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Hoarse voice

MedGen UID:
5602
Concept ID:
C0019825
Sign or Symptom
Synonyms: Hoarseness; Hoarseness of Voice; Hoarseness, Voice; Hoarsenesses; Voice Hoarseness
SNOMED CT: Husky voice (50219008); Croaky voice (50219008); Voice hoarseness (50219008); Hoarse (50219008); Hoarseness (50219008)
 
HPO: HP:0001609

Definition

Hoarseness refers to a change in the pitch or quality of the voice, with the voice sounding weak, very breathy, scratchy, or husky. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVHoarse voice

Conditions with this feature

Lipid proteinosis
MedGen UID:
6112
Concept ID:
C0023795
Disease or Syndrome
Lipoid proteinosis (LP) is characterized by deposition of hyaline-like material in various tissues resulting in a hoarse voice from early infancy, vesicles and hemorrhagic crusts in the mouth and on the face and extremities, verrucous and keratotic cutaneous lesions on extensor surfaces (especially the elbows), and moniliform blepharosis (multiple beaded papules along the eyelid margins and inner canthus). Extracutaneous manifestations may include epilepsy, neuropsychiatric disorders, spontaneous CNS hemorrhage, and asymptomatic multiple yellowish nodules throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Generally, the disease course is chronic and fluctuating. Males and females are affected equally. Affected individuals have a normal life span unless they experience laryngeal obstruction.
Melnick-Needles syndrome
MedGen UID:
6292
Concept ID:
C0025237
Disease or Syndrome
The X-linked otopalatodigital (X-OPD) spectrum disorders, characterized primarily by skeletal dysplasia, include the following: Otopalatodigital syndrome type 1 (OPD1). Otopalatodigital syndrome type 2 (OPD2). Frontometaphyseal dysplasia type 1 (FMD1). Melnick-Needles syndrome (MNS). Terminal osseous dysplasia with pigmentary skin defects (TODPD). In OPD1, most manifestations are present at birth; females can present with severity similar to affected males, although some have only mild manifestations. In OPD2, females are less severely affected than related affected males. Most males with OPD2 die during the first year of life, usually from thoracic hypoplasia resulting in pulmonary insufficiency. Males who live beyond the first year of life are usually developmentally delayed and require respiratory support and assistance with feeding. In FMD1, females are less severely affected than related affected males. Males do not experience a progressive skeletal dysplasia but may have joint contractures and hand and foot malformations. Progressive scoliosis is observed in both affected males and females. In MNS, wide phenotypic variability is observed; some individuals are diagnosed in adulthood, while others require respiratory support and have reduced longevity. MNS in males results in perinatal lethality in all recorded cases. TODPD, seen only in females, is characterized by a skeletal dysplasia that is most prominent in the digits, pigmentary defects of the skin, and recurrent digital fibromata.
Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-II
MedGen UID:
7734
Concept ID:
C0026705
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II; also known as Hunter syndrome) is an X-linked multisystem disorder characterized by glycosaminoglycan (GAG) accumulation. The vast majority of affected individuals are male; on rare occasion heterozygous females manifest findings. Age of onset, disease severity, and rate of progression vary significantly among affected males. In those with early progressive disease, CNS involvement (manifest primarily by progressive cognitive deterioration), progressive airway disease, and cardiac disease usually result in death in the first or second decade of life. In those with slowly progressive disease, the CNS is not (or is minimally) affected, although the effect of GAG accumulation on other organ systems may be early progressive to the same degree as in those who have progressive cognitive decline. Survival into the early adult years with normal intelligence is common in the slowly progressing form of the disease. Additional findings in both forms of MPS II include: short stature; macrocephaly with or without communicating hydrocephalus; macroglossia; hoarse voice; conductive and sensorineural hearing loss; hepatosplenomegaly; dysostosis multiplex; spinal stenosis; and carpal tunnel syndrome.
Epidermolysis bullosa simplex 1A, generalized severe
MedGen UID:
38194
Concept ID:
C0079295
Disease or Syndrome
Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) is characterized by fragility of the skin (and mucosal epithelia in some instances) that results in non-scarring blisters and erosions caused by minor mechanical trauma. EBS is distinguished from other types of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) or non-EB skin fragility syndromes by the location of the blistering in relation to the dermal-epidermal junction. In EBS, blistering occurs within basal keratinocytes. The severity of blistering ranges from limited to hands and feet to widespread involvement. Additional features can include hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles (keratoderma), nail dystrophy, milia, and hyper- and/or hypopigmentation. Rare EBS subtypes have been associated with additional clinical features including pyloric atresia, muscular dystrophy, cardiomyopathy, and/or nephropathy.
Hypohidrotic X-linked ectodermal dysplasia
MedGen UID:
57890
Concept ID:
C0162359
Disease or Syndrome
Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is characterized by hypotrichosis (sparseness of scalp and body hair), hypohidrosis (reduced ability to sweat), and hypodontia (congenital absence of teeth). The cardinal features of classic HED become obvious during childhood. The scalp hair is thin, lightly pigmented, and slow growing. Sweating, although present, is greatly deficient, leading to episodes of hyperthermia until the affected individual or family acquires experience with environmental modifications to control temperature. Only a few abnormally formed teeth erupt, at a later-than-average age. Physical growth and psychomotor development are otherwise within normal limits. Mild HED is characterized by mild manifestations of any or all the characteristic features.
Williams syndrome
MedGen UID:
59799
Concept ID:
C0175702
Disease or Syndrome
Williams syndrome (WS) is characterized by cardiovascular disease (elastin arteriopathy, peripheral pulmonary stenosis, supravalvar aortic stenosis, hypertension), distinctive facies, connective tissue abnormalities, intellectual disability (usually mild), a specific cognitive profile, unique personality characteristics, growth abnormalities, and endocrine abnormalities (hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria, hypothyroidism, and early puberty). Feeding difficulties often lead to poor weight gain in infancy. Hypotonia and hyperextensible joints can result in delayed attainment of motor milestones.
Diastrophic dysplasia
MedGen UID:
113103
Concept ID:
C0220726
Disease or Syndrome
Diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) is characterized by limb shortening, normal-sized head, hitchhiker thumbs, spinal deformities (scoliosis, exaggerated lumbar lordosis, cervical kyphosis), and contractures of the large joints with deformities and early-onset osteoarthritis. Other typical findings are ulnar deviation of the fingers, gap between the first and second toes, and clubfoot. On occasion, the disease can be lethal at birth, but most affected individuals survive the neonatal period and develop physical limitations with normal intelligence.
Hypothalamic hypothyroidism
MedGen UID:
113137
Concept ID:
C0220998
Disease or Syndrome
A type of hypothyroidism that results from a defect in thyrotropin-releasing hormone activity.
Acromicric dysplasia
MedGen UID:
78549
Concept ID:
C0265287
Congenital Abnormality
Acromicric dysplasia (ACMICD) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by severe short stature, short hands and feet, joint limitations, and skin thickening. Radiologic features include delayed bone age, cone-shaped epiphyses, shortened long tubular bones, and ovoid vertebral bodies. Affected individuals have distinct facial features, including round face, well-defined eyebrows, long eyelashes, bulbous nose with anteverted nostrils, long and prominent philtrum, and thick lips with a small mouth. Other characteristic features include hoarse voice and pseudomuscular build, and there are distinct skeletal features as well, including an internal notch of the femoral head, internal notch of the second metacarpal, and external notch of the fifth metacarpal (summary by Le Goff et al., 2011). Allelic disorders with overlapping skeletal and joint features include geleophysic dysplasia-2 (GPHYSD2; 614185) and the autosomal dominant form of Weill-Marchesani syndrome (608328).
Dermatofibrosis lenticularis disseminata
MedGen UID:
120545
Concept ID:
C0265514
Disease or Syndrome
Buschke-Ollendorff syndrome (BOS) is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder manifest by multiple subcutaneous nevi or nodules. They may be either elastin-rich (elastoma) or collagen-rich (dermatofibrosis lenticularis disseminata) on histologic examination. The lesions are usually nontender and firm. Affected individuals also have osteopoikilosis (OPK), literally meaning 'spotted bones,' which are osteosclerotic foci that occur in the epiphyses and metaphyses of long bones, wrist, foot, ankle, pelvis, and scapula. Some individuals have both skin and bone manifestations, whereas others may lack skin or bone manifestations. Some individuals may also have melorheostosis (155950), which is characterized by 'flowing' hyperostosis of the cortex of tubular bones. Most reported cases of BOS and OPK are benign, and the bone lesions are found incidentally, although some patients may have joint pain (reviews by Hellemans et al., 2004 and Zhang et al., 2009).
Aspartylglucosaminuria
MedGen UID:
78649
Concept ID:
C0268225
Disease or Syndrome
Aspartylglucosaminuria (AGU) is a severe autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder that involves the central nervous system and causes skeletal abnormalities as well as connective tissue lesions. The most characteristic feature is progressive mental retardation. The disorder is caused by deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme glycosylasparaginase, which results in body fluid and tissue accumulation of a series of glycoasparagines, i.e., glycoconjugates with an aspartylglucosamine moiety at the reducing end. AGU belongs to the group of disorders commonly referred to as the Finnish disease heritage (summary by Mononen et al., 1993 and Arvio and Arvio, 2002).
Farber lipogranulomatosis
MedGen UID:
78654
Concept ID:
C0268255
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of ASAH1-related disorders ranges from Farber disease (FD) to spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMA-PME). Classic FD is characterized by onset in the first weeks of life of painful, progressive deformity of the major joints; palpable subcutaneous nodules of joints and mechanical pressure points; and a hoarse cry resulting from granulomas of the larynx and epiglottis. Life expectancy is usually less than two years. In the other less common types of FD, onset, severity, and primary manifestations vary. SMA-PME is characterized by early-childhood-onset progressive lower motor neuron disease manifest typically between ages three and seven years as proximal lower-extremity weakness, followed by progressive myoclonic and atonic seizures, tremulousness/tremor, and sensorineural hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy typically begins in late childhood after the onset of weakness and can include jerking of the upper limbs, action myoclonus, myoclonic status, and eyelid myoclonus. Other findings include generalized tremor, and cognitive decline. The time from disease onset to death from respiratory complications is usually five to 15 years.
Megaloblastic anemia, thiamine-responsive, with diabetes mellitus and sensorineural deafness
MedGen UID:
83338
Concept ID:
C0342287
Congenital Abnormality
Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome (TRMA) is characterized by megaloblastic anemia, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, and diabetes mellitus. Onset of megaloblastic anemia occurs between infancy and adolescence. The anemia is corrected with thiamine treatment, but the red cells remain macrocytic and anemia can recur if treatment is withdrawn. Progressive sensorineural hearing loss often occurs early and can be detected in toddlers; hearing loss is irreversible and may not be prevented by thiamine treatment. The diabetes mellitus is non-type I in nature, with age of onset from infancy to adolescence. Thiamine treatment may reduce insulin requirement and delay onset of diabetes in some individuals.
Congenital laryngeal abductor palsy
MedGen UID:
96004
Concept ID:
C0396059
Congenital Abnormality
Laryngeal abductor paralysis is an autosomal dominant condition characterized by variable penetrance and expressivity ranging from mild symptoms to neonatal asphyxia. (summary by Morelli et al., 1982; Manaligod and Smith, 1998).
Congenital laryngeal adductor palsy
MedGen UID:
140759
Concept ID:
C0396060
Disease or Syndrome
Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome
MedGen UID:
98357
Concept ID:
C0406704
Disease or Syndrome
EEC syndrome is a genetic developmental disorder characterized by ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and orofacial clefts (cleft lip/palate).
Costello syndrome
MedGen UID:
108454
Concept ID:
C0587248
Disease or Syndrome
While the majority of individuals with Costello syndrome share characteristic findings affecting multiple organ systems, the phenotypic spectrum is wide, ranging from a milder or attenuated phenotype to a severe phenotype with early lethal complications. Costello syndrome is typically characterized by failure to thrive in infancy as a result of severe postnatal feeding difficulties; short stature; developmental delay or intellectual disability; coarse facial features (full lips, large mouth, full nasal tip); curly or sparse, fine hair; loose, soft skin with deep palmar and plantar creases; papillomata of the face and perianal region; diffuse hypotonia and joint laxity with ulnar deviation of the wrists and fingers; tight Achilles tendons; and cardiac involvement including: cardiac hypertrophy (usually typical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy), congenital heart defect (usually valvar pulmonic stenosis), and arrhythmia (usually supraventricular tachycardia, especially chaotic atrial rhythm/multifocal atrial tachycardia or ectopic atrial tachycardia). Relative or absolute macrocephaly is typical, and postnatal cerebellar overgrowth can result in the development of a Chiari I malformation with associated anomalies including hydrocephalus or syringomyelia. Individuals with Costello syndrome have an approximately 15% lifetime risk for malignant tumors including rhabdomyosarcoma and neuroblastoma in young children and transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder in adolescents and young adults.
FRAXE
MedGen UID:
155512
Concept ID:
C0751157
Disease or Syndrome
Intellectual developmental disorder-109 (MRX109) is characterized by mildly to moderately impaired intellectual development associated with learning difficulties, communication deficits, attention problems, hyperactivity, and autistic behavior (summary by Bensaid et al., 2009). The disorder, which is associated with a fragile site on chromosome Xq28 (FRAXE), can be caused either by silencing of the FMR2 gene as a consequence of a CCG expansion located upstream of this gene or by deletion within the gene (Stettner et al., 2011).
Scapuloperoneal spinal muscular atrophy
MedGen UID:
148283
Concept ID:
C0751335
Disease or Syndrome
The autosomal dominant TRPV4 disorders (previously considered to be clinically distinct phenotypes before their molecular basis was discovered) are now grouped into neuromuscular disorders and skeletal dysplasias; however, the overlap within each group is considerable. Affected individuals typically have either neuromuscular or skeletal manifestations alone, and in only rare instances an overlap syndrome has been reported. The three autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorders (mildest to most severe) are: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2C. Scapuloperoneal spinal muscular atrophy. Congenital distal spinal muscular atrophy. The autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorders are characterized by a congenital-onset, static, or later-onset progressive peripheral neuropathy with variable combinations of laryngeal dysfunction (i.e., vocal fold paresis), respiratory dysfunction, and joint contractures. The six autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasias (mildest to most severe) are: Familial digital arthropathy-brachydactyly. Autosomal dominant brachyolmia. Spondylometaphyseal dysplasia, Kozlowski type. Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, Maroteaux type. Parastremmatic dysplasia. Metatropic dysplasia. The skeletal dysplasia is characterized by brachydactyly (in all 6); the five that are more severe have short stature that varies from mild to severe with progressive spinal deformity and involvement of the long bones and pelvis. In the mildest of the autosomal dominant TRPV4 disorders life span is normal; in the most severe it is shortened. Bilateral progressive sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) can occur with both autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorders and skeletal dysplasias.
Smith-Magenis syndrome
MedGen UID:
162881
Concept ID:
C0795864
Disease or Syndrome
Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is characterized by distinctive physical features (particularly coarse facial features that progress with age), developmental delay, cognitive impairment, behavioral abnormalities, sleep disturbance, and childhood-onset abdominal obesity. Infants have feeding difficulties, failure to thrive, hypotonia, hyporeflexia, prolonged napping or need to be awakened for feeds, and generalized lethargy. The majority of individuals function in the mild-to-moderate range of intellectual disability. The behavioral phenotype, including significant sleep disturbance, stereotypies, and maladaptive and self-injurious behaviors, is generally not recognized until age 18 months or older and continues to change until adulthood. Sensory issues are frequently noted; these may include avoidant behavior, as well as repetitive seeking of textures, sounds, and experiences. Toileting difficulties are common. Significant anxiety is common as are problems with executive functioning, including inattention, distractibility, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. Maladaptive behaviors include frequent outbursts / temper tantrums, attention-seeking behaviors, opposition, aggression, and self-injurious behaviors including self-hitting, self-biting, skin picking, inserting foreign objects into body orifices (polyembolokoilamania), and yanking fingernails and/or toenails (onychotillomania). Among the stereotypic behaviors described, the spasmodic upper-body squeeze or "self-hug" seems to be highly associated with SMS. An underlying developmental asynchrony, specifically emotional maturity delayed beyond intellectual functioning, may also contribute to maladaptive behaviors in people with SMS.
Syndromic X-linked intellectual disability Snyder type
MedGen UID:
162918
Concept ID:
C0796160
Disease or Syndrome
Snyder-Robinson syndrome (SRS) is an X-linked intellectual disability syndrome characterized by asthenic build, facial dysmorphism with a prominent lower lip, kyphoscoliosis, osteoporosis, speech abnormalities, and seizures. Developmental delay usually presents as failure to meet early developmental milestones and then evolves to moderate to profound intellectual disability (which appears to remain stable over time) and variable motor disability. Asthenic habitus and low muscle mass usually develop during the first year, even in males who are ambulatory. During the first decade, males with SRS develop osteoporosis, resulting in fractures in the absence of trauma.
Pachyonychia congenita 2
MedGen UID:
314107
Concept ID:
C1721007
Disease or Syndrome
Pachyonychia congenita (PC) is characterized by hypertrophic nail dystrophy, painful palmoplantar keratoderma and blistering, oral leukokeratosis, pilosebaceous cysts (including steatocystoma and vellus hair cysts), palmoplantar hyperhydrosis, and follicular keratoses on the trunk and extremities.
Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1B
MedGen UID:
330880
Concept ID:
C1842586
Disease or Syndrome
The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN), which are also referred to as hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSN) in the absence of significant autonomic features, are a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of disorders associated with sensory dysfunction. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HSAN, see HSAN1A (162400).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, axonal, with vocal cord paresis, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
375113
Concept ID:
C1843183
Disease or Syndrome
Paragangliomas 3
MedGen UID:
340200
Concept ID:
C1854336
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary paraganglioma-pheochromocytoma (PGL/PCC) syndromes are characterized by paragangliomas (tumors that arise from neuroendocrine tissues distributed along the paravertebral axis from the base of the skull to the pelvis) and pheochromocytomas (paragangliomas that are confined to the adrenal medulla). Sympathetic paragangliomas cause catecholamine excess; parasympathetic paragangliomas are most often nonsecretory. Extra-adrenal parasympathetic paragangliomas are located predominantly in the skull base and neck (referred to as head and neck PGL [HNPGL]) and sometimes in the upper mediastinum; approximately 95% of such tumors are nonsecretory. In contrast, sympathetic extra-adrenal paragangliomas are generally confined to the lower mediastinum, abdomen, and pelvis, and are typically secretory. Pheochromocytomas, which arise from the adrenal medulla, typically lead to catecholamine excess. Symptoms of PGL/PCC result from either mass effects or catecholamine hypersecretion (e.g., sustained or paroxysmal elevations in blood pressure, headache, episodic profuse sweating, forceful palpitations, pallor, and apprehension or anxiety). The risk for developing metastatic disease is greater for extra-adrenal sympathetic paragangliomas than for pheochromocytomas.
Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, Shohat type
MedGen UID:
400703
Concept ID:
C1865185
Disease or Syndrome
Shohat-type spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMDSH) is a chondrodysplasia characterized by vertebral, epiphyseal, and metaphyseal abnormalities, including scoliosis with vertebral compression fractures, flattened vertebral bodies, and hypomineralization of long bones. Affected individuals may exhibit a small trunk, short neck, small limbs, joint laxity, bowlegs, and/or abdominal distention with hepatosplenomegaly (summary by Egunsola et al., 2017).
Paragangliomas 2
MedGen UID:
357076
Concept ID:
C1866552
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary paraganglioma-pheochromocytoma (PGL/PCC) syndromes are characterized by paragangliomas (tumors that arise from neuroendocrine tissues distributed along the paravertebral axis from the base of the skull to the pelvis) and pheochromocytomas (paragangliomas that are confined to the adrenal medulla). Sympathetic paragangliomas cause catecholamine excess; parasympathetic paragangliomas are most often nonsecretory. Extra-adrenal parasympathetic paragangliomas are located predominantly in the skull base and neck (referred to as head and neck PGL [HNPGL]) and sometimes in the upper mediastinum; approximately 95% of such tumors are nonsecretory. In contrast, sympathetic extra-adrenal paragangliomas are generally confined to the lower mediastinum, abdomen, and pelvis, and are typically secretory. Pheochromocytomas, which arise from the adrenal medulla, typically lead to catecholamine excess. Symptoms of PGL/PCC result from either mass effects or catecholamine hypersecretion (e.g., sustained or paroxysmal elevations in blood pressure, headache, episodic profuse sweating, forceful palpitations, pallor, and apprehension or anxiety). The risk for developing metastatic disease is greater for extra-adrenal sympathetic paragangliomas than for pheochromocytomas.
Mucolipidosis type II
MedGen UID:
435914
Concept ID:
C2673377
Disease or Syndrome
GNPTAB-related disorders comprise the phenotypes mucolipidosis II (ML II) and mucolipidosis IIIa/ß (ML IIIa/ß), and phenotypes intermediate between ML II and ML IIIa/ß. ML II is evident at birth and slowly progressive; death most often occurs in early childhood. Orthopedic abnormalities present at birth may include thoracic deformity, kyphosis, clubfeet, deformed long bones, and/or dislocation of the hip(s). Growth often ceases in the second year of life; contractures develop in all large joints. The skin is thickened, facial features are coarse, and gingiva are hypertrophic. All children have cardiac involvement, most commonly thickening and insufficiency of the mitral valve and, less frequently, the aortic valve. Progressive mucosal thickening narrows the airways, and gradual stiffening of the thoracic cage contributes to respiratory insufficiency, the most common cause of death. ML IIIa/ß becomes evident at about age three years with slow growth rate and short stature; joint stiffness and pain initially in the shoulders, hips, and fingers; gradual mild coarsening of facial features; and normal to mildly impaired cognitive development. Pain from osteoporosis becomes more severe during adolescence. Cardiorespiratory complications (restrictive lung disease, thickening and insufficiency of the mitral and aortic valves, left and/or right ventricular hypertrophy) are common causes of death, typically in early to middle adulthood. Phenotypes intermediate between ML II and ML IIIa/ß are characterized by physical growth in infancy that resembles that of ML II and neuromotor and speech development that resemble that of ML IIIa/ß.
Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, Cantu type
MedGen UID:
435975
Concept ID:
C2673649
Disease or Syndrome
An extremely rare type of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia described in about 5 patients to date with clinical signs including short stature, peculiar facies with blepharophimosis, upward slanted eyes, abundant eyebrows and eyelashes, coarse voice, and short hands and feet.
Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, aggrecan type
MedGen UID:
411237
Concept ID:
C2748544
Disease or Syndrome
A new form of skeletal dysplasia with manifestations of severe short stature, facial dysmorphism and characteristic radiographic findings. To date, three cases have been described, all originating from the same family. The disease results from a missense mutation affecting the C-type lectin domain of aggrecan (AGC1 gene; chromosome 15) which regulates endochondral ossification. Transmission is autosomal recessive.
Chromosome Xp11.23-p11.22 duplication syndrome
MedGen UID:
440690
Concept ID:
C2749022
Disease or Syndrome
Familial and <i>de novo</i> recurrent Xp11.22-p11.23 microduplication has been recently identified in males and females.
Pituitary hormone deficiency, combined, 1
MedGen UID:
414421
Concept ID:
C2751608
Disease or Syndrome
Combined pituitary hormone deficiency (CPHD) in man denotes impaired production of growth hormone (GH; 139250) and one or more of the other 5 anterior pituitary hormones. Mutations of the POU1F1 gene in the human and Pit1 in the mouse are responsible for pleiotropic deficiencies of GH, prolactin (PRL; 176760), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH; see 188540), while the production of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH; see 176830), luteinizing hormone (LH; 152780), and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH; 136530) are preserved (Wu et al., 1998). Some patients exhibit only GH deficiency, although approximately 50% of isolated GH deficiency progresses to CPHD (Gergics et al., 2021). In infancy severe growth deficiency from birth as well as distinctive facial features with prominent forehead, marked midfacial hypoplasia with depressed nasal bridge, deep-set eyes, and a short nose with anteverted nostrils and hypoplastic pituitary gland by MRI examination can be seen (Aarskog et al., 1997). Some cases present with severe mental retardation along with short stature (Radovick et al., 1992). Reviews Voss and Rosenfeld (1992) reviewed the development and differentiation of the 5 pituitary cell types: galactotropes, gonadotropes, corticotropes, thyrotropes, and somatotropes. As indicated by the mutations in PIT1 described later, combined pituitary hormone deficiency can have either autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive inheritance, depending on the part of the PIT1 molecule affected by the mutation. Some mutations have a dominant-negative effect. Genetic Heterogeneity of Combined Pituitary Hormone Deficiency CPHD2 (262600), associated with hypogonadism, is caused by mutation in the PROP1 gene (601538). CPHD3 (221750), which is associated with rigid cervical spine and variable sensorineural deafness, is caused by mutation in the LHX3 gene (600577). CPHD4 (262700) is caused by mutation in the LHX4 gene (602146). CPHD5 (see septooptic dysplasia, 182230) is caused by mutation in the HESX1 gene (601802). CPHD6 (613986) is caused by mutation in the OTX2 gene (600037). CPHD7 (618160) is caused by mutation in the RNPC3 gene (618016).
X-linked Opitz G/BBB syndrome
MedGen UID:
424842
Concept ID:
C2936904
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked Opitz G/BBB syndrome (X-OS) is a multiple-congenital-anomaly disorder characterized by facial anomalies (hypertelorism, prominent forehead, widow's peak, broad nasal bridge, anteverted nares), genitourinary abnormalities (hypospadias, cryptorchidism, and hypoplastic/bifid scrotum), and laryngotracheoesophageal defects. Developmental delay and intellectual disability are observed in about 50% of affected males. Cleft lip and/or palate are present in approximately 50% of affected individuals. Other malformations (present in <50% of individuals) include congenital heart defects, imperforate or ectopic anus, and midline brain defects (Dandy-Walker malformation and agenesis or hypoplasia of the corpus callosum and/or cerebellar vermis). Wide clinical variability occurs even among members of the same family. Female heterozygotes usually manifest hypertelorism only.
Peripheral neuropathy-myopathy-hoarseness-hearing loss syndrome
MedGen UID:
482186
Concept ID:
C3280556
Disease or Syndrome
Peripheral neuropathy-myopathy-hoarseness-hearing loss syndrome is a rare, syndromic genetic deafness characterized by a combination of muscle weakness, chronic neuropathic and myopathic features, hoarseness and sensorineural hearing loss. A wide range of disease onset and severity has been reported even within the same family.
Congenital nongoitrous hypothryoidism 6
MedGen UID:
482447
Concept ID:
C3280817
Disease or Syndrome
Any hypothyroidism, congenital, nongoitrous in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the THRA gene.
Coffin-Siris syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
482831
Concept ID:
C3281201
Disease or Syndrome
Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) is classically characterized by aplasia or hypoplasia of the distal phalanx or nail of the fifth and additional digits, developmental or cognitive delay of varying degree, distinctive facial features, hypotonia, hirsutism/hypertrichosis, and sparse scalp hair. Congenital anomalies can include malformations of the cardiac, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and/or central nervous systems. Other findings commonly include feeding difficulties, slow growth, ophthalmologic abnormalities, and hearing impairment.
Paragangliomas 1
MedGen UID:
488134
Concept ID:
C3494181
Neoplastic Process
Hereditary paraganglioma-pheochromocytoma (PGL/PCC) syndromes are characterized by paragangliomas (tumors that arise from neuroendocrine tissues distributed along the paravertebral axis from the base of the skull to the pelvis) and pheochromocytomas (paragangliomas that are confined to the adrenal medulla). Sympathetic paragangliomas cause catecholamine excess; parasympathetic paragangliomas are most often nonsecretory. Extra-adrenal parasympathetic paragangliomas are located predominantly in the skull base and neck (referred to as head and neck PGL [HNPGL]) and sometimes in the upper mediastinum; approximately 95% of such tumors are nonsecretory. In contrast, sympathetic extra-adrenal paragangliomas are generally confined to the lower mediastinum, abdomen, and pelvis, and are typically secretory. Pheochromocytomas, which arise from the adrenal medulla, typically lead to catecholamine excess. Symptoms of PGL/PCC result from either mass effects or catecholamine hypersecretion (e.g., sustained or paroxysmal elevations in blood pressure, headache, episodic profuse sweating, forceful palpitations, pallor, and apprehension or anxiety). The risk for developing metastatic disease is greater for extra-adrenal sympathetic paragangliomas than for pheochromocytomas.
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis type 21
MedGen UID:
813851
Concept ID:
C3807521
Disease or Syndrome
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-21 (ALS21) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder affecting upper and lower motor neurons, resulting in muscle weakness and respiratory failure. Some patients may develop myopathic features or dementia (summary by Johnson et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, see ALS1 (105400).
Noonan syndrome-like disorder with loose anagen hair 1
MedGen UID:
1379805
Concept ID:
C4478716
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome-like disorder with loose anagen hair is characterized by facial features similar to those observed in Noonan syndrome (163950), including hypertelorism, ptosis, downslanting palpebral fissures, low-set posteriorly angulated ears, and overfolded pinnae. In addition, patients display short stature, frequently with growth hormone (GH; see 139250) deficiency; cognitive deficits; relative macrocephaly; small posterior fossa resulting in Chiari I malformation; hypernasal voice; cardiac defects, especially dysplasia of the mitral valve and septal defects; and ectodermal abnormalities, in which the most characteristic feature is the hair anomaly, including easily pluckable, sparse, thin, slow-growing hair (summary by Bertola et al., 2017). Reviews Komatsuzaki et al. (2010) reviewed the clinical manifestations of patients with Noonan syndrome, Costello syndrome (218040), and cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome (CFC; see 115150) compared to patients with mutations in the SHOC2 gene. They noted that although there is phenotypic overlap among the disorders, loose anagen/easily pluckable hair had not been reported in mutation-positive patients with Noonan, CFC, or Costello syndrome, and appeared to be a distinctive feature of SHOC2 mutation-positive patients. Genetic Heterogeneity of Noonan Syndrome-Like Disorder with Loose Anagen Hair NSLH2 (617506) is caused by mutation in the PPP1CB gene (600590) on chromosome 2p23.
Epileptic encephalopathy, infantile or early childhood, 1
MedGen UID:
1626137
Concept ID:
C4540199
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-91 (DEE91) is characterized by delayed psychomotor development apparent in infancy and resulting in severely to profoundly impaired intellectual development with poor or absent speech. Most patients never achieve independent walking. Patients typically have onset of refractory multifocal seizures between the first weeks and years of life, and some may show developmental regression. Additional features, such as hypotonia and cortical visual impairment, are more variable (summary by Myers et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Immunodeficiency, developmental delay, and hypohomocysteinemia
MedGen UID:
1616061
Concept ID:
C4540293
Disease or Syndrome
IMDDHH is a multisystem disorder characterized by immunodeficiency, mildly delayed psychomotor development, poor overall growth from infancy, and hypohomocysteinemia. Additional features, such as congenital heart defects and liver involvement, are more variable (summary by Huppke et al., 2017).
Geleophysic dysplasia 3
MedGen UID:
1615724
Concept ID:
C4540511
Congenital Abnormality
Geleophysic dysplasia, a progressive condition resembling a lysosomal storage disorder, is characterized by short stature, short hands and feet, progressive joint limitation and contractures, distinctive facial features, progressive cardiac valvular disease, and thickened skin. Intellect is normal. Major findings are likely to be present in the first year of life. Cardiac, respiratory, and lung involvement result in death before age five years in approximately 33% of individuals with ADAMTSL2-related geleophysic dysplasia.
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, periodontal type 1
MedGen UID:
1642148
Concept ID:
C4551499
Disease or Syndrome
Periodontal Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (pEDS) is characterized by distinct oral manifestations. Periodontal tissue breakdown beginning in the teens results in premature loss of teeth. Lack of attached gingiva and thin and fragile gums lead to gingival recession. Connective tissue abnormalities of pEDS typically include easy bruising, pretibial plaques, distal joint hypermobility, hoarse voice, and less commonly manifestations such as organ or vessel rupture. Since the first descriptions of pEDS in the 1970s, 148 individuals have been reported in the literature; however, future in-depth descriptions of non-oral manifestations in newly diagnosed individuals with a molecularly confirmed diagnosis of pEDS will be important to further define the clinical features.
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 57
MedGen UID:
1648280
Concept ID:
C4748003
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
MRD57 is an autosomal dominant neurodevelopmental disorder with a highly variable phenotype. Most affected individuals have delayed psychomotor development apparent in infancy or early childhood, language delay, and behavioral abnormalities. Additional features may include hypotonia, feeding problems, gastrointestinal issues, and dysmorphic facial features (summary by Reijnders et al., 2018).
Respiratory papillomatosis, juvenile recurrent, congenital
MedGen UID:
1719353
Concept ID:
C5394112
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital juvenile respiratory papillomatosis (JRRP) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the development of recurrent growth of papillomas (warts) on respiratory epithelial cells in the upper airway, particularly the larynx. Patients present in early childhood with hoarse voice and, in severe cases, respiratory stridor due to airway obstruction. Affected individuals may also have mild dermatologic abnormalities similar to those observed in AIADK. While JRRP is a genetic disorder resulting from abnormal activation of the immune system, RRP in general is usually associated with acquired HPV infection, commonly with HPV types 6 and 11 (summary by Drutman et al., 2019).
Noonan syndrome 13
MedGen UID:
1761918
Concept ID:
C5436773
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population.
Developmental delay, impaired speech, and behavioral abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1794167
Concept ID:
C5561957
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental delay, impaired speech, and behavioral abnormalities (DDISBA) is characterized by global developmental delay apparent from early childhood. Intellectual disability can range from mild to severe. Additional variable features may include dysmorphic facial features, seizures, hypotonia, motor abnormalities such as Tourette syndrome or dystonia, and hearing loss (summary by Cousin et al., 2021).
Stüve-Wiedemann syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1803541
Concept ID:
C5676888
Disease or Syndrome
Stuve-Wiedemann syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by bowing of the long bones and other skeletal anomalies, episodic hyperthermia, respiratory distress, and feeding difficulties usually resulting in early death (Dagoneau et al., 2004). See also 'classic' Schwartz-Jampel syndrome type 1 (SJS1; 255800), a phenotypically similar but genetically distinct disorder caused by mutation in the HSPG2 gene (142461) on chromosome 1p36. Genetic Heterogeneity of Stuve-Wiedemann Syndrome Stuve-Wiedemann syndrome-2 (STWS2; 619751) is caused by mutation in the IL6ST gene (600694) on chromosome 5q11.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Larson ST, Wilbur J
Am Fam Physician 2020 Jan 15;101(2):95-108. PMID: 31939642
Rajapaksa S, Starr M
Aust Fam Physician 2010 May;39(5):280-2. PMID: 20485713
Yates RW, Doull IJ
Drug Saf 1997 Jan;16(1):48-55. doi: 10.2165/00002018-199716010-00003. PMID: 9010642

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Szklanny K, Gubrynowicz R, Tylki-Szymańska A
J Appl Genet 2018 Feb;59(1):73-80. Epub 2017 Dec 23 doi: 10.1007/s13353-017-0421-6. PMID: 29275451Free PMC Article
Reiter R, Hoffmann TK, Pickhard A, Brosch S
Dtsch Arztebl Int 2015 May 8;112(19):329-37. doi: 10.3238/arztebl.2015.0329. PMID: 26043420Free PMC Article
Aydin K, Turkyilmaz D, Ozturk B, Dagdelen S, Ozgen B, Unal F, Erbas T
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 2013 Mar;270(4):1391-6. Epub 2013 Feb 7 doi: 10.1007/s00405-013-2369-4. PMID: 23389327
Rajapaksa S, Starr M
Aust Fam Physician 2010 May;39(5):280-2. PMID: 20485713
Caponas G
Anaesth Intensive Care 2002 Oct;30(5):551-69. doi: 10.1177/0310057X0203000503. PMID: 12413253

Diagnosis

Skirko J
FP Essent 2022 Feb;513:25-31. PMID: 35143152
Larson ST, Wilbur J
Am Fam Physician 2020 Jan 15;101(2):95-108. PMID: 31939642
Mcgrath JA
Handb Clin Neurol 2015;132:317-22. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-444-62702-5.00023-8. PMID: 26564090
Reiter R, Hoffmann TK, Pickhard A, Brosch S
Dtsch Arztebl Int 2015 May 8;112(19):329-37. doi: 10.3238/arztebl.2015.0329. PMID: 26043420Free PMC Article
Grundfast KM, Harley E
Otolaryngol Clin North Am 1989 Jun;22(3):569-97. PMID: 2657584

Therapy

Reiter R, Hoffmann TK, Pickhard A, Brosch S
Dtsch Arztebl Int 2015 May 8;112(19):329-37. doi: 10.3238/arztebl.2015.0329. PMID: 26043420Free PMC Article
Rajapaksa S, Starr M
Aust Fam Physician 2010 May;39(5):280-2. PMID: 20485713
Caponas G
Anaesth Intensive Care 2002 Oct;30(5):551-69. doi: 10.1177/0310057X0203000503. PMID: 12413253
Herzinger T, Schorling S, Röcken J, Röcken M
Lancet 2002 Apr 13;359(9314):1308. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(02)08271-5. PMID: 11965277
Drug Ther Bull 2000 Mar;38(3):22-4. doi: 10.1136/dtb.2000.38322. PMID: 10829352

Prognosis

Kallvik E, Toivonen L, Peltola V, Kaljonen A, Simberg S
J Voice 2019 Sep;33(5):801.e21-801.e25. Epub 2018 Mar 3 doi: 10.1016/j.jvoice.2018.01.021. PMID: 29506899
Szklanny K, Gubrynowicz R, Tylki-Szymańska A
J Appl Genet 2018 Feb;59(1):73-80. Epub 2017 Dec 23 doi: 10.1007/s13353-017-0421-6. PMID: 29275451Free PMC Article
Verma H, Solanki P, James M
J Voice 2016 Sep;30(5):600-5. Epub 2015 Oct 21 doi: 10.1016/j.jvoice.2015.06.008. PMID: 26474713
Rajapaksa S, Starr M
Aust Fam Physician 2010 May;39(5):280-2. PMID: 20485713
Yates RW, Doull IJ
Drug Saf 1997 Jan;16(1):48-55. doi: 10.2165/00002018-199716010-00003. PMID: 9010642

Clinical prediction guides

Kutkowska-Kaźmierczak A, Boczar M, Kalka E, Castañeda J, Klapecki J, Pietrzyk A, Barczyk A, Malinowska O, Landowska A, Gambin T, Kowalczyk K, Wiśniowiecka-Kowalnik B, Smyk M, Dawidziuk M, Niepokój K, Paczkowska M, Szyld P, Lipska-Ziętkiewicz B, Szczałuba K, Kostyk E, Runge A, Rutkowska K, Płoski R, Nowakowska B, Bal J, Obersztyn E, Gos M
Genes (Basel) 2021 Aug 17;12(8) doi: 10.3390/genes12081257. PMID: 34440431Free PMC Article
Kallvik E, Toivonen L, Peltola V, Kaljonen A, Simberg S
J Voice 2019 Sep;33(5):801.e21-801.e25. Epub 2018 Mar 3 doi: 10.1016/j.jvoice.2018.01.021. PMID: 29506899
Verma H, Solanki P, James M
J Voice 2016 Sep;30(5):600-5. Epub 2015 Oct 21 doi: 10.1016/j.jvoice.2015.06.008. PMID: 26474713
Le Goff C, Cormier-Daire V
Am J Med Genet C Semin Med Genet 2012 Aug 15;160C(3):145-53. Epub 2012 Jul 12 doi: 10.1002/ajmg.c.31337. PMID: 22791552
Gropman AL, Duncan WC, Smith AC
Pediatr Neurol 2006 May;34(5):337-50. doi: 10.1016/j.pediatrneurol.2005.08.018. PMID: 16647992

Recent systematic reviews

Yu SH, Beirne OR
J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2010 Oct;68(10):2359-76. Epub 2010 Jul 31 doi: 10.1016/j.joms.2010.04.017. PMID: 20674126

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