anus, rectovaginal fistula) defects.
Ulnar hypoplasia-split foot syndrome
MedGen UID:
333256
Concept ID:
C1839123
Disease or Syndrome
Ulnar hypoplasia-split foot syndrome is characterised by the association of severe ulnar hypoplasia, absence of fingers two to five, and split-foot. It has been described in four males belonging to two generations of the same family. X-linked recessive inheritance is suggested, but autosomal dominant transmission cannot be excluded.
Acrocapitofemoral dysplasia
MedGen UID:
334681
Concept ID:
C1843096
Disease or Syndrome
Acrocapitofemoral dysplasia (ACFD) is an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia characterized by postnatal-onset disproportionate short stature, relatively large head, narrow thorax, lumbar lordosis, short limbs, and brachydactyly with small broad nails (Ozyavuz Cubuk and Duz, 2021).
Hypoproteinemia, hypercatabolic
MedGen UID:
343422
Concept ID:
C1855796
Disease or Syndrome
Fibulo-ulnar hypoplasia-renal anomalies syndrome
MedGen UID:
383972
Concept ID:
C1856727
Disease or Syndrome
This syndrome has features of fibuloulnar dysostosis with renal anomalies. It has been described in two siblings born to nonconsanguinous parents. The syndrome is lethal at birth (respiratory failure). Clinical manifestations include ear and facial anomalies (including micrognathia), symmetrical shortness of long bones, fibular agenesis and hypoplastic ulna, oligosyndactyly, congenital heart defects, and cystic or hypoplastic kidney. It is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait.
Lethal faciocardiomelic dysplasia
MedGen UID:
384007
Concept ID:
C1856891
Disease or Syndrome
Lethal faciocardiomelic dysplasia is an extremely rare polymalformative syndrome. It was described only once, in 1975, in 3 affected males in a sibship of 13, from second-cousin parents. Patients were all of low birth weight, had microretrognathia, microstomia, and microglossia, hypoplasia of the radius and ulna with radial deviation of the hands, simian creases and hypoplasia of fingers I and V, hypoplasia of the fibula and tibia with talipes and wide space between toes I and II, and severe malformation of the left heart which may have been responsible for death of all 3 in the first week or so of life.
Cenani-Lenz syndactyly syndrome
MedGen UID:
395226
Concept ID:
C1859309
Disease or Syndrome
A congenital malformation syndrome that associates a complex syndactyly of the hands with malformations of the forearm bones and similar manifestations in the lower limbs. Fewer than 30 cases have been described, the majority of cases occurred in related families. The syndrome affects both the upper and lower limbs but, in general, the latter are less severely affected. Associated malformations (renal hypoplasia and vertebral and hemi-vertebral anomalies) have occasionally been reported. Mild facial dysmorphism has been described in isolated cases. The disease is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. Homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations of the LRP4 gene (11p12-p11.2) have been identified.
Acro-renal-mandibular syndrome
MedGen UID:
395425
Concept ID:
C1860166
Disease or Syndrome
A very rare multiple congenital anomalies syndrome with characteristics of limb deficiencies and renal anomalies that include split hand-split foot malformation, renal agenesis, polycystic kidneys, uterine anomalies and severe mandibular hypoplasia.
Mesomelic dwarfism, Reinhardt-Pfeiffer type
MedGen UID:
395935
Concept ID:
C1860616
Disease or Syndrome
Disproportionate short stature present from birth with dysplasia of the ulna and fibula. Curvatures of the forearm, radial head luxation, and tibial anomalies have also been described. The syndrome is transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner.
Osebold-Remondini syndrome
MedGen UID:
350598
Concept ID:
C1862130
Disease or Syndrome
The Osebold-Remondini syndrome is a bone dysplasia with mesomelic shortness of limbs and, hence, shortness of stature, absence or hypoplasia of second phalanges with synostosis of the remaining phalanges, carpal and tarsal coalitions, and apparently no other anomalies (summary by Opitz and Gilbert, 1985). See 602875 for a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive acromesomelic dysplasia.
Arms, malformation of
MedGen UID:
350694
Concept ID:
C1862534
Congenital Abnormality
Brachyphalangy, polydactyly, and tibial aplasia/hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
355340
Concept ID:
C1864965
Disease or Syndrome
Skeletal dysplasia and progressive central nervous system degeneration, lethal
MedGen UID:
400685
Concept ID:
C1865117
Disease or Syndrome
Holoprosencephaly-radial heart renal anomalies syndrome
MedGen UID:
401047
Concept ID:
C1866649
Disease or Syndrome
This syndrome has characteristics of holoprosencephaly, predominantly radial limb deficiency (absent thumbs, phocomelia), heart defects, kidney malformations and absence of gallbladder. It has been described in two families (with at least seven affected persons). Variable manifestations include vertebral anomalies, cleft lip/palate, microphthalmia, absent nose, dysplastic ears, hearing loss, colobomas of the iris and retina and/or bifid uvula. Inheritance is likely to be autosomal dominant with variable expressivity.
Ulnar-mammary syndrome
MedGen UID:
357886
Concept ID:
C1866994
Disease or Syndrome
Ulnar-mammary syndrome (UMS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by posterior limb deficiencies or duplications, apocrine/mammary gland hypoplasia and/or dysfunction, abnormal dentition, delayed puberty in males, and genital anomalies (Bamshad et al., 1996).
Alagille syndrome due to a JAG1 point mutation
MedGen UID:
365434
Concept ID:
C1956125
Disease or Syndrome
Alagille syndrome (ALGS) is a multisystem disorder with a wide spectrum of clinical variability; this variability is seen even among individuals from the same family. The major clinical manifestations of ALGS are bile duct paucity on liver biopsy, cholestasis, congenital cardiac defects (primarily involving the pulmonary arteries), butterfly vertebrae, ophthalmologic abnormalities (most commonly posterior embryotoxon), and characteristic facial features. Renal abnormalities, growth failure, developmental delays, splenomegaly, and vascular abnormalities may also occur.
Skeletal defects, genital hypoplasia, and intellectual disability
MedGen UID:
382795
Concept ID:
C2676231
Disease or Syndrome
Acromesomelic dysplasia 2C, Hunter-Thompson type
MedGen UID:
419681
Concept ID:
C2930970
Disease or Syndrome
Acromesomelic dysplasia-2C (AMD2C) is characterized by skeletal abnormalities restricted to the limbs; the craniofacial skeleton and axial skeletal structures are normal. The severity of the long bone shortening progresses in a proximal to distal direction. The hands and feet are most severely affected, but the distal phalanges are relative normal. Affected individuals have joint dislocations but the number of joints involved is not constant (summary by Thomas et al., 1996). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of acromesomelic dysplasia, see AMD1 (601875).
Diamond-Blackfan anemia 11
MedGen UID:
766956
Concept ID:
C3554042
Disease or Syndrome
Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is characterized by a profound normochromic and usually macrocytic anemia with normal leukocytes and platelets, congenital malformations in up to 50%, and growth deficiency in 30% of affected individuals. The hematologic complications occur in 90% of affected individuals during the first year of life. The phenotypic spectrum ranges from a mild form (e.g., mild anemia or no anemia with only subtle erythroid abnormalities, physical malformations without anemia) to a severe form of fetal anemia resulting in nonimmune hydrops fetalis. DBA is associated with an increased risk for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and solid tumors including osteogenic sarcoma.
Short ulna-dysmorphism-hypotonia-intellectual disability syndrome
MedGen UID:
767523
Concept ID:
C3554609
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Short ulna-dysmorphism-hypotonia-intellectual disability syndrome is a rare, genetic, multiple congenital anomalies/dysmorphic syndrome characterized by mild to severe global development delay, severe intellectual disability, mild hypotonia, a short ulna, hirsutism of the face and extremities, minimal scoliosis, and facial dysmorphism, notably a tall broad forehead, synophrys, hypertelorism, malar hypoplasia, broad nose with thick alae nasi, low-set, small ears, long philtrum, thin upper lip and everted lower lip vermilion.
Multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
815686
Concept ID:
C3809356
Disease or Syndrome
Multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by neonatal hypotonia, lack of psychomotor development, seizures, dysmorphic features, and variable congenital anomalies involving the cardiac, urinary, and gastrointestinal systems. Most affected individuals die before 3 years of age (summary by Maydan et al., 2011). The disorder is caused by a defect in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of MCAHS, see MCAHS1 (614080). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293).
Acromesomelic dysplasia 3
MedGen UID:
904735
Concept ID:
C4225404
Disease or Syndrome
Asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy 1
MedGen UID:
1648057
Concept ID:
C4551856
Congenital Abnormality
Short-rib thoracic dysplasia (SRTD) with or without polydactyly refers to a group of autosomal recessive skeletal ciliopathies that are characterized by a constricted thoracic cage, short ribs, shortened tubular bones, and a 'trident' appearance of the acetabular roof. SRTD encompasses Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) and the disorders previously designated as Jeune syndrome or asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD), short rib-polydactyly syndrome (SRPS), and Mainzer-Saldino syndrome (MZSDS). Polydactyly is variably present, and there is phenotypic overlap in the various forms of SRTDs, which differ by visceral malformation and metaphyseal appearance. Nonskeletal involvement can include cleft lip/palate as well as anomalies of major organs such as the brain, eye, heart, kidneys, liver, pancreas, intestines, and genitalia. Some forms of SRTD are lethal in the neonatal period due to respiratory insufficiency secondary to a severely restricted thoracic cage, whereas others are compatible with life (summary by Huber and Cormier-Daire, 2012 and Schmidts et al., 2013). There is phenotypic overlap with the cranioectodermal dysplasias (Sensenbrenner syndrome; see CED1, 218330). Genetic Heterogeneity of Asphyxiating Thoracic Dysplasia SRTD1 has been mapped to chromosome 15q13. See also SRTD2 (611263), caused by mutation in the IFT80 gene (611177); SRTD3 (613091), caused by mutation in the DYNC2H1 gene (603297); SRTD4 (613819), caused by mutation in the TTC21B gene (612014); SRTD5 (614376), caused by mutation in the WDR19 gene (608151); SRTD6 (263520), caused by mutation in the NEK1 gene (604588); SRTD7 (614091), caused by mutation in the WDR35 gene (613602); SRTD8 (615503), caused by mutation in the WDR60 gene (615462); SRTD9 (266920), caused by mutation in the IFT140 gene (614620); SRTD10 (615630), caused by mutation in the IFT172 gene (607386); SRTD11 (615633), caused by mutation in the WDR34 gene (613363); SRTD13 (616300), caused by mutation in the CEP120 gene (613446); SRTD14 (616546), caused by mutation in the KIAA0586 gene (610178); SRTD15 (617088), caused by mutation in the DYNC2LI1 gene (617083); SRTD16 (617102), caused by mutation in the IFT52 gene (617094); SRTD17 (617405), caused by mutation in the TCTEX1D2 gene (617353); SRTD18 (617866), caused by mutation in the IFT43 gene (614068); SRTD19 (617895), caused by mutation in the IFT81 gene (605489); SRTD20 (617925), caused by mutation in the INTU gene (610621); and SRTD21 (619479), caused by mutation in the KIAA0753 gene (617112). See also SRTD12 (Beemer-Langer syndrome; 269860).
Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with joint laxity, type 3
MedGen UID:
1677378
Concept ID:
C5193073
Disease or Syndrome
Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with joint laxity-3 (SEMDJL3) is characterized by multiple joint dislocations at birth, severe joint laxity, scoliosis, gracile metacarpals and metatarsals, delayed bone age, and poorly ossified carpal and tarsal bones (Girisha et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of SEMD with joint laxity, see SEMDJL1 (271640).
Ritscher-Schinzel syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
1744611
Concept ID:
C5436883
Disease or Syndrome
Ritscher-Schinzel syndrome-3 (RTSC3) is characterized by craniocerebellocardiac anomalies and severe postnatal growth restriction, as well as complicated skeletal malformations, including vertebral body hypoossification, sternal aplasia, and chondrodysplasia punctata. Other features include developmental delay, ocular anomalies, periventricular nodular heterotopia, and proteinuria (Kato et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Ritscher-Schinzel syndrome, see RTSC1 (220210).
Upper limb mesomelic dysplasia
MedGen UID:
1811806
Concept ID:
C5574958
Disease or Syndrome
This syndrome is an isolated upper limb mesomelic dysplasia. It has been described in four patients from two unrelated families (a man and his daughter, and a Lebanese man and his son). Patients present with ulnar hypoplasia with severe radial bowing, but normal stature. The mode of transmission is likely to be autosomal dominant with variable expressivity.

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Zheng C, Han H, Cao Y
J Orthop Surg Res 2020 Nov 23;15(1):555. doi: 10.1186/s13018-020-02080-z. PMID: 33228698Free PMC Article
Levy SM, Reid M, Montgomery AM, Botterill E, Kovalchik SA, Omizzolo M, Malara F, Wood TO, Hoy GA, Rotstein AH
Skeletal Radiol 2020 Mar;49(3):407-415. Epub 2019 Aug 10 doi: 10.1007/s00256-019-03285-y. PMID: 31401682
Vuillermin C, Butler L, Ezaki M, Oishi S
J Pediatr Orthop 2018 Apr;38(4):244-248. doi: 10.1097/BPO.0000000000000807. PMID: 27280899
Farr S, Bae DS
J Hand Surg Am 2015 Jan;40(1):62-6.e1. Epub 2014 Oct 7 doi: 10.1016/j.jhsa.2014.08.037. PMID: 25300989
Yoshida K, Kawabata H, Wada M
J Pediatr Orthop 2011 Sep;31(6):674-8. doi: 10.1097/BPO.0b013e318221ebe7. PMID: 21841444

Diagnosis

Shen Y, Chen F
Medicine (Baltimore) 2019 Oct;98(40):e17226. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000017226. PMID: 31577713Free PMC Article
Toprak U, Turkoglu S
Surg Radiol Anat 2018 Sep;40(9):989-994. Epub 2018 Apr 19 doi: 10.1007/s00276-018-2028-y. PMID: 29675678
Menezes GA, Araujo Júnior E, Lopes J, Belmonte S, Tonni G, Werner H
J Obstet Gynaecol Res 2016 Aug;42(8):1016-20. Epub 2016 Apr 17 doi: 10.1111/jog.13014. PMID: 27087030
Cha SM, Shin HD, Jeon JH
J Pediatr Orthop B 2016 Mar;25(2):174-82. doi: 10.1097/BPB.0000000000000259. PMID: 26683368
Girisha KM, Vasudevan TG, Saadi AV, Shah H, Gopinath PM, Satyamoorthy K
Clin Dysmorphol 2011 Oct;20(4):205-209. doi: 10.1097/MCD.0b013e328348d956. PMID: 21716096

Therapy

Zheng C, Han H, Cao Y
J Orthop Surg Res 2020 Nov 23;15(1):555. doi: 10.1186/s13018-020-02080-z. PMID: 33228698Free PMC Article
Vergara-Amador E, López Rincón L, Herrera Rodríguez S
Rev Esp Cir Ortop Traumatol (Engl Ed) 2019 May - Jun;63(3):217-226. Epub 2018 Dec 9 doi: 10.1016/j.recot.2018.10.004. PMID: 30541698
Menezes GA, Araujo Júnior E, Lopes J, Belmonte S, Tonni G, Werner H
J Obstet Gynaecol Res 2016 Aug;42(8):1016-20. Epub 2016 Apr 17 doi: 10.1111/jog.13014. PMID: 27087030
de Bruin M, van de Giessen M, Vroemen JC, Veeger HE, Maas M, Strackee SD, Kreulen M
Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon) 2014 Apr;29(4):451-7. Epub 2014 Jan 15 doi: 10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2014.01.003. PMID: 24485089
Yoshida K, Kawabata H, Wada M
J Pediatr Orthop 2011 Sep;31(6):674-8. doi: 10.1097/BPO.0b013e318221ebe7. PMID: 21841444

Prognosis

Zheng C, Han H, Cao Y
J Orthop Surg Res 2020 Nov 23;15(1):555. doi: 10.1186/s13018-020-02080-z. PMID: 33228698Free PMC Article
Vuillermin C, Butler L, Ezaki M, Oishi S
J Pediatr Orthop 2018 Apr;38(4):244-248. doi: 10.1097/BPO.0000000000000807. PMID: 27280899
de Bruin M, van de Giessen M, Vroemen JC, Veeger HE, Maas M, Strackee SD, Kreulen M
Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon) 2014 Apr;29(4):451-7. Epub 2014 Jan 15 doi: 10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2014.01.003. PMID: 24485089
Yoshida K, Kawabata H, Wada M
J Pediatr Orthop 2011 Sep;31(6):674-8. doi: 10.1097/BPO.0b013e318221ebe7. PMID: 21841444
Vogt B, Tretow HL, Daniilidis K, Wacker S, Buller TC, Henrichs MP, Roedl RW, Schiedel F
J Pediatr Orthop 2011 Jun;31(4):393-401. doi: 10.1097/BPO.0b013e31821a5e27. PMID: 21572277

Clinical prediction guides

Tosi L, Mitchell F, Porter GF, Ruland L, Gropman A, Lasutschinkow PC, Tran SL, Rajah EN, Gillies AP, Hendrie P, Peret R, Sadeghin T, Samango-Sprouse CA
Am J Med Genet A 2021 Dec;185(12):3531-3540. Epub 2020 Apr 3 doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.61578. PMID: 32243688
Zheng C, Han H, Cao Y
J Orthop Surg Res 2020 Nov 23;15(1):555. doi: 10.1186/s13018-020-02080-z. PMID: 33228698Free PMC Article
Cha SM, Shin HD, Jeon JH
J Pediatr Orthop B 2016 Mar;25(2):174-82. doi: 10.1097/BPB.0000000000000259. PMID: 26683368
Farr S, Bae DS
J Hand Surg Am 2015 Jan;40(1):62-6.e1. Epub 2014 Oct 7 doi: 10.1016/j.jhsa.2014.08.037. PMID: 25300989
de Bruin M, van de Giessen M, Vroemen JC, Veeger HE, Maas M, Strackee SD, Kreulen M
Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon) 2014 Apr;29(4):451-7. Epub 2014 Jan 15 doi: 10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2014.01.003. PMID: 24485089

Recent systematic reviews

Barik S, Farr S, Gallone G, Zarantonello P, Trisolino G, Di Gennaro GL
J Pediatr Orthop B 2021 Nov 1;30(6):593-600. doi: 10.1097/BPB.0000000000000841. PMID: 33315801Free PMC Article
Twu J, Landy DC, Wolf JM
J Hand Surg Asian Pac Vol 2020 Mar;25(1):110-113. doi: 10.1142/S2424835520720017. PMID: 32000610
Murphy GRF, Logan MPO, Smith G, Sivakumar B, Smith P
J Bone Joint Surg Am 2017 Dec 20;99(24):2120-2126. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.17.00164. PMID: 29257019Free PMC Article
Yammine K
Clin Anat 2013 Sep;26(6):709-18. Epub 2013 Jul 3 doi: 10.1002/ca.22289. PMID: 23825029

Supplemental Content

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Support Center