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Craniofacial microsomia 1(CFM1)

MedGen UID:
501171
Concept ID:
C3495417
Congenital Abnormality
Synonyms: CFM1; Hemifacial microsomia
SNOMED CT: Hemifacial microsomia (254025006)
 
Gene (location): SF3B2 (11q13.1)
 
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0958175
OMIM®: 164210

Definition

Craniofacial microsomia is a term used to describe a spectrum of abnormalities that primarily affect the development of the skull (cranium) and face before birth. Microsomia means abnormal smallness of body structures. Most people with craniofacial microsomia have differences in the size and shape of facial structures between the right and left sides of the face (facial asymmetry). In about two-thirds of cases, both sides of the face have abnormalities, which usually differ from one side to the other. Other individuals with craniofacial microsomia are affected on only one side of the face. The facial characteristics in craniofacial microsomia typically include underdevelopment of one side of the upper or lower jaw (maxillary or mandibular hypoplasia), which can cause dental problems and difficulties with feeding and speech. In cases of severe mandibular hypoplasia, breathing may also be affected.

People with craniofacial microsomia usually have ear abnormalities affecting one or both ears, typically to different degrees. They may have growths of skin (skin tags) in front of the ear (preauricular tags), an underdeveloped or absent external ear (microtia or anotia), or a closed or absent ear canal; these abnormalities may lead to hearing loss. Eye problems are less common in craniofacial microsomia, but some affected individuals have an unusually small eyeball (microphthalmia) or other eye abnormalities that result in vision loss.

Abnormalities in other parts of the body, such as malformed bones of the spine (vertebrae), abnormally shaped kidneys, and heart defects, may also occur in people with craniofacial microsomia.

Many other terms have been used for craniofacial microsomia. These other names generally refer to forms of craniofacial microsomia with specific combinations of signs and symptoms, although sometimes they are used interchangeably. Hemifacial microsomia often refers to craniofacial microsomia with maxillary or mandibular hypoplasia. People with hemifacial microsomia and noncancerous (benign) growths in the eye called epibulbar dermoids may be said to have Goldenhar syndrome or oculoauricular dysplasia. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

Clinical features

From HPO
Vesicoureteral reflux
MedGen UID:
21852
Concept ID:
C0042580
Disease or Syndrome
Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is characterized by the reflux of urine from the bladder into the ureters and sometimes into the kidneys. It is a risk factor for urinary tract infections. Primary VUR results from a developmental defect of the ureterovesical junction (UVJ). In combination with intrarenal reflux, the resulting inflammatory reaction may result in renal injury or scarring, also called reflux nephropathy (RN). Extensive renal scarring impairs renal function and may predispose patients to hypertension, proteinuria, and renal insufficiency (summary by Lu et al., 2007). Genetic Heterogeneity of Vesicoureteral Reflux A locus designated VUR1 maps to chromosome 1p13. VUR2 (610878) is caused by mutation in the ROBO2 gene (602431) on chromosome 3p12; VUR3 (613674) is caused by mutation in the SOX17 gene (610928) on chromosome 8q11; VUR4 (614317) maps to chromosome 5; VUR5 (614318) maps to chromosome 13; VUR6 (614319) maps to chromosome 18; VUR7 (615390) maps to chromosome 12; and VUR8 (615963) is caused by mutation in the TNXB gene (600985) on chromosome 6p21. A possible X-linked form has been reported (VURX; 314550).
Ectopic kidney
MedGen UID:
68661
Concept ID:
C0238207
Congenital Abnormality
A developmental defect in which a kidney is located in an abnormal anatomic position.
Ureteropelvic junction obstruction
MedGen UID:
105482
Concept ID:
C0521619
Anatomical Abnormality
Blockage of urine flow from the renal pelvis to the proximal ureter.
Renal agenesis
MedGen UID:
154237
Concept ID:
C0542519
Congenital Abnormality
Agenesis, that is, failure of the kidney to develop during embryogenesis and development.
Multicystic kidney dysplasia
MedGen UID:
811388
Concept ID:
C3714581
Disease or Syndrome
Multicystic dysplasia of the kidney is characterized by multiple cysts of varying size in the kidney and the absence of a normal pelvicaliceal system. The condition is associated with ureteral or ureteropelvic atresia, and the affected kidney is nonfunctional.
Genu valgum
MedGen UID:
154364
Concept ID:
C0576093
Anatomical Abnormality
The legs angle inward, such that the knees are close together and the ankles far apart.
Partial duplication of thumb phalanx
MedGen UID:
909031
Concept ID:
C4082168
Anatomical Abnormality
A partial duplication, depending on severity leading to a broad or bifid appearance, affecting one or more of the phalanges of the thumb. As opposed to a complete duplication there is still a variable degree of fusion between the duplicated bones.
Coarctation of aorta
MedGen UID:
1617
Concept ID:
C0003492
Congenital Abnormality
Coarctation of the aorta is a narrowing or constriction of a segment of the aorta.
Patent ductus arteriosus
MedGen UID:
4415
Concept ID:
C0013274
Congenital Abnormality
In utero, the ductus arteriosus (DA) serves to divert ventricular output away from the lungs and toward the placenta by connecting the main pulmonary artery to the descending aorta. A patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in the first 3 days of life is a physiologic shunt in healthy term and preterm newborn infants, and normally is substantially closed within about 24 hours after bith and completely closed after about three weeks. Failure of physiologcal closure is referred to a persistent or patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Depending on the degree of left-to-right shunting, PDA can have clinical consequences.
Ventricular septal defect
MedGen UID:
42366
Concept ID:
C0018818
Congenital Abnormality
A hole between the two bottom chambers (ventricles) of the heart. The defect is centered around the most superior aspect of the ventricular septum.
Right aortic arch
MedGen UID:
48474
Concept ID:
C0035615
Congenital Abnormality
Aorta descends on right instead of on the left.
Tetralogy of Fallot
MedGen UID:
21498
Concept ID:
C0039685
Congenital Abnormality
People with CCHD have one or more specific heart defects. The heart defects classified as CCHD include coarctation of the aorta, double-outlet right ventricle, D-transposition of the great arteries, Ebstein anomaly, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, interrupted aortic arch, pulmonary atresia with intact septum, single ventricle, total anomalous pulmonary venous connection, tetralogy of Fallot, tricuspid atresia, and truncus arteriosus.\n\nEach of the heart defects associated with CCHD affects the flow of blood into, out of, or through the heart. Some of the heart defects involve structures within the heart itself, such as the two lower chambers of the heart (the ventricles) or the valves that control blood flow through the heart. Others affect the structure of the large blood vessels leading into and out of the heart (including the aorta and pulmonary artery). Still others involve a combination of these structural abnormalities.\n\nSome people with treated CCHD have few related health problems later in life. However, long-term effects of CCHD can include delayed development and reduced stamina during exercise. Adults with these heart defects have an increased risk of abnormal heart rhythms, heart failure, sudden cardiac arrest, stroke, and premature death.\n\nAlthough babies with CCHD may appear healthy for the first few hours or days of life, signs and symptoms soon become apparent. These can include an abnormal heart sound during a heartbeat (heart murmur), rapid breathing (tachypnea), low blood pressure (hypotension), low levels of oxygen in the blood (hypoxemia), and a blue or purple tint to the skin caused by a shortage of oxygen (cyanosis). If untreated, CCHD can lead to shock, coma, and death. However, most people with CCHD now survive past infancy due to improvements in early detection, diagnosis, and treatment.\n\nCritical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a term that refers to a group of serious heart defects that are present from birth. These abnormalities result from problems with the formation of one or more parts of the heart during the early stages of embryonic development. CCHD prevents the heart from pumping blood effectively or reduces the amount of oxygen in the blood. As a result, organs and tissues throughout the body do not receive enough oxygen, which can lead to organ damage and life-threatening complications. Individuals with CCHD usually require surgery soon after birth.
Conductive hearing impairment
MedGen UID:
9163
Concept ID:
C0018777
Disease or Syndrome
An abnormality of vibrational conductance of sound to the inner ear leading to impairment of sensory perception of sound.
Sensorineural hearing loss disorder
MedGen UID:
9164
Concept ID:
C0018784
Disease or Syndrome
A type of hearing impairment in one or both ears related to an abnormal functionality of the cochlear nerve.
Microtia
MedGen UID:
57535
Concept ID:
C0152423
Congenital Abnormality
Underdevelopment of the external ear.
Atresia of the external auditory canal
MedGen UID:
78613
Concept ID:
C0266597
Congenital Abnormality
Absence or failure to form of the external auditory canal.
Anotia
MedGen UID:
152377
Concept ID:
C0702139
Congenital Abnormality
Complete absence of any auricular structures.
Unilateral external ear deformity
MedGen UID:
322330
Concept ID:
C1834043
Finding
Underdeveloped tragus
MedGen UID:
861866
Concept ID:
C4013429
Anatomical Abnormality
Decreased posterolateral protrusion of the tragus.
Duplicated tragus
MedGen UID:
866818
Concept ID:
C4021172
Anatomical Abnormality
A complete or partial duplication of the tragus; expected to lie anterior to the normal tragus.
Chiari malformation
MedGen UID:
2065
Concept ID:
C0003803
Congenital Abnormality
Chiari malformation consists of a downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsils and the medulla through the foramen magnum, sometimes causing hydrocephalus as a result of obstruction of CSF outflow.
Occipital encephalocele
MedGen UID:
4935
Concept ID:
C0014067
Congenital Abnormality
A type of encephalocele (that is, a a protrusion of part of the cranial contents including brain tissue through a congenital opening in the cranium, typically covered with skin or mucous membrane) in the occipital region of the skull. Occipital encephalocele presents as a midline swelling over the occipital bone. It is usually covered with normal full-thickness scalp.
Hydrocephalus
MedGen UID:
9335
Concept ID:
C0020255
Disease or Syndrome
Hydrocephalus is an active distension of the ventricular system of the brain resulting from inadequate passage of CSF from its point of production within the cerebral ventricles to its point of absorption into the systemic circulation.
Corpus callosum, agenesis of
MedGen UID:
104498
Concept ID:
C0175754
Congenital Abnormality
The corpus callosum is the largest fiber tract in the central nervous system and the major interhemispheric fiber bundle in the brain. Formation of the corpus callosum begins as early as 6 weeks' gestation, with the first fibers crossing the midline at 11 to 12 weeks' gestation, and completion of the basic shape by age 18 to 20 weeks (Schell-Apacik et al., 2008). Agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) is one of the most frequent malformations in brain with a reported incidence ranging between 0.5 and 70 in 10,000 births. ACC is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous condition, which can be observed either as an isolated condition or as a manifestation in the context of a congenital syndrome (see MOLECULAR GENETICS and Dobyns, 1996). Also see mirror movements-1 and/or agenesis of the corpus callosum (MRMV1; 157600). Schell-Apacik et al. (2008) noted that there is confusion in the literature regarding radiologic terminology concerning partial absence of the corpus callosum, where various designations have been used, including hypogenesis, hypoplasia, partial agenesis, or dysgenesis.
Intellectual disability
MedGen UID:
811461
Concept ID:
C3714756
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Intellectual disability, previously referred to as mental retardation, is characterized by subnormal intellectual functioning that occurs during the developmental period. It is defined by an IQ score below 70.
Mild global developmental delay
MedGen UID:
861405
Concept ID:
C4012968
Finding
A mild delay in the achievement of motor or mental milestones in the domains of development of a child.
Micrognathia
MedGen UID:
44428
Concept ID:
C0025990
Congenital Abnormality
Developmental hypoplasia of the mandible.
Scoliosis
MedGen UID:
11348
Concept ID:
C0036439
Disease or Syndrome
The presence of an abnormal lateral curvature of the spine.
Cervical rib
MedGen UID:
102359
Concept ID:
C0158779
Congenital Abnormality
Presence of rib formation in the cervical region.
Hypoplasia of the maxilla
MedGen UID:
66804
Concept ID:
C0240310
Congenital Abnormality
Abnormally small dimension of the Maxilla. Usually creating a malocclusion or malalignment between the upper and lower teeth or resulting in a deficient amount of projection of the base of the nose and lower midface region.
Hemivertebrae
MedGen UID:
82720
Concept ID:
C0265677
Congenital Abnormality
Absence of one half of the vertebral body.
Vertebral hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
87502
Concept ID:
C0345394
Congenital Abnormality
Small, underdeveloped vertebral bodies.
Hypoplasia of facial musculature
MedGen UID:
320257
Concept ID:
C1834042
Finding
Underdevelopment of one or more muscles innervated by the facial nerve (the seventh cranial nerve).
Block vertebrae
MedGen UID:
375498
Concept ID:
C1844753
Congenital Abnormality
Congenital synostosis between two or more adjacent vertebrae (partial or complete fusion of adjacent vertabral bodies).
Maxillozygomatic hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
338569
Concept ID:
C1848908
Finding
Hypoplasia of the maxillozygomatic complex.
Malar flattening
MedGen UID:
347616
Concept ID:
C1858085
Finding
Underdevelopment of the malar prominence of the jugal bone (zygomatic bone in mammals), appreciated in profile, frontal view, and/or by palpation.
Pulmonary hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
78574
Concept ID:
C0265783
Congenital Abnormality
A congenital abnormality in which the lung parenchyma is not fully developed. It may be associated with other congenital abnormalities.
Blepharophimosis
MedGen UID:
2670
Concept ID:
C0005744
Anatomical Abnormality
A fixed reduction in the vertical distance between the upper and lower eyelids with short palpebral fissures.
Cleft upper lip
MedGen UID:
40327
Concept ID:
C0008924
Congenital Abnormality
A gap or groove in the upper lip. This is a congenital defect resulting from nonfusion of tissues of the lip during embryonal development.
Wide mouth
MedGen UID:
44238
Concept ID:
C0024433
Congenital Abnormality
Distance between the oral commissures more than 2 SD above the mean. Alternatively, an apparently increased width of the oral aperture (subjective).
Facial asymmetry
MedGen UID:
266298
Concept ID:
C1306710
Finding
An abnormal difference between the left and right sides of the face.
Branchial anomaly
MedGen UID:
349421
Concept ID:
C1862066
Congenital Abnormality
Congenital developmental defect arising from the primitive branchial apparatus.
Upper eyelid coloboma
MedGen UID:
350283
Concept ID:
C1863872
Disease or Syndrome
A short discontinuity of the margin of the upper eyelid.
Cleft palate
MedGen UID:
756015
Concept ID:
C2981150
Congenital Abnormality
Cleft palate is a developmental defect of the palate resulting from a failure of fusion of the palatine processes and manifesting as a separation of the roof of the mouth (soft and hard palate).
Transverse facial cleft
MedGen UID:
866608
Concept ID:
C4020954
Anatomical Abnormality
A horizontal cleft of the face, varying from slight widening of the mouth, to a cleft extending to the ear.
Hemifacial hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
868995
Concept ID:
C4023411
Disease or Syndrome
Unilateral underdevelopment of the facial tissues, including muscles and bones.
Preauricular skin tag
MedGen UID:
395989
Concept ID:
C1860816
Finding
A rudimentary tag of skin often containing ear tissue including a core of cartilage and located just anterior to the auricle (outer part of the ear).
Amblyopia
MedGen UID:
8009
Concept ID:
C0002418
Disease or Syndrome
Reduced visual acuity that is uncorrectable by lenses in the absence of detectable anatomic defects in the eye or visual pathways.
Anophthalmia
MedGen UID:
314
Concept ID:
C0003119
Congenital Abnormality
Absence of the globe or eyeball.
Ptosis
MedGen UID:
2287
Concept ID:
C0005745
Disease or Syndrome
The upper eyelid margin is positioned 3 mm or more lower than usual and covers the superior portion of the iris (objective); or, the upper lid margin obscures at least part of the pupil (subjective).
Microphthalmia
MedGen UID:
10033
Concept ID:
C0026010
Congenital Abnormality
Microphthalmia is an eye abnormality that arises before birth. In this condition, one or both eyeballs are abnormally small. In some affected individuals, the eyeball may appear to be completely missing; however, even in these cases some remaining eye tissue is generally present. Such severe microphthalmia should be distinguished from another condition called anophthalmia, in which no eyeball forms at all. However, the terms anophthalmia and severe microphthalmia are often used interchangeably. Microphthalmia may or may not result in significant vision loss.\n\nPeople with microphthalmia may also have a condition called coloboma. Colobomas are missing pieces of tissue in structures that form the eye. They may appear as notches or gaps in the colored part of the eye called the iris; the retina, which is the specialized light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye; the blood vessel layer under the retina called the choroid; or in the optic nerves, which carry information from the eyes to the brain. Colobomas may be present in one or both eyes and, depending on their size and location, can affect a person's vision.\n\nPeople with microphthalmia may also have other eye abnormalities, including clouding of the lens of the eye (cataract) and a narrowed opening of the eye (narrowed palpebral fissure). Additionally, affected individuals may have an abnormality called microcornea, in which the clear front covering of the eye (cornea) is small and abnormally curved.\n\nBetween one-third and one-half of affected individuals have microphthalmia as part of a syndrome that affects other organs and tissues in the body. These forms of the condition are described as syndromic. When microphthalmia occurs by itself, it is described as nonsyndromic or isolated.
Strabismus
MedGen UID:
21337
Concept ID:
C0038379
Disease or Syndrome
A misalignment of the eyes so that the visual axes deviate from bifoveal fixation. The classification of strabismus may be based on a number of features including the relative position of the eyes, whether the deviation is latent or manifest, intermittent or constant, concomitant or otherwise and according to the age of onset and the relevance of any associated refractive error.
Limbal dermoid
MedGen UID:
401267
Concept ID:
C1867616
Neoplastic Process
A benign tumor typically found at the junction of the cornea and sclera (limbal epibullar dermoid).

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Renkema RW, de Vreugt V, Heike CL, Padwa BL, Forrest CR, Dunaway DJ, Wolvius EB, Caron CJJM, Koudstaal MJ
J Craniofac Surg 2023 Sep 1;34(6):1780-1783. Epub 2023 Jun 2 doi: 10.1097/SCS.0000000000009446. PMID: 37264504Free PMC Article
Luo S, Sun H, Bian Q, Liu Z, Wang X
Oral Dis 2023 Sep;29(6):2449-2462. Epub 2023 Mar 13 doi: 10.1111/odi.14508. PMID: 36648381
Chan CH, Hu AC, Jain NS, Dang BN, Liu MT, Bertrand AA, Wilson LF, Lee JC
J Craniofac Surg 2021 Nov-Dec 01;32(8):2771-2773. doi: 10.1097/SCS.0000000000007938. PMID: 34727477

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Roth DA, Gosain AK, McCarthy JG, Stracher MA, Lefton DR, Grayson BH
Plast Reconstr Surg 1997 Apr;99(5):1237-47; discussion 1248-50. doi: 10.1097/00006534-199704001-00005. PMID: 9105350

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