U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination

Hand polydactyly

MedGen UID:
510636
Concept ID:
C0158733
Congenital Abnormality
Synonyms: Accessory digit of hand; Accessory finger; Accessory fingers; Extra finger; Finger polydactyly; Polydactyly of fingers; Polydactyly of the hand; Supernumerary digit of hand; Supernumerary finger
SNOMED CT: Polydactyly of fingers (81793007); Accessory fingers (81793007); Accessory digit of hand (81793007); Supernumerary digit of hand (81793007); Extra finger (81793007); Accessory finger (81793007)
 
HPO: HP:0001161

Definition

A kind of polydactyly characterized by the presence of a supernumerary finger or fingers. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

Conditions with this feature

Bloom syndrome
MedGen UID:
2685
Concept ID:
C0005859
Disease or Syndrome
Bloom syndrome (BSyn) is characterized by severe pre- and postnatal growth deficiency, immune abnormalities, sensitivity to sunlight, insulin resistance, and a high risk for many cancers that occur at an early age. Despite their very small head circumference, most affected individuals have normal intellectual ability. Women may be fertile but often have early menopause, and men tend to be infertile, with only one confirmed case of paternity. Serious medical complications that are more common than in the general population and that also appear at unusually early ages include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus as a result of insulin resistance, and cancer of a wide variety of types and anatomic sites.
Ito hypomelanosis
MedGen UID:
5920
Concept ID:
C0022283
Congenital Abnormality
A large brown, blue, or gray hamartoma of dermal melanocytes, usually on the shoulder and upper arm that is most commonly found in Asian populations and in females. It is sometimes associated with sensory changes in the involved skin area, but very rarely becomes cancerous.
Angioosteohypertrophic syndrome
MedGen UID:
9646
Concept ID:
C0022739
Disease or Syndrome
Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is a condition that affects the development of blood vessels, soft tissues (such as skin and muscles), and bones. The disorder has three characteristic features: a red birthmark called a port-wine stain, abnormal overgrowth of soft tissues and bones, and vein malformations.\n\nMost people with Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome are born with a port-wine stain. This type of birthmark is caused by swelling of small blood vessels near the surface of the skin. Port-wine stains are typically flat and can vary from pale pink to deep maroon in color. In people with Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, the port-wine stain usually covers part of one limb. The affected area may become lighter or darker with age. Occasionally, port-wine stains develop small red blisters that break open and bleed easily.\n\nKlippel-Trenaunay syndrome is also associated with overgrowth of bones and soft tissues beginning in infancy. Usually this abnormal growth is limited to one limb, most often one leg. However, overgrowth can also affect the arms or, rarely, the torso. The abnormal growth can cause pain, a feeling of heaviness, and reduced movement in the affected area. If the overgrowth causes one leg to be longer than the other, it can also lead to problems with walking.\n\nMalformations of veins are the third major feature of Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome. These abnormalities include varicose veins, which are swollen and twisted veins near the surface of the skin that often cause pain. Varicose veins usually occur on the sides of the upper legs and calves. Veins deep in the limbs can also be abnormal in people with Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome. Malformations of deep veins increase the risk of a type of blood clot called a deep vein thrombosis (DVT). If a DVT travels through the bloodstream and lodges in the lungs, it can cause a life-threatening blood clot known as a pulmonary embolism (PE).\n\nOther complications of Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome can include a type of skin infection called cellulitis, swelling caused by a buildup of fluid (lymphedema), and internal bleeding from abnormal blood vessels. Less commonly, this condition is also associated with fusion of certain fingers or toes (syndactyly) or the presence of extra digits (polydactyly).
Constriction rings syndrome
MedGen UID:
66322
Concept ID:
C0220724
Congenital Abnormality
Constriction rings syndrome is a congenital limb malformation disorder with an extremely variable clinical presentation characterized by the presence of partial to complete, congenital, fibrous, circumferential, constriction bands/rings on any part of the body, although a particular predilection for the upper or lower extremities is seen. Phenotypes range from only a mild skin indentation to complete amputation of parts of the fetus (e.g. digits, distal limb). Compression from the rings may lead to edema, skeletal anomalies (e.g. fractures, foot deformities) and, infrequently, neural compromise.
Acrocephalosyndactyly type V
MedGen UID:
78551
Concept ID:
C0265303
Congenital Abnormality
Goodman syndrome is an extremely rare genetic disorder with characteristics of marked malformations of the head and face (essentially acrocephaly), abnormalities of the hands and feet (polydactyly, syndactyly, clinodactyly, camptodactyly, ulnar deviation), and congenital heart disease. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1979. Goodman syndrome could be a variant of Carpenter syndrome.
CHARGE association
MedGen UID:
75567
Concept ID:
C0265354
Disease or Syndrome
CHD7 disorder encompasses the entire phenotypic spectrum of heterozygous CHD7 pathogenic variants that includes CHARGE syndrome as well as subsets of features that comprise the CHARGE syndrome phenotype. The mnemonic CHARGE syndrome, introduced in the premolecular era, stands for coloboma, heart defect, choanal atresia, retarded growth and development, genital hypoplasia, ear anomalies (including deafness). Following the identification of the genetic cause of CHD7 disorder, the phenotypic spectrum expanded to include cranial nerve anomalies, vestibular defects, cleft lip and/or palate, hypothyroidism, tracheoesophageal anomalies, brain anomalies, seizures, and renal anomalies. Life expectancy highly depends on the severity of manifestations; mortality can be high in the first few years when severe birth defects (particularly complex heart defects) are present and often complicated by airway and feeding issues. In childhood, adolescence, and adulthood, decreased life expectancy is likely related to a combination of residual heart defects, infections, aspiration or choking, respiratory issues including obstructive and central apnea, and possibly seizures. Despite these complications, the life expectancy for many individuals can be normal.
Orofacial-digital syndrome IV
MedGen UID:
98358
Concept ID:
C0406727
Disease or Syndrome
Oral-facial-digital syndrome is actually a group of related conditions that affect the development of the oral cavity (the mouth and teeth), facial features, and digits (fingers and toes).\n\nResearchers have identified at least 13 potential forms of oral-facial-digital syndrome. The different types are classified by their patterns of signs and symptoms. However, the features of the various types overlap significantly, and some types are not well defined. The classification system for oral-facial-digital syndrome continues to evolve as researchers find more affected individuals and learn more about this disorder.\n\nThe signs and symptoms of oral-facial-digital syndrome vary widely. However, most forms of this disorder involve problems with development of the oral cavity, facial features, and digits. Most forms are also associated with brain abnormalities and some degree of intellectual disability.\n\nAbnormalities of the oral cavity that occur in many types of oral-facial-digital syndrome include a split (cleft) in the tongue, a tongue with an unusual lobed shape, and the growth of noncancerous tumors or nodules on the tongue. Affected individuals may also have extra, missing, or defective teeth. Another common feature is an opening in the roof of the mouth (a cleft palate). Some people with oral-facial-digital syndrome have bands of extra tissue (called hyperplastic frenula) that abnormally attach the lip to the gums.\n\nDistinctive facial features often associated with oral-facial-digital syndrome include a split in the lip (a cleft lip); a wide nose with a broad, flat nasal bridge; and widely spaced eyes (hypertelorism).\n\nOther features occur in only one or a few types of oral-facial digital syndrome. These features help distinguish the different forms of the disorder. For example, the most common form of oral-facial-digital syndrome, type I, is associated with polycystic kidney disease. This kidney disease is characterized by the growth of fluid-filled sacs (cysts) that interfere with the kidneys' ability to filter waste products from the blood. Other forms of oral-facial-digital syndrome are characterized by neurological problems, particular changes in the structure of the brain, bone abnormalities, vision loss, and heart defects.\n\nAbnormalities of the digits can affect both the fingers and the toes in people with oral-facial-digital syndrome. These abnormalities include fusion of certain fingers or toes (syndactyly), digits that are shorter than usual (brachydactyly), or digits that are unusually curved (clinodactyly). The presence of extra digits (polydactyly) is also seen in most forms of oral-facial-digital syndrome.
Mesoaxial hexadactyly and cardiac malformation
MedGen UID:
167099
Concept ID:
C0796057
Disease or Syndrome
A syndrome of mental retardation, short stature, delayed puberty, polydactyly, synmetracarpalia, ocular torticollis, orofacial dysmorphism, and multiple cardiac malformations.
Orofaciodigital syndrome IX
MedGen UID:
162908
Concept ID:
C0796102
Disease or Syndrome
Syndrome with characteristics of highly arched palate with bifid tongue and bilateral supernumerary lower canines, hamartomatous tongue, multiple frenula, hypertelorism, telecanthus, strabismus, broad and/or bifid nasal tip, short stature, bifid hallux, forked metatarsal, poly and syndactyly, mild intellectual deficit and specific retinal abnormalities (bilateral optic disc coloboma and retinal dysplasia with partial detachment). Less than ten cases have been described in the literature. The causative gene has not yet been identified.
Laurin-Sandrow syndrome
MedGen UID:
340697
Concept ID:
C1851100
Disease or Syndrome
Laurin-Sandrow syndrome (LSS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by polysyndactyly of hands and feet, mirror image duplication of feet, and nasal defects (hypoplastic alae nasi, short columella), in connection with absent patella and duplicated fibula (summary by Lohan et al., 2014).
Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip-palate syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
343663
Concept ID:
C1851841
Disease or Syndrome
An EEC syndrome characterized by autosomal dominant inheritance that has material basis in variation in the chromosome region 7q11.2-q21.3.
Acrofrontofacionasal dysostosis type 2
MedGen UID:
383797
Concept ID:
C1855904
Disease or Syndrome
A very rare syndrome associating an acro-fronto-facio-nasal dysostosis with genitourinary anomalies. It has been described in three families. Craniofacial manifestations include wide anterior fontanelle, flat occiput, hypertelorism, ptosis, proptosis, broad nasal bridge and nasal tip, long philtrum and posteriorly rotated or low set ears. Hypospadias and shawl scrotum are present in all males. Acral manifestations include syndactyly of fingers, broad thumbs or halluces or preaxial polydactyly. The affected patients have no intellectual deficit. The condition seems to be hereditary, and transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait.
Holzgreve-Wagner-Rehder syndrome
MedGen UID:
344650
Concept ID:
C1856095
Disease or Syndrome
An extremely rare lethal multiple congenital anomalies/dysmorphic syndrome with characteristics of renal agenesis with Potter sequence, cleft lip/palate, oral synechiae, cardiac defects, and skeletal abnormalities including postaxial polydactyly. Intestinal nonfixation and intrauterine growth restriction are also associated. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1988.
Hirschsprung disease-hearing loss-polydactyly syndrome
MedGen UID:
341066
Concept ID:
C1856112
Disease or Syndrome
Hirschsprung disease-deafness-polydactyly syndrome is an extremely rare malformative association, described in only two siblings to date, characterized by Hirschsprung disease (defined by the presence of an aganglionic segment of variable extent in the terminal part of the colon that leads to symptoms of intestinal obstruction, including constipation and abdominal distension), polydactyly of hands and/or feet, unilateral renal agenesis, hypertelorism and congenital deafness. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1988.
Disorganization, mouse, homolog of
MedGen UID:
387773
Concept ID:
C1857230
Finding
Acro-renal-mandibular syndrome
MedGen UID:
395425
Concept ID:
C1860166
Disease or Syndrome
A very rare multiple congenital anomalies syndrome with characteristics of limb deficiencies and renal anomalies that include split hand-split foot malformation, renal agenesis, polycystic kidneys, uterine anomalies and severe mandibular hypoplasia.
Camptobrachydactyly
MedGen UID:
349399
Concept ID:
C1861963
Congenital Abnormality
An extremely rare brachydactyly syndrome with characteristics of short broad hands and feet with brachydactyly associated with congenital flexion contractures of the proximal and/or distal interphalangeal joints of the fingers, as well as syndactyly of feet. Polydactyly, septate vagina and urinary incontinence were also occasionally reported. Camptobrachydactyly has been described in 18 members of 1 family, suggesting an autosomal dominant inheritance. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1972.
VACTERL association, X-linked, with or without hydrocephalus
MedGen UID:
419019
Concept ID:
C2931228
Disease or Syndrome
VACTERL is an acronym for vertebral anomalies (similar to those of spondylocostal dysplasia), anal atresia, cardiac malformations, tracheoesophageal fistula, renal anomalies (urethral atresia with hydronephrosis), and limb anomalies (hexadactyly, humeral hypoplasia, radial aplasia, and proximally placed thumb; see 192350). Some patients may have hydrocephalus, which is referred to as VACTERL-H (Briard et al., 1984).
Asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy 1
MedGen UID:
1648057
Concept ID:
C4551856
Congenital Abnormality
Short-rib thoracic dysplasia (SRTD) with or without polydactyly refers to a group of autosomal recessive skeletal ciliopathies that are characterized by a constricted thoracic cage, short ribs, shortened tubular bones, and a 'trident' appearance of the acetabular roof. SRTD encompasses Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) and the disorders previously designated as Jeune syndrome or asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD), short rib-polydactyly syndrome (SRPS), and Mainzer-Saldino syndrome (MZSDS). Polydactyly is variably present, and there is phenotypic overlap in the various forms of SRTDs, which differ by visceral malformation and metaphyseal appearance. Nonskeletal involvement can include cleft lip/palate as well as anomalies of major organs such as the brain, eye, heart, kidneys, liver, pancreas, intestines, and genitalia. Some forms of SRTD are lethal in the neonatal period due to respiratory insufficiency secondary to a severely restricted thoracic cage, whereas others are compatible with life (summary by Huber and Cormier-Daire, 2012 and Schmidts et al., 2013). There is phenotypic overlap with the cranioectodermal dysplasias (Sensenbrenner syndrome; see CED1, 218330). Genetic Heterogeneity of Asphyxiating Thoracic Dysplasia SRTD1 has been mapped to chromosome 15q13. See also SRTD2 (611263), caused by mutation in the IFT80 gene (611177); SRTD3 (613091), caused by mutation in the DYNC2H1 gene (603297); SRTD4 (613819), caused by mutation in the TTC21B gene (612014); SRTD5 (614376), caused by mutation in the WDR19 gene (608151); SRTD6 (263520), caused by mutation in the NEK1 gene (604588); SRTD7 (614091), caused by mutation in the WDR35 gene (613602); SRTD8 (615503), caused by mutation in the WDR60 gene (615462); SRTD9 (266920), caused by mutation in the IFT140 gene (614620); SRTD10 (615630), caused by mutation in the IFT172 gene (607386); SRTD11 (615633), caused by mutation in the WDR34 gene (613363); SRTD13 (616300), caused by mutation in the CEP120 gene (613446); SRTD14 (616546), caused by mutation in the KIAA0586 gene (610178); SRTD15 (617088), caused by mutation in the DYNC2LI1 gene (617083); SRTD16 (617102), caused by mutation in the IFT52 gene (617094); SRTD17 (617405), caused by mutation in the TCTEX1D2 gene (617353); SRTD18 (617866), caused by mutation in the IFT43 gene (614068); SRTD19 (617895), caused by mutation in the IFT81 gene (605489); SRTD20 (617925), caused by mutation in the INTU gene (610621); and SRTD21 (619479), caused by mutation in the KIAA0753 gene (617112). See also SRTD12 (Beemer-Langer syndrome; 269860).

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Kamal L, Pierce SB, Canavati C, Rayyan AA, Jaraysa T, Lobel O, Lolas S, Norquist BM, Rabie G, Zahdeh F, Levy-Lahad E, King MC, Kanaan MN
Cold Spring Harb Mol Case Stud 2020 Oct;6(5) Epub 2020 Oct 7 doi: 10.1101/mcs.a005652. PMID: 33028645Free PMC Article
Rittler M, Liascovich R, López-Camelo J, Castilla EE
Am J Med Genet 2001 Jul 22;102(1):36-43. doi: 10.1002/1096-8628(20010722)102:1<36::aid-ajmg1394>3.0.co;2-m. PMID: 11471170

Diagnosis

Kamal L, Pierce SB, Canavati C, Rayyan AA, Jaraysa T, Lobel O, Lolas S, Norquist BM, Rabie G, Zahdeh F, Levy-Lahad E, King MC, Kanaan MN
Cold Spring Harb Mol Case Stud 2020 Oct;6(5) Epub 2020 Oct 7 doi: 10.1101/mcs.a005652. PMID: 33028645Free PMC Article
Özdemir M, Kavak RP, Öztürk B, Durmuş İ
BMJ Case Rep 2020 Feb 5;13(2) doi: 10.1136/bcr-2019-233064. PMID: 32029517Free PMC Article
Ryu JK, Cho JY, Choi JS
Korean J Radiol 2003 Oct-Dec;4(4):243-51. doi: 10.3348/kjr.2003.4.4.243. PMID: 14726642Free PMC Article

Clinical prediction guides

Rittler M, Liascovich R, López-Camelo J, Castilla EE
Am J Med Genet 2001 Jul 22;102(1):36-43. doi: 10.1002/1096-8628(20010722)102:1<36::aid-ajmg1394>3.0.co;2-m. PMID: 11471170

Supplemental Content

Table of contents

    Clinical resources

    Consumer resources

    Recent activity

    Your browsing activity is empty.

    Activity recording is turned off.

    Turn recording back on

    See more...
    Support Center