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Ascites

MedGen UID:
416
Concept ID:
C0003962
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: Accumulation of fluid in the abdomen; Hydroperitoneum; Hydroperitonia; Hydrops abdominis
SNOMED CT: Ascites (389026000); Hydrops abdominis (389026000); Hydroperitonia (389026000); Hydroperitoneum (389026000)
 
HPO: HP:0001541

Definition

Accumulation of fluid in the peritoneal cavity. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Glycogen storage disease, type IV
MedGen UID:
6642
Concept ID:
C0017923
Disease or Syndrome
The clinical manifestations of glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV) discussed in this entry span a continuum of different subtypes with variable ages of onset, severity, and clinical features. Clinical findings vary extensively both within and between families. The fatal perinatal neuromuscular subtype presents in utero with fetal akinesia deformation sequence, including decreased fetal movements, polyhydramnios, and fetal hydrops. Death usually occurs in the neonatal period. The congenital neuromuscular subtype presents in the newborn period with profound hypotonia, respiratory distress, and dilated cardiomyopathy. Death usually occurs in early infancy. Infants with the classic (progressive) hepatic subtype may appear normal at birth, but rapidly develop failure to thrive; hepatomegaly, liver dysfunction, and progressive liver cirrhosis; hypotonia; and cardiomyopathy. Without liver transplantation, death from liver failure usually occurs by age five years. Children with the non-progressive hepatic subtype tend to present with hepatomegaly, liver dysfunction, myopathy, and hypotonia; however, they are likely to survive without progression of the liver disease and may not show cardiac, skeletal muscle, or neurologic involvement. The childhood neuromuscular subtype is rare and the course is variable, ranging from onset in the second decade with a mild disease course to a more severe, progressive course resulting in death in the third decade.
Wilson disease
MedGen UID:
42426
Concept ID:
C0019202
Disease or Syndrome
Wilson disease is a disorder of copper metabolism that can present with hepatic, neurologic, or psychiatric disturbances, or a combination of these, in individuals ranging from age three years to older than 50 years; symptoms vary among and within families. Liver disease includes recurrent jaundice, simple acute self-limited hepatitis-like illness, autoimmune-type hepatitis, fulminant hepatic failure, or chronic liver disease. Neurologic presentations include movement disorders (tremors, poor coordination, loss of fine-motor control, chorea, choreoathetosis) or rigid dystonia (mask-like facies, rigidity, gait disturbance, pseudobulbar involvement). Psychiatric disturbance includes depression, neurotic behaviors, disorganization of personality, and, occasionally, intellectual deterioration. Kayser-Fleischer rings, frequently present, result from copper deposition in Descemet's membrane of the cornea and reflect a high degree of copper storage in the body.
Protein-losing enteropathy
MedGen UID:
19522
Concept ID:
C0033680
Disease or Syndrome
Complement hyperactivation, angiopathic thrombosis, and protein-losing enteropathy (CHAPLE) is characterized by abdominal pain and diarrhea, primary intestinal lymphangiectasia, hypoproteinemic edema, and malabsorption. Some patients also exhibit bowel inflammation, recurrent infections associated with hypogammaglobulinemia, and/or angiopathic thromboembolic disease. Patient T lymphocytes show increased complement activation, causing surface deposition of complement and generating soluble C5a (Ozen et al., 2017).
Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome
MedGen UID:
38966
Concept ID:
C0085083
Disease or Syndrome
A rare non-malformative gynecological disease affecting pre-menopausal women usually following treatment with ovarian stimulating hormones, characterized by ovarian enlargement and, to varying degrees, shift of serum from the intravascular space to the third space, mainly into the peritoneal, pleural, and to a lesser extent to the pericardial cavities. Presenting symptoms include abdomen distention, pain, nausea, and vomiting. Severity ranges from mild to life-threatening and is complicated by increased risk of thrombosis, acute hepato-renal failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and ovarian torsion and rupture.
Johanson-Blizzard syndrome
MedGen UID:
59798
Concept ID:
C0175692
Disease or Syndrome
Johanson-Blizzard syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by poor growth, mental retardation, and variable dysmorphic features, including aplasia or hypoplasia of the nasal alae, abnormal hair patterns or scalp defects, and oligodontia. Other features include hypothyroidism, sensorineural hearing loss, imperforate anus, and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (summary by Al-Dosari et al., 2008).
Progressive sclerosing poliodystrophy
MedGen UID:
60012
Concept ID:
C0205710
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life and about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called "chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus," or "CPEO+").
Dysmorphic sialidosis with renal involvement
MedGen UID:
82778
Concept ID:
C0268232
Congenital Abnormality
Niemann-Pick disease, type A
MedGen UID:
78650
Concept ID:
C0268242
Disease or Syndrome
The phenotype of acid sphingomyelinase deficiency (ASMD) occurs along a continuum. Individuals with the severe early-onset form, infantile neurovisceral ASMD, were historically diagnosed with Niemann-Pick disease type A (NPD-A). The later-onset, chronic visceral form of ASMD is also referred to as Niemann-Pick disease type B (NPD-B). A phenotype with intermediate severity is also known as chronic neurovisceral ASMD (NPD-A/B). The most common presenting symptom in NPD-A is hepatosplenomegaly, usually detectable by age three months; over time the liver and spleen become massive in size. Psychomotor development progresses no further than the 12-month level, after which neurologic deterioration is relentless. Failure to thrive typically becomes evident by the second year of life. A classic cherry-red spot of the macula of the retina, which may not be present in the first few months, is eventually present in all affected children. Interstitial lung disease caused by storage of sphingomyelin in pulmonary macrophages results in frequent respiratory infections and often respiratory failure. Most children succumb before the third year of life. NPD-B generally presents later than NPD-A, and the manifestations are less severe. NPD-B is characterized by progressive hepatosplenomegaly, gradual deterioration in liver and pulmonary function, osteopenia, and atherogenic lipid profile. No central nervous system (CNS) manifestations occur. Individuals with NPD-A/B have symptoms that are intermediate between NPD-A and NPD-B. The presentation in individuals with NPD-A/B varies greatly, although all are characterized by the presence of some CNS manifestations. Survival to adulthood can occur in individuals with NPD-B and NPD-A/B.
Tyrosinemia type I
MedGen UID:
75688
Concept ID:
C0268490
Disease or Syndrome
Untreated tyrosinemia type I usually presents either in young infants with severe liver involvement or later in the first year with liver dysfunction and renal tubular dysfunction associated with growth failure and rickets. Untreated children may have repeated, often unrecognized, neurologic crises lasting one to seven days that can include change in mental status, abdominal pain, peripheral neuropathy, and/or respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. Death in the untreated child usually occurs before age ten years, typically from liver failure, neurologic crisis, or hepatocellular carcinoma. Combined treatment with nitisinone and a low-tyrosine diet has resulted in a greater than 90% survival rate, normal growth, improved liver function, prevention of cirrhosis, correction of renal tubular acidosis, and improvement in secondary rickets.
Splenoportal vascular anomaly
MedGen UID:
137945
Concept ID:
C0340826
Congenital Abnormality
Fumarase deficiency
MedGen UID:
87458
Concept ID:
C0342770
Disease or Syndrome
Fumarate hydratase (FH) deficiency results in severe neonatal and early infantile encephalopathy that is characterized by poor feeding, failure to thrive, hypotonia, lethargy, and seizures. Dysmorphic facial features include frontal bossing, depressed nasal bridge, and widely spaced eyes. Many affected individuals are microcephalic. A spectrum of brain abnormalities are seen on magnetic resonance imaging, including cerebral atrophy, enlarged ventricles and generous extra-axial cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) spaces, delayed myelination for age, thinning of the corpus callosum, and an abnormally small brain stem. Brain malformations including bilateral polymicrogyria and absence of the corpus callosum can also be observed. Development is severely affected: most affected individuals are nonverbal and nonambulatory, and many die during early childhood. Less severely affected individuals with moderate cognitive impairment and long-term survival have been reported.
Type IV short rib polydactyly syndrome
MedGen UID:
96578
Concept ID:
C0432198
Disease or Syndrome
Short-rib thoracic dysplasia (SRTD) with or without polydactyly refers to a group of autosomal recessive skeletal ciliopathies that are characterized by a constricted thoracic cage, short ribs, shortened tubular bones, and a 'trident' appearance of the acetabular roof. SRTD encompasses Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) and the disorders previously designated as Jeune syndrome or asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD), short rib-polydactyly syndrome (SRPS), and Mainzer-Saldino syndrome (MZSDS). Polydactyly is variably present, and there is phenotypic overlap in the various forms of SRTDs, which differ by visceral malformation and metaphyseal appearance. Nonskeletal involvement can include cleft lip/palate as well as anomalies of major organs such as the brain, eye, heart, kidneys, liver, pancreas, intestines, and genitalia. Some forms of SRTD are lethal in the neonatal period due to respiratory insufficiency secondary to a severely restricted thoracic cage, whereas others are compatible with life (summary by Huber and Cormier-Daire, 2012 and Schmidts et al., 2013). There is phenotypic overlap with the cranioectodermal dysplasias (Sensenbrenner syndrome; see CED1, 218330). Patients with a clinical diagnosis of Beemer-Langer syndrome have been found to carry mutations in the IFT80 gene (611177); see SRTD2, 611263. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of short-rib thoracic dysplasia, see SRTD1 (208500).
Mulibrey nanism syndrome
MedGen UID:
99347
Concept ID:
C0524582
Disease or Syndrome
Mulibrey nanism (MUL) is a rare autosomal recessive growth disorder with prenatal onset, including occasional progressive cardiomyopathy, characteristic facial features, failure of sexual maturation, insulin resistance with type 2 diabetes, and an increased risk for Wilms tumor (summary by Hamalainen et al., 2006).
Perlman syndrome
MedGen UID:
162909
Concept ID:
C0796113
Disease or Syndrome
Perlman syndrome (PRLMNS) is an autosomal recessive congenital overgrowth syndrome with similarities to Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS; 130650). Affected children are large at birth, are hypotonic, and show organomegaly, characteristic facial dysmorphisms (inverted V-shaped upper lip, prominent forehead, deep-set eyes, broad and flat nasal bridge, and low-set ears), renal anomalies (nephromegaly and hydronephrosis), frequent neurodevelopmental delay, and high neonatal mortality. Perlman syndrome is associated with a high risk of Wilms tumor, with a 64% incidence in infants surviving beyond the neonatal period. The tumor is diagnosed at an earlier age in these individuals compared with sporadic cases (less than 2 years and 3-4 years of age, respectively), and there is a high frequency of bilateral tumors (55%). Histologic examination of the kidneys in children with Perlman syndrome shows frequent nephroblastomatosis, which is a precursor lesion for Wilms tumor (summary by Astuti et al., 2012).
Polycystic liver disease 1
MedGen UID:
165781
Concept ID:
C0887850
Congenital Abnormality
Polycystic liver disease-1 is an autosomal dominant condition characterized by the presence of multiple liver cysts of biliary epithelial origin. Although the clinical presentation and histologic features of polycystic liver disease in the presence or absence of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (see, e.g., PKD1, 173900) are indistinguishable, PCLD1 is a genetically distinct form of isolated polycystic liver disease (summary by Reynolds et al., 2000). A subset of patients (28-35%) may develop kidney cysts that are usually incidental findings and do not result in clinically significant renal disease (review by Cnossen and Drenth, 2014). Genetic Heterogeneity of Polycystic Liver Disease See also PCLD2 (617004), caused by mutation in the SEC63 gene (608648) on chromosome 6q21; PCLD3 (617874), caused by mutation in the ALG8 gene (608103) on chromosome 11p; and PCLD4 (617875), causes by mutation in the LRP5 gene (603506) on chromosome 11q13.
Sialic acid storage disease, severe infantile type
MedGen UID:
203367
Concept ID:
C1096902
Disease or Syndrome
Free sialic acid storage disorders (FSASDs) are a spectrum of neurodegenerative disorders resulting from increased lysosomal storage of free sialic acid. Historically, FSASD was divided into separate allelic disorders: Salla disease, intermediate severe Salla disease, and infantile free sialic acid storage disease (ISSD). The mildest type was Salla disease, characterized by normal appearance and absence of neurologic findings at birth, followed by slowly progressive neurologic deterioration resulting in mild-to-moderate psychomotor delays, spasticity, athetosis, and epileptic seizures. Salla disease was named for a municipality in Finnish Lapland where a specific founder variant is relatively prevalent. However, the term Salla has been used in the literature to refer to less severe FSASD. More severe FSASD is historically referred to as ISSD, and is characterized by severe developmental delay, coarse facial features, hepatosplenomegaly, and cardiomegaly; death usually occurs in early childhood.
Gaucher disease perinatal lethal
MedGen UID:
374996
Concept ID:
C1842704
Disease or Syndrome
Gaucher disease (GD) encompasses a continuum of clinical findings from a perinatal lethal disorder to an asymptomatic type. The identification of three major clinical types (1, 2, and 3) and two other subtypes (perinatal-lethal and cardiovascular) is useful in determining prognosis and management. GD type 1 is characterized by the presence of clinical or radiographic evidence of bone disease (osteopenia, focal lytic or sclerotic lesions, and osteonecrosis), hepatosplenomegaly, anemia and thrombocytopenia, lung disease, and the absence of primary central nervous system disease. GD types 2 and 3 are characterized by the presence of primary neurologic disease; in the past, they were distinguished by age of onset and rate of disease progression, but these distinctions are not absolute. Disease with onset before age two years, limited psychomotor development, and a rapidly progressive course with death by age two to four years is classified as GD type 2. Individuals with GD type 3 may have onset before age two years, but often have a more slowly progressive course, with survival into the third or fourth decade. The perinatal-lethal form is associated with ichthyosiform or collodion skin abnormalities or with nonimmune hydrops fetalis. The cardiovascular form is characterized by calcification of the aortic and mitral valves, mild splenomegaly, corneal opacities, and supranuclear ophthalmoplegia. Cardiopulmonary complications have been described with all the clinical subtypes, although varying in frequency and severity.
Granulomatous disease, chronic, X-linked
MedGen UID:
336165
Concept ID:
C1844376
Disease or Syndrome
Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder of phagocytes (neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, and eosinophils) resulting from impaired killing of bacteria and fungi. CGD is characterized by severe recurrent bacterial and fungal infections and dysregulated inflammatory responses resulting in granuloma formation and other inflammatory disorders such as colitis. Infections typically involve the lung (pneumonia), lymph nodes (lymphadenitis), liver (abscess), bone (osteomyelitis), and skin (abscesses or cellulitis). Granulomas typically involve the genitourinary system (bladder) and gastrointestinal tract (often the pylorus initially, and later the esophagus, jejunum, ileum, cecum, rectum, and perirectal area). Some males with X-linked CGD have McLeod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome as the result of a contiguous gene deletion. While CGD may present anytime from infancy to late adulthood, the vast majority of affected individuals are diagnosed before age five years. Use of antimicrobial prophylaxis and therapy has greatly improved overall survival.
Congenital pulmonary lymphangiectasia
MedGen UID:
340355
Concept ID:
C1849554
Congenital Abnormality
Pulmonary lymphangiectasia is a rare congenital vascular dysplasia characterized by an increased number of dilated pulmonary lymphatics in the subpleural, peribronchial, and interlobular septa. Respiratory distress is usually noted immediately after birth (summary by Stevenson et al., 2006).
Lethal congenital glycogen storage disease of heart
MedGen UID:
337919
Concept ID:
C1849813
Disease or Syndrome
A rare glycogen storage disease with fetal or neonatal onset of severe cardiomyopathy with non-lysosomal glycogen accumulation and fatal outcome in infancy. Patients present with massive cardiomegaly, severe cardiac and respiratory complications and failure to thrive. Non-specific facial dysmorphism, bilateral cataracts, macroglossia, hydrocephalus, enlarged kidneys and skeletal muscle involvement have been reported in some cases.
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 6 (hepatocerebral type)
MedGen UID:
338045
Concept ID:
C1850406
Disease or Syndrome
MPV17-related mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance defect presents in the vast majority of affected individuals as an early-onset encephalohepatopathic (hepatocerebral) disease that is typically associated with mtDNA depletion, particularly in the liver. A later-onset neuromyopathic disease characterized by myopathy and neuropathy, and associated with multiple mtDNA deletions in muscle, has also rarely been described. MPV17-related mtDNA maintenance defect, encephalohepatopathic form is characterized by: Hepatic manifestations (liver dysfunction that typically progresses to liver failure, cholestasis, hepatomegaly, and steatosis); Neurologic involvement (developmental delay, hypotonia, microcephaly, and motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy); Gastrointestinal manifestations (gastrointestinal dysmotility, feeding difficulties, and failure to thrive); and Metabolic derangements (lactic acidosis and hypoglycemia). Less frequent manifestations include renal tubulopathy, nephrocalcinosis, and hypoparathyroidism. Progressive liver disease often leads to death in infancy or early childhood. Hepatocellular carcinoma has been reported.
Mullerian derivatives-lymphangiectasia-polydactyly syndrome
MedGen UID:
343489
Concept ID:
C1856159
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic disease characterized by the presence of Müllerian duct derivatives (rudimentary uterus, fallopian tubes, and atretic vagina) and other genital anomalies (cryptorchidism, micropenis) in male newborns, intestinal and pulmonary lymphangiectasia, protein-losing enteropathy, hepatomegaly, and renal anomalies. Postaxial polydactyly, facial dysmorphism (including broad nasal bridge, bulbous nasal tip, long and prominent upper lip with smooth philtrum, hypertrophic alveolar ridges, and mild retrognathia, among other features), and short limbs have also been described. The syndrome is fatal in infancy.
Cirrhosis, familial
MedGen UID:
350049
Concept ID:
C1861556
Disease or Syndrome
Cirrhosis in which no causative agent can be identified.
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 4
MedGen UID:
350526
Concept ID:
C1861862
Disease or Syndrome
Nonfamilial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy tends to be milder. This form typically begins later in life than familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and affected individuals have a lower risk of serious cardiac events and sudden death than people with the familial form.\n\nWhile most people with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are symptom-free or have only mild symptoms, this condition can have serious consequences. It can cause abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias) that may be life threatening. People with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy have an increased risk of sudden death, even if they have no other symptoms of the condition. A small number of affected individuals develop potentially fatal heart failure, which may require heart transplantation.\n\nThe symptoms of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are variable, even within the same family. Many affected individuals have no symptoms. Other people with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may experience chest pain; shortness of breath, especially with physical exertion; a sensation of fluttering or pounding in the chest (palpitations); lightheadedness; dizziness; and fainting.\n\nIn familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, cardiac thickening usually occurs in the interventricular septum, which is the muscular wall that separates the lower left chamber of the heart (the left ventricle) from the lower right chamber (the right ventricle). In some people, thickening of the interventricular septum impedes the flow of oxygen-rich blood from the heart, which may lead to an abnormal heart sound during a heartbeat (heart murmur) and other signs and symptoms of the condition. Other affected individuals do not have physical obstruction of blood flow, but the pumping of blood is less efficient, which can also lead to symptoms of the condition. Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy often begins in adolescence or young adulthood, although it can develop at any time throughout life.\n\nHypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a heart condition characterized by thickening (hypertrophy) of the heart (cardiac) muscle. When multiple members of a family have the condition, it is known as familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy also occurs in people with no family history; these cases are considered nonfamilial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. 
Osteocraniostenosis
MedGen UID:
356331
Concept ID:
C1865639
Disease or Syndrome
Gracile bone dysplasia (GCLEB) is a perinatally lethal condition characterized by gracile bones with thin diaphyses, premature closure of basal cranial sutures, and microphthalmia (summary by Unger et al., 2013).
Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 3
MedGen UID:
356333
Concept ID:
C1865643
Disease or Syndrome
The signs and symptoms of PFIC2 are typically related to liver disease only; however, these signs and symptoms tend to be more severe than those experienced by people with PFIC1. People with PFIC2 often develop liver failure within the first few years of life. Additionally, affected individuals are at increased risk of developing a type of liver cancer called hepatocellular carcinoma.\n\nIn addition to signs and symptoms related to liver disease, people with PFIC1 may have short stature, deafness, diarrhea, inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), and low levels of fat-soluble vitamins (vitamins A, D, E, and K) in the blood. Affected individuals typically develop liver failure before adulthood.\n\nMost people with PFIC3 have signs and symptoms related to liver disease only. Signs and symptoms of PFIC3 usually do not appear until later in infancy or early childhood; rarely, people are diagnosed in early adulthood. Liver failure can occur in childhood or adulthood in people with PFIC3.\n\nThere are three known types of PFIC: PFIC1, PFIC2, and PFIC3. The types are also sometimes described as shortages of particular proteins needed for normal liver function. Each type has a different genetic cause.\n\nSigns and symptoms of PFIC typically begin in infancy and are related to bile buildup and liver disease. Specifically, affected individuals experience severe itching, yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes (jaundice), failure to gain weight and grow at the expected rate (failure to thrive), high blood pressure in the vein that supplies blood to the liver (portal hypertension), and an enlarged liver and spleen (hepatosplenomegaly).\n\nProgressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) is a disorder that causes progressive liver disease, which typically leads to liver failure. In people with PFIC, liver cells are less able to secrete a digestive fluid called bile. The buildup of bile in liver cells causes liver disease in affected individuals.
Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis 5
MedGen UID:
409627
Concept ID:
C1968603
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis-5 is a form of infantile malignant osteopetrosis, characterized by defective osteoclast function resulting in decreased bone resorption and generalized osteosclerosis. Defective resorption causes development of densely sclerotic fragile bones and progressive obliteration of the marrow spaces and cranial foramina. Marrow obliteration is associated with extramedullary hematopoiesis and hepatosplenomegaly, and results in anemia and thrombocytopenia, whereas nerve entrapment accounts for progressive blindness and hearing loss. Other major manifestations include failure to thrive, pathologic fractures, and increased infection rate. Most affected children succumb to severe bone marrow failure and overwhelming infection in the first few years of life (Quarello et al., 2004).
XFE progeroid syndrome
MedGen UID:
410064
Concept ID:
C1970416
Disease or Syndrome
An autosomal recessive condition caused by mutation(s) in the ERCC4 gene, encoding DNA repair endonuclease XPF. it is characterized by characterized by cutaneous photosensitivity and progeroid features in multiple organ systems.
Hypotonia with lactic acidemia and hyperammonemia
MedGen UID:
435972
Concept ID:
C2673642
Disease or Syndrome
This syndrome is characterized by severe hypotonia, lactic acidemia and congenital hyperammonemia. It has been described in three newborns born to consanguineous parents. Ultrasound examination during the 36th week of pregnancy revealed generalized edema. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and tubulopathy developed within the first week of life and the infants died within the first month. The activities of enzymes in the mitochondrial respiratory chain were reduced in the muscles of the patients. Mutations were identified in the MRPS22 gene on chromosome 3q23, encoding a mitochondrial ribosomal protein
Hypoplastic pancreas-intestinal atresia-hypoplastic gallbalder syndrome
MedGen UID:
411637
Concept ID:
C2748662
Disease or Syndrome
Mitchell-Riley syndrome is characterized by neonatal diabetes, pancreatic hypoplasia, intestinal atresia, and gallbladder aplasia or hypoplasia. There is considerable phenotypic overlap between Mitchell-Riley syndrome and Martinez-Frias syndrome (601346), the latter being characterized by the features of the Mitchell-Riley syndrome except for neonatal diabetes, and including tracheoesophageal fistula in some patients (Smith et al., 2010).
Cutis laxa with severe pulmonary, gastrointestinal and urinary anomalies
MedGen UID:
442566
Concept ID:
C2750804
Disease or Syndrome
LTBP4-related cutis laxa is characterized by cutis laxa, early childhood-onset pulmonary emphysema, peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, and other evidence of a generalized connective tissue disorder such as inguinal hernias and hollow visceral diverticula (e.g., intestine, bladder). Other manifestations can include pyloric stenosis, diaphragmatic hernia, rectal prolapse, gastrointestinal elongation/tortuosity, cardiovascular abnormality, pulmonary hypertension, hypotonia and frequent pulmonary infections. Bladder diverticula and hydronephrosis are common. Early demise has been associated with pulmonary emphysema.
ALG8 congenital disorder of glycosylation
MedGen UID:
419692
Concept ID:
C2931002
Disease or Syndrome
CDGs, previously called carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndromes, grew from hereditary multisystem disorders first recognized by Jaeken et al. (1980). The characteristic biochemical abnormality of CDGs is the hypoglycosylation of glycoproteins, which is routinely determined by isoelectric focusing of serum transferrin. Type I CDG comprises those disorders in which there is a defect in the assembly of lipid-linked oligosaccharides or their transfer onto nascent glycoproteins, whereas type II CDG comprises defects of trimming, elongation, and processing of protein-bound glycans. For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065). CDG1H is a severe form of CDG. The majority of patients have brain involvement, liver pathology, gastrointestinal symptoms, dysmorphism (including brachydactyly), eye involvement (especially cataract), and skin symptoms. Most patients die within the first year of life (summary by Marques-da-Silva et al., 2017).
ALG9 congenital disorder of glycosylation
MedGen UID:
443955
Concept ID:
C2931006
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) that represent defects of dolichol-linked oligosaccharide assembly are classified as CDG type I. For a general description and a discussion of the classification of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065).
Short-rib thoracic dysplasia 7 with or without polydactyly
MedGen UID:
481422
Concept ID:
C3279792
Disease or Syndrome
Short-rib thoracic dysplasia (SRTD) with or without polydactyly refers to a group of autosomal recessive skeletal ciliopathies that are characterized by a constricted thoracic cage, short ribs, shortened tubular bones, and a 'trident' appearance of the acetabular roof. SRTD encompasses Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) and the disorders previously designated as Jeune syndrome or asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD), short rib-polydactyly syndrome (SRPS), and Mainzer-Saldino syndrome (MZSDS). Polydactyly is variably present, and there is phenotypic overlap in the various forms of SRTDs, which differ by visceral malformation and metaphyseal appearance. Nonskeletal involvement can include cleft lip/palate as well as anomalies of major organs such as the brain, eye, heart, kidneys, liver, pancreas, intestines, and genitalia. Some forms of SRTD are lethal in the neonatal period due to respiratory insufficiency secondary to a severely restricted thoracic cage, whereas others are compatible with life (summary by Huber and Cormier-Daire, 2012 and Schmidts et al., 2013). There is phenotypic overlap with the cranioectodermal dysplasias (Sensenbrenner syndrome; see CED1, 218330). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of short-rib thoracic dysplasia, see SRTD1 (208500).
Hemochromatosis type 1
MedGen UID:
854011
Concept ID:
C3469186
Disease or Syndrome
HFE hemochromatosis is characterized by inappropriately high absorption of iron by the small intestinal mucosa. The phenotypic spectrum of HFE hemochromatosis includes: Persons with clinical HFE hemochromatosis, in whom manifestations of end-organ damage secondary to iron overload are present; Individuals with biochemical HFE hemochromatosis, in whom transferrin-iron saturation is increased and the only evidence of iron overload is increased serum ferritin concentration; and Non-expressing p.Cys282Tyr homozygotes, in whom neither clinical manifestations of HFE hemochromatosis nor iron overload are present. Clinical HFE hemochromatosis is characterized by excessive storage of iron in the liver, skin, pancreas, heart, joints, and anterior pituitary gland. In untreated individuals, early symptoms include: abdominal pain, weakness, lethargy, weight loss, arthralgias, diabetes mellitus; and increased risk of cirrhosis when the serum ferritin is higher than 1,000 ng/mL. Other findings may include progressive increase in skin pigmentation, congestive heart failure, and/or arrhythmias, arthritis, and hypogonadism. Clinical HFE hemochromatosis is more common in men than women.
Acrocephalopolydactyly
MedGen UID:
501209
Concept ID:
C3495588
Disease or Syndrome
Acrocephalopolydactylous dysplasia, or Elejalde syndrome, is a lethal multiple congenital disorder characterized by increased birth weight, globular body with thick skin, organomegaly, and fibrosis in multiple tissues (summary by Phadke et al., 2011).
Lymphoproliferative syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
767454
Concept ID:
C3554540
Disease or Syndrome
Lymphoproliferative syndrome-2, also known as CD27 deficiency, is an autosomal recessive immunodeficiency disorder associated with persistent symptomatic EBV viremia, hypogammaglobulinemia, and impairment in specific antibody function resulting from impaired T cell-dependent B-cell responses and T-cell dysfunction (summary by van Montfrans et al., 2012). The phenotype can vary significantly, from asymptomatic borderline-low hypogammaglobulinemia, to a full-blown symptomatic systemic inflammatory response with life-threatening EBV-related complications, including hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, a lymphoproliferative disorder, and malignant lymphoma requiring stem cell transplantation (summary by Salzer et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lymphoproliferative syndrome, see XLP1 (308240).
Severe combined immunodeficiency due to LCK deficiency
MedGen UID:
862670
Concept ID:
C4014233
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-22 (IMD22) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the onset of recurrent bacterial, viral, and fungal respiratory, gastrointestinal, and skin infections in infancy or early childhood. Immunologic workup shows severe T-cell lymphopenia, particularly affecting the CD4+ subset, and impaired proximal TCR intracellular signaling and activation. Although NK cells and B cells are normal, some patients may have hypogammaglobulinemia secondary to the T-cell defect. There are variable manifestations, likely due to the severity of the particular LCK mutation: patients may develop prominent skin lesions resembling epidermodysplasia verruciformis, gastrointestinal inflammation, and virus-induced malignancy. The disease can be fatal in childhood, but hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) may be curative (Hauck et al., 2012; Li et al., 2016; Keller et al., 2023).
Complex lethal osteochondrodysplasia
MedGen UID:
900688
Concept ID:
C4225162
Disease or Syndrome
Complex lethal osteochondrodysplasia of the Symoens-Barnes-Gistelinck type is characterized by severe skeletal osteopenia, microcephaly, multiple fractures, and congenital anomalies including ascites, pleural effusion, and intracranial ventriculomegaly (Symoens et al., 2015).
Lymphatic malformation 6
MedGen UID:
908120
Concept ID:
C4225184
Disease or Syndrome
Lymphatic malformation-6 is a form of generalized lymphatic dysplasia (GLD), which is characterized by a uniform, widespread lymphedema affecting all segments of the body, with systemic involvement such as intestinal and/or pulmonary lymphangiectasia, pleural effusions, chylothoraces and/or pericardial effusions. In LMPHM6, there is a high incidence of nonimmune hydrops fetalis (NIHF) with either death or complete resolution of the neonatal edema, but childhood onset of lymphedema with or without systemic involvement also occurs. Mild facial edema is often present. Patients have normal intelligence and no seizures (summary by Fotiou et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lymphatic malformation, see 153100.
Sialidosis type 2
MedGen UID:
924303
Concept ID:
C4282398
Disease or Syndrome
Sialidosis is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the progressive lysosomal storage of sialylated glycopeptides and oligosaccharides caused by a deficiency of the enzyme neuraminidase. Common to the sialidoses is the accumulation and/or excretion of sialic acid (N-acetylneuraminic acid) covalently linked ('bound') to a variety of oligosaccharides and/or glycoproteins (summary by Lowden and O'Brien, 1979). The sialidoses are distinct from the sialurias in which there is storage and excretion of 'free' sialic acid, rather than 'bound' sialic acid; neuraminidase activity in sialuria is normal or elevated. Salla disease (604369) is a form of 'free' sialic acid disease. Classification Lowden and O'Brien (1979) provided a logical nosology of neuraminidase deficiency into sialidosis type I and type II. Type I is the milder form, also known as the 'normosomatic' type or the cherry red spot-myoclonus syndrome. Sialidosis type II is the more severe form with an earlier onset, and is also known as the 'dysmorphic' type. Type II has been subdivided into juvenile and infantile forms. Other terms for sialidosis type II are mucolipidosis I and lipomucopolysaccharidosis.
Lymphatic malformation 7
MedGen UID:
934596
Concept ID:
C4310629
Disease or Syndrome
LMPHM7 is an autosomal dominant disorder with variable expressivity. Some patients may develop severe nonimmune lymphatic-related hydrops fetalis (LRHF) in utero, resulting in early death, whereas others may have milder manifestations, such as atrial septal defect (ASD) or varicose veins as adults. The hydrops and/or swelling improves spontaneously in those who survive the neonatal period (summary by Martin-Almedina et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lymphatic malformation, see 153100.
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 15 (hepatocerebral type)
MedGen UID:
934657
Concept ID:
C4310690
Disease or Syndrome
Any mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the TFAM gene.
Cholestasis, progressive familial intrahepatic, 5
MedGen UID:
934714
Concept ID:
C4310747
Disease or Syndrome
Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis-5 (PFIC5) is an autosomal recessive severe liver disorder characterized by onset of intralobular cholestasis in the neonatal period. The disease is rapidly progressive, leading to liver failure and death if liver transplant is not performed. Other features include abnormal liver enzymes, low to normal gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) activity, increased alpha-fetoprotein, and a vitamin K-independent coagulopathy (summary by Gomez-Ospina et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PFIC, see PFIC1 (211600).
Hydrops-lactic acidosis-sideroblastic anemia-multisystemic failure syndrome
MedGen UID:
934728
Concept ID:
C4310761
Disease or Syndrome
Hydrops, lactic acidosis, and sideroblastic anemia (HLASA) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by the onset of hydrops in utero. The severity of the hydrops and the disorder in general is highly variable. At birth, affected infants usually show poor growth, lactic acidosis, pulmonary hypertension with hypoxic respiratory insufficiency, and sideroblastic anemia. More variable features may include hepatosplenomegaly or cholestasis, hypoglycemia, pancreatic insufficiency, and micropenis or hypospadias. Death in infancy may occur. Those who survive tend to have resolution of lactic acidosis and anemia, but may show developmental delay and sensorineural deafness (summary by Riley et al., 2020).
Isolated neonatal sclerosing cholangitis
MedGen UID:
1393230
Concept ID:
C4479344
Disease or Syndrome
Neonatal sclerosing cholangitis (NSC) is a rare autosomal recessive form of severe liver disease with onset in infancy. Affected infants have jaundice, cholestasis, acholic stools, and progressive liver dysfunction resulting in fibrosis and cirrhosis; most require liver transplantation in the first few decades of life. Cholangiography shows patent biliary ducts, but there are bile duct irregularities (summary by Girard et al., 2016; Grammatikopoulos et al., 2016).
Pseudo-TORCH syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
1373355
Concept ID:
C4479376
Disease or Syndrome
Pseudo-TORCH syndrome-2 (PTORCH2) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by antenatal onset of intracranial hemorrhage, calcification, brain malformations, liver dysfunction, and often thrombocytopenia. Affected individuals tend to have respiratory insufficiency and seizures, and die in infancy. The phenotype resembles the sequelae of intrauterine infection, but there is no evidence of an infectious agent. The disorder results from inappropriate activation of the interferon (IFN) immunologic pathway (summary by Meuwissen et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PTORCH, see PTORCH1 (251290).
Fraser syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
1621907
Concept ID:
C4540040
Disease or Syndrome
Fraser syndrome is an autosomal recessive malformation disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, and abnormalities of the respiratory and urogenital tract (summary by van Haelst et al., 2008). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Fraser syndrome, see 219000.
Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis 1
MedGen UID:
1636833
Concept ID:
C4551527
Disease or Syndrome
Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a pathologic finding in several renal disorders that manifest clinically as proteinuria and progressive decline in renal function. Some patients with FSGS develop the clinical entity called 'nephrotic syndrome' (see NPHS1; 256300), which includes massive proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, hyperlipidemia, and edema. However, patients with FSGS may have proteinuria in the nephrotic range without other features of the nephrotic syndrome (summary by D'Agati et al., 2004; Mathis et al., 1998). D'Agati et al. (2011) provided a detailed review of FSGS, emphasizing that the disorder results from defects of the podocyte. Because of confusion in the literature regarding use of the terms 'nephrotic syndrome' and 'focal segmental glomerulosclerosis' (see NOMENCLATURE section), these disorders in OMIM are classified as NPHS or FSGS according to how they were first designated in the literature. Genetic Heterogeneity of Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis and Nephrotic Syndrome Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and nephrotic syndrome are genetically heterogeneous disorders representing a spectrum of hereditary renal diseases. See also FSGS2 (603965), caused by mutation in the TRPC6 gene (603652); FSGS3 (607832), associated with variation in the CD2AP gene (604241); FSGS4 (612551), mapped to chromosome 22q12; FSGS5 (613237), caused by mutation in the INF2 gene (610982); FSGS6 (614131), caused by mutation in the MYO1E gene (601479); FSGS7 (616002), caused by mutation in the PAX2 gene (167409); FSGS8 (616032), caused by mutation in the ANLN gene (616027); FSGS9 (616220), caused by mutation in the CRB2 gene (609720); and FSGS10 (256020), caused by mutation in the LMX1B gene (602575). See also NPHS1 (256300), caused by mutation in the NPHS1 gene (602716); NPHS2 (600995), caused by mutation in the podocin gene (604766); NPHS3 (610725), caused by mutation in the PLCE1 gene (608414); NPHS4 (256370), caused by mutation in the WT1 gene (607102); NPHS5 (614199), caused by mutation in the LAMB2 gene (150325); NPHS6 (614196), caused by mutation in the PTPRO gene (600579); NPHS7 (615008), caused by mutation in the DGKE gene (601440); NPHS8 (615244), caused by mutation in the ARHGDIA gene (601925); NPHS9 (615573), caused by mutation in the COQ8B gene (615567); NPHS10 (615861), caused by mutation in the EMP2 gene (602334); NPHS11 (616730), caused by mutation in the NUP107 gene (607617); NPHS12 (616892), caused by mutation in the NUP93 gene (614351); NPHS13 (616893), caused by mutation in the NUP205 gene (614352); NPHS14 (617575), caused by mutation in the SGPL1 gene (603729); NPHS15 (617609), caused by mutation in the MAGI2 gene (606382); NPHS16 (617783), caused by mutation in the KANK2 gene (614610), NPHS17 (618176), caused by mutation in the NUP85 gene (170285); NPHS18 (618177), caused by mutation in the NUP133 gene (607613); NPHS19 (618178), caused by mutation in the NUP160 gene (607614); NPHS20 (301028), caused by mutation in the TBC1D8B gene (301027); and NPHS21 (618594) caused by mutation in the AVIL gene (613397).
Diarrhea 10, protein-losing enteropathy type
MedGen UID:
1648311
Concept ID:
C4748579
Disease or Syndrome
Diarrhea-10 (DIAR10) is a protein-losing enteropathy characterized by intractable secretory diarrhea and massive protein loss due to leaky fenestrated capillaries. Features include early-onset anasarca, severe hypoalbuminemia, hypogammaglobulinemia, and hypertriglyceridemia, as well as electrolyte abnormalities. Some patients exhibit facial dysmorphism and cardiac and renal anomalies. Intrafamilial variability has been observed, and the disease can be severe, with death occurring in infancy in some patients (Broekaert et al., 2018; Kurolap et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of diarrhea, see DIAR1 (214700).
Mitochondrial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with lactic acidosis due to MTO1 deficiency
MedGen UID:
1664257
Concept ID:
C4749921
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-10 (COXPD10) is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting in variable defects of mitochondrial oxidative respiration. Affected individuals present in infancy with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and lactic acidosis. The severity is variable, but can be fatal in the most severe cases (summary by Ghezzi et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Ferro-cerebro-cutaneous syndrome
MedGen UID:
1658844
Concept ID:
C4751570
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic metabolic liver disease with characteristics of progressive neurodegeneration, cutaneous abnormalities including varying degrees of ichthyosis or seborrheic dermatitis, and systemic iron overload. Patients manifest with infantile-onset seizures, encephalopathy, abnormal eye movements, axial hypotonia with peripheral hypertonia, brisk reflexes, cortical blindness and deafness, myoclonus and hepato/splenomegaly, as well as oral manifestations including microdontia, widely spaced and pointed teeth with delayed eruption and gingival overgrowth.
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 3 (hepatocerebral type)
MedGen UID:
1682503
Concept ID:
C5191055
Disease or Syndrome
The two forms of deoxyguanosine kinase (DGUOK) deficiency are a neonatal multisystem disorder and an isolated hepatic disorder that presents later in infancy or childhood. The majority of affected individuals have the multisystem illness with hepatic disease (jaundice, cholestasis, hepatomegaly, and elevated transaminases) and neurologic manifestations (hypotonia, nystagmus, and psychomotor retardation) evident within weeks of birth. Those with isolated liver disease may also have renal involvement and some later develop mild hypotonia. Progressive hepatic disease is the most common cause of death in both forms.
Congenital disorder of glycosylation, type IIr
MedGen UID:
1717186
Concept ID:
C5393313
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 2R (CDG2R) is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by infantile onset of liver failure, recurrent infections due to hypogammaglobulinemia, and cutis laxa. Some patients may also have mild intellectual impairment and dysmorphic features. Laboratory studies showed defective glycosylation of serum transferrin in a type 2 pattern (summary by Rujano et al., 2017). For an overview of congenital disorders of glycosylation, see CDG1A (212065) and CDG2A (212066).
Rajab interstitial lung disease with brain calcifications 1
MedGen UID:
1750003
Concept ID:
C5436276
Disease or Syndrome
Rajab interstitial lung disease with brain calcifications-1 (RILCBC1) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder with a highly variable phenotype. Most patients present in infancy or early childhood with poor growth and interstitial lung disease, which may lead to death. Some may also have liver, skeletal, and renal abnormalities, and most have intracranial calcifications on brain imaging. Some may have early impaired motor development, but most have normal cognitive development (summary by Xu et al., 2018). Genetic Heterogeneity of Rajab Interstitial Lung Disease with Brain Calcifications Also see Rajab interstitial disease with brain calcifications-2 (RILDBC2; 619013), caused by mutation in the FARSA gene (602918).
Cardiomyopathy, familial restrictive, 6
MedGen UID:
1780781
Concept ID:
C5543638
Disease or Syndrome
Familial restrictive cardiomyopathy-6 (RCM6) is characterized by prenatal onset of severe restrictive cardiomyopathy predominantly involving the right ventricle, resulting in irreversible heart failure and early death (Louw et al., 2018). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial restrictive cardiomyopathy, see RCM1 (115210).
Portal hypertension, noncirrhotic, 2
MedGen UID:
1794158
Concept ID:
C5561948
Disease or Syndrome
Noncirrhotic portal hypertension-2 (NCPH2) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by signs of liver dysfunction that become apparent in the first decades of life. Affected individuals have jaundice, hyperbilirubinemia, pancytopenia, including neutropenia, lymphopenia, and thrombocytopenia, hepatosplenomegaly, and esophageal varices. Some patients may have recurrent infections or features suggestive of an immunodeficiency. Liver biopsy is notable for the absence of cirrhosis and the presence of nodular regeneration. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) have abnormal expression of CD34 (142230) (summary by Drzewiecki et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of NCPH, see 617068.
Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 9
MedGen UID:
1794176
Concept ID:
C5561966
Disease or Syndrome
Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome-9 (AGS9) is a type I interferonopathy characterized by severe developmental delay and progressive neurologic deterioration. Patients present in infancy with irritability and spasticity. Brain imaging shows diffusely abnormal white matter, cerebral atrophy, and intracranial calcification. Premature death has been associated with renal and/or hepatic failure (Uggenti et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome, see AGS1 (225750).
Biliary, renal, neurologic, and skeletal syndrome
MedGen UID:
1794200
Concept ID:
C5561990
Disease or Syndrome
Biliary, renal, neurologic, and skeletal syndrome (BRENS) is an autosomal recessive complex ciliopathy with multisystemic manifestations. The most common presentation is severe neonatal cholestasis that progresses to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Most patients have additional clinical features suggestive of a ciliopathy, including postaxial polydactyly, hydrocephalus, retinal abnormalities, and situs inversus. Additional features of the syndrome may include congenital cardiac defects, echogenic kidneys with renal failure, ocular abnormalities, joint hyperextensibility, and dysmorphic facial features. Some patients have global developmental delay. Brain imaging typically shows dilated ventricles, hypomyelination, and white matter abnormalities, although some patients have been described with abnormal pituitary development (summary by Shaheen et al., 2020 and David et al., 2020).
Immunodeficiency 87 and autoimmunity
MedGen UID:
1794280
Concept ID:
C5562070
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-87 and autoimmunity (IMD87) is an autosomal recessive immunologic disorder with wide phenotypic variation and severity. Affected individuals usually present in infancy or early childhood with increased susceptibility to infections, often Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), as well as with lymphadenopathy or autoimmune manifestations, predominantly hemolytic anemia. Laboratory studies may show low or normal lymphocyte numbers, often with skewed T-cell subset ratios. The disorder results primarily from defects in T-cell function, which causes both immunodeficiency and overall immune dysregulation (summary by Serwas et al., 2019 and Fournier et al., 2021).
Liver disease, severe congenital
MedGen UID:
1823968
Concept ID:
C5774195
Disease or Syndrome
Severe congenital liver disease (SCOLIV) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the onset of progressive hepatic dysfunction usually in the first years of life. Affected individuals show feeding difficulties with failure to thrive and features such as jaundice, hepatomegaly, and abdominal distension. Laboratory workup is consistent with hepatic insufficiency and may also show coagulation defects, anemia, or metabolic disturbances. Cirrhosis and hypernodularity are commonly observed on liver biopsy. Many patients die of liver failure in early childhood (Moreno Traspas et al., 2022).
Lymphatic malformation 13
MedGen UID:
1840915
Concept ID:
C5830279
Disease or Syndrome
Lymphatic malformation-13 (LMPHM13) is characterized by the presence of nonimmune hydrops fetalis which often resolves with age. Capillary or cavernous hemangiomas are present in most patients, as are cardiac defects, often mild (Abdelrahman et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lymphatic malformation, see 153100.
Congenital myopathy 22B, severe fetal
MedGen UID:
1841137
Concept ID:
C5830501
Disease or Syndrome
Severe fetal congenital myopathy-22B (CMYP22B) is an autosomal recessive muscle disorder characterized by in utero onset of severe muscle weakness manifest as fetal akinesia. The pregnancies are often complicated by polyhydramnios, and affected individuals develop fetal hydrops with pulmonary hypoplasia, severe joint contractures, and generalized muscle hypoplasia. Those who are born have respiratory failure resulting in death. Dysmorphic facial features may be present. The features in these patients overlap with fetal akinesia deformation sequence (FADS; see 208150) and lethal congenital contractures syndrome (LCCS; see 253310) (Zaharieva et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Tapper EB, Parikh ND
JAMA 2023 May 9;329(18):1589-1602. doi: 10.1001/jama.2023.5997. PMID: 37159031Free PMC Article
Carson SA, Kallen AN
JAMA 2021 Jul 6;326(1):65-76. doi: 10.1001/jama.2021.4788. PMID: 34228062Free PMC Article
Smith A, Baumgartner K, Bositis C
Am Fam Physician 2019 Dec 15;100(12):759-770. PMID: 31845776

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Long B, Gottlieb M
Am J Emerg Med 2023 Aug;70:84-89. Epub 2023 May 13 doi: 10.1016/j.ajem.2023.05.015. PMID: 37244043
Tonon M, Piano S
Med Clin North Am 2023 May;107(3):505-516. Epub 2023 Feb 20 doi: 10.1016/j.mcna.2022.12.004. PMID: 37001950
Bleicher J, Lambert LA
Surg Oncol Clin N Am 2021 Jul;30(3):475-490. doi: 10.1016/j.soc.2021.02.004. PMID: 34053663
Gordon FD
Clin Liver Dis 2012 May;16(2):285-99. doi: 10.1016/j.cld.2012.03.004. PMID: 22541699
Reynolds TB
Clin Liver Dis 2000 Feb;4(1):151-68, vii. doi: 10.1016/s1089-3261(05)70101-x. PMID: 11232182

Diagnosis

Duletzke NT, Kiraly LN, Martindale RG
Nutr Clin Pract 2023 Jun;38(3):557-563. Epub 2023 Mar 20 doi: 10.1002/ncp.10973. PMID: 36938719
Hodge C, Badgwell BD
J Surg Oncol 2019 Jul;120(1):67-73. Epub 2019 Mar 22 doi: 10.1002/jso.25453. PMID: 30903617
Lizaola B, Bonder A, Trivedi HD, Tapper EB, Cardenas A
Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2017 Nov;46(9):816-824. Epub 2017 Sep 11 doi: 10.1111/apt.14284. PMID: 28892178
Bavdekar A, Thakur N
Indian J Pediatr 2016 Nov;83(11):1334-1340. Epub 2016 Jun 9 doi: 10.1007/s12098-016-2168-1. PMID: 27278239
Reynolds TB
Clin Liver Dis 2000 Feb;4(1):151-68, vii. doi: 10.1016/s1089-3261(05)70101-x. PMID: 11232182

Therapy

Tapper EB, Parikh ND
JAMA 2023 May 9;329(18):1589-1602. doi: 10.1001/jama.2023.5997. PMID: 37159031Free PMC Article
Villanueva C, Torres F, Sarin SK, Shah HA, Tripathi D, Brujats A, Rodrigues SG, Bhardwaj A, Azam Z, Hayes PC, Jindal A, Abid S, Alvarado E, Bosch J; Carvedilol-IPD-MA-group and the Baveno Cooperation: an EASL Consortium
J Hepatol 2022 Oct;77(4):1014-1025. Epub 2022 May 31 doi: 10.1016/j.jhep.2022.05.021. PMID: 35661713
China L, Freemantle N, Forrest E, Kallis Y, Ryder SD, Wright G, Portal AJ, Becares Salles N, Gilroy DW, O'Brien A; ATTIRE Trial Investigators
N Engl J Med 2021 Mar 4;384(9):808-817. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa2022166. PMID: 33657293
Sun Q, Sever P
J Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone Syst 2020 Oct-Dec;21(4):1470320320975893. doi: 10.1177/1470320320975893. PMID: 33234024Free PMC Article
Rochling FA, Zetterman RK
Drugs 2009;69(13):1739-60. doi: 10.2165/11316390-000000000-00000. PMID: 19719331

Prognosis

Trebicka J, Fernandez J, Papp M, Caraceni P, Laleman W, Gambino C, Giovo I, Uschner FE, Jimenez C, Mookerjee R, Gustot T, Albillos A, Bañares R, Janicko M, Steib C, Reiberger T, Acevedo J, Gatti P, Bernal W, Zeuzem S, Zipprich A, Piano S, Berg T, Bruns T, Bendtsen F, Coenraad M, Merli M, Stauber R, Zoller H, Ramos JP, Solè C, Soriano G, de Gottardi A, Gronbaek H, Saliba F, Trautwein C, Özdogan OC, Francque S, Ryder S, Nahon P, Romero-Gomez M, Van Vlierberghe H, Francoz C, Manns M, Garcia E, Tufoni M, Amoros A, Pavesi M, Sanchez C, Curto A, Pitarch C, Putignano A, Moreno E, Shawcross D, Aguilar F, Clària J, Ponzo P, Jansen C, Vitalis Z, Zaccherini G, Balogh B, Vargas V, Montagnese S, Alessandria C, Bernardi M, Ginès P, Jalan R, Moreau R, Angeli P, Arroyo V; PREDICT STUDY group of the EASL-CLIF Consortium
J Hepatol 2020 Oct;73(4):842-854. Epub 2020 Jul 13 doi: 10.1016/j.jhep.2020.06.013. PMID: 32673741
Fernandes FF, Alves VO, Sánchez TE, Paula WD, Santana AN
Rev Inst Med Trop Sao Paulo 2016 Jul 11;58:57. doi: 10.1590/S1678-9946201658057. PMID: 27410917Free PMC Article
Maeda H, Kobayashi M, Sakamoto J
World J Gastroenterol 2015 Oct 21;21(39):10936-47. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v21.i39.10936. PMID: 26494952Free PMC Article
Schouten J, Michielsen PP
Acta Gastroenterol Belg 2007 Apr-Jun;70(2):217-22. PMID: 17715638
Reynolds TB
Clin Liver Dis 2000 Feb;4(1):151-68, vii. doi: 10.1016/s1089-3261(05)70101-x. PMID: 11232182

Clinical prediction guides

Berzigotti A
J Hepatol 2017 Aug;67(2):399-411. Epub 2017 Feb 14 doi: 10.1016/j.jhep.2017.02.003. PMID: 28223101
Kim J, Won JH
Tech Vasc Interv Radiol 2016 Dec;19(4):291-298. Epub 2016 Oct 8 doi: 10.1053/j.tvir.2016.10.006. PMID: 27993325
Maeda H, Kobayashi M, Sakamoto J
World J Gastroenterol 2015 Oct 21;21(39):10936-47. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v21.i39.10936. PMID: 26494952Free PMC Article
Abraldes JG, Sarlieve P, Tandon P
Clin Liver Dis 2014 Nov;18(4):779-92. Epub 2014 Aug 21 doi: 10.1016/j.cld.2014.07.002. PMID: 25438283
Timmerman D, Testa AC, Bourne T, Ameye L, Jurkovic D, Van Holsbeke C, Paladini D, Van Calster B, Vergote I, Van Huffel S, Valentin L
Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol 2008 Jun;31(6):681-90. doi: 10.1002/uog.5365. PMID: 18504770

Recent systematic reviews

Pan J, Wang L, Gao F, An Y, Yin Y, Guo X, Nery FG, Yoshida EM, Qi X
Eur J Intern Med 2022 Oct;104:21-32. Epub 2022 Jun 7 doi: 10.1016/j.ejim.2022.05.032. PMID: 35688747
Villanueva C, Torres F, Sarin SK, Shah HA, Tripathi D, Brujats A, Rodrigues SG, Bhardwaj A, Azam Z, Hayes PC, Jindal A, Abid S, Alvarado E, Bosch J; Carvedilol-IPD-MA-group and the Baveno Cooperation: an EASL Consortium
J Hepatol 2022 Oct;77(4):1014-1025. Epub 2022 May 31 doi: 10.1016/j.jhep.2022.05.021. PMID: 35661713
Tsheten T, Clements ACA, Gray DJ, Adhikary RK, Furuya-Kanamori L, Wangdi K
Infect Dis Poverty 2021 Oct 9;10(1):123. doi: 10.1186/s40249-021-00908-2. PMID: 34627388Free PMC Article
Pimentel R, Gregório C, Figueiredo P
Acta Gastroenterol Belg 2021 Apr-Jun;84(2):333-342. doi: 10.51821/84.2.333. PMID: 34217185
Liu AY, Nabel CS, Finkelman BS, Ruth JR, Kurzrock R, van Rhee F, Krymskaya VP, Kelleher D, Rubenstein AH, Fajgenbaum DC
Lancet Haematol 2016 Apr;3(4):e163-75. Epub 2016 Mar 17 doi: 10.1016/S2352-3026(16)00006-5. PMID: 27063975

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