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Menorrhagia

MedGen UID:
44358
Concept ID:
C0025323
Pathologic Function
Synonyms: Heavy Menstrual Bleeding; Heavy Period; Heavy Periods; Hypermenorrhea; Menstrual Bleeding, Heavy
SNOMED CT: Menorrhagia (386692008); Hypermenorrhea (386692008); Flooding during periods (386692008); Heavy period (386692008); Profuse menstrual flow (386692008); Heavy periods (386692008); Heavy menstrual bleeding (386692008)
 
HPO: HP:0000132

Definition

Prolonged and excessive menses at regular intervals in excess of 80 mL or lasting longer than 7 days. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVMenorrhagia

Conditions with this feature

Bernard Soulier syndrome
MedGen UID:
2212
Concept ID:
C0005129
Disease or Syndrome
Bernard-Soulier syndrome is an autosomal recessive bleeding disorder caused by a defect in or deficiency of the platelet membrane von Willebrand factor (VWF; 613160) receptor complex, glycoprotein Ib (GP Ib). GP Ib is composed of 4 subunits encoded by 4 separate genes: GP1BA, GP1BB, GP9, and GP5 (173511). Genetic Heterogeneity of Platelet-Type Bleeding Disorders Inherited platelet disorders are a heterogeneous group of bleeding disorders affecting platelet number, function, or both. Functional defects can involve platelet receptors, signaling pathways, cytoskeletal proteins, granule contents, activation, or aggregation (review by Cox et al., 2011 and Nurden and Nurden, 2011). Platelet-type bleeding disorders include Bernard-Soulier syndrome (BDPLT1); Glanzmann thrombasthenia (BDPLT2; 273800), caused by mutation in the ITGA2B (607759) or ITGB3 (173470) gene; pseudo-von Willebrand disease (BDPLT3; 177820), caused by mutation in the GP1BA gene (606672); gray platelet syndrome (BDPLT4; 139090), caused by mutation in the NBEAL2 gene (614169); Quebec platelet disorder (BDPLT5; 601709), caused by tandem duplication of the PLAU gene (191840); May-Hegglin anomaly (BDPLT6; 155100), caused by mutation in the MYH9 gene (160775); Scott syndrome (BDPLT7; 262890), caused by mutation in the TMEM16F gene (608663); BDPLT8 (609821), caused by mutation in the P2RY12 gene (600515); BDPLT9 (614200), associated with deficiency of the glycoprotein Ia/IIa receptor (see ITGA2; 192974); glycoprotein IV deficiency (BDPLT10; 608404), caused by mutation in the CD36 gene (173510); BDPLT11 (614201), caused by mutation in the GP6 gene (605546); BDPLT12 (605735), associated with a deficiency of platelet COX1 (176805); susceptibility to BDPLT13 (614009), caused by mutation in the TBXA2R gene (188070); BDPLT14 (614158), associated with deficiency of thromboxane synthetase (TBXAS1; 274180); BDPLT15 (615193), caused by mutation in the ACTN1 gene (102575); BDPLT16 (187800), caused by mutation in the ITGA2B (607759) or ITGB3 (173470) gene; BDPLT17 (187900), caused by mutation in the GFI1B gene (604383); BDPLT18 (615888), caused by mutation in the RASGRP2 gene (605577); BDPLT19 (616176), caused by mutation in the PRKACG gene (176893); BDPLT20 (616913), caused by mutation in the SLFN14 gene (614958); BDPLT21 (617443), caused by mutation in the FLI1 gene (193067); BDPLT22 (618462), caused by mutation in the EPHB2 gene (600997); BDPLT23 (619267), caused by mutation in the ITGB3 gene (173470); BDPLT24 (619271), caused by mutation in the ITGB3 gene (173470); and BDPLT25 (620486), caused by mutation in the TPM4 gene (600317). See reviews by Rao (2003), Cox et al. (2011), and Nurden and Nurden (2011). For a discussion of the genetic heterogeneity of hereditary thrombocytopenia, see THC1 (313900).
Congenital factor V deficiency
MedGen UID:
4633
Concept ID:
C0015499
Disease or Syndrome
Factor V deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive bleeding disorder with variable phenotypic expression (summary by van Wijk et al., 2001).
Glanzmann thrombasthenia
MedGen UID:
52736
Concept ID:
C0040015
Disease or Syndrome
Glanzmann thrombasthenia is a bleeding disorder that is characterized by prolonged or spontaneous bleeding starting from birth. People with Glanzmann thrombasthenia tend to bruise easily, have frequent nosebleeds (epistaxis), and may bleed from the gums. They may also develop red or purple spots on the skin caused by bleeding underneath the skin (petechiae) or swelling caused by bleeding within tissues (hematoma). Glanzmann thrombasthenia can also cause prolonged bleeding following injury, trauma, or surgery (including dental work). Women with this condition can have prolonged and sometimes abnormally heavy menstrual bleeding. Affected women also have an increased risk of excessive blood loss during pregnancy and childbirth.\n\nAbout a quarter of individuals with Glanzmann thrombasthenia have bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract, which often occurs later in life. Rarely, affected individuals have bleeding inside the skull (intracranial hemorrhage) or joints (hemarthrosis).\n\nThe severity and frequency of the bleeding episodes in Glanzmann thrombasthenia can vary greatly among affected individuals, even in the same family. Spontaneous bleeding tends to become less frequent with age.
Gray platelet syndrome
MedGen UID:
82900
Concept ID:
C0272302
Disease or Syndrome
The gray platelet syndrome (GPS) is a rare inherited disorder characterized by mild to moderate bleeding tendency, moderate thrombocytopenia, and a marked decrease or absence of platelet alpha-granules and of the proteins contained in alpha-granules. The platelets are enlarged, but not giant, and have a gray appearance on light microscopy of Wright-stained peripheral blood smears due to decreased granules. Many patients with gray platelet syndrome develop a stable myelofibrosis (summary by Nurden and Nurden, 2007). Cases suggesting autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance have been described, indicating that GPS is probably a genetically heterogeneous disorder with more than one molecular cause.
Congenital prothrombin deficiency
MedGen UID:
124425
Concept ID:
C0272317
Disease or Syndrome
Prothrombin deficiency is an extremely rare autosomal recessive bleeding disorder characterized by low levels of circulating prothrombin; it affects about 1 in 2,000,000 individuals. There are 2 main types: type I deficiency, known as true prothrombin deficiency or 'hypoprothrombinemia,' is defined as plasma levels of prothrombin being less than 10% of normal with a concomitant decrease in activity. These patients have severe bleeding from birth, including umbilical cord hemorrhage, hematomas, ecchymoses, hematuria, mucosal bleeding, hemarthroses, intracranial bleeding, gastrointestinal bleeding, and menorrhagia. Type II deficiency, known as 'dysprothrombinemia,' is characterized by normal or low-normal synthesis of a dysfunctional protein. Bleeding symptoms are more variable, depending on the amount of residual functional activity. Variant prothrombin gene alleles can result in 'hypoprothrombinemia' or 'dysprothrombinemia,' and individuals who are compound heterozygous for these 2 types of alleles have variable manifestations. Heterozygous mutation carriers, who have plasma levels between 40 and 60% of normal, are usually asymptomatic, but can show bleeding after tooth extraction or surgical procedures (review by Lancellotti and De Cristofaro, 2009).
Congenital factor VII deficiency
MedGen UID:
473015
Concept ID:
C0272320
Disease or Syndrome
A rare, genetic, congenital vitamin K-dependant coagulation factor deficiency disorder characterized by decreased levels or absence of coagulation factor VII (FVII), resulting in bleeding diathesis of variable severity.
Hereditary factor X deficiency disease
MedGen UID:
543976
Concept ID:
C0272327
Disease or Syndrome
A rare inherited bleeding disorder with a decreased antigen and/or activity of factor X (FX) and characterized by mild to severe bleeding symptoms.
von Willebrand disease type 1
MedGen UID:
220393
Concept ID:
C1264039
Disease or Syndrome
Von Willebrand disease (VWD), a congenital bleeding disorder caused by deficient or defective plasma von Willebrand factor (VWF), may only become apparent on hemostatic challenge, and bleeding history may become more apparent with increasing age. Recent guidelines on VWD have recommended taking a VWF level of 30 or 40 IU/dL as a cutoff for those diagnosed with the disorder. Individuals with VWF levels greater than 30 IU/dL and lower than 50 IU/dL can be described as having a risk factor for bleeding. This change in guidelines significantly alters the proportion of individuals with each disease type. Type 1 VWD (~30% of VWD) typically manifests as mild mucocutaneous bleeding. Type 2 VWD accounts for approximately 60% of VWD. Type 2 subtypes include: Type 2A, which usually manifests as mild-to-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding; Type 2B, which typically manifests as mild-to-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding that can include thrombocytopenia that worsens in certain circumstances; Type 2M, which typically manifests as mild-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding; Type 2N, which can manifest as excessive bleeding with surgery and mimics mild hemophilia A. Type 3 VWD (<10% of VWD) manifests with severe mucocutaneous and musculoskeletal bleeding.
von Willebrand disease type 2
MedGen UID:
224736
Concept ID:
C1264040
Disease or Syndrome
Von Willebrand disease (VWD), a congenital bleeding disorder caused by deficient or defective plasma von Willebrand factor (VWF), may only become apparent on hemostatic challenge, and bleeding history may become more apparent with increasing age. Recent guidelines on VWD have recommended taking a VWF level of 30 or 40 IU/dL as a cutoff for those diagnosed with the disorder. Individuals with VWF levels greater than 30 IU/dL and lower than 50 IU/dL can be described as having a risk factor for bleeding. This change in guidelines significantly alters the proportion of individuals with each disease type. Type 1 VWD (~30% of VWD) typically manifests as mild mucocutaneous bleeding. Type 2 VWD accounts for approximately 60% of VWD. Type 2 subtypes include: Type 2A, which usually manifests as mild-to-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding; Type 2B, which typically manifests as mild-to-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding that can include thrombocytopenia that worsens in certain circumstances; Type 2M, which typically manifests as mild-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding; Type 2N, which can manifest as excessive bleeding with surgery and mimics mild hemophilia A. Type 3 VWD (<10% of VWD) manifests with severe mucocutaneous and musculoskeletal bleeding.
von Willebrand disease type 3
MedGen UID:
266075
Concept ID:
C1264041
Disease or Syndrome
Von Willebrand disease (VWD), a congenital bleeding disorder caused by deficient or defective plasma von Willebrand factor (VWF), may only become apparent on hemostatic challenge, and bleeding history may become more apparent with increasing age. Recent guidelines on VWD have recommended taking a VWF level of 30 or 40 IU/dL as a cutoff for those diagnosed with the disorder. Individuals with VWF levels greater than 30 IU/dL and lower than 50 IU/dL can be described as having a risk factor for bleeding. This change in guidelines significantly alters the proportion of individuals with each disease type. Type 1 VWD (~30% of VWD) typically manifests as mild mucocutaneous bleeding. Type 2 VWD accounts for approximately 60% of VWD. Type 2 subtypes include: Type 2A, which usually manifests as mild-to-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding; Type 2B, which typically manifests as mild-to-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding that can include thrombocytopenia that worsens in certain circumstances; Type 2M, which typically manifests as mild-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding; Type 2N, which can manifest as excessive bleeding with surgery and mimics mild hemophilia A. Type 3 VWD (<10% of VWD) manifests with severe mucocutaneous and musculoskeletal bleeding.
Autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss 1
MedGen UID:
343767
Concept ID:
C1852282
Disease or Syndrome
DFNA1 is an autosomal dominant form of progressive hearing loss with onset in the first decade. Some patients have mild thrombocytopenia and enlarged platelets, although most of these individuals do not have significant bleeding tendencies (summary by Neuhaus et al., 2017).
Quebec platelet disorder
MedGen UID:
356528
Concept ID:
C1866423
Disease or Syndrome
Quebec platelet disorder is an autosomal dominant bleeding disorder due to a gain-of-function defect in fibrinolysis. Although affected individuals do not exhibit systemic fibrinolysis, they show delayed onset bleeding after challenge, such as surgery. The hallmark of the disorder is markedly increased PLAU levels within platelets, which causes intraplatelet plasmin generation and secondary degradation of alpha-granule proteins. The disorder shows a favorable therapeutic response to fibrinolytic inhibitors (summary by Diamandis et al., 2009).
Primary release disorder of platelets
MedGen UID:
356845
Concept ID:
C1867770
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 deficiency
MedGen UID:
412870
Concept ID:
C2750067
Disease or Syndrome
Untreated complete plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) deficiency is characterized by mild-to-moderate bleeding, although in some instances bleeding can be life threatening. Most commonly, delayed bleeding is associated with injury, trauma, or surgery; spontaneous bleeding does not occur. While males and females with complete PAI-1 deficiency are affected equally, females may present more frequently with clinical manifestations or earlier in life than males due to menorrhagia and postpartum hemorrhage. Fewer than ten families with complete PAI-1 deficiency have been reported to date. The incidence of complete PAI-1 deficiency is higher than expected in the genetic isolate of the Old Order Amish population of eastern and southern Indiana due to a pathogenic founder variant. In one family from this Old Order Amish population, seven individuals had cardiac fibrosis ranging from minimal-to-moderate (6 individuals) to severe (1).
Platelet-type bleeding disorder 12
MedGen UID:
414043
Concept ID:
C2751535
Disease or Syndrome
Platelet prostaglandin-endoperoxidase synthase-1 deficiency is a hematologic disorder characterized by mildly increased bleeding due to a platelet defect. The PTGS1 gene (176805) encodes prostaglandin-endoperoxidase synthase-1, also known as COX1 or PGHS1, which catalyzes the formation of prostaglandin G2 (PGG2) and prostaglandin H2 from arachidonic acid, and the downstream formation of thromboxane A2 (TXA2) and prostacyclin. Thromboxane A2 is important for platelet aggregation (summary by Matijevic-Aleksic et al., 1996).
Factor 5 and Factor VIII, combined deficiency of, 2
MedGen UID:
462239
Concept ID:
C3150889
Disease or Syndrome
Combined deficiency of factor V and factor VIII type 2 (F5F8D2) is characterized by bleeding symptoms similar to those in hemophilia (306700) or parahemophilia (227400), caused by single deficiency of FV (612309) or FVIII (300841), respectively. The most common symptoms are epistaxis, menorrhagia, and excessive bleeding during or after trauma. Plasma FV and FVIII antigen and activity levels are in the range of 5 to 30%. Inheritance of F5F8D2 is autosomal recessive and distinct from the coinheritance of FV deficiency and FVIII deficiency (summary by Zhang and Ginsburg, 2004). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of F5F8D, see 227300.
Bernard-Soulier syndrome, type A2, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
478706
Concept ID:
C3277076
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant Bernard-Soulier syndrome type A2 (BSSA2) is characterized by chronic macrothrombocytopenia with mild or no clinical symptoms, normal platelet function, and normal megakaryocyte count. When present, clinical findings include excessive ecchymoses, frequent epistaxis, gingival bleeding, prolonged menstrual periods, or prolonged bleeding after tooth extraction (Savoia et al., 2001). Genetic Heterogeneity of Bernard-Soulier Syndrome Homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the GP1BA gene cause classic autosomal recessive Bernard-Soulier syndrome (BSSA1; 231200).
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 7
MedGen UID:
481386
Concept ID:
C3279756
Disease or Syndrome
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, a bleeding diathesis, and, in some individuals, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. Ocular findings include reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in variable bruising, epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects occur primarily in individuals with pathogenic variants in AP3B1 and AP3D1.
Platelet-type bleeding disorder 11
MedGen UID:
481750
Concept ID:
C3280120
Disease or Syndrome
Platelet-type bleeding disorder-11 is an autosomal recessive mild to moderate bleeding disorder caused by defective platelet activation and aggregation in response to collagen (summary by Dumont et al., 2009).
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
483344
Concept ID:
C3484357
Disease or Syndrome
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, a bleeding diathesis, and, in some individuals, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. Ocular findings include reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in variable bruising, epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects occur primarily in individuals with pathogenic variants in AP3B1 and AP3D1.
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 5
MedGen UID:
854711
Concept ID:
C3888004
Disease or Syndrome
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, a bleeding diathesis, and, in some individuals, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. Ocular findings include reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in variable bruising, epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects occur primarily in individuals with pathogenic variants in AP3B1 and AP3D1.
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 8
MedGen UID:
854728
Concept ID:
C3888026
Disease or Syndrome
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, a bleeding diathesis, and, in some individuals, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. Ocular findings include reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in variable bruising, epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects occur primarily in individuals with pathogenic variants in AP3B1 and AP3D1.
Platelet-type bleeding disorder 18
MedGen UID:
863021
Concept ID:
C4014584
Disease or Syndrome
Bleeding disorder due to CalDAG-GEFI deficiency is a rare hematologic disease due to defective platelet function and characterized by mucocutaneous bleeding starting in infancy (around 18 months of age), presenting with prolonged and severe epistaxis, hematomas and bleeding after tooth extraction. Massive menorrhagia and chronic anemia have also been reported.
Platelet-type bleeding disorder 19
MedGen UID:
863842
Concept ID:
C4015405
Disease or Syndrome
A rare isolated hereditary giant platelet disorder characterized by severe thrombocytopenia and thrombopathy due to defects in proplatelet formation and platelet activation in homozygous patients. Clinical manifestation are recurrent bleeding episodes including epistaxis, spontaneous hematomas, and menorrhagia.
Platelet-type bleeding disorder 20
MedGen UID:
934764
Concept ID:
C4310797
Disease or Syndrome
A rare isolated constitutional thrombocytopenia characterized by reduced platelet count and defective platelet ATP secretion, resulting in increased bleeding tendency. Clinical manifestations are easy bruising, gum bleeding, menorrhagia, spontaneous epistaxis, spontaneous muscle hematoma, and potential postpartum hemorrhage, among others.
Bleeding disorder, platelet-type, 21
MedGen UID:
1386863
Concept ID:
C4479515
Disease or Syndrome
BDPLT21 is a hematologic disorder characterized by increased risk of bleeding resulting from a functional platelet defect. Platelets have decreased or even absent dense bodies and abnormally enlarged and fused alpha-granules, and they show defective secretion and aggregation responses to agonists. Platelets are usually enlarged, and some patients may have mild to moderate thrombocytopenia (summary by Saultier et al., 2017).
Familial hyperprolactinemia
MedGen UID:
1645317
Concept ID:
C4706551
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic endocrine disorder characterized by persistently high prolactin serum levels (not associated with gestation, puerperium, drug intake or pituitary tumor) in multiple affected family members. Clinically it manifests with signs usually observed in hyperprolactinemia, which are: secondary medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA)-negative amenorrhea and galactorrhea in female patients, and hypogonadism and decreased testosterone level-driven sexual disfunction in male patients. Oligomenorrhea and primary infertility have also been reported in some female patients.
Macrothrombocytopenia and granulocyte inclusions with or without nephritis or sensorineural hearing loss
MedGen UID:
1704278
Concept ID:
C5200934
Disease or Syndrome
MYH9-related disease (MYH9-RD) is characterized in all affected individuals by hematologic features present from birth consisting of platelet macrocytosis (i.e., >40% of platelets larger than 3.9 µm in diameter), thrombocytopenia (platelet count <150 x 109/L), and aggregates of the MYH9 protein in the cytoplasm of neutrophil granulocytes. Most affected individuals develop one or more additional extrahematologic manifestations of the disease over their lifetime, including sensorineural hearing loss, renal disease (manifesting initially as glomerular nephropathy), presenile cataracts, and/or elevation of liver enzymes.
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 11
MedGen UID:
1727728
Concept ID:
C5436936
Disease or Syndrome
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, a bleeding diathesis, and, in some individuals, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. Ocular findings include reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in variable bruising, epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects occur primarily in individuals with pathogenic variants in AP3B1 and AP3D1.
Glanzmann thrombasthenia 2
MedGen UID:
1782592
Concept ID:
C5543273
Disease or Syndrome
Glanzmann thrombasthenia-2 (GT2) is an autosomal recessive bleeding disorder characterized by failure of platelet aggregation and by absent or diminished clot retraction. The abnormalities are related to quantitative or qualitative abnormalities of the GPIIb (607759)/IIIa platelet surface fibrinogen receptor complex resulting from mutations in the GPIIIa gene (Rosenberg et al., 1997). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Glanzmann thrombasthenia, see 273800.
Bleeding disorder, platelet-type, 24
MedGen UID:
1785711
Concept ID:
C5543280
Disease or Syndrome
Platelet-type bleeding disorder-24 (BDPLT24) is an autosomal dominant form of congenital macrothrombocytopenia associated with platelet anisocytosis. It is a disorder of platelet production. Affected individuals may have no or only mildly increased bleeding tendency. In vitro studies show mild platelet functional abnormalities (summary by Kunishima et al., 2011 and Nurden et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Glanzmann thrombasthenia-like with macrothrombocytopenia, see 187800.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Dason ES, Maxim M, Sanders A, Papillon-Smith J, Ng D, Chan C, Sobel M
J Obstet Gynaecol Can 2023 Jun;45(6):417-429.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jogc.2023.04.008. PMID: 37244746
Achanna KS, Nanda J
Med J Malaysia 2022 May;77(3):374-383. PMID: 35638495
Burnett M, Lemyre M
J Obstet Gynaecol Can 2017 Jul;39(7):585-595. doi: 10.1016/j.jogc.2016.12.023. PMID: 28625286

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Fielder S, Nickkho-Amiry M, Seif MW
Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol 2023 Jul;89:102343. Epub 2023 May 11 doi: 10.1016/j.bpobgyn.2023.102343. PMID: 37279629
Eladly F, Miesbach W
Hamostaseologie 2022 Oct;42(5):330-336. Epub 2022 Nov 2 doi: 10.1055/a-1891-9976. PMID: 36323280
Beyer-Westendorf J
Thromb Res 2019 Sep;181 Suppl 1:S19-S22. doi: 10.1016/S0049-3848(19)30361-5. PMID: 31477222
Senturk LM, Imamoglu M
Womens Health (Lond) 2015 Aug;11(5):717-24. Epub 2015 Aug 28 doi: 10.2217/whe.15.60. PMID: 26315369
Corson SL, Brooks PG
Fertil Steril 1991 Jun;55(6):1041-4. doi: 10.1016/s0015-0282(16)54349-0. PMID: 2037101

Diagnosis

Lebduska E, Beshear D, Spataro BM
Med Clin North Am 2023 Mar;107(2):235-246. Epub 2022 Dec 26 doi: 10.1016/j.mcna.2022.10.014. PMID: 36759094
Petraglia F, Dolmans MM
Fertil Steril 2022 Oct;118(4):605-606. doi: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2022.08.850. PMID: 36182259
Achanna KS, Nanda J
Med J Malaysia 2022 May;77(3):374-383. PMID: 35638495
Borzutzky C, Jaffray J
JAMA Pediatr 2020 Feb 1;174(2):186-194. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2019.5040. PMID: 31886837
Leebeek FW, Eikenboom JC
N Engl J Med 2016 Nov 24;375(21):2067-2080. doi: 10.1056/NEJMra1601561. PMID: 27959741

Therapy

Al-Hendy A, Lukes AS, Poindexter AN 3rd, Venturella R, Villarroel C, McKain L, Li Y, Wagman RB, Stewart EA
Obstet Gynecol 2022 Dec 1;140(6):920-930. Epub 2022 Nov 2 doi: 10.1097/AOG.0000000000004988. PMID: 36357960Free PMC Article
Anthony MS, Zhou X, Schoendorf J, Reed SD, Getahun D, Armstrong MA, Gatz J, Peipert JF, Raine-Bennett T, Fassett MJ, Saltus CW, Ritchey ME, Ichikawa L, Shi JM, Alabaster A, Wahdan Y, Wang J, Xie F, Merchant M, Hunter S, Chiu VY, Postlethwaite D, Rothman KJ, Im TM, Chillemi G, Takhar HS, Asiimwe A, Pisa F
Obstet Gynecol 2022 Dec 1;140(6):1017-1030. Epub 2022 Nov 2 doi: 10.1097/AOG.0000000000005000. PMID: 36357958Free PMC Article
Manyonda I, Belli AM, Lumsden MA, Moss J, McKinnon W, Middleton LJ, Cheed V, Wu O, Sirkeci F, Daniels JP, McPherson K; FEMME Collaborative Group
N Engl J Med 2020 Jul 30;383(5):440-451. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1914735. PMID: 32726530
Powell M, Dutta D
Womens Health (Lond) 2016 Nov;12(6):544-548. Epub 2017 Feb 13 doi: 10.1177/1745505717692591. PMID: 29334010Free PMC Article
Angioni S, Pontis A, Nappi L, Sedda F, Sorrentino F, Litta P, Haimovich S, Melis GB
Minerva Ginecol 2016 Apr;68(2):143-53. Epub 2016 Feb 29 PMID: 26928420

Prognosis

Wang J, Yang Q, Zhang N, Wang D
Arch Gynecol Obstet 2021 Jul;304(1):171-177. Epub 2021 Feb 10 doi: 10.1007/s00404-021-05992-1. PMID: 33569612
Dun EC, Kho KA, Morozov VV, Kearney S, Zurawin JL, Nezhat CH
JSLS 2015 Apr-Jun;19(2) doi: 10.4293/JSLS.2015.00019. PMID: 26005317Free PMC Article
Duckitt K
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Duckitt K, Collins S
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Corson SL, Brooks PG
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