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Orofaciodigital syndrome type 6(OFD6)

MedGen UID:
411200
Concept ID:
C2745997
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: Central polydactyly cleft lip/palate or lingual lump and psychomotor retardation; Joubert syndrome with orofacialdigital anomalies; OFD6; OFDS VI; Oral-facial-digital syndrome type 6; Oral-Facial-Digital Syndrome Type VI; Orofaciodigital syndrome VI; POLYDACTYLY, CLEFT LIP/PALATE OR LINGUAL LUMP, AND PSYCHOMOTOR RETARDATION; VARADI SYNDROME; Varadi-Papp syndrome; Y-shaped central metacarpal and cerebellar defect
SNOMED CT: Joubert syndrome with orofaciodigital defect (721873007); Joubert syndrome with oro-facial-digital syndrome (721873007); Orofaciodigital syndrome type 6 (721873007); Varadi Papp syndrome (721873007); Varadi syndrome (721873007)
Modes of inheritance:
Autosomal recessive inheritance
MedGen UID:
141025
Concept ID:
C0441748
Intellectual Product
Source: Orphanet
A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on one of the autosomes (i.e., the human chromosomes 1-22) in which a trait manifests in individuals with two pathogenic alleles, either homozygotes (two copies of the same mutant allele) or compound heterozygotes (whereby each copy of a gene has a distinct mutant allele).
X-linked recessive inheritance
MedGen UID:
375779
Concept ID:
C1845977
Finding
Source: Orphanet
A mode of inheritance that is observed for recessive traits related to a gene encoded on the X chromosome. In the context of medical genetics, X-linked recessive disorders manifest in males (who have one copy of the X chromosome and are thus hemizygotes), but generally not in female heterozygotes who have one mutant and one normal allele.
 
Gene (location): CPLANE1 (5p13.2)
 
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0010176
OMIM®: 277170
Orphanet: ORPHA2754

Definition

Orofaciodigital syndrome type VI (OFD6), or Varadi syndrome, is a rare autosomal recessive disorder distinguished from other orofaciodigital syndromes by metacarpal abnormalities with central polydactyly and by cerebellar abnormalities, including the molar tooth sign (summary by Doss et al., 1998 and Lopez et al., 2014). [from OMIM]

Additional description

From MedlinePlus Genetics
Oral-facial-digital syndrome is actually a group of related conditions that affect the development of the oral cavity (the mouth and teeth), facial features, and digits (fingers and toes).

Researchers have identified at least 13 potential forms of oral-facial-digital syndrome. The different types are classified by their patterns of signs and symptoms. However, the features of the various types overlap significantly, and some types are not well defined. The classification system for oral-facial-digital syndrome continues to evolve as researchers find more affected individuals and learn more about this disorder.

The signs and symptoms of oral-facial-digital syndrome vary widely. However, most forms of this disorder involve problems with development of the oral cavity, facial features, and digits. Most forms are also associated with brain abnormalities and some degree of intellectual disability.

Abnormalities of the digits can affect both the fingers and the toes in people with oral-facial-digital syndrome. These abnormalities include fusion of certain fingers or toes (syndactyly), digits that are shorter than usual (brachydactyly), or digits that are unusually curved (clinodactyly). The presence of extra digits (polydactyly) is also seen in most forms of oral-facial-digital syndrome.

Abnormalities of the oral cavity that occur in many types of oral-facial-digital syndrome include a split (cleft) in the tongue, a tongue with an unusual lobed shape, and the growth of noncancerous tumors or nodules on the tongue. Affected individuals may also have extra, missing, or defective teeth. Another common feature is an opening in the roof of the mouth (a cleft palate). Some people with oral-facial-digital syndrome have bands of extra tissue (called hyperplastic frenula) that abnormally attach the lip to the gums.

Distinctive facial features often associated with oral-facial-digital syndrome include a split in the lip (a cleft lip); a wide nose with a broad, flat nasal bridge; and widely spaced eyes (hypertelorism).

Other features occur in only one or a few types of oral-facial digital syndrome. These features help distinguish the different forms of the disorder. For example, the most common form of oral-facial-digital syndrome, type I, is associated with polycystic kidney disease. This kidney disease is characterized by the growth of fluid-filled sacs (cysts) that interfere with the kidneys' ability to filter waste products from the blood. Other forms of oral-facial-digital syndrome are characterized by neurological problems, particular changes in the structure of the brain, bone abnormalities, vision loss, and heart defects.  https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/oral-facial-digital-syndrome

Clinical features

From HPO
Renal agenesis
MedGen UID:
154237
Concept ID:
C0542519
Congenital Abnormality
Agenesis, that is, failure of the kidney to develop during embryogenesis and development.
Renal dysplasia
MedGen UID:
760690
Concept ID:
C3536714
Congenital Abnormality
The presence of developmental dysplasia of the kidney.
Postaxial polydactyly
MedGen UID:
67394
Concept ID:
C0220697
Disease or Syndrome
Polydactyly refers to the occurrence of supernumerary digits and is the most frequent of congenital hand and foot deformities. Based on the location of the extra digits, polydactyly can be classified into preaxial, involving the thumb or great toe; postaxial, affecting the fifth digit; and central, involving the 3 central digits. Postaxial polydactyly (PAP) is further subclassified into 2 types: in type A, a well-formed extra digit articulates with the fifth or a sixth metacarpal, whereas in type B, a rudimentary, poorly developed extra digit is present (summary by Umm-e-Kalsoom et al., 2012). Genetic Heterogeneity of Postaxial Polydactyly Other forms of postaxial polydactyly type A include PAPA2 (602085) on chromosome 13q21; PAPA3 (607324) on chromosome 19p13; PAPA4 (608562) on chromosome 7q22; PAPA5 (263450) on chromosome 13q13; PAPA6 (615226), caused by mutation in the ZNF141 gene (194648) on chromosome 4p16; PAPA7 (617642), caused by mutation in the IQCE gene (617631) on chromosome 7p22; PAPA8 (618123), caused by mutation in the GLI1 gene (165220) on chromosome 12q13; PAPA9 (618219), caused by mutation in the FAM98A gene (617273) on chromosome 8q22; and PAPA10 (618498), caused by mutation in the KIAA0825 gene (617266) on chromosome 5q15.
Brachydactyly
MedGen UID:
67454
Concept ID:
C0221357
Congenital Abnormality
Digits that appear disproportionately short compared to the hand/foot. The word brachydactyly is used here to describe a series distinct patterns of shortened digits (brachydactyly types A-E). This is the sense used here.
Toe syndactyly
MedGen UID:
75581
Concept ID:
C0265660
Congenital Abnormality
Webbing or fusion of the toes, involving soft parts only or including bone structure. Bony fusions are referred to as "bony" Syndactyly if the fusion occurs in a radio-ulnar axis. Fusions of bones of the toes in a proximo-distal axis are referred to as "Symphalangism".
Short femur
MedGen UID:
87499
Concept ID:
C0345375
Congenital Abnormality
An abnormal shortening of the femur.
Postaxial hand polydactyly
MedGen UID:
609221
Concept ID:
C0431904
Congenital Abnormality
Supernumerary digits located at the ulnar side of the hand (that is, on the side with the fifth finger).
Preaxial hand polydactyly
MedGen UID:
237235
Concept ID:
C1395852
Congenital Abnormality
Supernumerary digits located at the radial side of the hand. Polydactyly (supernumerary digits) involving the thumb occurs in many distinct forms of high variability and severity. Ranging from fleshy nubbins over varying degrees of partial duplication/splitting to completely duplicated or even triplicated thumbs or preaxial (on the radial side of the hand) supernumerary digits.
Fibular aplasia
MedGen UID:
373034
Concept ID:
C1836186
Finding
Absence of the fibula.
Radial deviation of finger
MedGen UID:
322852
Concept ID:
C1836189
Finding
Bending or curvature of a finger toward the radial side (i.e., towards the thumb). The deviation is at the metacarpal-phalangeal joint, and this finding is distinct from clinodactyly.
Tibial bowing
MedGen UID:
332360
Concept ID:
C1837081
Finding
A bending or abnormal curvature of the tibia.
Central Y-shaped metacarpal
MedGen UID:
338504
Concept ID:
C1848597
Finding
A central Y-shaped metacarpal is the result of a partial fusion of two central metacarpals (i.e., metacarpals 2-4) of the hand, with the two arms of the Y pointing in the distal direction. Central Y-shaped metacarpals may be seen as a result of a central polydactyly with partial fusion of the duplicated metacarpal.
Preaxial foot polydactyly
MedGen UID:
389171
Concept ID:
C2112942
Finding
Duplication of all or part of the first ray.
Mesoaxial hand polydactyly
MedGen UID:
893020
Concept ID:
C4021606
Anatomical Abnormality
The presence of a supernumerary finger (not a thumb) involving the third or fourth metacarpal with associated osseous syndactyly.
Clinodactyly
MedGen UID:
1644094
Concept ID:
C4551485
Congenital Abnormality
An angulation of a digit at an interphalangeal joint in the plane of the palm (finger) or sole (toe).
Coarctation of aorta
MedGen UID:
1617
Concept ID:
C0003492
Congenital Abnormality
Coarctation of the aorta is a narrowing or constriction of a segment of the aorta.
Hypoplastic left heart syndrome
MedGen UID:
57746
Concept ID:
C0152101
Disease or Syndrome
Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a term that refers to a group of serious heart defects that are present from birth. These abnormalities result from problems with the formation of one or more parts of the heart during the early stages of embryonic development. CCHD prevents the heart from pumping blood effectively or reduces the amount of oxygen in the blood. As a result, organs and tissues throughout the body do not receive enough oxygen, which can lead to organ damage and life-threatening complications. Individuals with CCHD usually require surgery soon after birth.\n\nAlthough babies with CCHD may appear healthy for the first few hours or days of life, signs and symptoms soon become apparent. These can include an abnormal heart sound during a heartbeat (heart murmur), rapid breathing (tachypnea), low blood pressure (hypotension), low levels of oxygen in the blood (hypoxemia), and a blue or purple tint to the skin caused by a shortage of oxygen (cyanosis). If untreated, CCHD can lead to shock, coma, and death. However, most people with CCHD now survive past infancy due to improvements in early detection, diagnosis, and treatment.\n\nSome people with treated CCHD have few related health problems later in life. However, long-term effects of CCHD can include delayed development and reduced stamina during exercise. Adults with these heart defects have an increased risk of abnormal heart rhythms, heart failure, sudden cardiac arrest, stroke, and premature death.\n\nEach of the heart defects associated with CCHD affects the flow of blood into, out of, or through the heart. Some of the heart defects involve structures within the heart itself, such as the two lower chambers of the heart (the ventricles) or the valves that control blood flow through the heart. Others affect the structure of the large blood vessels leading into and out of the heart (including the aorta and pulmonary artery). Still others involve a combination of these structural abnormalities.\n\nPeople with CCHD have one or more specific heart defects. The heart defects classified as CCHD include coarctation of the aorta, double-outlet right ventricle, D-transposition of the great arteries, Ebstein anomaly, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, interrupted aortic arch, pulmonary atresia with intact septum, single ventricle, total anomalous pulmonary venous connection, tetralogy of Fallot, tricuspid atresia, and truncus arteriosus.
Short stature
MedGen UID:
87607
Concept ID:
C0349588
Finding
A height below that which is expected according to age and gender norms. Although there is no universally accepted definition of short stature, many refer to "short stature" as height more than 2 standard deviations below the mean for age and gender (or below the 3rd percentile for age and gender dependent norms).
Failure to thrive
MedGen UID:
746019
Concept ID:
C2315100
Disease or Syndrome
Failure to thrive (FTT) refers to a child whose physical growth is substantially below the norm.
Hamartoma of tongue
MedGen UID:
98465
Concept ID:
C0431565
Finding
A benign (noncancerous) tumorlike malformation made up of an abnormal mixture of cells and tissues that originates in the tongue.
Conductive hearing impairment
MedGen UID:
9163
Concept ID:
C0018777
Disease or Syndrome
An abnormality of vibrational conductance of sound to the inner ear leading to impairment of sensory perception of sound.
Low-set ears
MedGen UID:
65980
Concept ID:
C0239234
Congenital Abnormality
Upper insertion of the ear to the scalp below an imaginary horizontal line drawn between the inner canthi of the eye and extending posteriorly to the ear.
Posteriorly rotated ears
MedGen UID:
96566
Concept ID:
C0431478
Congenital Abnormality
A type of abnormal location of the ears in which the position of the ears is characterized by posterior rotation (the superior part of the ears is rotated towards the back of the head, and the inferior part of the ears towards the front).
Arachnoid cyst
MedGen UID:
86860
Concept ID:
C0078981
Disease or Syndrome
An extra-parenchymal and intra-arachnoidal collection of fluid with a composition similar to that of cerebrospinal fluid.
Arrhinencephaly
MedGen UID:
36258
Concept ID:
C0078982
Congenital Abnormality
A defect of development of the brain characterized by congenital absence of the part of the brain that includes the olfactory bulbs, tracts, and other structures associated with the sense of smell.
Corpus callosum, agenesis of
MedGen UID:
104498
Concept ID:
C0175754
Congenital Abnormality
The corpus callosum is the largest fiber tract in the central nervous system and the major interhemispheric fiber bundle in the brain. Formation of the corpus callosum begins as early as 6 weeks' gestation, with the first fibers crossing the midline at 11 to 12 weeks' gestation, and completion of the basic shape by age 18 to 20 weeks (Schell-Apacik et al., 2008). Agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) is one of the most frequent malformations in brain with a reported incidence ranging between 0.5 and 70 in 10,000 births. ACC is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous condition, which can be observed either as an isolated condition or as a manifestation in the context of a congenital syndrome (see MOLECULAR GENETICS and Dobyns, 1996). Also see mirror movements-1 and/or agenesis of the corpus callosum (MRMV1; 157600). Schell-Apacik et al. (2008) noted that there is confusion in the literature regarding radiologic terminology concerning partial absence of the corpus callosum, where various designations have been used, including hypogenesis, hypoplasia, partial agenesis, or dysgenesis.
Polymicrogyria
MedGen UID:
78605
Concept ID:
C0266464
Congenital Abnormality
Polymicrogyria is a congenital malformation of the cerebral cortex characterized by abnormal cortical layering (lamination) and an excessive number of small gyri (folds).
Hamartoma of hypothalamus
MedGen UID:
137970
Concept ID:
C0342418
Finding
Pallister-Hall-like syndrome (PHLS) is a pleiotropic autosomal recessive disorder characterized by phenotypic variability. Patients exhibit postaxial polydactyly as well as hypothalamic hamartoma, cardiac and skeletal anomalies, and craniofacial dysmorphisms. Hirschsprung disease has also been observed (Rubino et al., 2018; Le et al., 2020). Pallister-Hall syndrome (146510) is an autosomal dominant disorder with features overlapping those of PHLS, caused by mutation in the GLI3 gene (165240).
Global developmental delay
MedGen UID:
107838
Concept ID:
C0557874
Finding
A delay in the achievement of motor or mental milestones in the domains of development of a child, including motor skills, speech and language, cognitive skills, and social and emotional skills. This term should only be used to describe children younger than five years of age.
Cerebellar vermis hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
333548
Concept ID:
C1840379
Finding
Underdevelopment of the vermis of cerebellum.
Occipital meningocele
MedGen UID:
336389
Concept ID:
C1848652
Disease or Syndrome
A herniation of meninges through a congenital bone defect in the skull in the occipital region.
Molar tooth sign on MRI
MedGen UID:
400670
Concept ID:
C1865060
Finding
An abnormal appearance of the midbrain in axial magnetic resonance imaging in which the elongated superior cerebellar peduncles give the midbrain an appearance reminiscent of a molar or wisdom tooth.
Periventricular nodular heterotopia
MedGen UID:
358387
Concept ID:
C1868720
Disease or Syndrome
Nodules of heterotopia along the ventricular walls. There can be a single nodule or a large number of nodules, they can exist on either or both sides of the brain at any point along the higher ventricle margins, they can be small or large, single or multiple.
Intellectual disability
MedGen UID:
811461
Concept ID:
C3714756
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Intellectual disability, previously referred to as mental retardation, is characterized by subnormal intellectual functioning that occurs during the developmental period. It is defined by an IQ score below 70.
Porencephalic cyst
MedGen UID:
906044
Concept ID:
C4082172
Disease or Syndrome
A cavity within the cerebral hemisphere, filled with cerebrospinal fluid, that communicates directly with the ventricular system.
Micrognathia
MedGen UID:
44428
Concept ID:
C0025990
Congenital Abnormality
Developmental hypoplasia of the mandible.
Hypotonia
MedGen UID:
10133
Concept ID:
C0026827
Finding
Hypotonia is an abnormally low muscle tone (the amount of tension or resistance to movement in a muscle). Even when relaxed, muscles have a continuous and passive partial contraction which provides some resistance to passive stretching. Hypotonia thus manifests as diminished resistance to passive stretching. Hypotonia is not the same as muscle weakness, although the two conditions can co-exist.
11 pairs of ribs
MedGen UID:
326950
Concept ID:
C1839731
Finding
Presence of only 11 pairs of ribs.
Enlarged cisterna magna
MedGen UID:
344031
Concept ID:
C1853377
Finding
Increase in size of the cisterna magna, one of three principal openings in the subarachnoid space between the arachnoid and pia mater, located between the cerebellum and the dorsal surface of the medulla oblongata.
Generalized hypotonia
MedGen UID:
346841
Concept ID:
C1858120
Finding
Generalized muscular hypotonia (abnormally low muscle tone).
Cleft upper lip
MedGen UID:
40327
Concept ID:
C0008924
Congenital Abnormality
A gap or groove in the upper lip. This is a congenital defect resulting from nonfusion of tissues of the lip during embryonal development.
High palate
MedGen UID:
66814
Concept ID:
C0240635
Congenital Abnormality
Height of the palate more than 2 SD above the mean (objective) or palatal height at the level of the first permanent molar more than twice the height of the teeth (subjective).
Tongue nodules
MedGen UID:
116122
Concept ID:
C0241438
Finding
Broad nasal tip
MedGen UID:
98424
Concept ID:
C0426429
Finding
Increase in width of the nasal tip.
Lobulated tongue
MedGen UID:
140914
Concept ID:
C0431564
Congenital Abnormality
Multiple indentations and/or elevations on the edge and/or surface of the tongue producing an irregular surface contour.
Epicanthus
MedGen UID:
151862
Concept ID:
C0678230
Congenital Abnormality
Epicanthus is a condition in which a fold of skin stretches from the upper to the lower eyelid, partially covering the inner canthus. Usher (1935) noted that epicanthus is a normal finding in the fetus of all races. Epicanthus also occurs in association with hereditary ptosis (110100).
Cleft palate
MedGen UID:
756015
Concept ID:
C2981150
Congenital Abnormality
Cleft palate is a developmental defect of the palate resulting from a failure of fusion of the palatine processes and manifesting as a separation of the roof of the mouth (soft and hard palate).
Incomplete cleft of the upper lip
MedGen UID:
866805
Concept ID:
C4021158
Anatomical Abnormality
Cleft of the upper lip that does not go all the way from the bottom of the upper lip until the nasal cavity.
Accessory oral frenulum
MedGen UID:
867439
Concept ID:
C4021814
Congenital Abnormality
Extra fold of tissue extending from the alveolar ridge to the inner surface of the upper or lower lip.
Esotropia
MedGen UID:
4550
Concept ID:
C0014877
Disease or Syndrome
A form of strabismus with one or both eyes turned inward ('crossed') to a relatively severe degree, usually defined as 10 diopters or more.
Hypertelorism
MedGen UID:
9373
Concept ID:
C0020534
Finding
Although hypertelorism means an excessive distance between any paired organs (e.g., the nipples), the use of the word has come to be confined to ocular hypertelorism. Hypertelorism occurs as an isolated feature and is also a feature of many syndromes, e.g., Opitz G syndrome (see 300000), Greig cephalopolysyndactyly (175700), and Noonan syndrome (163950) (summary by Cohen et al., 1995).
Nystagmus
MedGen UID:
45166
Concept ID:
C0028738
Disease or Syndrome
Rhythmic, involuntary oscillations of one or both eyes related to abnormality in fixation, conjugate gaze, or vestibular mechanisms.

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVOrofaciodigital syndrome type 6
Follow this link to review classifications for Orofaciodigital syndrome type 6 in Orphanet.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Drury S, Williams H, Trump N, Boustred C; GOSGene, Lench N, Scott RH, Chitty LS
Prenat Diagn 2015 Oct;35(10):1010-7. Epub 2015 Sep 11 doi: 10.1002/pd.4675. PMID: 26275891

Curated

Valente EM, Brancati F, Boltshauser E, Dallapiccola B
Eur J Hum Genet 2011 Sep;19(9) Epub 2011 Mar 30 doi: 10.1038/ejhg.2011.49. PMID: 21448235Free PMC Article

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Drury S, Williams H, Trump N, Boustred C; GOSGene, Lench N, Scott RH, Chitty LS
Prenat Diagn 2015 Oct;35(10):1010-7. Epub 2015 Sep 11 doi: 10.1002/pd.4675. PMID: 26275891

Diagnosis

Drury S, Williams H, Trump N, Boustred C; GOSGene, Lench N, Scott RH, Chitty LS
Prenat Diagn 2015 Oct;35(10):1010-7. Epub 2015 Sep 11 doi: 10.1002/pd.4675. PMID: 26275891

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