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Prader-Willi syndrome(PWS)

MedGen UID:
46057
Concept ID:
C0032897
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: Obesity, muscular hypotonia, mental retardation, short stature, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and small hands and feet; Prader Labhart Willi syndrome; PWS
SNOMED CT: Prader-Willi syndrome (89392001); Prader Labhart Willi syndrome (89392001)
Modes of inheritance:
Autosomal dominant inheritance
MedGen UID:
141047
Concept ID:
C0443147
Intellectual Product
Source: Orphanet
A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on one of the autosomes (i.e., the human chromosomes 1-22) in which a trait manifests in heterozygotes. In the context of medical genetics, an autosomal dominant disorder is caused when a single copy of the mutant allele is present. Males and females are affected equally, and can both transmit the disorder with a risk of 50% for each child of inheriting the mutant allele.
Not genetically inherited
MedGen UID:
988794
Concept ID:
CN307044
Finding
Source: Orphanet
clinical entity without genetic inheritance.
 
Genes (locations): HERC2 (15q13.1); IPW (15q11.2); MAGEL2 (15q11.2); MKRN3 (15q11.2); MKRN3-AS1 (15q11-q13); NPAP1 (15q11.2); PWAR1 (15q11.2); PWRN1 (15q11.2); SNORD115-1 (15q11.2); SNORD116-1 (15q11.2)
 
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0008300
OMIM®: 176270
Orphanet: ORPHA739

Disease characteristics

Excerpted from the GeneReview: Prader-Willi Syndrome
Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is characterized by severe hypotonia, poor appetite, and feeding difficulties in early infancy, followed in early childhood by excessive eating and gradual development of morbid obesity (unless food intake is strictly controlled). Motor milestones and language development are delayed. All individuals have some degree of cognitive impairment. Hypogonadism is present in both males and females and manifests as genital hypoplasia, incomplete pubertal development, and, in most, infertility. Short stature is common (if not treated with growth hormone). A distinctive behavioral phenotype (temper tantrums, stubbornness, manipulative behavior, and obsessive-compulsive characteristics) is common. Characteristic facial features, strabismus, and scoliosis are often present. [from GeneReviews]
Authors:
Daniel J Driscoll  |  Jennifer L Miller  |  Suzanne B Cassidy   view full author information

Additional descriptions

From OMIM
Prader-Willi syndrome is characterized by diminished fetal activity, obesity, muscular hypotonia, mental retardation, short stature, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and small hands and feet. It can be considered to be an autosomal dominant disorder and is caused by deletion or disruption of a gene or several genes on the proximal long arm of the paternal chromosome 15 or maternal uniparental disomy 15, because the gene(s) on the maternal chromosome(s) 15 are virtually inactive through imprinting. Horsthemke and Wagstaff (2008) provided a detailed review of the mechanisms of imprinting of the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome (105830) region. See also the chromosome 15q11-q13 duplication syndrome (608636), which shows overlapping clinical features.  http://www.omim.org/entry/176270
From MedlinePlus Genetics
Prader-Willi syndrome is a complex genetic condition that affects many parts of the body. In infancy, this condition is characterized by weak muscle tone (hypotonia), feeding difficulties, poor growth, and delayed development. Beginning in childhood, affected individuals develop an extreme hunger, which leads to chronic overeating (hyperphagia) and obesity. Some people with Prader-Willi syndrome, particularly those with obesity, also develop type 2 diabetes (the most common form of diabetes).

People with Prader-Willi syndrome typically have mild to moderate intellectual impairment and learning disabilities. Behavioral problems are common, including temper outbursts, stubbornness, and compulsive behavior such as picking at the skin. Sleep abnormalities can also occur. Additional features of this condition include distinctive facial features such as a narrow forehead, almond-shaped eyes, and a triangular mouth; short stature; and small hands and feet. Some people with Prader-Willi syndrome have unusually fair skin and light-colored hair. Both affected males and affected females have underdeveloped genitals. Puberty is delayed or incomplete, and most affected individuals are unable to have children (infertile).  https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/prader-willi-syndrome

Clinical features

From HPO
Cryptorchidism
MedGen UID:
8192
Concept ID:
C0010417
Congenital Abnormality
Cryptorchidism, or failure of testicular descent, is a common human congenital abnormality with a multifactorial etiology that likely reflects the involvement of endocrine, environmental, and hereditary factors. Cryptorchidism can result in infertility and increases risk for testicular tumors. Testicular descent from abdomen to scrotum occurs in 2 distinct phases: the transabdominal phase and the inguinoscrotal phase (summary by Gorlov et al., 2002).
Infertility disorder
MedGen UID:
43876
Concept ID:
C0021359
Finding
Inability to conceive for at least one year after trying and having unprotected sex. Causes of female infertility include endometriosis, fallopian tubes obstruction, and polycystic ovary syndrome. Causes of male infertility include abnormal sperm production or function, blockage of the epididymis, blockage of the ejaculatory ducts, hypospadias, exposure to pesticides, and health related issues.
Oligomenorrhea
MedGen UID:
18159
Concept ID:
C0028949
Pathologic Function
Infrequent menses (less than 6 per year or more than 35 days between cycles).
Primary amenorrhea
MedGen UID:
115918
Concept ID:
C0232939
Disease or Syndrome
Abnormally late or absent menarche in a female with normal secondary sexual characteristics.
Small scrotum
MedGen UID:
141577
Concept ID:
C0455792
Finding
Apparently small scrotum for age.
Clitoral hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
336198
Concept ID:
C1844527
Finding
Developmental hypoplasia of the clitoris.
Hypoplastic labia minora
MedGen UID:
376558
Concept ID:
C1849295
Finding
External genital hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
344478
Concept ID:
C1855333
Finding
Underdevelopment of part or all of the external reproductive organs.
Micropenis
MedGen UID:
1633603
Concept ID:
C4551492
Congenital Abnormality
Abnormally small penis. At birth, the normal penis is about 3 cm (stretched length from pubic tubercle to tip of penis) with micropenis less than 2.0-2.5 cm.
Syndactyly
MedGen UID:
52619
Concept ID:
C0039075
Congenital Abnormality
Webbing or fusion of the fingers or toes, involving soft parts only or including bone structure. Bony fusions are referred to as "bony" syndactyly if the fusion occurs in a radio-ulnar axis. Fusions of bones of the fingers or toes in a proximo-distal axis are referred to as "symphalangism".
Small hand
MedGen UID:
108279
Concept ID:
C0575802
Finding
Disproportionately small hand.
Genu valgum
MedGen UID:
154364
Concept ID:
C0576093
Anatomical Abnormality
The legs angle inward, such that the knees are close together and the ankles far apart.
Acromicria
MedGen UID:
923182
Concept ID:
C1386091
Congenital Abnormality
Small hands and feet in proportion to the rest of the body.
Radial deviation of finger
MedGen UID:
322852
Concept ID:
C1836189
Finding
Bending or curvature of a finger toward the radial side (i.e., towards the thumb). The deviation is at the metacarpal-phalangeal joint, and this finding is distinct from clinodactyly.
Short palm
MedGen UID:
334684
Concept ID:
C1843108
Finding
Short palm.
Short foot
MedGen UID:
376415
Concept ID:
C1848673
Finding
A measured foot length that is more than 2 SD below the mean for a newborn of 27 - 41 weeks gestation, or foot that is less than the 3rd centile for individuals from birth to 16 years of age (objective). Alternatively, a foot that appears disproportionately short (subjective).
Narrow palm
MedGen UID:
346628
Concept ID:
C1857632
Finding
For children from birth to 4 years of age, the palm width is more than 2 SD below the mean; for children from 4 to 16 years of age the palm width is below the 5th centile; or, the width of the palm appears disproportionately narrow for its length.
Clinodactyly
MedGen UID:
1644094
Concept ID:
C4551485
Congenital Abnormality
An angulation of a digit at an interphalangeal joint in the plane of the palm (finger) or sole (toe).
Fetal growth restriction
MedGen UID:
4693
Concept ID:
C0015934
Pathologic Function
An abnormal restriction of fetal growth with fetal weight below the tenth percentile for gestational age.
Obesity
MedGen UID:
18127
Concept ID:
C0028754
Disease or Syndrome
Accumulation of substantial excess body fat.
Abdominal obesity
MedGen UID:
90229
Concept ID:
C0311277
Finding
Excessive fat around the stomach and abdomen.
Short stature
MedGen UID:
87607
Concept ID:
C0349588
Finding
A height below that which is expected according to age and gender norms. Although there is no universally accepted definition of short stature, many refer to "short stature" as height more than 2 standard deviations below the mean for age and gender (or below the 3rd percentile for age and gender dependent norms).
Class III obesity
MedGen UID:
284586
Concept ID:
C1556381
Finding
Obesity with a body mass index of 40 kg per square meter or higher.
Failure to thrive in infancy
MedGen UID:
358083
Concept ID:
C1867873
Finding
Tube feeding
MedGen UID:
8641
Concept ID:
C0014327
Therapeutic or Preventive Procedure
Feeding problem necessitating food and nutrient delivery via a tube.
Chronic constipation
MedGen UID:
98325
Concept ID:
C0401149
Sign or Symptom
Constipation for longer than three months with fewer than 3 bowel movements per week, straining, lumpy or hard stools, and a sensation of anorectal obstruction or incomplete defecation.
Poor suck
MedGen UID:
324693
Concept ID:
C1837142
Finding
An inadequate sucking reflex, resulting in the difficult of newborns to be breast-fed.
Feeding difficulties in infancy
MedGen UID:
436211
Concept ID:
C2674608
Finding
Impaired feeding performance of an infant as manifested by difficulties such as weak and ineffective sucking, brief bursts of sucking, and falling asleep during sucking. There may be difficulties with chewing or maintaining attention.
Autism
MedGen UID:
13966
Concept ID:
C0004352
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Autism, the prototypic pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), is usually apparent by 3 years of age. It is characterized by a triad of limited or absent verbal communication, a lack of reciprocal social interaction or responsiveness, and restricted, stereotypic, and ritualized patterns of interests and behavior (Bailey et al., 1996; Risch et al., 1999). 'Autism spectrum disorder,' sometimes referred to as ASD, is a broader phenotype encompassing the less severe disorders Asperger syndrome (see ASPG1; 608638) and pervasive developmental disorder, not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). 'Broad autism phenotype' includes individuals with some symptoms of autism, but who do not meet the full criteria for autism or other disorders. Mental retardation coexists in approximately two-thirds of individuals with ASD, except for Asperger syndrome, in which mental retardation is conspicuously absent (Jones et al., 2008). Genetic studies in autism often include family members with these less stringent diagnoses (Schellenberg et al., 2006). Levy et al. (2009) provided a general review of autism and autism spectrum disorder, including epidemiology, characteristics of the disorder, diagnosis, neurobiologic hypotheses for the etiology, genetics, and treatment options. Genetic Heterogeneity of Autism Autism is considered to be a complex multifactorial disorder involving many genes. Accordingly, several loci have been identified, some or all of which may contribute to the phenotype. Included in this entry is AUTS1, which has been mapped to chromosome 7q22. Other susceptibility loci include AUTS3 (608049), which maps to chromosome 13q14; AUTS4 (608636), which maps to chromosome 15q11; AUTS6 (609378), which maps to chromosome 17q11; AUTS7 (610676), which maps to chromosome 17q21; AUTS8 (607373), which maps to chromosome 3q25-q27; AUTS9 (611015), which maps to chromosome 7q31; AUTS10 (611016), which maps to chromosome 7q36; AUTS11 (610836), which maps to chromosome 1q41; AUTS12 (610838), which maps to chromosome 21p13-q11; AUTS13 (610908), which maps to chromosome 12q14; AUTS14A (611913), which has been found in patients with a deletion of a region of 16p11.2; AUTS14B (614671), which has been found in patients with a duplication of a region of 16p11.2; AUTS15 (612100), associated with mutation in the CNTNAP2 gene (604569) on chromosome 7q35-q36; AUTS16 (613410), associated with mutation in the SLC9A9 gene (608396) on chromosome 3q24; AUTS17 (613436), associated with mutation in the SHANK2 gene (603290) on chromosome 11q13; AUTS18 (615032), associated with mutation in the CHD8 gene (610528) on chromosome 14q11; AUTS19 (615091), associated with mutation in the EIF4E gene (133440) on chromosome 4q23; and AUTS20 (618830), associated with mutation in the NLGN1 gene (600568) on chromosome 3q26. (NOTE: the symbol 'AUTS2' has been used to refer to a gene on chromosome 7q11 (KIAA0442; 607270) and therefore is not used as a part of this autism locus series.) There are several X-linked forms of autism susceptibility: AUTSX1 (300425), associated with mutations in the NLGN3 gene (300336); AUTSX2 (300495), associated with mutations in NLGN4 (300427); AUTSX3 (300496), associated with mutations in MECP2 (300005); AUTSX4 (300830), associated with variation in the region on chromosome Xp22.11 containing the PTCHD1 gene (300828); AUTSX5 (300847), associated with mutations in the RPL10 gene (312173); and AUTSX6 (300872), associated with mutation in the TMLHE gene (300777). A locus on chromosome 2q (606053) associated with a phenotype including intellectual disability and speech deficits was formerly designated AUTS5. Folstein and Rosen-Sheidley (2001) reviewed the genetics of autism.
Polyphagia
MedGen UID:
9369
Concept ID:
C0020505
Finding
A neurological anomaly with gross overeating associated with an abnormally strong desire or need to eat.
Psychotic disorder
MedGen UID:
19568
Concept ID:
C0033975
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
A condition characterized by changes in personality and thought patterns, often accompanied by hallucinations and delusional beliefs, is known as psychosis.
Seizure
MedGen UID:
20693
Concept ID:
C0036572
Sign or Symptom
A seizure is an intermittent abnormality of nervous system physiology characterized by a transient occurrence of signs and/or symptoms due to abnormal excessive or synchronous neuronal activity in the brain.
Sleep apnea
MedGen UID:
11458
Concept ID:
C0037315
Disease or Syndrome
An intermittent cessation of airflow at the mouth and nose during sleep is known as sleep apnea. Apneas that last at least 10 seconds are considered significant, but individuals with sleep apnea may experience apneas lasting from 20 seconds up to 2 or 3 minutes. Patients may have up to 15 events per hour of sleep.
Sleep abnormality
MedGen UID:
52372
Concept ID:
C0037317
Sign or Symptom
An abnormal pattern in the quality, quantity, or characteristics of sleep.
Self-injurious behavior
MedGen UID:
88371
Concept ID:
C0085271
Individual Behavior
Self-aggression.
Atypical behavior
MedGen UID:
535345
Concept ID:
C0233514
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Atypical behavior is an abnormality in a person's actions, which can be controlled or modulated by the will of the individual. While abnormal behaviors can be difficult to control, they are distinct from other abnormal actions that cannot be affected by the individual's will.
Delayed speech and language development
MedGen UID:
105318
Concept ID:
C0454644
Finding
A degree of language development that is significantly below the norm for a child of a specified age.
Poor gross motor coordination
MedGen UID:
641383
Concept ID:
C0556280
Finding
An abnormality of the ability (skills) to perform a precise movement of large muscles with the intent to perform a specific act. Gross motor skills are required to mediate movements of the arms, legs, and other large body parts.
Global developmental delay
MedGen UID:
107838
Concept ID:
C0557874
Finding
A delay in the achievement of motor or mental milestones in the domains of development of a child, including motor skills, speech and language, cognitive skills, and social and emotional skills. This term should only be used to describe children younger than five years of age.
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
MedGen UID:
220387
Concept ID:
C1263846
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a behavioral disorder that typically begins in childhood and is characterized by a short attention span (inattention), an inability to be calm and stay still (hyperactivity), and poor impulse control (impulsivity). Some people with ADHD have problems with only inattention or with hyperactivity and impulsivity, but most have problems related to all three features.\n\nIn people with ADHD, the characteristic behaviors are frequent and severe enough to interfere with the activities of daily living such as school, work, and relationships with others. Because of an inability to stay focused on tasks, people with inattention may be easily distracted, forgetful, avoid tasks that require sustained attention, have difficulty organizing tasks, or frequently lose items.\n\nHyperactivity is usually shown by frequent movement. Individuals with this feature often fidget or tap their foot when seated, leave their seat when it is inappropriate to do so (such as in the classroom), or talk a lot and interrupt others.\n\nImpulsivity can result in hasty actions without thought for the consequences. Individuals with poor impulse control may have difficulty waiting for their turn, deferring to others, or considering their actions before acting.\n\nMore than two-thirds of all individuals with ADHD have additional conditions, including insomnia, mood or anxiety disorders, learning disorders, or substance use disorders. Affected individuals may also have autism spectrum disorder, which is characterized by impaired communication and social interaction, or Tourette syndrome, which is a disorder characterized by repetitive and involuntary movements or noises called tics.\n\nIn most affected individuals, ADHD continues throughout life, but in about one-third of individuals, signs and symptoms of ADHD go away by adulthood.
Impaired pain sensation
MedGen UID:
373348
Concept ID:
C1837522
Finding
Reduced ability to perceive painful stimuli.
Motor delay
MedGen UID:
381392
Concept ID:
C1854301
Finding
A type of Developmental delay characterized by a delay in acquiring motor skills.
Poor fine motor coordination
MedGen UID:
356863
Concept ID:
C1867864
Finding
An abnormality of the ability (skills) to perform a precise movement of small muscles with the intent to perform a specific act. Fine motor skills are required to mediate movements of the wrists, hands, fingers, feet, and toes.
Ventriculomegaly
MedGen UID:
480553
Concept ID:
C3278923
Finding
An increase in size of the ventricular system of the brain.
Intellectual disability
MedGen UID:
811461
Concept ID:
C3714756
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Intellectual disability, previously referred to as mental retardation, is characterized by subnormal intellectual functioning that occurs during the developmental period. It is defined by an IQ score below 70.
Specific learning disability
MedGen UID:
871302
Concept ID:
C4025790
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Impairment of certain skills such as reading or writing, coordination, self-control, or attention that interfere with the ability to learn. The impairment is not related to a global deficiency of intelligence.
Excessive daytime somnolence
MedGen UID:
1635612
Concept ID:
C4551761
Sign or Symptom
A state of abnormally strong desire for sleep during the daytime.
Kyphosis
MedGen UID:
44042
Concept ID:
C0022821
Anatomical Abnormality
Exaggerated anterior convexity of the thoracic vertebral column.
Osteopenia
MedGen UID:
18222
Concept ID:
C0029453
Disease or Syndrome
Osteopenia is a term to define bone density that is not normal but also not as low as osteoporosis. By definition from the World Health Organization osteopenia is defined by bone densitometry as a T score -1 to -2.5.
Osteoporosis
MedGen UID:
14535
Concept ID:
C0029456
Disease or Syndrome
Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disease characterized by low bone density and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue with a consequent increase in bone fragility. According to the WHO criteria, osteoporosis is defined as a BMD that lies 2.5 standard deviations or more below the average value for young healthy adults (a T-score below -2.5 SD).
Scoliosis
MedGen UID:
11348
Concept ID:
C0036439
Disease or Syndrome
The presence of an abnormal lateral curvature of the spine.
Dolichocephaly
MedGen UID:
65142
Concept ID:
C0221358
Congenital Abnormality
An abnormality of skull shape characterized by a increased anterior-posterior diameter, i.e., an increased antero-posterior dimension of the skull. Cephalic index less than 76%. Alternatively, an apparently increased antero-posterior length of the head compared to width. Often due to premature closure of the sagittal suture.
Decreased muscle mass
MedGen UID:
373256
Concept ID:
C1837108
Finding
Generalized hypotonia
MedGen UID:
346841
Concept ID:
C1858120
Finding
Generalized muscular hypotonia (abnormally low muscle tone).
Neonatal hypotonia
MedGen UID:
412209
Concept ID:
C2267233
Disease or Syndrome
Muscular hypotonia (abnormally low muscle tone) manifesting in the neonatal period.
Developmental dysplasia of the hip
MedGen UID:
1640560
Concept ID:
C4551649
Congenital Abnormality
Congenital dysplasia of the hip (CDH) is an abnormality of the seating of the femoral head in the acetabulum. Its severity ranges from mild instability of the femoral head with slight capsular laxity, through moderate lateral displacement of the femoral head, without loss of contact of the head with the acetabulum, up to complete dislocation of the femoral head from the acetabulum. It is one of the most common skeletal congenital anomalies (summary by Sollazzo et al., 2000). Acetabular dysplasia is an idiopathic, localized developmental dysplasia of the hip that is characterized by a shallow hip socket and decreased coverage of the femoral head. Its radiologic criteria include the center-edge angle of Wiberg, the Sharp angle, and the acetabular roof obliquity. Most patients with acetabular dysplasia develop osteoarthritis (165720) after midlife, and even mild acetabular dysplasia can cause hip osteoarthritis (summary by Mabuchi et al., 2006). CDH occurs as an isolated anomaly or with more general disorders represented by several syndromes and with chromosomal abnormalities such as trisomy 18 (Wynne-Davies, 1970). Genetic Heterogeneity of Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip Developmental dysplasia of the hip-1 (DDH1) maps to chromosome 13q22; DDH2 (615612) maps to chromosome 3p21. DDH3 (620690) is caused by mutation in the LRP1 gene (107770) on chromosome 12q13.
Hypoventilation
MedGen UID:
469022
Concept ID:
C3203358
Pathologic Function
A reduction in the amount of air transported into the pulmonary alveoli by breathing, leading to hypercapnia (increase in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide).
Recurrent respiratory infections
MedGen UID:
812812
Concept ID:
C3806482
Finding
An increased susceptibility to respiratory infections as manifested by a history of recurrent respiratory infections.
Type 2 diabetes mellitus
MedGen UID:
41523
Concept ID:
C0011860
Disease or Syndrome
Type 2 diabetes mellitus is distinct from maturity-onset diabetes of the young (see 606391) in that it is polygenic, characterized by gene-gene and gene-environment interactions with onset in adulthood, usually at age 40 to 60 but occasionally in adolescence if a person is obese. The pedigrees are rarely multigenerational. The penetrance is variable, possibly 10 to 40% (Fajans et al., 2001). Persons with type 2 diabetes usually have an obese body habitus and manifestations of the so-called metabolic syndrome (see 605552), which is characterized by diabetes, insulin resistance, hypertension, and hypertriglyceridemia. Genetic Heterogeneity of Susceptibility to Type 2 Diabetes Susceptibility to T2D1 (601283) is conferred by variation in the calpain-10 gene (CAPN10; 605286) on chromosome 2q37. The T2D2 locus (601407) on chromosome 12q was found in a Finnish population. The T2D3 locus (603694) maps to chromosome 20. The T2D4 locus (608036) maps to chromosome 5q34-q35. Susceptibility to T2D5 (616087) is conferred by variation in the TBC1D4 gene (612465) on chromosome 13q22. A mutation has been observed in hepatocyte nuclear factor-4-alpha (HNF4A; 600281.0004) in a French family with NIDDM of late onset. Mutations in the NEUROD1 gene (601724) on chromosome 2q32 were found to cause type 2 diabetes mellitus in 2 families. Mutation in the GLUT2 glucose transporter was associated with NIDDM in 1 patient (138160.0001). Mutation in the MAPK8IP1 gene, which encodes the islet-brain-1 protein, was found in a family with type 2 diabetes in individuals in 4 successive generations (604641.0001). Polymorphism in the KCNJ11 gene (600937.0014) confers susceptibility. In French white families, Vionnet et al. (2000) found evidence for a susceptibility locus for type 2 diabetes on 3q27-qter. They confirmed the diabetes susceptibility locus on 1q21-q24 reported by Elbein et al. (1999) in whites and by Hanson et al. (1998) in Pima Indians. A mutation in the GPD2 gene (138430.0001) on chromosome 2q24.1, encoding mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase, was found in a patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus and in his glucose-intolerant half sister. Mutations in the PAX4 gene (167413) have been identified in patients with type 2 diabetes. Triggs-Raine et al. (2002) stated that in the Oji-Cree, a gly319-to-ser change in HNF1-alpha (142410.0008) behaves as a susceptibility allele for type 2 diabetes. Mutation in the HNF1B gene (189907.0007) was found in 2 Japanese patients with typical late-onset type 2 diabetes. Mutations in the IRS1 gene (147545) have been found in patients with type 2 diabetes. A missense mutation in the AKT2 gene (164731.0001) caused autosomal dominant type 2 diabetes in 1 family. A (single-nucleotide polymorphism) SNP in the 3-prime untranslated region of the resistin gene (605565.0001) was associated with susceptibility to diabetes and to insulin resistance-related hypertension in Chinese subjects. Susceptibility to insulin resistance has been associated with polymorphism in the TCF1 (142410.0011), PPP1R3A (600917.0001), PTPN1 (176885.0001), ENPP1 (173335.0006), IRS1 (147545.0002), and EPHX2 (132811.0001) genes. The K121Q polymorphism of ENPP1 (173335.0006) is associated with susceptibility to type 2 diabetes; a haplotype defined by 3 SNPs of this gene, including K121Q, is associated with obesity, glucose intolerance, and type 2 diabetes. A SNP in the promoter region of the hepatic lipase gene (151670.0004) predicts conversion from impaired glucose tolerance to type 2 diabetes. Variants of transcription factor 7-like-2 (TCF7L2; 602228.0001), located on 10q, have also been found to confer risk of type 2 diabetes. A common sequence variant, rs10811661, on chromosome 9p21 near the CDKN2A (600160) and CDKN2B (600431) genes has been associated with risk of type 2 diabetes. Variation in the PPARG gene (601487) has been associated with risk of type 2 diabetes. A promoter polymorphism in the IL6 gene (147620) is associated with susceptibility to NIDDM. Variation in the KCNJ15 gene (602106) has been associated with T2DM in lean Asians. Variation in the SLC30A8 gene (611145) has been associated with susceptibility to T2D. Variation in the HMGA1 gene (600701.0001) is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Mutation in the MTNR1B gene (600804) is associated with susceptibility to type 2 diabetes. Protection Against Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Protein-truncating variants in the SLC30A8 (611145) have been associated with a reduced risk for T2D.
Edema
MedGen UID:
4451
Concept ID:
C0013604
Pathologic Function
An abnormal accumulation of fluid beneath the skin, or in one or more cavities of the body.
Hypercholesterolemia
MedGen UID:
5687
Concept ID:
C0020443
Disease or Syndrome
An increased concentration of cholesterol in the blood.
Decreased HDL cholesterol concentration
MedGen UID:
57731
Concept ID:
C0151691
Finding
An decreased concentration of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in the blood.
Hypertriglyceridemia
MedGen UID:
167238
Concept ID:
C0813230
Finding
An abnormal increase in the level of triglycerides in the blood.
Temperature instability
MedGen UID:
329973
Concept ID:
C1820737
Finding
Disordered thermoregulation characterized by an impaired ability to maintain a balance between heat production and heat loss, with resulting instability of body temperature.
Hypernasal speech
MedGen UID:
107884
Concept ID:
C0566620
Finding
A type of speech characterized by the presence of an abnormally increased nasal airflow during speech associated with structural abnormality of the nasal passages.
Carious teeth
MedGen UID:
8288
Concept ID:
C0011334
Disease or Syndrome
Caries is a multifactorial bacterial infection affecting the structure of the tooth. This term has been used to describe the presence of more than expected dental caries.
Upslanted palpebral fissure
MedGen UID:
98390
Concept ID:
C0423109
Finding
The palpebral fissure inclination is more than two standard deviations above the mean for age (objective); or, the inclination of the palpebral fissure is greater than typical for age.
Narrow forehead
MedGen UID:
326956
Concept ID:
C1839758
Finding
Width of the forehead or distance between the frontotemporales is more than two standard deviations below the mean (objective); or apparently narrow intertemporal region (subjective).
Thin upper lip vermilion
MedGen UID:
355352
Concept ID:
C1865017
Finding
Height of the vermilion of the upper lip in the midline more than 2 SD below the mean. Alternatively, an apparently reduced height of the vermilion of the upper lip in the frontal view (subjective).
Downturned corners of mouth
MedGen UID:
356471
Concept ID:
C1866195
Anatomical Abnormality
A morphological abnormality of the mouth in which the angle of the mouth is downturned. The oral commissures are positioned inferior to the midline labial fissure.
Almond-shaped palpebral fissure
MedGen UID:
870336
Concept ID:
C4024780
Finding
A shape created by an acute downward arching of the upper eyelid and upward arching of the lower eyelid, toward the medial canthus, which gives the outline of the palpebral fissures the configuration of an almond. Thus, the maximum distance between the fissures is offset from, and medial to, the center point.
Narrow nasal bridge
MedGen UID:
1641596
Concept ID:
C4551564
Finding
Decreased width of the bony bridge of the nose.
Cutaneous photosensitivity
MedGen UID:
87601
Concept ID:
C0349506
Pathologic Function
An increased sensitivity of the skin to light. Photosensitivity may result in a rash upon exposure to the sun (which is known as photodermatosis). Photosensitivity can be diagnosed by phototests in which light is shone on small areas of skin.
Frontal upsweep of hair
MedGen UID:
452910
Concept ID:
C1185616
Finding
Upward and/or sideward growth of anterior hair.
Generalized hypopigmentation
MedGen UID:
340426
Concept ID:
C1849923
Finding
Breech presentation
MedGen UID:
654
Concept ID:
C0006157
Pathologic Function
A position of the fetus at delivery in which the fetus enters the birth canal with the buttocks or feet first.
Polyhydramnios
MedGen UID:
6936
Concept ID:
C0020224
Pathologic Function
The presence of excess amniotic fluid in the uterus during pregnancy.
Oligohydramnios
MedGen UID:
86974
Concept ID:
C0079924
Pathologic Function
Diminished amniotic fluid volume in pregnancy.
Decreased fetal movement
MedGen UID:
68618
Concept ID:
C0235659
Finding
An abnormal reduction in quantity or strength of fetal movements.
Low 1-minute APGAR score
MedGen UID:
1369505
Concept ID:
C4476848
Finding
Low 5-minute APGAR score
MedGen UID:
1370671
Concept ID:
C4476849
Finding
Adrenal insufficiency
MedGen UID:
1351
Concept ID:
C0001623
Disease or Syndrome
Insufficient production of steroid hormones (primarily cortisol) by the adrenal glands.
Hyperinsulinemia
MedGen UID:
43779
Concept ID:
C0020459
Disease or Syndrome
An increased concentration of insulin in the blood.
Delayed puberty
MedGen UID:
46203
Concept ID:
C0034012
Pathologic Function
Passing the age when puberty normally occurs with no physical or hormonal signs of the onset of puberty.
Precocious puberty
MedGen UID:
18752
Concept ID:
C0034013
Disease or Syndrome
The onset of secondary sexual characteristics before a normal age. Although it is difficult to define normal age ranges because of the marked variation with which puberty begins in normal children, precocious puberty can be defined as the onset of puberty before the age of 8 years in girls or 9 years in boys.
Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism
MedGen UID:
82883
Concept ID:
C0271623
Disease or Syndrome
Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is characterized by reduced function of the gonads (testes in males or ovaries in females) and results from the absence of the gonadal stimulating pituitary hormones
Decreased response to growth hormone stimulation test
MedGen UID:
1784655
Concept ID:
C5539399
Finding
Insufficient responses to growth hormone (GH) provocation tests. GH deficiency is defined as a serum peak GH concentration less than 10 ng/mL on provocation with a combination of at least two separate stimulation tests.
Esotropia
MedGen UID:
4550
Concept ID:
C0014877
Disease or Syndrome
A form of strabismus with one or both eyes turned inward ('crossed') to a relatively severe degree, usually defined as 10 diopters or more.
Hypermetropia
MedGen UID:
43780
Concept ID:
C0020490
Disease or Syndrome
An abnormality of refraction characterized by the ability to see objects in the distance clearly, while objects nearby appear blurry.
Myopia
MedGen UID:
44558
Concept ID:
C0027092
Disease or Syndrome
Nearsightedness, also known as myopia, is an eye condition that causes blurry distance vision. People who are nearsighted have more trouble seeing things that are far away (such as when driving) than things that are close up (such as when reading or using a computer). If it is not treated with corrective lenses or surgery, nearsightedness can lead to squinting, eyestrain, headaches, and significant visual impairment.\n\nNearsightedness usually begins in childhood or adolescence. It tends to worsen with age until adulthood, when it may stop getting worse (stabilize). In some people, nearsightedness improves in later adulthood.\n\nFor normal vision, light passes through the clear cornea at the front of the eye and is focused by the lens onto the surface of the retina, which is the lining of the back of the eye that contains light-sensing cells. People who are nearsighted typically have eyeballs that are too long from front to back. As a result, light entering the eye is focused too far forward, in front of the retina instead of on its surface. It is this change that causes distant objects to appear blurry. The longer the eyeball is, the farther forward light rays will be focused and the more severely nearsighted a person will be.\n\nNearsightedness is measured by how powerful a lens must be to correct it. The standard unit of lens power is called a diopter. Negative (minus) powered lenses are used to correct nearsightedness. The more severe a person's nearsightedness, the larger the number of diopters required for correction. In an individual with nearsightedness, one eye may be more nearsighted than the other.\n\nEye doctors often refer to nearsightedness less than -5 or -6 diopters as "common myopia." Nearsightedness of -6 diopters or more is commonly called "high myopia." This distinction is important because high myopia increases a person's risk of developing other eye problems that can lead to permanent vision loss or blindness. These problems include tearing and detachment of the retina, clouding of the lens (cataract), and an eye disease called glaucoma that is usually related to increased pressure within the eye. The risk of these other eye problems increases with the severity of the nearsightedness. The term "pathological myopia" is used to describe cases in which high myopia leads to tissue damage within the eye.
Strabismus
MedGen UID:
21337
Concept ID:
C0038379
Disease or Syndrome
A misalignment of the eyes so that the visual axes deviate from bifoveal fixation. The classification of strabismus may be based on a number of features including the relative position of the eyes, whether the deviation is latent or manifest, intermittent or constant, concomitant or otherwise and according to the age of onset and the relevance of any associated refractive error.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Erhardt É, Molnár D
Nutrients 2022 May 6;14(9) doi: 10.3390/nu14091950. PMID: 35565916Free PMC Article
Butler MG, Miller JL, Forster JL
Curr Pediatr Rev 2019;15(4):207-244. doi: 10.2174/1573396315666190716120925. PMID: 31333129Free PMC Article
Sabus A, Feinstein J, Romani P, Goldson E, Blackmer A
Pharmacotherapy 2019 Jun;39(6):645-664. Epub 2019 Mar 27 doi: 10.1002/phar.2238. PMID: 30793794Free PMC Article

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Pellikaan K, Nguyen NQC, Rosenberg AGW, Coupaye M, Goldstone AP, Høybye C, Markovic T, Grugni G, Crinò A, Caixàs A, Poitou C, Corripio R, Nieuwenhuize RM, van der Lely AJ, de Graaff LCG
J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2023 Nov 17;108(12):e1720-e1730. doi: 10.1210/clinem/dgad312. PMID: 37267430Free PMC Article
Itani R, Gillett ES, Perez IA
Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep 2023 Mar;23(3):25-32. Epub 2023 Feb 15 doi: 10.1007/s11910-023-01254-6. PMID: 36790642Free PMC Article
Alves C, Franco RR
Arch Endocrinol Metab 2020 May-Jun;64(3):223-234. doi: 10.20945/2359-3997000000248. PMID: 32555988Free PMC Article
Abdilla Y, Andria Barbara M, Calleja-Agius J
Neonatal Netw 2017 May 1;36(3):134-141. doi: 10.1891/0730-0832.36.3.134. PMID: 28494825
Cassidy SB, Schwartz S, Miller JL, Driscoll DJ
Genet Med 2012 Jan;14(1):10-26. Epub 2011 Sep 26 doi: 10.1038/gim.0b013e31822bead0. PMID: 22237428

Diagnosis

Erhardt É, Molnár D
Nutrients 2022 May 6;14(9) doi: 10.3390/nu14091950. PMID: 35565916Free PMC Article
Godler DE, Butler MG
Genes (Basel) 2021 Sep 16;12(9) doi: 10.3390/genes12091429. PMID: 34573411Free PMC Article
Butler MG, Miller JL, Forster JL
Curr Pediatr Rev 2019;15(4):207-244. doi: 10.2174/1573396315666190716120925. PMID: 31333129Free PMC Article
Angulo MA, Butler MG, Cataletto ME
J Endocrinol Invest 2015 Dec;38(12):1249-63. Epub 2015 Jun 11 doi: 10.1007/s40618-015-0312-9. PMID: 26062517Free PMC Article
Cassidy SB, Schwartz S, Miller JL, Driscoll DJ
Genet Med 2012 Jan;14(1):10-26. Epub 2011 Sep 26 doi: 10.1038/gim.0b013e31822bead0. PMID: 22237428

Therapy

Miller JL, Gevers E, Bridges N, Yanovski JA, Salehi P, Obrynba KS, Felner EI, Bird LM, Shoemaker AH, Angulo M, Butler MG, Stevenson D, Abuzzahab J, Barrett T, Lah M, Littlejohn E, Mathew V, Cowen NM, Bhatnagar A; DESTINY PWS Investigators
J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2023 Jun 16;108(7):1676-1685. doi: 10.1210/clinem/dgad014. PMID: 36639249Free PMC Article
Haqq AM, Chung WK, Dollfus H, Haws RM, Martos-Moreno GÁ, Poitou C, Yanovski JA, Mittleman RS, Yuan G, Forsythe E, Clément K, Argente J
Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol 2022 Dec;10(12):859-868. Epub 2022 Nov 7 doi: 10.1016/S2213-8587(22)00277-7. PMID: 36356613Free PMC Article
Diene G, Angulo M, Hale PM, Jepsen CH, Hofman PL, Hokken-Koelega A, Ramesh C, Turan S, Tauber M
J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2022 Dec 17;108(1):4-12. doi: 10.1210/clinem/dgac549. PMID: 36181471Free PMC Article
Danowitz M, Grimberg A
Adv Pediatr 2022 Aug;69(1):203-217. Epub 2022 Jun 17 doi: 10.1016/j.yapd.2022.03.005. PMID: 35985710Free PMC Article
Deal CL, Tony M, Höybye C, Allen DB, Tauber M, Christiansen JS; 2011 Growth Hormone in Prader-Willi Syndrome Clinical Care Guidelines Workshop Participants
J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2013 Jun;98(6):E1072-87. Epub 2013 Mar 29 doi: 10.1210/jc.2012-3888. PMID: 23543664Free PMC Article

Prognosis

Höybye C, Tauber M
J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2022 May 17;107(6):1698-1705. doi: 10.1210/clinem/dgac082. PMID: 35150573Free PMC Article
Salvatoni A, Nosetti L, Salvatore S, Agosti M
Expert Rev Endocrinol Metab 2021 Mar;16(2):63-71. Epub 2021 Mar 16 doi: 10.1080/17446651.2021.1898375. PMID: 33724138
Kostovski M, Tasic V, Laban N, Polenakovic M, Danilovski D, Gucev Z
Pril (Makedon Akad Nauk Umet Odd Med Nauki) 2017 Dec 1;38(3):121-133. doi: 10.2478/prilozi-2018-0013. PMID: 29668472
Hurren BJ, Flack NA
Clin Anat 2016 Jul;29(5):590-605. Epub 2016 Jan 29 doi: 10.1002/ca.22686. PMID: 26749552
Kaditis AG, Alonso Alvarez ML, Boudewyns A, Alexopoulos EI, Ersu R, Joosten K, Larramona H, Miano S, Narang I, Trang H, Tsaoussoglou M, Vandenbussche N, Villa MP, Van Waardenburg D, Weber S, Verhulst S
Eur Respir J 2016 Jan;47(1):69-94. Epub 2015 Nov 5 doi: 10.1183/13993003.00385-2015. PMID: 26541535

Clinical prediction guides

Mahmoud R, Kimonis V, Butler MG
Int J Mol Sci 2023 Jan 21;24(3) doi: 10.3390/ijms24032150. PMID: 36768472Free PMC Article
Diene G, Angulo M, Hale PM, Jepsen CH, Hofman PL, Hokken-Koelega A, Ramesh C, Turan S, Tauber M
J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2022 Dec 17;108(1):4-12. doi: 10.1210/clinem/dgac549. PMID: 36181471Free PMC Article
Tauber M, Hoybye C
Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol 2021 Apr;9(4):235-246. Epub 2021 Feb 26 doi: 10.1016/S2213-8587(21)00002-4. PMID: 33647242
van Bosse HJP, Butler MG
Genes (Basel) 2020 Feb 28;11(3) doi: 10.3390/genes11030260. PMID: 32121146Free PMC Article
Kabasakalian A, Ferretti CJ, Hollander E
Curr Top Behav Neurosci 2018;35:529-557. doi: 10.1007/7854_2017_28. PMID: 28956320

Recent systematic reviews

Wolfe G, Salehi V, Browne A, Riddle R, Hall E, Fam J, Tichansky D, Myers S
Surg Obes Relat Dis 2023 Aug;19(8):907-915. Epub 2023 Feb 1 doi: 10.1016/j.soard.2023.01.017. PMID: 36872159
Shalma NM, Alsharabasy MA, Taha AM, Alsawareah A, Manirambona E, Ahmed SK, Mohamed MR, Taha NA, Abd-ElGawad M
Diabetes Metab Syndr 2023 Feb;17(2):102711. Epub 2023 Feb 4 doi: 10.1016/j.dsx.2023.102711. PMID: 36774885
Bonnot O, Cohen D, Thuilleaux D, Consoli A, Cabal S, Tauber M
Eur J Pediatr 2016 Jan;175(1):9-18. Epub 2015 Nov 19 doi: 10.1007/s00431-015-2670-x. PMID: 26584571
Bennett JA, Germani T, Haqq AM, Zwaigenbaum L
Am J Med Genet A 2015 Dec;167A(12):2936-44. Epub 2015 Aug 29 doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.37286. PMID: 26331980
Deal CL, Tony M, Höybye C, Allen DB, Tauber M, Christiansen JS; 2011 Growth Hormone in Prader-Willi Syndrome Clinical Care Guidelines Workshop Participants
J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2013 Jun;98(6):E1072-87. Epub 2013 Mar 29 doi: 10.1210/jc.2012-3888. PMID: 23543664Free PMC Article

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