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EEG abnormality

MedGen UID:
56235
Concept ID:
C0151611
Finding
Synonyms: EEG abnormalities; Electroencephalogram (EEG) abnormalities
SNOMED CT: EEG abnormal (274521009); Electroencephalogram abnormal (274521009)
 
HPO: HP:0002353

Definition

Abnormality observed by electroencephalogram (EEG), which is used to record of the brain's spontaneous electrical activity from multiple electrodes placed on the scalp. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVEEG abnormality

Conditions with this feature

Autism
MedGen UID:
13966
Concept ID:
C0004352
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Autism, the prototypic pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), is usually apparent by 3 years of age. It is characterized by a triad of limited or absent verbal communication, a lack of reciprocal social interaction or responsiveness, and restricted, stereotypic, and ritualized patterns of interests and behavior (Bailey et al., 1996; Risch et al., 1999). 'Autism spectrum disorder,' sometimes referred to as ASD, is a broader phenotype encompassing the less severe disorders Asperger syndrome (see ASPG1; 608638) and pervasive developmental disorder, not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). 'Broad autism phenotype' includes individuals with some symptoms of autism, but who do not meet the full criteria for autism or other disorders. Mental retardation coexists in approximately two-thirds of individuals with ASD, except for Asperger syndrome, in which mental retardation is conspicuously absent (Jones et al., 2008). Genetic studies in autism often include family members with these less stringent diagnoses (Schellenberg et al., 2006). Levy et al. (2009) provided a general review of autism and autism spectrum disorder, including epidemiology, characteristics of the disorder, diagnosis, neurobiologic hypotheses for the etiology, genetics, and treatment options. Genetic Heterogeneity of Autism Autism is considered to be a complex multifactorial disorder involving many genes. Accordingly, several loci have been identified, some or all of which may contribute to the phenotype. Included in this entry is AUTS1, which has been mapped to chromosome 7q22. Other susceptibility loci include AUTS3 (608049), which maps to chromosome 13q14; AUTS4 (608636), which maps to chromosome 15q11; AUTS6 (609378), which maps to chromosome 17q11; AUTS7 (610676), which maps to chromosome 17q21; AUTS8 (607373), which maps to chromosome 3q25-q27; AUTS9 (611015), which maps to chromosome 7q31; AUTS10 (611016), which maps to chromosome 7q36; AUTS11 (610836), which maps to chromosome 1q41; AUTS12 (610838), which maps to chromosome 21p13-q11; AUTS13 (610908), which maps to chromosome 12q14; AUTS14A (611913), which has been found in patients with a deletion of a region of 16p11.2; AUTS14B (614671), which has been found in patients with a duplication of a region of 16p11.2; AUTS15 (612100), associated with mutation in the CNTNAP2 gene (604569) on chromosome 7q35-q36; AUTS16 (613410), associated with mutation in the SLC9A9 gene (608396) on chromosome 3q24; AUTS17 (613436), associated with mutation in the SHANK2 gene (603290) on chromosome 11q13; AUTS18 (615032), associated with mutation in the CHD8 gene (610528) on chromosome 14q11; AUTS19 (615091), associated with mutation in the EIF4E gene (133440) on chromosome 4q23; and AUTS20 (618830), associated with mutation in the NLGN1 gene (600568) on chromosome 3q26. (NOTE: the symbol 'AUTS2' has been used to refer to a gene on chromosome 7q11 (KIAA0442; 607270) and therefore is not used as a part of this autism locus series.) There are several X-linked forms of autism susceptibility: AUTSX1 (300425), associated with mutations in the NLGN3 gene (300336); AUTSX2 (300495), associated with mutations in NLGN4 (300427); AUTSX3 (300496), associated with mutations in MECP2 (300005); AUTSX4 (300830), associated with variation in the region on chromosome Xp22.11 containing the PTCHD1 gene (300828); AUTSX5 (300847), associated with mutations in the RPL10 gene (312173); and AUTSX6 (300872), associated with mutation in the TMLHE gene (300777). A locus on chromosome 2q (606053) associated with a phenotype including intellectual disability and speech deficits was formerly designated AUTS5. Folstein and Rosen-Sheidley (2001) reviewed the genetics of autism.
Galactosylceramide beta-galactosidase deficiency
MedGen UID:
44131
Concept ID:
C0023521
Disease or Syndrome
Krabbe disease comprises a spectrum ranging from infantile-onset disease (i.e., onset of extreme irritability, spasticity, and developmental delay before age 12 months) to later-onset disease (i.e., onset of manifestations after age 12 months and as late as the seventh decade). Although historically 85%-90% of symptomatic individuals with Krabbe disease diagnosed by enzyme activity alone have infantile-onset Krabbe disease and 10%-15% have later-onset Krabbe disease, the experience with newborn screening (NBS) suggests that the proportion of individuals with possible later-onset Krabbe disease is higher than previously thought. Infantile-onset Krabbe disease is characterized by normal development in the first few months followed by rapid severe neurologic deterioration; the average age of death is 24 months (range 8 months to 9 years). Later-onset Krabbe disease is much more variable in its presentation and disease course.
Rett syndrome
MedGen UID:
48441
Concept ID:
C0035372
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of MECP2-related phenotypes in females ranges from classic Rett syndrome to variant Rett syndrome with a broader clinical phenotype (either milder or more severe than classic Rett syndrome) to mild learning disabilities; the spectrum in males ranges from severe neonatal encephalopathy to pyramidal signs, parkinsonism, and macroorchidism (PPM-X) syndrome to severe syndromic/nonsyndromic intellectual disability. Females: Classic Rett syndrome, a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder primarily affecting girls, is characterized by apparently normal psychomotor development during the first six to 18 months of life, followed by a short period of developmental stagnation, then rapid regression in language and motor skills, followed by long-term stability. During the phase of rapid regression, repetitive, stereotypic hand movements replace purposeful hand use. Additional findings include fits of screaming and inconsolable crying, autistic features, panic-like attacks, bruxism, episodic apnea and/or hyperpnea, gait ataxia and apraxia, tremors, seizures, and acquired microcephaly. Males: Severe neonatal-onset encephalopathy, the most common phenotype in affected males, is characterized by a relentless clinical course that follows a metabolic-degenerative type of pattern, abnormal tone, involuntary movements, severe seizures, and breathing abnormalities. Death often occurs before age two years.
Schizophrenia
MedGen UID:
48574
Concept ID:
C0036341
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Schizophrenia is highly heritable, as shown by family, twin, and adoption studies. For example, for identical twins, if one twin develops schizophrenia, the other twin has about a 50% chance of also developing the disease. The risk of the general population developing the schizophrenia is about 0.3-0.7% worldwide. The search for “schizophrenia genes” has been elusive. Initial linkage studies looked at parts of the genome associated with schizophrenia, and many candidate genes were identified, including APOE, COMT, DAO, DRD1, DRD2, DRD4, DTNBP1, GABRB2, GRIN2B, HP, IL1B, MTHFR, PLXNA2, SLC6A4, TP53, and TPH1. However, some of these have later been questioned. Microdeletions and microduplications have been found to be three times more common in individuals with schizophrenia, compared to controls. Because these deletions and duplications are in genes that are overexpressed in pathways related to brain development, it is possible that the inheritance of multiple rare variants may contribute to the development of schizophrenia. Several genetic disorders feature schizophrenia as a clinical feature. The 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome comprises many different syndromes, of which one of the most serious is DiGeorge syndrome. Children born with DiGeorge syndrome typically have heart defects, cleft palate, learning difficulties, and immune deficiency. Schizophrenia is a late manifestation, affecting around 30% of individuals. Microdeletions and duplications in chromosome 1, 2, 3, 7, 15 and 16 have also been associated with schizophrenia. In 2014, a genome-wide association study looked at the genomes of over 35,000 patients and 110,00 controls. The study identified 108 SNPs that were associated with schizophrenia, 83 of which had not been previously reported. As expected, many of these loci occurred in genes that are expressed in the brain. For example, the SNPs included a gene that encodes the dopamine D2 receptor, DRD2 (the target of antipsychotic drugs), and many genes involved in glutamine neurotransmitter pathways and synaptic plasticity (e.g., GRM3, GRIN2A, SRR, GRIA1). More surprisingly, however, associations were also enriched among genes expressed in tissues with important immune functions. In 2016, a study based on nearly 65,000 people investigated the association between schizophrenia and variation in the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) locus—a region on chromosome 6 that is important for immune function. The study focused on the C4 gene (complement component 4) that exists as two distinct genes: C4A and C4B, which encode particularly structurally diverse alleles. The study found that the alleles which promoted greater expression of C4A in the brain were associated with a greater risk of schizophrenia. By using mice models, the study showed that C4 is involved in the elimination of synapses during brain maturation. In humans, “synaptic pruning” is most active during late adolescence, which coincides with the typical onset of symptoms of schizophrenia. It is therefore possible that the inheritance of specific C4A alleles could lead to “run away” synaptic pruning, increasing the risk of schizophrenia. Further research may even determine C4 as a potential therapeutic target.
Angelman syndrome
MedGen UID:
58144
Concept ID:
C0162635
Disease or Syndrome
Angelman syndrome (AS) is characterized by severe developmental delay or intellectual disability, severe speech impairment, gait ataxia and/or tremulousness of the limbs, and unique behavior with an apparent happy demeanor that includes frequent laughing, smiling, and excitability. Microcephaly and seizures are also common. Developmental delays are first noted at around age six months; however, the unique clinical features of AS do not become manifest until after age one year.
Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome
MedGen UID:
78557
Concept ID:
C0265339
Disease or Syndrome
Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome (BFLS) is an uncommon X-linked intellectual developmental disorder that evolves with age. Clinical manifestations in males are quite variable, with the most consistent features being initial hypotonia, mild to moderate impaired intellectual development, large fleshy ears, underdeveloped genitalia, gynecomastia, truncal obesity, tapering fingers, and shortening of the fourth and fifth toes. Heterozygous females may have a milder similar clinical phenotype, which can include hypothyroidism; however, many carrier females appear unaffected (summary by Crawford et al., 2006).
Proline dehydrogenase deficiency
MedGen UID:
120645
Concept ID:
C0268529
Disease or Syndrome
Phang et al. (2001) noted that prospective studies of HPI probands identified through newborn screening as well as reports of several families have suggested that it is a metabolic disorder not clearly associated with clinical manifestations. Phang et al. (2001) concluded that HPI is a relatively benign condition in most individuals under most circumstances. However, other reports have suggested that some patients have a severe phenotype with neurologic manifestations, including epilepsy and mental retardation (Jacquet et al., 2003). Genetic Heterogeneity of Hyperprolinemia See also hyperprolinemia type II (HYRPRO2; 239510), which is caused by mutation in the gene encoding pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH, ALDH4A1; 606811) on chromosome 1p36.
Saccharopinuria
MedGen UID:
75693
Concept ID:
C0268556
Disease or Syndrome
Saccharopinuria, also known as hyperlysinemia type II, is an autosomal recessive metabolic condition with few, if any, clinical manifestations. Hyperlysinemia type II and hyperlysinemia type I (238700) both result from deficiency of the bifunctional enzyme AASS (605113) on chromosome 7q31. The AASS gene encodes lysine alpha-ketoglutarate reductase and saccharopine dehydrogenase, which catalyze, respectively, the sequential conversion of lysine to saccharopine and saccharopine to alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde and glutamate (summary by Tondo et al., 2013). In hyperlysinemia type I, both enzymatic functions of AASS are defective and patients have increased serum lysine and possibly increased saccharopine; in hyperlysinemia type II, most of the first enzymatic function is retained, and patients tend to have isolated saccharopine increase (Cox, 1985; Cox et al., 1986).
Deficiency of hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA lyase
MedGen UID:
78692
Concept ID:
C0268601
Disease or Syndrome
3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency (HMGCLD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with the cardinal manifestations of metabolic acidosis without ketonuria, hypoglycemia, and a characteristic pattern of elevated urinary organic acid metabolites, including 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric, 3-methylglutaric, and 3-hydroxyisovaleric acids. Urinary levels of 3-methylcrotonylglycine may be increased. Dicarboxylic aciduria, hepatomegaly, and hyperammonemia may also be observed. Presenting clinical signs include irritability, lethargy, coma, and vomiting (summary by Gibson et al., 1988).
Succinate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency
MedGen UID:
124340
Concept ID:
C0268631
Disease or Syndrome
Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency is characterized by infantile-onset hypotonia, developmental delay, cognitive impairment, expressive language deficit, and mild ataxia. Epilepsy is present in about half of affected individuals and is more common in adults. Hyperkinetic behavior, aggression, self-injurious behaviors, hallucinations, and sleep disturbances have been reported in nearly half of all affected individuals, more commonly in those who are older. Basal ganglia signs including choreoathetosis, dystonia, and myoclonus have been reported in a few individuals with earlier-onset, more severe disease. Involvement beyond the central nervous system has not been described. Individuals with SSADH deficiency typically have 4-hydroxybutyric aciduria present on urine organic acid analysis. Head MRI reveals T2 hyperintensities in multiple regions, involving the globus pallidi, cerebellar dentate nuclei, subthalamic nuclei, subcortical white matter, and brain stem, as well as cerebral and sometimes cerebellar atrophy. EEG findings include background slowing and spike discharges that are usually generalized.
Reading seizure
MedGen UID:
75817
Concept ID:
C0278193
Disease or Syndrome
A rare reflex epilepsy characterized by reading-induced seizures which in most cases present with orofacial/jaw myoclonus possibly extending to the upper limbs but can also manifest as dyslexia or alexia and visual symptoms. In both variants secondary generalized tonic-clonic seizures may evolve if the stimulus is not interrupted. The disease typically begins in the second or third decade of life and may be inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. It usually takes a benign course with little tendency to spontaneous seizures.
GAPO syndrome
MedGen UID:
98034
Concept ID:
C0406723
Disease or Syndrome
GAPO syndrome is the acronymic designation for a complex of growth retardation, alopecia, pseudoanodontia (failure of tooth eruption), and progressive optic atrophy (Tipton and Gorlin, 1984). Ilker et al. (1999) and Bayram et al. (2014) noted that optic atrophy is not a consistent feature of the disorder.
Smith-Magenis syndrome
MedGen UID:
162881
Concept ID:
C0795864
Disease or Syndrome
Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is characterized by distinctive physical features (particularly coarse facial features that progress with age), developmental delay, cognitive impairment, behavioral abnormalities, sleep disturbance, and childhood-onset abdominal obesity. Infants have feeding difficulties, failure to thrive, hypotonia, hyporeflexia, prolonged napping or need to be awakened for feeds, and generalized lethargy. The majority of individuals function in the mild-to-moderate range of intellectual disability. The behavioral phenotype, including significant sleep disturbance, stereotypies, and maladaptive and self-injurious behaviors, is generally not recognized until age 18 months or older and continues to change until adulthood. Sensory issues are frequently noted; these may include avoidant behavior, as well as repetitive seeking of textures, sounds, and experiences. Toileting difficulties are common. Significant anxiety is common as are problems with executive functioning, including inattention, distractibility, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. Maladaptive behaviors include frequent outbursts / temper tantrums, attention-seeking behaviors, opposition, aggression, and self-injurious behaviors including self-hitting, self-biting, skin picking, inserting foreign objects into body orifices (polyembolokoilamania), and yanking fingernails and/or toenails (onychotillomania). Among the stereotypic behaviors described, the spasmodic upper-body squeeze or "self-hug" seems to be highly associated with SMS. An underlying developmental asynchrony, specifically emotional maturity delayed beyond intellectual functioning, may also contribute to maladaptive behaviors in people with SMS.
Worster-Drought syndrome
MedGen UID:
163228
Concept ID:
C0796204
Disease or Syndrome
A form of cerebral palsy with characteristics of congenital pseudobulbar (suprabulbar) paresis manifesting as selective weakness of the lips, tongue and soft palate, dysphagia, dysphonia, drooling and jaw jerking. Mean age at diagnosis is 6 years. The main clinical features are spasticity and limited movements around the mouth and throat from an early age, and brisk jaw jerks. Most cases are sporadic but several families with more than one affected member have been reported. Inheritance in these families appeared to follow an autosomal dominant pattern with variable expression and penetrance.
Partington syndrome
MedGen UID:
163237
Concept ID:
C0796250
Disease or Syndrome
Partington syndrome (PRTS) is an X-linked developmental disorder characterized by impaired intellectual development and variable movement disturbances. Partington syndrome is part of a phenotypic spectrum of disorders caused by mutation in the ARX gene comprising a nearly continuous series of developmental disorders ranging from hydranencephaly and lissencephaly (LISX2; 300215) to Proud syndrome (300004) to infantile spasms without brain malformations (see 308350) to nonsyndromic intellectual disability (300419). Although males with ARX mutations are often more severely affected, female mutation carriers may also be affected (Kato et al., 2004; Wallerstein et al., 2008).
Intellectual disability with optic atrophy, facial dysmorphism, microcephaly, and short stature
MedGen UID:
324635
Concept ID:
C1836915
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1E
MedGen UID:
324784
Concept ID:
C1837396
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) are metabolic deficiencies in glycoprotein biosynthesis that usually cause severe mental and psychomotor retardation. Different forms of CDGs can be recognized by altered isoelectric focusing (IEF) patterns of serum transferrin. For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG Ia (212065) and CDG Ib (602579).
Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis 8
MedGen UID:
374004
Concept ID:
C1838570
Disease or Syndrome
The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL; CLN) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the intracellular accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigment storage material in different patterns ultrastructurally. The lipopigment patterns observed most often in CLN8 comprise mixed combinations of 'granular,' 'curvilinear,' and 'fingerprint' profiles (Mole et al., 2005). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CLN, see CLN1 (256730).
Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis 7
MedGen UID:
325457
Concept ID:
C1838571
Disease or Syndrome
The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL, or CLN) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the intracellular accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigment storage material in different patterns ultrastructurally (summary by Mole et al., 2005). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CLN, see CLN1 (256730).
Childhood onset GLUT1 deficiency syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
330866
Concept ID:
C1842534
Disease or Syndrome
The phenotypic spectrum of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (Glut1 DS) is now known to be a continuum that includes the classic phenotype as well as paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia and epilepsy (previously known as dystonia 18 [DYT18]) and paroxysmal choreoathetosis with spasticity (previously known as dystonia 9 [DYT9]), atypical childhood absence epilepsy, myoclonic astatic epilepsy, and paroxysmal non-epileptic findings including intermittent ataxia, choreoathetosis, dystonia, and alternating hemiplegia. The classic phenotype is characterized by infantile-onset seizures, delayed neurologic development, acquired microcephaly, and complex movement disorders. Seizures in classic early-onset Glut1 DS begin before age six months. Several seizure types occur: generalized tonic or clonic, focal, myoclonic, atypical absence, atonic, and unclassified. In some infants, apneic episodes and abnormal episodic eye-head movements similar to opsoclonus may precede the onset of seizures. The frequency, severity, and type of seizures vary among affected individuals and are not related to disease severity. Cognitive impairment, ranging from learning disabilities to severe intellectual disability, is typical. The complex movement disorder, characterized by ataxia, dystonia, and chorea, may occur in any combination and may be continuous, paroxysmal, or continual with fluctuations in severity influenced by environmental factors such as fasting or with infectious stress. Symptoms often improve substantially when a ketogenic diet is started.
Autism, susceptibility to, 3
MedGen UID:
334211
Concept ID:
C1842632
Finding
Autism, the prototypic pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), is usually apparent by 3 years of age. It is characterized by a triad of limited or absent verbal communication, a lack of reciprocal social interaction or responsiveness, and restricted, stereotypic, and ritualized patterns of interests and behavior (Bailey et al., 1996; Risch et al., 1999). 'Autism spectrum disorder,' sometimes referred to as ASD, is a broader phenotype encompassing the less severe disorders Asperger syndrome (see ASPG1; 608638) and pervasive developmental disorder, not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). 'Broad autism phenotype' includes individuals with some symptoms of autism, but who do not meet the full criteria for autism or other disorders. Impaired intellectual development coexists in approximately two-thirds of individuals with ASD, except for Asperger syndrome, in which impaired intellectual development is conspicuously absent (Jones et al., 2008). Genetic studies in autism often include family members with these less stringent diagnoses (Schellenberg et al., 2006). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autism, see 209850. See also chromosome 13q14 deletion syndrome (613884), in which retinoblastoma and impaired intellectual development are features.
Intellectual disability, X-linked 82
MedGen UID:
337201
Concept ID:
C1845286
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Autism, susceptibility to, X-linked 3
MedGen UID:
335161
Concept ID:
C1845336
Finding
The spectrum of MECP2-related phenotypes in females ranges from classic Rett syndrome to variant Rett syndrome with a broader clinical phenotype (either milder or more severe than classic Rett syndrome) to mild learning disabilities; the spectrum in males ranges from severe neonatal encephalopathy to pyramidal signs, parkinsonism, and macroorchidism (PPM-X) syndrome to severe syndromic/nonsyndromic intellectual disability. Females: Classic Rett syndrome, a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder primarily affecting girls, is characterized by apparently normal psychomotor development during the first six to 18 months of life, followed by a short period of developmental stagnation, then rapid regression in language and motor skills, followed by long-term stability. During the phase of rapid regression, repetitive, stereotypic hand movements replace purposeful hand use. Additional findings include fits of screaming and inconsolable crying, autistic features, panic-like attacks, bruxism, episodic apnea and/or hyperpnea, gait ataxia and apraxia, tremors, seizures, and acquired microcephaly. Males: Severe neonatal-onset encephalopathy, the most common phenotype in affected males, is characterized by a relentless clinical course that follows a metabolic-degenerative type of pattern, abnormal tone, involuntary movements, severe seizures, and breathing abnormalities. Death often occurs before age two years.
Autism, susceptibility to, X-linked 2
MedGen UID:
336964
Concept ID:
C1845539
Finding
Autism, the prototypic pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), is usually apparent by 3 years of age. It is characterized by a triad of limited or absent verbal communication, a lack of reciprocal social interaction or responsiveness, and restricted, stereotypic, and ritualized patterns of interests and behavior (Bailey et al., 1996; Risch et al., 1999). 'Autism spectrum disorder,' sometimes referred to as ASD, is a broader phenotype encompassing the less severe disorders Asperger syndrome (see ASPG1; 608638) and pervasive developmental disorder, not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). 'Broad autism phenotype' includes individuals with some symptoms of autism, but who do not meet the full criteria for autism or other disorders. Impaired intellectual development coexists in approximately two-thirds of individuals with ASD, except for Asperger syndrome, in which intellectual disability is conspicuously absent (Jones et al., 2008). Genetic studies in autism often include family members with these less stringent diagnoses (Schellenberg et al., 2006). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autism, see 209850.
Autism, susceptibility to, X-linked 1
MedGen UID:
335205
Concept ID:
C1845540
Finding
Autism, the prototypic pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), is usually apparent by 3 years of age. It is characterized by a triad of limited or absent verbal communication, a lack of reciprocal social interaction or responsiveness, and restricted, stereotypic, and ritualized patterns of interests and behavior (Bailey et al., 1996; Risch et al., 1999). 'Autism spectrum disorder,' sometimes referred to as ASD, is a broader phenotype encompassing the less severe disorders Asperger syndrome (see ASPG1; 608638) and pervasive developmental disorder, not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). 'Broad autism phenotype' includes individuals with some symptoms of autism, but who do not meet the full criteria for autism or other disorders. Mental retardation coexists in approximately two-thirds of individuals with ASD, except for Asperger syndrome, in which mental retardation is conspicuously absent (Jones et al., 2008). Genetic studies in autism often include family members with these less stringent diagnoses (Schellenberg et al., 2006). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autism, see 209850.
Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy 3
MedGen UID:
342403
Concept ID:
C1850053
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive hypomyelinating leukodystrophy-3 (HLD3) is a severe neurologic disorder characterized by early infantile onset of global developmental delay, lack of development, lack of speech acquisition, and peripheral spasticity associated with decreased myelination in the central nervous system (summary by Feinstein et al., 2010). The disorder is phenotypically similar to X-linked Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD; 312080), which is caused by mutation in the PLP1 gene (300401). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HLD, see 312080.
Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis 1
MedGen UID:
340540
Concept ID:
C1850451
Disease or Syndrome
The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL; CLN) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the intracellular accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigment storage material in different patterns ultrastructurally. The lipopigment pattern seen most often in CLN1 is referred to as granular osmiophilic deposits (GROD). The patterns most often observed in CLN2 and CLN3 are 'curvilinear' and 'fingerprint' profiles, respectively. CLN4, CLN5, CLN6, CLN7, and CLN8 show mixed combinations of granular, curvilinear, fingerprint, and rectilinear profiles. The clinical course includes progressive dementia, seizures, and progressive visual failure (Mole et al., 2005). Zeman and Dyken (1969) referred to these conditions as the 'neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses.' Goebel (1995) provided a comprehensive review of the NCLs and noted that they are possibly the most common group of neurodegenerative diseases in children. Mole et al. (2005) provided a detailed clinical and genetic review of the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses. Genetic Heterogeneity of Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis See also CLN2 (204500), caused by mutation in the TPP1 gene (607998) on chromosome 11p15; CLN3 (204200), caused by mutation in the CLN3 gene (607042) on 16p12; CLN4 (162350), caused by mutation in the DNAJC5 gene (611203) on 20q13; CLN5 (256731), caused by mutation in the CLN5 gene (608102) on 13q22; CLN6A (601780) and CLN6B (204300), both caused by mutation in the CLN6 gene (606725) on 15q21; CLN7 (610951), caused by mutation in the MFSD8 gene (611124) on 4q28; CLN8 (600143) and the Northern epilepsy variant of CLN8 (610003), both caused by mutation in the CLN8 gene (607837) on 8p23; CLN10 (610127), caused by mutation in the CTSD gene (116840) on 11p15; CLN11 (614706), caused by mutation in the GRN gene (138945) on 17q21; CLN13 (615362), caused by mutation in the CTSF gene (603539) on 11q13; and CLN14 (611726), caused by mutation in the KCTD7 gene (611725) on 7q11. CLN9 (609055) has not been molecularly characterized. A disorder that was formerly designated neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis-12 (CLN12) is now considered to be a variable form of Kufor-Rakeb syndrome (KRS; 606693).
Benign occipital epilepsy
MedGen UID:
377052
Concept ID:
C1851549
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic neurological disorder with characteristics of visual seizures and occipital epileptiform paroxysms reactive to ocular opening which present in infancy to mid-adolescence. Vomiting, tonic eye deviation and impairment of consciousness are typically associated with the Panayiotopoulos type, while visual hallucinations, ictal blindness and post-ictal headache are commonly observed in the Gastaut type. Electroencephalographic findings in both types are similar and include bilateral, synchronous, high voltage spike-wave complexes in a normal background activity located predominantly in the occipital lobes.
Electroencephalographic peculiarity: fronto-precentral beta wave groups
MedGen UID:
343646
Concept ID:
C1851756
Finding
Electroencephalographic peculiarity: 14 and 6 per sec. positive spike phenomenon
MedGen UID:
377516
Concept ID:
C1851757
Finding
Cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
342798
Concept ID:
C1853100
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome-4 (COFS4) is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by growth retardation, dysmorphic facial features, arthrogryposis, and neurologic abnormalities. Cellular studies show a defect in both transcription-coupled and global genome nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER and GG-NER) (summary by Jaspers et al., 2007 and Kashiyama et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome, see 214150.
Microcephaly 2, primary, autosomal recessive, with or without cortical malformations
MedGen UID:
346929
Concept ID:
C1858535
Disease or Syndrome
In WDR62 primary microcephaly (WDR62-MCPH), microcephaly (occipitofrontal circumference [OFC] = -2 SD) is usually present at birth, but in some instances becomes evident later in the first year of life. Growth is otherwise normal. Except for brain malformations in most affected individuals, no other congenital malformations are observed. Central nervous system involvement can include delayed motor development, mild-to-severe intellectual disability (ID), behavior problems, epilepsy, spasticity, and ataxia.
Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis 8 northern epilepsy variant
MedGen UID:
355328
Concept ID:
C1864923
Disease or Syndrome
The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL; CLN) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the intracellular accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigment storage material in different patterns ultrastructurally. The lipopigment patterns observed most often in CLN8 comprise mixed combinations of 'granular,' 'curvilinear,' and 'fingerprint' profiles (Mole et al., 2005). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CLN, see CLN1 (256730).
4p partial monosomy syndrome
MedGen UID:
408255
Concept ID:
C1956097
Disease or Syndrome
Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome is a congenital malformation syndrome characterized by pre- and postnatal growth deficiency, developmental disability of variable degree, characteristic craniofacial features ('Greek warrior helmet' appearance of the nose, high forehead, prominent glabella, hypertelorism, high-arched eyebrows, protruding eyes, epicanthal folds, short philtrum, distinct mouth with downturned corners, and micrognathia), and a seizure disorder (Battaglia et al., 2008).
Severe neonatal-onset encephalopathy with microcephaly
MedGen UID:
409616
Concept ID:
C1968556
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of MECP2-related phenotypes in females ranges from classic Rett syndrome to variant Rett syndrome with a broader clinical phenotype (either milder or more severe than classic Rett syndrome) to mild learning disabilities; the spectrum in males ranges from severe neonatal encephalopathy to pyramidal signs, parkinsonism, and macroorchidism (PPM-X) syndrome to severe syndromic/nonsyndromic intellectual disability. Females: Classic Rett syndrome, a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder primarily affecting girls, is characterized by apparently normal psychomotor development during the first six to 18 months of life, followed by a short period of developmental stagnation, then rapid regression in language and motor skills, followed by long-term stability. During the phase of rapid regression, repetitive, stereotypic hand movements replace purposeful hand use. Additional findings include fits of screaming and inconsolable crying, autistic features, panic-like attacks, bruxism, episodic apnea and/or hyperpnea, gait ataxia and apraxia, tremors, seizures, and acquired microcephaly. Males: Severe neonatal-onset encephalopathy, the most common phenotype in affected males, is characterized by a relentless clinical course that follows a metabolic-degenerative type of pattern, abnormal tone, involuntary movements, severe seizures, and breathing abnormalities. Death often occurs before age two years.
Autism, susceptibility to, 8
MedGen UID:
409897
Concept ID:
C1969710
Finding
Autism, the prototypic pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), is usually apparent by 3 years of age. It is characterized by a triad of limited or absent verbal communication, a lack of reciprocal social interaction or responsiveness, and restricted, stereotypical, and ritualized patterns of interests and behavior (Bailey et al., 1996; Risch et al., 1999). 'Autism spectrum disorder,' sometimes referred to as ASD, is a broader phenotype encompassing the less severe disorders Asperger syndrome (see ASPG1; 608638) and pervasive developmental disorder, not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). 'Broad autism phenotype' includes individuals with some symptoms of autism, but who do not meet the full criteria for autism or other disorders. Mental retardation coexists in approximately two-thirds of individuals with ASD, except for Asperger syndrome, in which mental retardation is conspicuously absent (Jones et al., 2008). Genetic studies in autism often include family members with these less stringent diagnoses (Schellenberg et al., 2006). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autism, see 209850.
15q11q13 microduplication syndrome
MedGen UID:
390767
Concept ID:
C2675336
Disease or Syndrome
Maternal 15q duplication syndrome (maternal dup15q) is characterized by hypotonia and motor delays, intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and epilepsy including infantile spasms. Rarely, maternal dup15q may also be associated with psychosis or sudden unexplained death. Those with a maternal isodicentric 15q11.2-q13.1 supernumerary chromosome are typically more severely affected than those with an interstitial duplication.
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 5
MedGen UID:
382611
Concept ID:
C2675473
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
SYNGAP1-related intellectual disability (SYNGAP1-ID) is characterized by developmental delay (DD) or intellectual disability (ID) (100% of affected individuals), generalized epilepsy (~84%), and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other behavioral abnormalities (=50%). To date more than 50 individuals with SYNGAP1-ID have been reported. In the majority DD/ID was moderate to severe; in some it was mild. The epilepsy is generalized; a subset of individuals with epilepsy have myoclonic astatic epilepsy (Doose syndrome) or epilepsy with myoclonic absences. Behavioral abnormalities can include stereotypic behaviors (e.g., hand flapping, obsessions with certain objects) as well as poor social development. Feeding difficulties can be significant in some.
Chromosome 2p16.1-p15 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
390902
Concept ID:
C2675875
Disease or Syndrome
Chromosome 2p16.1-p15 deletion syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, intellectual disability, and variable but distinctive dysmorphic features, including microcephaly, bitemporal narrowing, smooth and long philtrum, hypertelorism, downslanting palpebral fissures, broad nasal root, thin upper lip, and high palate. Many patients have behavioral disorders, including autistic features, as well as structural brain abnormalities, such as pachygyria or hypoplastic corpus callosum. Those with deletions including the BCL11A gene (606557) also have persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HbF), which is asymptomatic and does not affected hematologic parameters or susceptibility to infection (summary by Funnell et al., 2015). Point mutation in the BCL11A gene causes intellectual developmental disorder with persistence of fetal hemoglobin (617101), which shows overlapping features. See also fetal hemoglobin quantitative trait locus-5 (HBFQTL5; 142335).
Chromosome Xp11.23-p11.22 duplication syndrome
MedGen UID:
440690
Concept ID:
C2749022
Disease or Syndrome
Familial and <i>de novo</i> recurrent Xp11.22-p11.23 microduplication has been recently identified in males and females.
Cortical dysplasia-focal epilepsy syndrome
MedGen UID:
413258
Concept ID:
C2750246
Disease or Syndrome
Pitt-Hopkins-like syndrome-1 (PTHSL1) is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, intellectual disability, severe speech impairment or regression, and behavioral abnormalities. Most patients have onset of seizures within the first years of life. Some patients may have cortical dysplasia on brain imaging (summary by Smogavec et al., 2016).
Immunodeficiency 83, susceptibility to viral infections
MedGen UID:
416638
Concept ID:
C2751803
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-83 (IMD83) is characterized by increased susceptibility to severe viral infections, including herpes simplex virus (HSV), varicella zoster virus (VZV), influenza A virus (IAV), hantavirus, and possibly respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). The age at onset varies widely from infancy to adulthood, and there is incomplete penetrance. The susceptibility to encephalitis or pneumonitis appears to result from impaired TLR3-dependent interferon production by nonhematopoietic cells that reside within the central nervous system (CNS) or lung epithelial cells (review by Zhang et al., 2013; summary by Mork et al., 2015; Sironi et al., 2017, Lim et al., 2019, Partanen et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of acute infection-induced encephalopathy, see 610551.
Odontotrichomelic syndrome
MedGen UID:
443944
Concept ID:
C2930960
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic disease characterized by intellectual disability, growth delay, absence deformities of upper and lower limbs, hypotrichosis, hypoplastic nails, abnormal dentition, abnormal auricles, hypoplastic nipples, thyroid enlargement, and abnormalities of tyrosine and/or tryptophane metabolism. Hypogonadism and cleft lip have also been reported. No new cases have been confirmed since 1970.
Potocki-Lupski syndrome
MedGen UID:
444010
Concept ID:
C2931246
Disease or Syndrome
Potocki-Lupski syndrome (PTLS) is characterized by cognitive, behavioral, and medical manifestations. Cognitively, most individuals present with developmental delay, later meeting criteria for moderate intellectual disability. Behaviorally, issues with attention, hyperactivity, withdrawal, and anxiety may be seen. Some individuals meet criteria for autism spectrum disorder. Medically, hypotonia, oropharyngeal dysphagia leading to failure to thrive, congenital heart disease, hypoglycemia associated with growth hormone deficiency, and mildly dysmorphic facial features are observed. Medical manifestations typically lead to identification of PTLS in infancy; however, those with only behavioral and cognitive manifestations may be identified in later childhood.
Rett syndrome, congenital variant
MedGen UID:
462055
Concept ID:
C3150705
Disease or Syndrome
The congenital variant of Rett syndrome is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder with features of classic Rett syndrome (RTT; 312750), but earlier onset in the first months of life. Classic Rett syndrome shows later onset and is caused by mutation in the MECP2 gene (300005).
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 6
MedGen UID:
462761
Concept ID:
C3151411
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
GRIN2B-related neurodevelopmental disorder is characterized by mild to profound developmental delay / intellectual disability (DD/ID) in all affected individuals. Muscle tone abnormalities (spasticity and/or hypotonia, occasionally associated with feeding difficulties), as well as epilepsy and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) / behavioral issues, are common. Other infantile- or childhood-onset findings include microcephaly; dystonic, dyskinetic, or choreiform movement disorder; and/or cortical visual impairment. Brain MRI reveals a malformation of cortical development in a minority of affected individuals. To date, fewer than 100 individuals with GRIN2B-related neurodevelopmental disorder have been reported.
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (congenital with brain and eye anomalies), type A3
MedGen UID:
462869
Concept ID:
C3151519
Disease or Syndrome
An autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the POMGNT1 gene. It is associated with characteristic brain and eye malformations, profound mental retardation, and death usually in the first years of life.
Occipital pachygyria and polymicrogyria
MedGen UID:
481505
Concept ID:
C3279875
Disease or Syndrome
Occipital cortical malformations (OCCM) is an autosomal recessive condition in which affected individuals develop seizures, sometimes associated with transient visual changes. Brain MRI shows both pachygyria and polymicrogyria restricted to the lateral occipital lobes (summary by Barak et al., 2011).
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 8
MedGen UID:
481912
Concept ID:
C3280282
Disease or Syndrome
GRIN1-related neurodevelopmental disorder (GRIN1-NDD) is characterized by mild-to-profound developmental delay / intellectual disability (DD/ID) in all affected individuals. Other common manifestations are epilepsy, muscular hypotonia, movement disorders, spasticity, feeding difficulties, and behavior problems. A subset of individuals show a malformation of cortical development consisting of extensive and diffuse bilateral polymicrogyria. To date, 72 individuals with GRIN1-NDD have been reported.
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia 12
MedGen UID:
482082
Concept ID:
C3280452
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-12 is a neurologic disorder characterized by onset of generalized seizures in infancy, delayed psychomotor development with mental retardation, and cerebellar ataxia. Some patients may also show spasticity (summary by Mallaret et al., 2014).
Psychomotor retardation, epilepsy, and craniofacial dysmorphism
MedGen UID:
482685
Concept ID:
C3281055
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia, craniofacial abnormalities, and seizures (NEDHCS) is an autosomal recessive syndrome characterized primarily by hypotonia and poor feeding apparent in early infancy. Affected individuals have severe global developmental delay, early-onset intractable seizures, and recognizable craniofacial dysmorphism with skull abnormalities. The disorder is believed to be unique to the Amish population, where it exhibits a founder effect (summary by Ammous et al., 2021).
Mitochondrial complex III deficiency nuclear type 1
MedGen UID:
762097
Concept ID:
C3541471
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive mitochondrial complex III deficiency is a severe multisystem disorder with onset at birth of lactic acidosis, hypotonia, hypoglycemia, failure to thrive, encephalopathy, and delayed psychomotor development. Visceral involvement, including hepatopathy and renal tubulopathy, may also occur. Many patients die in early childhood, but some may show longer survival (de Lonlay et al., 2001; De Meirleir et al., 2003). Genetic Heterogeneity of Mitochondrial Complex III Deficiency Mitochondrial complex III deficiency can be caused by mutation in several different nuclear-encoded genes. See MC3DN2 (615157), caused by mutation in the TTC19 gene (613814) on chromosome 17p12; MC3DN3 (615158), caused by mutation in the UQCRB gene (191330) on chromosome 8q; MC3DN4 (615159), caused by mutation in the UQCRQ gene (612080) on chromosome 5q31; MC3DN5 (615160), caused by mutation in the UQCRC2 gene (191329) on chromosome 16p12; MC3DN6 (615453), caused by mutation in the CYC1 gene (123980) on chromosome 8q24; MC3DN7 (615824), caused by mutation in the UQCC2 gene (614461) on chromosome 6p21; MC3DN8 (615838), caused by mutation in the LYRM7 gene (615831) on chromosome 5q23; MC3DN9 (616111), caused by mutation in the UQCC3 gene (616097) on chromosome 11q12; and MC3DN10 (618775), caused by mutation in the UQCRFS1 gene (191327) on chromosome 19q12. See also MTYCB (516020) for a discussion of a milder phenotype associated with isolated mitochondrial complex III deficiency and mutations in a mitochondrial-encoded gene.
Microcephalic primordial dwarfism due to RTTN deficiency
MedGen UID:
766745
Concept ID:
C3553831
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic neurodevelopmental disorder with primordial microcephaly, with characteristics of primary microcephaly, moderate to severe intellectual disability and global developmental delay. Variable brain malformations are common ranging from simplified gyration, to cortical malformations such as pachygyria, polymicrogyria, reduced sulcation and midline defects. Craniofacial dysmorphism (e.g. sloping forehead, high and broad nasal bridge) are related to the primary microcephaly. Short stature is frequently observed, and may be severe. Germline biallelic variants in RTTN (18q22.2) are responsible for the disease. The pattern of inheritance is autosomal recessive.
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 14B
MedGen UID:
766969
Concept ID:
C3554055
Disease or Syndrome
PBD14B is an autosomal recessive peroxisome biogenesis disorder characterized clinically by mild intellectual disability, congenital cataracts, progressive hearing loss, and polyneuropathy (Ebberink et al., 2012), all of which had been observed in patients with mild peroxisomal biogenesis disorders (e.g., Kelley et al., 1986; Poll-The et al., 1987). Additionally, recurrent migraine-like episodes following mental stress or physical exertion, not a common feature in peroxisome disorders, was reported. Thoms and Gartner (2012) classified the disorder described by Ebberink et al. (2012) in their patient as a mild 'Zellweger syndrome (214100) spectrum' (ZSS) disorder. See PBD1B (601539) for a phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of less severe phenotypes on the Zellweger syndrome spectrum. See PBD9B (614879) for another atypical peroxisome biogenesis disorder.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 18
MedGen UID:
815954
Concept ID:
C3809624
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-18 (DEE18) is a severe autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by lack of psychomotor development apparent from birth, dysmorphic facial features, and early onset of refractory seizures. Brain imaging shows a thick corpus callosum and persistent cavum septum pellucidum on brain imaging (summary by Basel-Vanagaite et al., 2013). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 28
MedGen UID:
863956
Concept ID:
C4015519
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-28 (DEE28) is an autosomal recessive severe neurologic disorder characterized by the onset of refractory seizures in the first months of life. Affected individuals have severe axial hypotonia and profoundly impaired psychomotor development. More severely affected patients have acquired microcephaly, poor or absent visual contact, and retinal degeneration; early death may occur (summary by Mignot et al., 2015). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Microcephaly-intellectual disability-sensorineural hearing loss-epilepsy-abnormal muscle tone syndrome
MedGen UID:
895574
Concept ID:
C4225276
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hearing loss, seizures, and brain abnormalities (NEDHSB) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe neurologic impairment including impaired intellectual development, epilepsy, microcephaly, abnormal muscle tone, and sensorineural hearing loss. Most affected individuals are nonambulatory, cannot sit unassisted, and have no speech development. More variable features include feeding difficulties, poor growth, cortical visual impairment, spasticity, scoliosis, immunodeficiency, and thrombocytopenia (Tanaka et al., 2015).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 49
MedGen UID:
934602
Concept ID:
C4310635
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-49 (DEE49) is a severe autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by onset of seizures in the neonatal period, global developmental delay with intellectual disability and lack of speech, hypotonia, spasticity, and coarse facial features. Some patients may have brain calcifications on imaging (summary by Han et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia, seizures, and absent language
MedGen UID:
934610
Concept ID:
C4310643
Disease or Syndrome
Intellectual disability-epilepsy-extrapyramidal syndrome
MedGen UID:
934650
Concept ID:
C4310683
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia and impaired expressive language and with or without seizures (NEDHELS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypotonia, poor feeding, and global developmental delay apparent from infancy. Most patients have poor overall growth, poor eye contact, sleep disturbances, and severely impaired expressive language. Affected individuals also tend to have behavioral problems, microcephaly, and variable dysmorphic features; many develop seizures. Brain imaging may show enlarged ventricles, thin corpus callosum and brainstem, and white matter abnormalities. The phenotype is variable (summary by Nabais Sa et al., 2019).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 47
MedGen UID:
934652
Concept ID:
C4310685
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-47 (DEE47) is a neurologic disorder characterized by onset of intractable seizures in the first days or weeks of life. EEG shows background slowing and multifocal epileptic spikes, and may show hypsarrhythmia. Most patients have developmental regression after seizure onset and show persistent intellectual disability and neurologic impairment, although the severity is variable. Treatment with phenytoin, a voltage-gated sodium channel blocker, may be beneficial (summary by Guella et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 42
MedGen UID:
934683
Concept ID:
C4310716
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-42 (DEE42) is a neurologic disorder characterized by the onset of various types of seizures in the first hours or days of life, although rare patients may have onset in the first weeks of life. The seizures tend to be refractory and associated with EEG abnormalities, including multifocal spikes and generalized spike-wave complexes. Affected infants show global developmental delay with severely impaired intellectual development. Other features may include axial hypotonia, peripheral hypertonia with hyperreflexia, tremor, ataxia, and abnormal eye movements (summary by the Epi4K Consortium, 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 41
MedGen UID:
934684
Concept ID:
C4310717
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-41 (DEE41) is a neurologic disorder characterized by the onset of seizures in the first days or weeks of life. Affected infants show severely impaired psychomotor development with hypotonia, spasticity, lack of speech, poor visual fixation, feeding difficulties sometimes necessitating tube feeding, poor overall growth and microcephaly, and contractures. Brain imaging may show delayed myelination, thin corpus callosum, and cerebral atrophy (summary by the EPI4K Consortium, 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 10
MedGen UID:
934713
Concept ID:
C4310746
Disease or Syndrome
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, a bleeding diathesis, and, in some individuals, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. Ocular findings include reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in variable bruising, epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects occur primarily in individuals with pathogenic variants in AP3B1 and AP3D1.
Hydrops-lactic acidosis-sideroblastic anemia-multisystemic failure syndrome
MedGen UID:
934728
Concept ID:
C4310761
Disease or Syndrome
Hydrops, lactic acidosis, and sideroblastic anemia (HLASA) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by the onset of hydrops in utero. The severity of the hydrops and the disorder in general is highly variable. At birth, affected infants usually show poor growth, lactic acidosis, pulmonary hypertension with hypoxic respiratory insufficiency, and sideroblastic anemia. More variable features may include hepatosplenomegaly or cholestasis, hypoglycemia, pancreatic insufficiency, and micropenis or hypospadias. Death in infancy may occur. Those who survive tend to have resolution of lactic acidosis and anemia, but may show developmental delay and sensorineural deafness (summary by Riley et al., 2020).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 54
MedGen UID:
1392637
Concept ID:
C4479319
Disease or Syndrome
HNRNPU-related neurodevelopmental disorder (HNRNPU-NDD) is characterized by developmental delay and intellectual disability – typically moderate to severe – with speech and language delay and/or absent speech. Affected individuals may also display autistic features. There may be feeding difficulties during the neonatal period as well as hypotonia, which often remains lifelong. Dysmorphic features have been described but they are nonspecific. Affected individuals are likely to experience seizures (most commonly tonic-clonic or absence) that may be refractory to treatment. Nonspecific brain MRI findings include ventriculomegaly and thinning of the corpus callosum. Less common findings include cardiac abnormalities, strabismus, undescended testes in males, renal anomalies, and skeletal features, including joint laxity, polydactyly, and scoliosis. Rarely, abnormal breathing patterns, including hyperventilation and apnea, may be present and can lead to sleep disturbance.
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia, neuropathy, and deafness
MedGen UID:
1382171
Concept ID:
C4479603
Disease or Syndrome
SPTBN4 disorder is typically characterized by severe-to-profound developmental delay and/or intellectual disability, although two individuals in one family had a milder phenotype, including one individual with normal cognitive development. Speech and language skills are often severely limited. Affected individuals rarely achieve head control. Most are unable to sit, stand, or walk. Affected individuals typically have congenital hypotonia that may transition to hypertonia. Axonal motor neuropathy leads to hyporeflexia/areflexia and weakness, which can result in respiratory difficulties requiring ventilatory support. Most affected individuals require tube feeding for nutrition. Half of affected individuals develop seizures. Cortical visual impairment and auditory neuropathy have also been reported.
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type R18
MedGen UID:
1385598
Concept ID:
C4517996
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-18 (LGMD18) is characterized by childhood-onset of proximal muscle weakness resulting in gait abnormalities and scapular winging. Serum creatine kinase is increased. A subset of patients may show a hyperkinetic movement disorder with chorea, ataxia, or dystonia and global developmental delay (summary by Bogershausen et al., 2013). Additional more variable features include alacrima, achalasia, cataracts, or hepatic steatosis (Liang et al., 2015; Koehler et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, see LGMDR1 (253600).
Combined oxidative phosphorylation defect type 8
MedGen UID:
1377817
Concept ID:
C4518839
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-8 (COXPD8) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The main clinical manifestation is a lethal infantile hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, but there may also be subtle skeletal muscle and brain involvement. Biochemical studies show combined respiratory chain complex deficiencies in complexes I, III, and IV in cardiac muscle, skeletal muscle, and brain. The liver is not affected (summary by Gotz et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Cerebellar atrophy, developmental delay, and seizures
MedGen UID:
1626119
Concept ID:
C4539985
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 56
MedGen UID:
1621755
Concept ID:
C4540034
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-56 (DEE56) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by early-onset seizures in most patients, followed by impaired intellectual development, variable behavioral abnormalities, and sometimes additional neurologic features, such as ataxia (summary by Guella et al., 2017). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Encephalopathy, neonatal severe, with lactic acidosis and brain abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1624694
Concept ID:
C4540052
Disease or Syndrome
NELABA is a severe autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by onset at birth of progressive encephalopathy associated with increased serum lactate. Affected individuals have little or no psychomotor development and show brain abnormalities, including cerebral atrophy, cysts, and white matter abnormalities. Some patients die in infancy (summary by Habarou et al., 2017).
Intellectual disability, autosomal recessive 61
MedGen UID:
1622296
Concept ID:
C4540424
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
MRT61 is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, moderate to severe intellectual disability, and variable dysmorphic facial features. More severely affected patients may develop refractory seizures and have brain abnormalities, including hypoplasia of the corpus callosum (summary by Alwadei et al., 2016).
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 53
MedGen UID:
1623344
Concept ID:
C4540481
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis defect 15
MedGen UID:
1615160
Concept ID:
C4540520
Disease or Syndrome
GPIBD15 is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, variable intellectual disability, hypotonia, early-onset seizures in most patients, and cerebellar atrophy, resulting in cerebellar signs including gait ataxia and dysarthria. The disorder is caused by a defect in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis (summary by Nguyen et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293).
Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome due to CREBBP mutations
MedGen UID:
1639327
Concept ID:
C4551859
Disease or Syndrome
Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is characterized by distinctive facial features, broad and often angulated thumbs and halluces, short stature, and moderate-to-severe intellectual disability. The characteristic craniofacial features are downslanted palpebral fissures, low-hanging columella, high palate, grimacing smile, and talon cusps. Prenatal growth is often normal, then height, weight, and head circumference percentiles rapidly drop in the first few months of life. Short stature is typical in adulthood. Obesity may develop in childhood or adolescence. Average IQ ranges between 35 and 50; however, developmental outcome varies considerably. Some individuals with EP300-RSTS have normal intellect. Additional features include ocular abnormalities, hearing loss, respiratory difficulties, congenital heart defects, renal abnormalities, cryptorchidism, feeding problems, recurrent infections, and severe constipation.
Encephalopathy due to GLUT1 deficiency
MedGen UID:
1645412
Concept ID:
C4551966
Disease or Syndrome
The phenotypic spectrum of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (Glut1 DS) is now known to be a continuum that includes the classic phenotype as well as paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia and epilepsy (previously known as dystonia 18 [DYT18]) and paroxysmal choreoathetosis with spasticity (previously known as dystonia 9 [DYT9]), atypical childhood absence epilepsy, myoclonic astatic epilepsy, and paroxysmal non-epileptic findings including intermittent ataxia, choreoathetosis, dystonia, and alternating hemiplegia. The classic phenotype is characterized by infantile-onset seizures, delayed neurologic development, acquired microcephaly, and complex movement disorders. Seizures in classic early-onset Glut1 DS begin before age six months. Several seizure types occur: generalized tonic or clonic, focal, myoclonic, atypical absence, atonic, and unclassified. In some infants, apneic episodes and abnormal episodic eye-head movements similar to opsoclonus may precede the onset of seizures. The frequency, severity, and type of seizures vary among affected individuals and are not related to disease severity. Cognitive impairment, ranging from learning disabilities to severe intellectual disability, is typical. The complex movement disorder, characterized by ataxia, dystonia, and chorea, may occur in any combination and may be continuous, paroxysmal, or continual with fluctuations in severity influenced by environmental factors such as fasting or with infectious stress. Symptoms often improve substantially when a ketogenic diet is started.
Neurodevelopmental disorder with or without hyperkinetic movements and seizures, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
1646665
Concept ID:
C4693325
Disease or Syndrome
GRIN1-related neurodevelopmental disorder (GRIN1-NDD) is characterized by mild-to-profound developmental delay / intellectual disability (DD/ID) in all affected individuals. Other common manifestations are epilepsy, muscular hypotonia, movement disorders, spasticity, feeding difficulties, and behavior problems. A subset of individuals show a malformation of cortical development consisting of extensive and diffuse bilateral polymicrogyria. To date, 72 individuals with GRIN1-NDD have been reported.
Epileptic encephalopathy, infantile or early childhood, 2
MedGen UID:
1638319
Concept ID:
C4693362
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-92 (DEE92) is characterized in most patients by onset of seizures in infancy or childhood and associated with global developmental delay and variable impairment of intellectual development. The seizure type and severity varies, and seizures may be intractable in some patients. Some patients are severely affected, unable to walk or speak, whereas others show some development. Additional neurologic features, including cortical blindness, dystonia, and spasticity, may occur. Mutations occur de novo (summary by Hamdan et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 55, with seizures
MedGen UID:
1635938
Concept ID:
C4693371
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental delay and seizures with or without movement abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1641343
Concept ID:
C4693376
Disease or Syndrome
DEDSM is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay, variable intellectual disability, and early-onset seizures with a myoclonic component. Most patients have delayed motor development and show abnormal movements, including ataxia, dystonia, and tremor (summary by Hamdan et al., 2017).
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 35
MedGen UID:
1639653
Concept ID:
C4693466
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-35 (COXPD35) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized mainly by global developmental delay with intellectual disability, microcephaly, and early-onset myoclonic and other types of seizures. Affected individuals have variable deficiencies of mitochondrial respiratory enzyme complexes resulting from a defect in mitochondrial metabolism (summary by Kernohan et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Encephalopathy, acute, infection-induced (herpes-specific), susceptibility to, 8
MedGen UID:
1646997
Concept ID:
C4693542
Finding
3p- syndrome
MedGen UID:
1643555
Concept ID:
C4706503
Disease or Syndrome
Characteristic features of the distal 3p- syndrome include low birth weight, microcephaly, trigonocephaly, hypotonia, psychomotor and growth retardation, ptosis, telecanthus, downslanting palpebral fissures, and micrognathia. Postaxial polydactyly, renal anomalies, cleft palate, congenital heart defects (especially atrioventricular septal defects), preauricular pits, sacral dimple, and gastrointestinal anomalies are variable features. Although intellectual deficits are almost invariably associated with cytogenetically visible 3p deletions, rare patients with a 3p26-p25 deletion and normal intelligence or only mild abnormalities have been described (summary by Shuib et al., 2009).
Polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy 1
MedGen UID:
1648386
Concept ID:
C4721893
Disease or Syndrome
Polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy (PLOSL) is characterized by fractures (resulting from radiologically demonstrable polycystic osseous lesions), frontal lobe syndrome, and progressive presenile dementia beginning in the fourth decade. The clinical course of PLOSL can be divided into four stages: 1. The latent stage is characterized by normal early development. 2. The osseous stage (3rd decade of life) is characterized by pain and tenderness, mostly in ankles and feet, usually following strain or injury. Fractures are typically diagnosed several years later, most commonly in the bones of the extremities. 3. In the early neurologic stage (4th decade of life), a change of personality begins to develop insidiously. Affected individuals show a frontal lobe syndrome (loss of judgment, euphoria, loss of social inhibitions, disturbance of concentration, and lack of insight, libido, and motor persistence) leading to serious social problems. 4. The late neurologic stage is characterized by progressive dementia and loss of mobility. Death usually occurs before age 50 years.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 67
MedGen UID:
1648285
Concept ID:
C4748341
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-67 (DEE67) is characterized by the onset of various types of seizures in the first months of life, although later onset may occur in milder cases. The seizures tend to be resistant to treatment. Affected individuals have global developmental delay with impaired motor and intellectual development, poor or absent speech, movement disorders, and stereotypic or autistic behavior (summary by Chatron et al., 2018). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Cortical dysplasia, complex, with other brain malformations 9
MedGen UID:
1648399
Concept ID:
C4748540
Disease or Syndrome
Complex cortical dysplasia with other brain malformations-9 is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by profoundly impaired motor and cognitive development apparent from early infancy. Affected individuals develop intractable seizures and are unable to speak or ambulate. Brain imaging shows pachygyria as well as hypogenesis of the corpus callosum and other variable brain abnormalities. The phenotype results from impaired cortical neuronal migration (summary by Schaffer et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CDCBM, see CDCBM1 (614039).
Polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy 2
MedGen UID:
1648374
Concept ID:
C4748657
Disease or Syndrome
Polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy-2 (PLOSL2), or Nasu-Hakola disease, is a recessively inherited presenile frontal dementia with leukoencephalopathy and basal ganglia calcification. In most cases the disorder first manifests in early adulthood as pain and swelling in ankles and feet, followed by bone fractures. Neurologic symptoms manifest in the fourth decade of life as a frontal lobe syndrome with loss of judgment, euphoria, and disinhibition. Progressive decline in other cognitive domains begins to develop at about the same time. The disorder culminates in a profound dementia and death by age 50 years (summary by Klunemann et al., 2005). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy, see 221770.
Infantile hypotonia-oculomotor anomalies-hyperkinetic movements-developmental delay syndrome
MedGen UID:
1648431
Concept ID:
C4748715
Disease or Syndrome
Baker-Gordon syndrome (BAGOS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by infantile hypotonia, ophthalmic abnormalities, moderate to profound global developmental delay, poor or absent speech, behavioral abnormalities, hyperkinetic movements, and EEG abnormalities in the absence of overt seizures (summary by Baker et al., 2018).
Mitochondrial complex 1 deficiency, nuclear type 26
MedGen UID:
1648283
Concept ID:
C4748809
Disease or Syndrome
Trichohepatoneurodevelopmental syndrome
MedGen UID:
1648322
Concept ID:
C4748898
Disease or Syndrome
Trichohepatoneurodevelopmental syndrome is a complex multisystem disorder characterized by woolly or coarse hair, liver dysfunction, pruritus, dysmorphic features, hypotonia, and severe global developmental delay (Morimoto et al., 2018).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 69
MedGen UID:
1648381
Concept ID:
C4748988
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-69 (DEE69) is an autosomal dominant severe neurodevelopmental encephalopathic disorder characterized by early-onset refractory seizures, hypotonia, and profoundly impaired development often associated with macrocephaly, hyperkinetic movements, and contractures. The disorder can sometimes result in early death. Some patients may have a favorable seizure response to topiramate medication (summary by Helbig et al., 2018). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Combined oxidative phosphorylation defect type 14
MedGen UID:
1663069
Concept ID:
C4755312
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of FARS2 deficiency ranges from the infantile-onset phenotype, characterized by epileptic encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and poor prognosis (70% of affected individuals), to the later-onset phenotype, characterized by spastic paraplegia, less severe neurologic manifestations, and longer survival (30% of affected individuals). To date FARS2 deficiency has been reported in 37 individuals from 25 families. Infantile-onset phenotype. Seizures are difficult to control and may progress quickly at an early age to intractable seizures with frequent status epilepticus; some children have hypsarrhythmia on EEG. All have developmental delay; most are nonverbal and unable to walk. Feeding difficulties are common. More than half of affected children die in early childhood. Later-onset phenotype. All affected individuals have spastic paraplegia manifested by weakness, spasticity, and exaggerated reflexes of the lower extremities associated with walking difficulties; some have developmental delay/intellectual disability; some have brief seizures that resolve over time.
Microcephaly, growth deficiency, seizures, and brain malformations
MedGen UID:
1676229
Concept ID:
C5193042
Disease or Syndrome
Microcephaly, growth deficiency, seizures, and brain malformations (MIGSB) is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by intrauterine growth retardation, postnatal growth deficiency with severe microcephaly, and poor or absent psychomotor development. Additional features include optic atrophy, early-onset seizures, dysmorphic facial features, and brain malformations, such as partial agenesis of the corpus callosum and simplified gyration (summary by Shaheen et al., 2015).
Neurodegeneration, early-onset, with choreoathetoid movements and microcytic anemia
MedGen UID:
1676579
Concept ID:
C5193104
Disease or Syndrome
Early-onset neurodegeneration with choreoathetoid movements and microcytic anemia (NDCAMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe psychomotor developmental abnormalities, abnormal movements, and functional iron deficiency (Costain et al., 2019).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with seizures and speech and walking impairment
MedGen UID:
1672912
Concept ID:
C5193119
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with seizures and speech and walking impairment (NEDSSWI) is an autosomal recessive disorder with onset in infancy. Patients show global developmental delay, particularly of speech acquisition, as well as walking difficulties due to hypotonia, hypertonia, spasticity, or poor coordination. Other features include seizures, mild dysmorphic features, and variable short stature. The pregnancies tend to be complicated by hyper- or hypotension (summary by Ganapathi et al., 2019).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with behavioral abnormalities, absent speech, and hypotonia
MedGen UID:
1684663
Concept ID:
C5231471
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with behavioral abnormalities, absent speech, and hypotonia (NEDBASH) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severely impaired intellectual and motor development, axial and peripheral hypotonia usually with inability to walk, and significant behavioral abnormalities consistent with autism spectrum disorder and reminiscent of Rett syndrome (RTT; 312750), such as poor communication, stereotypic or repetitive behaviors, hand-wringing, bruxism, and sleep disturbances. Other features include poor overall growth, and joint hypermobility. Rare features include seizures, dystonia, spasticity, and nonspecific brain abnormalities (summary by Abu-Libdeh et al., 2019 and Dias et al., 2019).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia and autistic features with or without hyperkinetic movements
MedGen UID:
1684874
Concept ID:
C5231491
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia and autistic features with or without hyperkinetic movements (NEDHAHM) is characterized by axial hypotonia apparent from birth, global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development and poor or absent language acquisition, and behavioral abnormalities, including autistic features, poor social interaction, and hang-wringing. Most patients have childhood-onset seizures that are usually responsive to medication, and a subset of patients develop cortical visual impairment and involuntary hyperkinetic movements, including chorea and dystonia. Some of the features are reminiscent of Rett syndrome (RTT; 312750) (summary by Salpietro et al., 2019).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 85, with or without midline brain defects
MedGen UID:
1708832
Concept ID:
C5393312
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-85 with or without midline brain defects (DEE85) is an X-linked neurologic disorder characterized by onset of severe refractory seizures in the first year of life, global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development and poor or absent speech, and dysmorphic facial features. The seizures tend to show a cyclic pattern with clustering. Many patients have midline brain defects on brain imaging, including thin corpus callosum and/or variable forms of holoprosencephaly (HPE). The severity and clinical manifestations are variable. Almost all reported patients are females with de novo mutations predicted to result in a loss of function (LOF). However, some patients may show skewed X inactivation, and the pathogenic mechanism may be due to a dominant-negative effect. The SMC1A protein is part of the multiprotein cohesin complex involved in chromatid cohesion during DNA replication and transcriptional regulation; DEE85 can thus be classified as a 'cohesinopathy' (summary by Symonds et al., 2017 and Kruszka et al., 2019). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Beck-Fahrner syndrome
MedGen UID:
1711894
Concept ID:
C5394097
Disease or Syndrome
Beck-Fahrner syndrome (BEFAHRS) is a developmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay with variably impaired intellectual development. Affected individuals often have behavioral abnormalities, such as autistic features or attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), as well as learning disabilities. Most patients have hypotonia and dysmorphic facies. Some may have growth abnormalities, including overgrowth or poor growth, poor feeding, and rarely, seizures. Although both monoallelic and biallelic mutations have been reported, some heterozygous carriers in autosomal recessive families may have milder symptoms; thus, both groups are included in this entry (summary by Beck et al., 2020).
Sandestig-stefanova syndrome
MedGen UID:
1718072
Concept ID:
C5394118
Disease or Syndrome
Sandestig-Stefanova syndrome (SANDSTEF) is an autosomal recessive developmental syndrome characterized by pre- and postnatal microcephaly, trigonocephaly, congenital cataract, microphthalmia, facial gestalt, camptodactyly, loss of periventricular white matter, thin corpus callosum, delayed myelinization, and poor prognosis (Sandestig et al., 2019).
Chromosome 1p36.33 duplication syndrome, atad3 gene cluster, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1708515
Concept ID:
C5394150
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant chromosome 1p36.33 duplication syndrome is a severe multisystemic disorder characterized by neonatal respiratory insufficiency, hypotonia, and cardiomyopathy, resulting in death in the first weeks of life. Affected infants may also have seizures, contractures, and corneal opacities. Brain imaging shows variable anomalies, such as white matter changes, and laboratory studies suggest that the phenotype results from metabolic defects in mitochondrial and cholesterol homeostasis (summary by Gunning et al., 2020).
Neurodegeneration, childhood-onset, with ataxia, tremor, optic atrophy, and cognitive decline
MedGen UID:
1715031
Concept ID:
C5394335
Disease or Syndrome
Childhood-onset neurodegeneration with ataxia, tremor, optic atrophy, and cognitive decline (CONATOC) is an autosomal recessive progressive disorder with onset of symptoms in the first decade. Brain imaging may show variable features, including leukoencephalopathy and cerebellar atrophy (summary by Fagerberg et al., 2020).
Lissencephaly 10
MedGen UID:
1719546
Concept ID:
C5394354
Disease or Syndrome
Lissencephaly-10 (LIS10) is a neurologic disorder characterized by variably delayed development with mildly to moderately impaired intellectual development and language delay, as well as seizures, which are often intractable. There is a spectrum of severity, with some patients having normal early development and only borderline to mild cognitive impairment. Brain imaging shows features consistent with neuronal migration defects, including posterior-predominant lissencephaly, pachygyria, agyria, and subcortical band heterotopia (summary by Tsai et al., 2020). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lissencephaly, see LIS1 (607432).
Deeah syndrome
MedGen UID:
1756624
Concept ID:
C5436579
Disease or Syndrome
DEEAH syndrome is an autosomal recessive multisystemic disorder with onset in early infancy. Affected individuals usually present in the perinatal period with respiratory insufficiency, apneic episodes, and generalized hypotonia. The patients have failure to thrive and severely impaired global development with poor acquisition of motor, cognitive, and language skills. Other common features include endocrine, pancreatic exocrine, and autonomic dysfunction, as well as hematologic disturbances, mainly low hemoglobin. Patients also have dysmorphic and myopathic facial features. Additional more variable features include seizures, undescended testes, and distal skeletal anomalies. Death in early childhood may occur (summary by Schneeberger et al., 2020).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with dysmorphic facies, impaired speech, and hypotonia
MedGen UID:
1776912
Concept ID:
C5436585
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with dysmorphic facies, impaired speech, and hypotonia (NEDDISH) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by global developmental delay and mildly to severely impaired intellectual development with poor speech and language acquisition. Some patients may have early normal development with onset of the disorder in the first years of life. More variable neurologic abnormalities include hypotonia, seizures, apnea, mild signs of autonomic or peripheral neuropathy, and autism. Aside from dysmorphic facial features and occasional findings such as scoliosis or undescended testes, other organ systems are not involved (summary by Schneeberger et al., 2020).
Intellectual developmental disorder with paroxysmal dyskinesia or seizures
MedGen UID:
1727046
Concept ID:
C5436894
Disease or Syndrome
Intellectual developmental disorder with paroxysmal dyskinesia or seizures (IDDPADS) is an autosomal recessive complex neurologic disorder characterized by global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development and language delay. In addition, most patients develop a paroxysmal hyperkinetic movement disorder in the first months or years of life manifest as sudden falls or backward propulsion, eye or head deviation, and dystonic limb posturing followed by chorea and dyskinetic movements. The episodes are pharmacoresistant to anticonvulsant medication. EEG may show interictal abnormalities, but are usually not consistent with epilepsy. However, some patients may also develop epileptic seizures or only have seizures without a movement disorder (summary by Doummar et al., 2020).
Neurodegeneration, childhood-onset, with hypotonia, respiratory insufficiency, and brain imaging abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1781967
Concept ID:
C5543020
Disease or Syndrome
Childhood-onset neurodegeneration with hypotonia, respiratory insufficiency, and brain imaging abnormalities (CONRIBA) is characterized by severe global developmental delay apparent in infancy or early childhood. Affected individuals have hypotonia with impaired motor development, respiratory insufficiency, and feeding difficulties requiring intervention. Intellectual and speech development is also delayed, and most have visual defects, including cortical visual blindness, nystagmus, and esotropia. The disorder is progressive, as manifest by developmental regression consistent with neurodegeneration. Although overt seizures are not observed, some patients may have episodic hypertonia or apnea, and EEG may show nonspecific abnormalities. Brain imaging shows unique diffusion restriction signal abnormalities affecting the brainstem, cerebellum, and corticospinal tracts. Early death may occur (summary by Polovitskaya et al., 2020).
Developmental delay with dysmorphic facies and dental anomalies
MedGen UID:
1785587
Concept ID:
C5543197
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental delay with dysmorphic facies and dental anomalies (DEFDA) is characterized by generally mild global developmental delay with variably impaired intellectual development, walking by 2 to 3 years, and slow language acquisition. The severity of the disorder ranges from moderate cognitive deficits to mild learning difficulties or behavioral abnormalities. Most patients have dysmorphic facial features, often with abnormal dentition and nonspecific visual defects, such as myopia, astigmatism, and strabismus. Although rare, involvement of other systems, such as skeletal, cardiac, and gastrointestinal, may be present (summary by den Hoed et al., 2021).
Kohlschutter-Tonz syndrome-like
MedGen UID:
1781649
Concept ID:
C5543202
Disease or Syndrome
Den Hoed-de Boer-Voisin syndrome (DHDBV) is characterized by global developmental delay with moderately to severely impaired intellectual development, poor or absent speech, and delayed motor skills. Although the severity of the disorder varies, many patients are nonverbal and have hypotonia with inability to sit or walk. Early-onset epilepsy is common and may be refractory to treatment, leading to epileptic encephalopathy and further interruption of developmental progress. Most patients have feeding difficulties with poor overall growth and dysmorphic facial features, as well as significant dental anomalies resembling amelogenesis imperfecta. The phenotype is reminiscent of Kohlschutter-Tonz syndrome (KTZS; 226750). More variable features of DHDBV include visual defects, behavioral abnormalities, and nonspecific involvement of other organ systems (summary by den Hoed et al., 2021).
Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency, nuclear type 22
MedGen UID:
1786100
Concept ID:
C5543491
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency nuclear type 22 (MC4DN22) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by neonatal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, encephalopathy, and severe lactic acidosis with fatal outcome (Wintjes et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) deficiency, see 220110.
Developmental delay, impaired speech, and behavioral abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1794167
Concept ID:
C5561957
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental delay, impaired speech, and behavioral abnormalities (DDISBA) is characterized by global developmental delay apparent from early childhood. Intellectual disability can range from mild to severe. Additional variable features may include dysmorphic facial features, seizures, hypotonia, motor abnormalities such as Tourette syndrome or dystonia, and hearing loss (summary by Cousin et al., 2021).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia and dysmorphic facies
MedGen UID:
1794184
Concept ID:
C5561974
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia and dysmorphic facies (NEDHYDF) is characterized by global developmental delay and hypotonia apparent from birth. Affected individuals have variably impaired intellectual development, often with speech delay and delayed walking. Seizures are generally not observed, although some patients may have single seizures or late-onset epilepsy. Most patients have prominent dysmorphic facial features. Additional features may include congenital cardiac defects (without arrhythmia), nonspecific renal anomalies, joint contractures or joint hyperextensibility, dry skin, and cryptorchidism. There is significant phenotypic variability in both the neurologic and extraneurologic manifestations (summary by Tan et al., 2022).
Chopra-Amiel-Gordon syndrome
MedGen UID:
1794185
Concept ID:
C5561975
Disease or Syndrome
Chopra-Amiel-Gordon syndrome (CAGS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by developmental delay and/or impaired intellectual development, speech delay, facial dysmorphism, and variable other features, including recurrent bacterial infections, ophthalmologic abnormalities, and nonspecific brain abnormalities (Chopra et al., 2021).
Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase deficiency, cytosolic
MedGen UID:
1801754
Concept ID:
C5574905
Disease or Syndrome
Cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase deficiency causes a defect in gluconeogenesis that results in a 'biochemical signature' of fasting hypoglycemia with high tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate excretion, particularly of fumarate. Other biochemical anomalies that may be seen during metabolic crisis include ketonuria, dicarboxylic aciduria, and urea cycle dysfunction (Vieira et al., 2017). See PCKDM (261650) for a discussion of mitochondrial PCK (PEPCK2; 614095) deficiency.
Holoprosencephaly 14
MedGen UID:
1811868
Concept ID:
C5676994
Disease or Syndrome
Holoprosencephaly-14 (HPE14) is an autosomal recessive condition characterized by severe developmental delay secondary to brain malformations within the holoprosencephaly spectrum (Drissi et al., 2022). For general phenotypic information and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of holoprosencephaly, see HPE1 (236100).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Jensen KHR, Urdanibia-Centelles O, Dam VH, Köhler-Forsberg K, Frokjaer VG, Knudsen GM, Jørgensen MB, Ip CT
Eur Neuropsychopharmacol 2024 Feb;79:59-65. Epub 2023 Dec 20 doi: 10.1016/j.euroneuro.2023.11.004. PMID: 38128462
Hancock EC, Osborne JP, Edwards SW
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2013 Jun 5;(6):CD001770. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD001770.pub3. PMID: 23740534
Hancock EC, Osborne JP, Edwards SW
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2008 Oct 8;(4):CD001770. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD001770.pub2. PMID: 18843624

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Yang Q, Wei B
J Neuroimmunol 2023 May 15;378:578089. Epub 2023 Apr 11 doi: 10.1016/j.jneuroim.2023.578089. PMID: 37094438
Wesselingh R, Broadley J, Buzzard K, Tarlinton D, Seneviratne U, Kyndt C, Stankovich J, Sanfilippo P, Nesbitt C, D'Souza W, Macdonell R, Butzkueven H, O'Brien TJ, Monif M
Epilepsy Behav 2022 Mar;128:108571. Epub 2022 Jan 29 doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2022.108571. PMID: 35101840
Kelleci UA, Calhan T, Sahin A, Aydin-Ozemir Z, Kahraman R, Ozdil K, Sokmen HM, Yalcin AD
Clin EEG Neurosci 2019 Mar;50(2):129-133. Epub 2018 Apr 30 doi: 10.1177/1550059418767589. PMID: 29707968
Hancock EC, Osborne JP, Edwards SW
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2013 Jun 5;(6):CD001770. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD001770.pub3. PMID: 23740534
Blume WT
Brain 1998 Oct;121 ( Pt 10):1937-49. doi: 10.1093/brain/121.10.1937. PMID: 9798748

Diagnosis

Wesselingh R, Broadley J, Buzzard K, Tarlinton D, Seneviratne U, Kyndt C, Stankovich J, Sanfilippo P, Nesbitt C, D'Souza W, Macdonell R, Butzkueven H, O'Brien TJ, Monif M
Epilepsy Behav 2022 Mar;128:108571. Epub 2022 Jan 29 doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2022.108571. PMID: 35101840
Kelleci UA, Calhan T, Sahin A, Aydin-Ozemir Z, Kahraman R, Ozdil K, Sokmen HM, Yalcin AD
Clin EEG Neurosci 2019 Mar;50(2):129-133. Epub 2018 Apr 30 doi: 10.1177/1550059418767589. PMID: 29707968
Brigo F, Rossini F, Stefani A, Nardone R, Tezzon F, Fiaschi A, Manganotti P, Bongiovanni LG
Clin Neurophysiol 2013 Feb;124(2):221-7. Epub 2012 Aug 24 doi: 10.1016/j.clinph.2012.07.017. PMID: 22925838
Chaudhary SC, Sonkar SK, Kumar V, Golchha S
J Assoc Physicians India 2011 May;59:327-9. PMID: 21751615
Rosén I
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord 1997 Mar-Apr;8(2):110-6. doi: 10.1159/000106615. PMID: 9065324

Therapy

Hancock EC, Osborne JP, Edwards SW
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2013 Jun 5;(6):CD001770. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD001770.pub3. PMID: 23740534
Chaudhary SC, Sonkar SK, Kumar V, Golchha S
J Assoc Physicians India 2011 May;59:327-9. PMID: 21751615
Hancock EC, Osborne JP, Edwards SW
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2008 Oct 8;(4):CD001770. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD001770.pub2. PMID: 18843624
Griepp EB, Griepp RB
J Card Surg 1992 Jun;7(2):134-55. doi: 10.1111/j.1540-8191.1992.tb00790.x. PMID: 1606366
White YS, Bell DS, Mellick R
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1973 Feb;36(1):146-51. doi: 10.1136/jnnp.36.1.146. PMID: 4691687Free PMC Article

Prognosis

Kaya Özçora GD, Söbü E, Gümüş U
Neurol Res 2023 Mar;45(3):226-233. Epub 2023 Feb 2 doi: 10.1080/01616412.2023.2170917. PMID: 36731496
Wesselingh R, Broadley J, Buzzard K, Tarlinton D, Seneviratne U, Kyndt C, Stankovich J, Sanfilippo P, Nesbitt C, D'Souza W, Macdonell R, Butzkueven H, O'Brien TJ, Monif M
Epilepsy Behav 2022 Mar;128:108571. Epub 2022 Jan 29 doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2022.108571. PMID: 35101840
Yeshokumar AK, Coughlin A, Fastman J, Psaila K, Harmon M, Randell T, Schorr EM, Han H, Hoang H, Soudant C, Jette N
Epilepsia 2021 Feb;62(2):397-407. Epub 2021 Jan 21 doi: 10.1111/epi.16807. PMID: 33475161
Blume WT
Brain 1998 Oct;121 ( Pt 10):1937-49. doi: 10.1093/brain/121.10.1937. PMID: 9798748
Synek VM
Clin Electroencephalogr 1988 Jul;19(3):160-6. doi: 10.1177/155005948801900310. PMID: 3416501

Clinical prediction guides

Chan MMY, Choi CXT, Tsoi TCW, Zhong J, Han YMY
Clin Neurophysiol 2024 Jul;163:56-67. Epub 2024 Apr 15 doi: 10.1016/j.clinph.2024.04.004. PMID: 38703700
Bonuccelli A, Santangelo A, Castelli F, Magherini G, Volpi E, Costa E, Alesci E, Massimetti G, Operto FF, Peroni DG, Orsini A
Int J Environ Res Public Health 2022 Dec 29;20(1) doi: 10.3390/ijerph20010552. PMID: 36612875Free PMC Article
Wesselingh R, Broadley J, Buzzard K, Tarlinton D, Seneviratne U, Kyndt C, Stankovich J, Sanfilippo P, Nesbitt C, D'Souza W, Macdonell R, Butzkueven H, O'Brien TJ, Monif M
Epilepsy Behav 2022 Mar;128:108571. Epub 2022 Jan 29 doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2022.108571. PMID: 35101840
Ertürk Çetin Ö, Korkmaz B, Alev G, Demirbilek V
Acta Neurol Belg 2017 Sep;117(3):729-732. Epub 2017 Apr 26 doi: 10.1007/s13760-017-0785-8. PMID: 28447214
Brigo F, Rossini F, Stefani A, Nardone R, Tezzon F, Fiaschi A, Manganotti P, Bongiovanni LG
Clin Neurophysiol 2013 Feb;124(2):221-7. Epub 2012 Aug 24 doi: 10.1016/j.clinph.2012.07.017. PMID: 22925838

Recent systematic reviews

Yeshokumar AK, Coughlin A, Fastman J, Psaila K, Harmon M, Randell T, Schorr EM, Han H, Hoang H, Soudant C, Jette N
Epilepsia 2021 Feb;62(2):397-407. Epub 2021 Jan 21 doi: 10.1111/epi.16807. PMID: 33475161
Hancock EC, Osborne JP, Edwards SW
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2013 Jun 5;(6):CD001770. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD001770.pub3. PMID: 23740534
Fallah A, Guyatt GH, Snead OC 3rd, Ebrahim S, Ibrahim GM, Mansouri A, Reddy D, Walter SD, Kulkarni AV, Bhandari M, Banfield L, Bhatnagar N, Liang S, Teutonico F, Liao J, Rutka JT
PLoS One 2013;8(2):e53565. Epub 2013 Feb 6 doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0053565. PMID: 23405072Free PMC Article
Hancock EC, Osborne JP, Edwards SW
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2008 Oct 8;(4):CD001770. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD001770.pub2. PMID: 18843624

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