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Hypogonadism

MedGen UID:
5711
Concept ID:
C0020619
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: Decreased activity of gonads; gonadotropin deficiency; hypogonadism; Hypogonadotropism; hypogonadotropism
SNOMED CT: Hypogonadism (48130008)
 
HPO: HP:0000135
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0002146

Definition

A decreased functionality of the gonad. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Werner syndrome
MedGen UID:
12147
Concept ID:
C0043119
Disease or Syndrome
Werner syndrome is characterized by the premature appearance of features associated with normal aging and cancer predisposition. Individuals with Werner syndrome develop normally until the end of the first decade. The first sign is the lack of a growth spurt during the early teen years. Early findings (usually observed in the 20s) include loss and graying of hair, hoarseness, and scleroderma-like skin changes, followed by bilateral ocular cataracts, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypogonadism, skin ulcers, and osteoporosis in the 30s. Myocardial infarction and cancer are the most common causes of death; the mean age of death in individuals with Werner syndrome is 54 years.
Adrenoleukodystrophy
MedGen UID:
57667
Concept ID:
C0162309
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) affects the nervous system white matter and the adrenal cortex. Three main phenotypes are seen in affected males: The childhood cerebral form manifests most commonly between ages four and eight years. It initially resembles attention-deficit disorder or hyperactivity; progressive impairment of cognition, behavior, vision, hearing, and motor function follow the initial symptoms and often lead to total disability within six months to two years. Most individuals have impaired adrenocortical function at the time that neurologic disturbances are first noted. Adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) manifests most commonly in an individual in his twenties or middle age as progressive stiffness and weakness of the legs, sphincter disturbances, sexual dysfunction, and often, impaired adrenocortical function; all symptoms are progressive over decades. "Addison disease only" presents with primary adrenocortical insufficiency between age two years and adulthood and most commonly by age 7.5 years, without evidence of neurologic abnormality; however, some degree of neurologic disability (most commonly AMN) usually develops by middle age. More than 20% of female carriers develop mild-to-moderate spastic paraparesis in middle age or later. Adrenal function is usually normal.
Hereditary acrodermatitis enteropathica
MedGen UID:
66355
Concept ID:
C0221036
Disease or Syndrome
Acrodermatitis enteropathica of the zinc deficiency type (AEZ) is characterized by intermittent simultaneous occurrence of diarrhea and dermatitis with failure to thrive. Alopecia of the scalp, eyebrows, and eyelashes is a usual feature. The skin lesions are bullous. Noteworthy is the cure by diodoquin, or diiodohydroxyquinoline (Dillaha et al., 1953; Bloom and Sobel, 1955). Rodin and Goldman (1969) described autopsy findings, including pancreatic islet hyperplasia, absence of the thymus and of germinal centers, and plasmocytosis of lymph nodes and spleen.
Pili torti-deafness syndrome
MedGen UID:
82728
Concept ID:
C0266006
Disease or Syndrome
Bjornstad syndrome (BJS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pili torti. The hearing loss is congenital and of variable severity. Pili torti (twisted hairs), a condition in which the hair shafts are flattened at irregular intervals and twisted 180 degrees from the normal axis, making the hair very brittle, is usually recognized early in childhood (Selvaag, 2000).
Xeroderma pigmentosum group B
MedGen UID:
78643
Concept ID:
C0268136
Disease or Syndrome
Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by: Acute sun sensitivity (severe sunburn with blistering, persistent erythema on minimal sun exposure) with marked freckle-like pigmentation of the face before age two years; Sunlight-induced ocular involvement (photophobia, severe keratitis, atrophy of the skin of the lids, ocular surface neoplasms); Greatly increased risk of sunlight-induced cutaneous neoplasms (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma) within the first decade of life. Approximately 25% of affected individuals have neurologic manifestations (acquired microcephaly, diminished or absent deep tendon stretch reflexes, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, progressive cognitive impairment, and ataxia). The most common causes of death are skin cancer, neurologic degeneration, and internal cancer. The median age at death in persons with XP with neurodegeneration (29 years) was found to be younger than that in persons with XP without neurodegeneration (37 years).
Partial androgen insensitivity syndrome
MedGen UID:
82785
Concept ID:
C0268301
Disease or Syndrome
Individuals with androgen insensitivity have a 46,XY karyotype and testes that produce age-appropriate androgen levels but have undermasculinized external genitalia due to defects in androgen action. The phenotype in PAIS varies depending on residual androgen receptor function, ranging from severe undermasculinization presenting as female-like external genitalia to male-appearing genitalia. The typical presentation comprises micropenis, severe hypospadias, and bifid scrotum with or without cryptorchidism (summary by Mongan et al., 2015).
Cockayne syndrome type 1
MedGen UID:
155488
Concept ID:
C0751039
Disease or Syndrome
Cockayne syndrome (referred to as CS in this GeneReview) spans a continuous phenotypic spectrum that includes: CS type I, the "classic" or "moderate" form; CS type II, a more severe form with symptoms present at birth; this form overlaps with cerebrooculofacioskeletal (COFS) syndrome; CS type III, a milder and later-onset form; COFS syndrome, a fetal form of CS. CS type I is characterized by normal prenatal growth with the onset of growth and developmental abnormalities in the first two years. By the time the disease has become fully manifest, height, weight, and head circumference are far below the fifth percentile. Progressive impairment of vision, hearing, and central and peripheral nervous system function leads to severe disability; death typically occurs in the first or second decade. CS type II is characterized by growth failure at birth, with little or no postnatal neurologic development. Congenital cataracts or other structural anomalies of the eye may be present. Affected children have early postnatal contractures of the spine (kyphosis, scoliosis) and joints. Death usually occurs by age five years. CS type III is a phenotype in which major clinical features associated with CS only become apparent after age two years; growth and/or cognition exceeds the expectations for CS type I. COFS syndrome is characterized by very severe prenatal developmental anomalies (arthrogryposis and microphthalmia).
Pituitary hormone deficiency, combined, 2
MedGen UID:
209236
Concept ID:
C0878683
Disease or Syndrome
PROP1-related combined pituitary hormone deficiency (CPHD) is associated with deficiencies of: growth hormone (GH); thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH); the two gonadotropins, luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH); prolactin (PrL); and occasionally adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). At birth, in contrast to individuals with congenital CPHD of other etiologies, neonates with PROP1-related CPHD lack perinatal signs of hypopituitarism. Mean birth weights and lengths are usually within the normal range and neonatal hypoglycemia and prolonged neonatal jaundice are not prevalent findings. Most affected individuals are ascertained because of short stature during childhood. Although TSH deficiency can present shortly after birth, TSH deficiency usually occurs with or after the onset of GH deficiency. Hypothyroidism is usually mild. FSH and LH deficiencies are typically identified at the age of onset of puberty. Affected individuals can have absent or delayed and incomplete secondary sexual development with infertility. Untreated males usually have a small penis and small testes. Some females experience menarche but subsequently require hormone replacement therapy. ACTH deficiency is less common and, when present, usually occurs in adolescence or adulthood. Neuroimaging of hypothalamic-pituitary region usually demonstrates a hypoplastic or normal anterior pituitary lobe and a normal posterior pituitary lobe.
Cone-rod dystrophy 1
MedGen UID:
371596
Concept ID:
C1833564
Disease or Syndrome
Cone-rod dystrophy is a group of related eye disorders that causes vision loss, which becomes more severe over time. These disorders affect the retina, which is the layer of light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. In people with cone-rod dystrophy, vision loss occurs as the light-sensing cells of the retina gradually deteriorate.\n\nThere are more than 30 types of cone-rod dystrophy, which are distinguished by their genetic cause and their pattern of inheritance: autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, and X-linked. Additionally, cone-rod dystrophy can occur alone without any other signs and symptoms or it can occur as part of a syndrome that affects multiple parts of the body.\n\nThe first signs and symptoms of cone-rod dystrophy, which often occur in childhood, are usually decreased sharpness of vision (visual acuity) and increased sensitivity to light (photophobia). These features are typically followed by impaired color vision (dyschromatopsia), blind spots (scotomas) in the center of the visual field, and partial side (peripheral) vision loss. Over time, affected individuals develop night blindness and a worsening of their peripheral vision, which can limit independent mobility. Decreasing visual acuity makes reading increasingly difficult and most affected individuals are legally blind by mid-adulthood. As the condition progresses, individuals may develop involuntary eye movements (nystagmus).
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal dominant 3
MedGen UID:
373087
Concept ID:
C1836439
Disease or Syndrome
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia is characterized by multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions in skeletal muscle. The most common clinical features include adult onset of weakness of the external eye muscles and exercise intolerance. Patients with C10ORF2-linked adPEO may have other clinical features including proximal muscle weakness, ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, cardiomyopathy, cataracts, depression, and endocrine abnormalities (summary by Fratter et al., 2010). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia, see PEOA1 (157640). PEO caused by mutations in the POLG gene (174763) are associated with more complicated phenotypes than those forms caused by mutations in the SLC25A4 (103220) or C10ORF2 genes (Lamantea et al., 2002).
Fanconi anemia complementation group B
MedGen UID:
336901
Concept ID:
C1845292
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA.
X-linked intellectual disability Cabezas type
MedGen UID:
337334
Concept ID:
C1845861
Disease or Syndrome
The Cabezas type of X-linked syndromic intellectual developmental disorder is characterized primarily by short stature, hypogonadism, and abnormal gait, with other more variable features such as speech delay, prominent lower lip, and tremor (Cabezas et al., 2000).
Congenital muscular dystrophy-infantile cataract-hypogonadism syndrome
MedGen UID:
376896
Concept ID:
C1850864
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy-infantile cataract-hypogonadism syndrome is characterized by congenital muscular dystrophy, infantile cataract and hypogonadism. It has been described in seven individuals from an isolated Norwegian village and in one unrelated individual. Transmission appears to be autosomal recessive.
Say-Barber-Miller syndrome
MedGen UID:
343258
Concept ID:
C1855078
Disease or Syndrome
Say-Barber-Miller syndrome is characterised by the association of unusual facial features, microcephaly, developmental delay, and severe postnatal growth retardation.
Hypergonadotropic hypogonadism-cataract syndrome
MedGen UID:
344596
Concept ID:
C1855859
Disease or Syndrome
Syndrome with the association of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and cataracts with onset during adolescence. It has been described in three brothers from a consanguineous family. An autosomal recessive mode of transmission appears likely.
Conductive deafness-malformed external ear syndrome
MedGen UID:
347429
Concept ID:
C1857341
Disease or Syndrome
A very rare, syndromic genetic deafness characterized by mild to moderate conductive hearing loss, dysmorphic pinnae and lip pits or dimples. The pinnae are usually small, cup-shaped, with helix folded forward, and hearing loss is associated with malformed ossicles and displacement of the external auditory canal.
Deafness, congenital, with total albinism
MedGen UID:
387799
Concept ID:
C1857343
Disease or Syndrome
Bardet-Biedl syndrome 7
MedGen UID:
347180
Concept ID:
C1859565
Disease or Syndrome
Bardet-Biedl syndrome-7 (BBS7) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by retinitis pigmentosa, postaxial polydactyly, mental retardation, obesity, renal anomalies, and hypogenitalism (Harville et al., 2010). Zaghloul and Katsanis (2009) estimated the contribution of BBS7 gene mutations to the total BBS mutational load to be 1.50%. For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bardet-Biedl syndrome, see BBS1 (209900).
Bardet-Biedl syndrome 8
MedGen UID:
347181
Concept ID:
C1859566
Disease or Syndrome
BBS8 is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by retinitis pigmentosa, obesity, postaxial polydactyly, hypogonadism, and developmental delay (Ansley et al., 2003). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bardet-Biedl syndrome, see BBS1 (209900).
Bardet-Biedl syndrome 10
MedGen UID:
347909
Concept ID:
C1859568
Disease or Syndrome
BBS10 is characterized by progressive retinal dystrophy, obesity, polydactyly, cognitive impairment, and renal dysplasia (Stoetzel et al., 2006). BBS10 represents a major locus for BBS, with mutations in the BBS10 gene accounting for approximately 20% of BBS patients (Stoetzel et al., 2006; Zaghloul and Katsanis, 2009). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bardet-Biedl syndrome, see BBS1 (209900).
Bardet-Biedl syndrome 11
MedGen UID:
395295
Concept ID:
C1859569
Disease or Syndrome
Bardet-Biedl syndrome-11 (BBS11) is a pleiotropic autosomal recessive disorder characterized by obesity, pigmentary retinopathy, polydactyly, renal abnormalities, learning disabilities, and hypogenitalism (Chiang et al., 2006). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bardet-Biedl syndrome, see BBS1 (209900).
Bardet-Biedl syndrome 12
MedGen UID:
347910
Concept ID:
C1859570
Disease or Syndrome
BBS12 is a clinically pleiotropic autosomal recessive ciliopathy. The patients with BBS12 studied by Stoetzel et al. (2007) and Harville et al. (2010) met the diagnostic criteria of Beales et al. (1999), which required the presence of either 4 primary features, including rod-cone dystrophy, polydactyly, obesity, learning disabilities, hypogonadism (in males), and/or renal anomalies; or 3 primary plus 2 secondary features (e.g., developmental delay, ataxia, cataracts). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bardet-Biedl syndrome, see BBS1 (209900).
Hemochromatosis type 2B
MedGen UID:
356040
Concept ID:
C1865616
Disease or Syndrome
Juvenile hemochromatosis is characterized by onset of severe iron overload occurring typically in the first to third decades of life. Males and females are equally affected. Prominent clinical features include hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, cardiomyopathy, glucose intolerance and diabetes, arthropathy, and liver fibrosis or cirrhosis. Hepatocellular cancer has been reported occasionally. The main cause of death is cardiac disease. If juvenile hemochromatosis is detected early enough and if blood is removed regularly through the process of phlebotomy to achieve iron depletion, morbidity and mortality are greatly reduced.
Colobomatous microphthalmia - obesity - hypogenitalism - intellectual disability syndrome
MedGen UID:
400954
Concept ID:
C1866256
Disease or Syndrome
Colobomatous microphthalmia-obesity-hypogenitalism-intellectual disability syndrome is a rare, genetic, syndromic microphthalmia disorder characterized by bilateral, usually asymmetrical, microphthalmia associated typically with a unilateral coloboma, truncal obesity, borderline to mild intellectual disability, hypogenitalism and, more variably, nystagmus, cataracts and developmental delay.
Trichothiodystrophy 1, photosensitive
MedGen UID:
355730
Concept ID:
C1866504
Disease or Syndrome
Trichothiodystrophy is also associated with recurrent infections, particularly respiratory infections, which can be life-threatening. People with trichothiodystrophy may have abnormal red blood cells, including red blood cells that are smaller than normal. They may also have elevated levels of a type of hemoglobin called A2, which is a protein found in red blood cells. Other features of trichothiodystrophy can include dry, scaly skin (ichthyosis); abnormalities of the fingernails and toenails; clouding of the lens in both eyes from birth (congenital cataracts); poor coordination; and skeletal abnormalities including degeneration of both hips at an early age.\n\nAbout half of all people with trichothiodystrophy have a photosensitive form of the disorder, which causes them to be extremely sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) rays from sunlight. They develop a severe sunburn after spending just a few minutes in the sun. However, for reasons that are unclear, they do not develop other sun-related problems such as excessive freckling of the skin or an increased risk of skin cancer. Many people with trichothiodystrophy report that they do not sweat.\n\nIntellectual disability and delayed development are common in people with trichothiodystrophy, although most affected individuals are highly social with an outgoing and engaging personality. Some people with trichothiodystrophy have brain abnormalities that can be seen with imaging tests. A common neurological feature of this disorder is impaired myelin production (dysmyelination). Myelin is a fatty substance that insulates nerve cells and promotes the rapid transmission of nerve impulses.\n\nMothers of children with trichothiodystrophy may experience problems during pregnancy including pregnancy-induced high blood pressure (preeclampsia) and a related condition called HELLP syndrome that can damage the liver. Babies with trichothiodystrophy are at increased risk of premature birth, low birth weight, and slow growth. Most children with trichothiodystrophy have short stature compared to others their age. \n\nThe signs and symptoms of trichothiodystrophy vary widely. Mild cases may involve only the hair. More severe cases also cause delayed development, significant intellectual disability, and recurrent infections; severely affected individuals may survive only into infancy or early childhood.\n\nIn people with trichothiodystrophy, tests show that the hair is lacking sulfur-containing proteins that normally gives hair its strength. A cross section of a cut hair shows alternating light and dark banding that has been described as a "tiger tail."\n\nTrichothiodystrophy, commonly called TTD, is a rare inherited condition that affects many parts of the body. The hallmark of this condition is hair that is sparse and easily broken. 
Chromosome 2p16.1-p15 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
390902
Concept ID:
C2675875
Disease or Syndrome
Chromosome 2p16.1-p15 deletion syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, intellectual disability, and variable but distinctive dysmorphic features, including microcephaly, bitemporal narrowing, smooth and long philtrum, hypertelorism, downslanting palpebral fissures, broad nasal root, thin upper lip, and high palate. Many patients have behavioral disorders, including autistic features, as well as structural brain abnormalities, such as pachygyria or hypoplastic corpus callosum. Those with deletions including the BCL11A gene (606557) also have persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HbF), which is asymptomatic and does not affected hematologic parameters or susceptibility to infection (summary by Funnell et al., 2015). Point mutation in the BCL11A gene causes intellectual developmental disorder with persistence of fetal hemoglobin (617101), which shows overlapping features. See also fetal hemoglobin quantitative trait locus-5 (HBFQTL5; 142335).
Waardenburg syndrome type 4C
MedGen UID:
413310
Concept ID:
C2750452
Disease or Syndrome
Waardenburg syndrome type 4 is an auditory-pigmentary syndrome characterized by pigmentary abnormalities of the eye, deafness, and Hirschsprung disease (review by Read and Newton, 1997). WS type 4C is caused by mutation in the SOX10 gene (602229). WS type 4 is genetically heterogeneous (see WS4A; 277580). For a description of other clinical variants of Waardenburg syndrome, see WS1 (193500), WS2 (193510), and WS3 (148820).
Odontotrichomelic syndrome
MedGen UID:
443944
Concept ID:
C2930960
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic disease characterized by intellectual disability, growth delay, absence deformities of upper and lower limbs, hypotrichosis, hypoplastic nails, abnormal dentition, abnormal auricles, hypoplastic nipples, thyroid enlargement, and abnormalities of tyrosine and/or tryptophane metabolism. Hypogonadism and cleft lip have also been reported. No new cases have been confirmed since 1970.
ALG1-congenital disorder of glycosylation
MedGen UID:
419308
Concept ID:
C2931005
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) comprise a group of multisystem diseases with mostly severe psychomotor and mental retardation. Type I CDG comprises those disorders in which there are defects that affect biosynthesis of dolichol-linked oligosaccharides in the cytosol or the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), as well as defects involving the transfer of oligosaccharides onto nascent glycoproteins. Type II CDG comprises all defects of further trimming and elongation of N-linked oligosaccharides in the ER and Golgi (Schwarz et al., 2004). CDG1K is a type I CDG characterized by predominant neurologic involvement. Survival ranges from the second day of life to adulthood. The liver is affected in a minority of patients and shows hepatomegaly, edema, ascites, cholestatic jaundice, portal hypertension, and Budd-Chiari syndrome (summary by Marques-da-Silva et al., 2017). For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065).
Spastic paraparesis-deafness syndrome
MedGen UID:
419037
Concept ID:
C2931291
Disease or Syndrome
A chronic neurodegenerative disorder with features of spastic paraparesis (beginning at about 10 years of age) and hearing deficits. It has been described in affecting at least six male members spanning three generations of a large family. Some relatives presented with tremor, cataracts, sensory deficits, short stature, hypogonadism, elevated cerebrospinal fluid protein, and/or absent or prolonged somatosensory evoked potentials.
Camurati-Engelmann disease, type 2
MedGen UID:
419470
Concept ID:
C2931683
Disease or Syndrome
Camurati-Engelmann Disease not associated with TGFB1. This is an n-of-1 use case where only one patient or family has been described with this disorder.
Myotonic dystrophy type 2
MedGen UID:
419137
Concept ID:
C2931689
Disease or Syndrome
Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is characterized by myotonia and muscle dysfunction (proximal and axial weakness, myalgia, and stiffness), and less commonly by posterior subcapsular cataracts, cardiac conduction defects, insulin-insensitive type 2 diabetes mellitus, and other endocrine abnormalities. While myotonia (involuntary muscle contraction with delayed relaxation) has been reported during the first decade, onset is typically in the third to fourth decade, most commonly with fluctuating or episodic muscle pain that can be debilitating and proximal and axial weakness of the neck flexors and the hip flexors. Subsequently, weakness occurs in the elbow extensors and finger flexors. Facial weakness and weakness of the ankle dorsiflexors are less common. Myotonia rarely causes severe symptoms. In a subset of individuals, calf hypertrophy in combination with brisk reflexes is notable.
Pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1C
MedGen UID:
420958
Concept ID:
C2932716
Disease or Syndrome
Disorders of GNAS inactivation include the phenotypes pseudohypoparathyroidism Ia, Ib, and Ic (PHP-Ia, -Ib, -Ic), pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP), progressive osseous heteroplasia (POH), and osteoma cutis (OC). PHP-Ia and PHP-Ic are characterized by: End-organ resistance to endocrine hormones including parathyroid hormone (PTH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), gonadotropins (LH and FSH), growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), and CNS neurotransmitters (leading to obesity and variable degrees of intellectual disability and developmental delay); and The Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) phenotype (short stature, round facies, and subcutaneous ossifications) and brachydactyly type E (shortening mainly of the 4th and/or 5th metacarpals and metatarsals and distal phalanx of the thumb). Although PHP-Ib is characterized principally by PTH resistance, some individuals also have partial TSH resistance and mild features of AHO (e.g., brachydactyly). PPHP, a more limited form of PHP-Ia, is characterized by various manifestations of the AHO phenotype without the hormone resistance or obesity. POH and OC are even more restricted variants of PPHP: POH consists of dermal ossification beginning in infancy, followed by increasing and extensive bone formation in deep muscle and fascia. OC consists of extra-skeletal ossification that is limited to the dermis and subcutaneous tissues.
Bardet-Biedl syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
422452
Concept ID:
C2936862
Disease or Syndrome
Bardet-Biedl syndrome is an autosomal recessive and genetically heterogeneous ciliopathy characterized by retinitis pigmentosa, obesity, kidney dysfunction, polydactyly, behavioral dysfunction, and hypogonadism (summary by Beales et al., 1999). Eight proteins implicated in the disorder assemble to form the BBSome, a stable complex involved in signaling receptor trafficking to and from cilia (summary by Scheidecker et al., 2014). Genetic Heterogeneity of Bardet-Biedl Syndrome BBS2 (615981) is caused by mutation in a gene on 16q13 (606151); BBS3 (600151), by mutation in the ARL6 gene on 3q11 (608845); BBS4 (615982), by mutation in a gene on 15q22 (600374); BBS5 (615983), by mutation in a gene on 2q31 (603650); BBS6 (605231), by mutation in the MKKS gene on 20p12 (604896); BBS7 (615984), by mutation in a gene on 4q27 (607590); BBS8 (615985), by mutation in the TTC8 gene on 14q32 (608132); BBS9 (615986), by mutation in a gene on 7p14 (607968); BBS10 (615987), by mutation in a gene on 12q21 (610148); BBS11 (615988), by mutation in the TRIM32 gene on 9q33 (602290); BBS12 (615989), by mutation in a gene on 4q27 (610683); BBS13 (615990), by mutation in the MKS1 gene (609883) on 17q23; BBS14 (615991), by mutation in the CEP290 gene (610142) on 12q21, BBS15 (615992), by mutation in the WDPCP gene (613580) on 2p15; BBS16 (615993), by mutation in the SDCCAG8 gene (613524) on 1q43; BBS17 (615994), by mutation in the LZTFL1 gene (606568) on 3p21; BBS18 (615995), by mutation in the BBIP1 gene (613605) on 10q25; BBS19 (615996), by mutation in the IFT27 gene (615870) on 22q12; BBS20 (619471), by mutation in the IFT172 gene (607386) on 9p21; BBS21 (617406), by mutation in the CFAP418 gene (614477) on 8q22; and BBS22 (617119), by mutation in the IFT74 gene (608040) on 9p21. The CCDC28B gene (610162) modifies the expression of BBS phenotypes in patients who have mutations in other genes. Mutations in MKS1, MKS3 (TMEM67; 609884), and C2ORF86 also modify the expression of BBS phenotypes in patients who have mutations in other genes. Although BBS had originally been thought to be a recessive disorder, Katsanis et al. (2001) demonstrated that clinical manifestation of some forms of Bardet-Biedl syndrome requires recessive mutations in 1 of the 6 loci plus an additional mutation in a second locus. While Katsanis et al. (2001) called this 'triallelic inheritance,' Burghes et al. (2001) suggested the term 'recessive inheritance with a modifier of penetrance.' Mykytyn et al. (2002) found no evidence of involvement of the common BBS1 mutation in triallelic inheritance. However, Fan et al. (2004) found heterozygosity in a mutation of the BBS3 gene (608845.0002) as an apparent modifier of the expression of homozygosity of the met390-to-arg mutation in the BBS1 gene (209901.0001). Allelic disorders include nonsyndromic forms of retinitis pigmentosa: RP51 (613464), caused by TTC8 mutation, and RP55 (613575), caused by ARL6 mutation.
Bardet-Biedl syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
422453
Concept ID:
C2936863
Disease or Syndrome
BBS2 is an autosomal recessive ciliopathy characterized by retinal degeneration, polydactyly, renal disease, hypogonadism, obesity, dysmorphic features, and variable degrees of cognitive impairment (Innes et al., 2010). Mutation in the BBS2 gene is the third most frequent cause of BBS, accounting for approximately 8% of cases (Zaghloul and Katsanis, 2009). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bardet-Biedl syndrome, see BBS1 (209900).
Bardet-Biedl syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
423627
Concept ID:
C2936864
Disease or Syndrome
BBS4 is a rare multisystemic disorder characterized primarily by retinal dystrophy, obesity, polydactyly, and renal dysfunction that accounts for less than 3% of BBS (Katsanis et al., 2002). Anosmia has been described in patients with BBS4 (Iannaccone et al., 2005), as well as polydactyly confined to the hands (Carmi et al., 1995). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bardet-Biedl syndrome, see BBS1 (209900).
Steinert myotonic dystrophy syndrome
MedGen UID:
886881
Concept ID:
C3250443
Disease or Syndrome
Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a multisystem disorder that affects skeletal and smooth muscle as well as the eye, heart, endocrine system, and central nervous system. The clinical findings, which span a continuum from mild to severe, have been categorized into three somewhat overlapping phenotypes: mild, classic, and congenital. Mild DM1 is characterized by cataract and mild myotonia (sustained muscle contraction); life span is normal. Classic DM1 is characterized by muscle weakness and wasting, myotonia, cataract, and often cardiac conduction abnormalities; adults may become physically disabled and may have a shortened life span. Congenital DM1 is characterized by hypotonia and severe generalized weakness at birth, often with respiratory insufficiency and early death; intellectual disability is common.
Xq27.3q28 duplication syndrome
MedGen UID:
477152
Concept ID:
C3275521
Disease or Syndrome
Chromosome Xq27.3-q28 duplication syndrome is an X-linked recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by mild mental retardation, mild facial dysmorphism, short stature, and primary testicular failure manifest as high-pitched voice, sparse body hair, abdominal obesity, and small testes. Female carriers may have short stature and premature ovarian failure (summary by Rio et al., 2010).
Acrodysostosis 1 with or without hormone resistance
MedGen UID:
477858
Concept ID:
C3276228
Disease or Syndrome
Acrodysostosis-1 (ACRDYS1) is a form of skeletal dysplasia characterized by short stature, severe brachydactyly, facial dysostosis, and nasal hypoplasia. Affected individuals often have advanced bone age and obesity. Laboratory studies show resistance to multiple hormones, including parathyroid, thyrotropin, calcitonin, growth hormone-releasing hormone, and gonadotropin (summary by Linglart et al., 2011). However, not all patients show endocrine abnormalities (Lee et al., 2012). Genetic Heterogeneity of Acrodysostosis See also ACRDYS2 (614613), caused by mutation in the PDE4D gene (600129) on chromosome 5q12.
Microcephaly, epilepsy, and diabetes syndrome
MedGen UID:
481870
Concept ID:
C3280240
Disease or Syndrome
Primary microcephaly-epilepsy-permanent neonatal diabetes syndrome is a rare, genetic, neurologic disease characterized by congenital microcephaly, severe, early-onset epileptic encephalopathy (manifesting as intractable, myoclonic and/or tonic-clonic seizures), permanent, neonatal, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and severe global developmental delay. Muscular hypotonia, skeletal abnormalities, feeding difficulties, and dysmorphic facial features (including narrow forehead, anteverted nares, small mouth with deep philtrum, tented upper lip vermilion) are frequently associated. Brain MRI reveals cerebral atrophy with cortical gyral simplification and aplasia/hypoplasia of the corpus callosum.
Pseudohypoparathyroidism type I A
MedGen UID:
488447
Concept ID:
C3494506
Disease or Syndrome
Disorders of GNAS inactivation include the phenotypes pseudohypoparathyroidism Ia, Ib, and Ic (PHP-Ia, -Ib, -Ic), pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP), progressive osseous heteroplasia (POH), and osteoma cutis (OC). PHP-Ia and PHP-Ic are characterized by: End-organ resistance to endocrine hormones including parathyroid hormone (PTH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), gonadotropins (LH and FSH), growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), and CNS neurotransmitters (leading to obesity and variable degrees of intellectual disability and developmental delay); and The Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) phenotype (short stature, round facies, and subcutaneous ossifications) and brachydactyly type E (shortening mainly of the 4th and/or 5th metacarpals and metatarsals and distal phalanx of the thumb). Although PHP-Ib is characterized principally by PTH resistance, some individuals also have partial TSH resistance and mild features of AHO (e.g., brachydactyly). PPHP, a more limited form of PHP-Ia, is characterized by various manifestations of the AHO phenotype without the hormone resistance or obesity. POH and OC are even more restricted variants of PPHP: POH consists of dermal ossification beginning in infancy, followed by increasing and extensive bone formation in deep muscle and fascia. OC consists of extra-skeletal ossification that is limited to the dermis and subcutaneous tissues.
Cornelia de Lange syndrome 5
MedGen UID:
763817
Concept ID:
C3550903
Disease or Syndrome
Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) encompasses a spectrum of findings from mild to severe. Severe (classic) CdLS is characterized by distinctive facial features, growth restriction (prenatal onset; <5th centile throughout life), hypertrichosis, and upper-limb reduction defects that range from subtle phalangeal abnormalities to oligodactyly (missing digits). Craniofacial features include synophrys, highly arched and/or thick eyebrows, long eyelashes, short nasal bridge with anteverted nares, small widely spaced teeth, and microcephaly. Individuals with a milder phenotype have less severe growth, cognitive, and limb involvement, but often have facial features consistent with CdLS. Across the CdLS spectrum IQ ranges from below 30 to 102 (mean: 53). Many individuals demonstrate autistic and self-destructive tendencies. Other frequent findings include cardiac septal defects, gastrointestinal dysfunction, hearing loss, myopia, and cryptorchidism or hypoplastic genitalia.
Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism 16 with or without anosmia
MedGen UID:
766935
Concept ID:
C3554021
Disease or Syndrome
Isolated gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) deficiency (IGD) is characterized by inappropriately low serum concentrations of the gonadotropins LH (luteinizing hormone) and FSH (follicle-stimulating hormone) in the presence of low circulating concentrations of sex steroids. IGD is associated with a normal sense of smell (normosmic IGD) in approximately 40% of affected individuals and an impaired sense of smell (Kallmann syndrome) in approximately 60%. IGD can first become apparent in infancy, adolescence, or adulthood. Infant boys with congenital IGD often have micropenis and cryptorchidism. Adolescents and adults with IGD have clinical evidence of hypogonadism and incomplete sexual maturation on physical examination. Adult males with IGD tend to have prepubertal testicular volume (i.e., <4 mL), absence of secondary sexual features (e.g., facial and axillary hair growth, deepening of the voice), decreased muscle mass, diminished libido, erectile dysfunction, and infertility. Adult females have little or no breast development and primary amenorrhea. Although skeletal maturation is delayed, the rate of linear growth is usually normal except for the absence of a distinct pubertal growth spurt.
Obesity due to congenital leptin deficiency
MedGen UID:
767138
Concept ID:
C3554224
Disease or Syndrome
Leptin deficiency or dysfunction (LEPD) is characterized by severe early-onset obesity, hyperphagia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and neuroendocrine/metabolic dysfunction (Ozata et al., 1999).
X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 1
MedGen UID:
777171
Concept ID:
C3669395
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 1 (CDPX1) is characterized by chondrodysplasia punctata (stippled epiphyses), brachytelephalangy (shortening of the distal phalanges), and nasomaxillary hypoplasia. Although most affected males have minimal morbidity and skeletal findings that improve by adulthood, some have significant medical problems including respiratory involvement, cervical spine stenosis and instability, mixed conductive and sensorineural hearing loss, and intellectual disability.
Bardet-Biedl syndrome 17
MedGen UID:
811538
Concept ID:
C3714980
Disease or Syndrome
Bardet-Biedl syndrome-17 (BBS17) is an autosomal recessive ciliopathy characterized by retinitis pigmentosa, cognitive impairment, obesity, renal dysfunction, and hypogenitalism. Polydactyly, most often postaxial, is also a primary feature of BBS; in BBS17, mesoaxial polydactyly, with fused or Y-shaped metacarpals, is a distinct manifestation (Deffert et al., 2007; Schaefer et al., 2014). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bardet-Biedl syndrome, see BBS1 (209900).
Severe congenital hypochromic anemia with ringed sideroblasts
MedGen UID:
815250
Concept ID:
C3808920
Disease or Syndrome
STEAP3/TSAP6-related sideroblastic anemia is a very rare severe non-syndromic hypochromic anemia, which is characterized by transfusion-dependent hypochromic, poorly regenerative anemia, iron overload, resembling non-syndromic sideroblastic anemia (see this term) except for increased erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels.
Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism 18 with or without anosmia
MedGen UID:
815305
Concept ID:
C3808975
Disease or Syndrome
Isolated gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) deficiency (IGD) is characterized by inappropriately low serum concentrations of the gonadotropins LH (luteinizing hormone) and FSH (follicle-stimulating hormone) in the presence of low circulating concentrations of sex steroids. IGD is associated with a normal sense of smell (normosmic IGD) in approximately 40% of affected individuals and an impaired sense of smell (Kallmann syndrome) in approximately 60%. IGD can first become apparent in infancy, adolescence, or adulthood. Infant boys with congenital IGD often have micropenis and cryptorchidism. Adolescents and adults with IGD have clinical evidence of hypogonadism and incomplete sexual maturation on physical examination. Adult males with IGD tend to have prepubertal testicular volume (i.e., <4 mL), absence of secondary sexual features (e.g., facial and axillary hair growth, deepening of the voice), decreased muscle mass, diminished libido, erectile dysfunction, and infertility. Adult females have little or no breast development and primary amenorrhea. Although skeletal maturation is delayed, the rate of linear growth is usually normal except for the absence of a distinct pubertal growth spurt.
Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism 20 with or without anosmia
MedGen UID:
815313
Concept ID:
C3808983
Disease or Syndrome
Isolated gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) deficiency (IGD) is characterized by inappropriately low serum concentrations of the gonadotropins LH (luteinizing hormone) and FSH (follicle-stimulating hormone) in the presence of low circulating concentrations of sex steroids. IGD is associated with a normal sense of smell (normosmic IGD) in approximately 40% of affected individuals and an impaired sense of smell (Kallmann syndrome) in approximately 60%. IGD can first become apparent in infancy, adolescence, or adulthood. Infant boys with congenital IGD often have micropenis and cryptorchidism. Adolescents and adults with IGD have clinical evidence of hypogonadism and incomplete sexual maturation on physical examination. Adult males with IGD tend to have prepubertal testicular volume (i.e., <4 mL), absence of secondary sexual features (e.g., facial and axillary hair growth, deepening of the voice), decreased muscle mass, diminished libido, erectile dysfunction, and infertility. Adult females have little or no breast development and primary amenorrhea. Although skeletal maturation is delayed, the rate of linear growth is usually normal except for the absence of a distinct pubertal growth spurt.
Bardet-Biedl syndrome 16
MedGen UID:
855172
Concept ID:
C3889474
Disease or Syndrome
Bardet-Biedl syndrome-16 (BBS16) is an autosomal recessive ciliopathy characterized by retinal degeneration, obesity, renal disease, and cognitive impairment. Although polydactyly is considered a primary feature of BBS overall, it has not been reported in any BBS16 patient (Billingsley et al., 2012). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bardet-Biedl syndrome, see BBS1 (209900).
Bardet-Biedl syndrome 19
MedGen UID:
855173
Concept ID:
C3889475
Disease or Syndrome
Bardet-Biedl syndrome-19 (BBS19) is an autosomal recessive ciliopathy characterized by obesity, impaired intellectual development, polydactyly, renal failure, retinitis pigmentosa, and hypogonadism (Aldahmesh et al., 2014). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bardet-Biedl syndrome, see BBS1 (209900).
Bardet-Biedl syndrome 5
MedGen UID:
856141
Concept ID:
C3892039
Disease or Syndrome
BBS5 is a ciliopathy associated with severe and early-onset retinal dystrophy, postaxial polydactyly, obesity, renal dysfunction, hypogonadism, and learning difficulties (summary by Scheidecker et al., 2015). Patients described by Young et al. (1999) and Moore et al. (2005) with mutations in the BBS5 gene did not have polydactyly. The contribution of BBS5 mutations to all cases of BBS has been estimated at 2% (Li et al., 2004) and 0.40% (Zaghloul and Katsanis, 2009). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bardet-Biedl syndrome, see BBS1 (209900).
Postaxial polydactyly-anterior pituitary anomalies-facial dysmorphism syndrome
MedGen UID:
862916
Concept ID:
C4014479
Disease or Syndrome
Postaxial polydactyly-anterior pituitary anomalies-facial dysmorphism syndrome is a rare, genetic developmental defect during embryogenesis disorder characterized primarily by congenital hypopituitarism and/or postaxial polydactyly. It can be associated with short stature, delayed bone age, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and/or midline facial defects (e.g. hypotelorism, mild midface hypoplasia, flat nasal bridge, and cleft lip and/or palate). Hypoplastic anterior pituitary and ectopic posterior pituitary lobe are frequent findings on MRI examination.
Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism 22 with or without anosmia
MedGen UID:
863425
Concept ID:
C4014988
Disease or Syndrome
Isolated gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) deficiency (IGD) is characterized by inappropriately low serum concentrations of the gonadotropins LH (luteinizing hormone) and FSH (follicle-stimulating hormone) in the presence of low circulating concentrations of sex steroids. IGD is associated with a normal sense of smell (normosmic IGD) in approximately 40% of affected individuals and an impaired sense of smell (Kallmann syndrome) in approximately 60%. IGD can first become apparent in infancy, adolescence, or adulthood. Infant boys with congenital IGD often have micropenis and cryptorchidism. Adolescents and adults with IGD have clinical evidence of hypogonadism and incomplete sexual maturation on physical examination. Adult males with IGD tend to have prepubertal testicular volume (i.e., <4 mL), absence of secondary sexual features (e.g., facial and axillary hair growth, deepening of the voice), decreased muscle mass, diminished libido, erectile dysfunction, and infertility. Adult females have little or no breast development and primary amenorrhea. Although skeletal maturation is delayed, the rate of linear growth is usually normal except for the absence of a distinct pubertal growth spurt.
Progeroid features-hepatocellular carcinoma predisposition syndrome
MedGen UID:
863898
Concept ID:
C4015461
Disease or Syndrome
Ruijs et al. (2003) reported a Moroccan boy with a chromosomal breakage who died of hepatocellular carcinoma at age 17 years. The boy was noted to have growth retardation at age 3 years; at age 7 he was found to have thoracic kyphosis, frontal bossing, and a delayed bone age of approximately 3 years. He underwent surgery for severe bilateral posterior subcapsular cataracts at age 14. Examination at age 15 showed short stature and low weight, with premature graying of scalp hair, small frontotemporal diameter, small deep-set eyes, bulbous nose with high nasal bridge, small upper lip, and micrognathia. In addition, he had thoracic kyphoscoliosis, sloping shoulders, mild pectus excavatum, moderate bilateral contractures of both elbows, bilateral clinodactyly, and pes planus. At age 17, he developed abdominal pain, and ultrasonography revealed a liver mass; biopsy confirmed hepatocellular carcinoma. Because of the advanced stage, no treatment was possible, and he died 2 months later. Although his parents were not known to be consanguineous, they originated from the same small Moroccan village. Lessel et al. (2014) studied 2 brothers from a nonconsanguineous Australian family of European ancestry who exhibited low body weight, micrognathia, triangular face, muscular atrophy, lipodystrophy, bilateral simian creases, delayed bone age, and mild joint restrictions in the fingers and elbows. In addition, both brothers developed early-onset hepatocellular carcinoma, at ages 16 and 14 years, respectively. The older brother died at age 18 from complications of acute fulminant hepatic failure. Analysis of patient tumor biopsies showed strong focal accumulations of cancer biomarkers as well as a high proliferative index compared to healthy liver or to cells from idiopathic hepatocellular carcinoma.
Senior-Loken syndrome 9
MedGen UID:
899086
Concept ID:
C4225263
Disease or Syndrome
Senior-Loken syndrome-9 is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early-onset nephronophthisis and pigmentary retinopathy. Additional more variable features can include liver defects, skeletal anomalies, and obesity (summary by Bizet et al., 2015). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Senior-Loken syndrome, see 266900.
Nephrotic syndrome 14
MedGen UID:
1617660
Concept ID:
C4540559
Disease or Syndrome
Sphingosine phosphate lyase insufficiency syndrome (SPLIS) is characterized by varying combinations of steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (ranging from nonimmune fetal hydrops to adolescent onset), primary adrenal insufficiency (with or without mineralocorticoid deficiency), testicular insufficiency, hypothyroidism, ichthyosis, lymphopenia/immunodeficiency, and neurologic abnormalities that can include developmental delay, regression / progressive neurologic involvement, cranial nerve deficits, and peripheral motor and sensory neuropathy.
Noonan syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1638960
Concept ID:
C4551602
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population.
Bone marrow failure syndrome 5
MedGen UID:
1648380
Concept ID:
C4748488
Disease or Syndrome
Bone marrow failure syndrome-5 (BMFS5) is a hematologic disorder characterized by infantile onset of severe red cell anemia requiring transfusion. Additional features include hypogammaglobulinemia, poor growth with microcephaly, developmental delay, and seizures (summary by Toki et al., 2018) For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of BMFS, see BMFS1 (614675).
Intellectual disability-hypotonic facies syndrome, X-linked, 1
MedGen UID:
1676827
Concept ID:
C4759781
Disease or Syndrome
Alpha-thalassemia X-linked intellectual disability (ATR-X) syndrome is characterized by distinctive craniofacial features, genital anomalies, hypotonia, and mild-to-profound developmental delay / intellectual disability (DD/ID). Craniofacial abnormalities include small head circumference, telecanthus or widely spaced eyes, short triangular nose, tented upper lip, and thick or everted lower lip with coarsening of the facial features over time. While all affected individuals have a normal 46,XY karyotype, genital anomalies comprise a range from hypospadias and undescended testicles, to severe hypospadias and ambiguous genitalia, to normal-appearing female external genitalia. Alpha-thalassemia, observed in about 75% of affected individuals, is mild and typically does not require treatment. Osteosarcoma has been reported in a few males with germline pathogenic variants.
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia 16
MedGen UID:
1674542
Concept ID:
C5190574
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-16 (SCAR16) is a progressive neurologic disorder characterized by truncal and limb ataxia, resulting in gait instability, associated with cerebellar atrophy on brain imaging. Most patients have onset in the teenage years, although earlier and later onset have been reported. Additional features may include dysarthria, nystagmus, hyperreflexia of the lower limbs, and mild peripheral sensory neuropathy. Some patients have gonadal dysfunction or hypogonadism and/or cognitive deficits. The phenotype represents a spectrum or continuum of neurodegenerative features that may overlap with those of SCA48 (summary by Shi et al., 2013 and Ravel et al., 2021).
Rothmund-Thomson syndrome type 2
MedGen UID:
1684753
Concept ID:
C5203410
Disease or Syndrome
Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS) is characterized by a rash that progresses to poikiloderma; sparse hair, eyelashes, and/or eyebrows; small size; skeletal and dental abnormalities; juvenile cataracts; and an increased risk for cancer, especially osteosarcoma. A variety of benign and malignant hematologic abnormalities have been reported in affected individuals. The rash of RTS typically develops between ages three and six months (occasionally as late as age two years) as erythema, swelling, and blistering on the face, subsequently spreading to the buttocks and extremities. The rash evolves over months to years into the chronic pattern of reticulated hypo- and hyperpigmentation, telangiectasias, and punctate atrophy (collectively known as poikiloderma) that persist throughout life. Hyperkeratotic lesions occur in approximately one third of individuals. Skeletal abnormalities can include radial ray defects, ulnar defects, absent or hypoplastic patella, and osteopenia.
Lessel-kubisch syndrome
MedGen UID:
1684750
Concept ID:
C5231460
Disease or Syndrome
Lessel-Kubisch syndrome (LSKB) is characterized by short stature and progeroid features, including prematurely gray hair, pinched facies, and scleroderma-like skin changes. Renal failure-associated hypertension and hypogonadism have also been observed (Lessel et al., 2017).
Cerebellar hypoplasia-intellectual disability-congenital microcephaly-dystonia-anemia-growth retardation syndrome
MedGen UID:
1780242
Concept ID:
C5543287
Disease or Syndrome
CIMDAG syndrome (CIMDAG) is a multisystemic disorder characterized by severely impaired psychomotor development and hematologic abnormalities apparent from early infancy. Affected individuals show poor overall growth with microcephaly, impaired intellectual development, poor or absent speech, poor eye contact, and motor problems, such as inability to walk, hypotonia, and spasticity. Brain imaging typically shows cerebral and cerebellar atrophy, thin corpus callosum, and delayed myelination. The associated hematologic abnormalities are variable, but are mostly consistent with congenital dyserythropoietic anemia (CDA) (summary by Rodger et al., 2020 and Seu et al., 2020).
Bardet-Biedl syndrome 22
MedGen UID:
1794146
Concept ID:
C5561936
Disease or Syndrome
Bardet-Biedl syndrome-22 (BBS22) is an autosomal recessive ciliopathy described in a single patient and characterized by retinitis pigmentosa, obesity, polydactyly, hypogonadism, and intellectual disability (Lindstrand et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bardet-Biedl syndrome, see BBS1 (209900).
Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism 24 without anosmia
MedGen UID:
1806136
Concept ID:
C5574957
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) is a disorder characterized by absent or incomplete sexual maturation by the age of 18 years, in conjunction with low levels of circulating gonadotropins and testosterone and no other abnormalities of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism can be caused by an isolated defect in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH; 152760) release, action, or both. Other associated nonreproductive phenotypes, such as anosmia, cleft palate, and sensorineural hearing loss, occur with variable frequency. In the presence of anosmia, idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism has been called 'Kallmann syndrome (KS),' whereas in the presence of a normal sense of smell, it has been termed 'normosmic idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (nIHH)' (summary by Raivio et al., 2007). Because families have been found to segregate both KS and nIHH, the disorder is here referred to as 'hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with or without anosmia (HH).' For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with or without anosmia, see 147950.
Schaaf-Yang syndrome
MedGen UID:
1807366
Concept ID:
C5575066
Disease or Syndrome
Schaaf-Yang syndrome (SYS) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder that shares multiple clinical features with the genetically related Prader-Willi syndrome. It usually manifests at birth with muscular hypotonia in all and distal joint contractures in a majority of affected individuals. Gastrointestinal/feeding problems are particularly pronounced in infancy and childhood, but can transition to hyperphagia and obesity in adulthood. Respiratory distress is present in many individuals at birth, with approximately half requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation, and approximately 20% requiring tracheostomy. Skeletal manifestations such as joint contractures, scoliosis, and decreased bone mineral density are frequently observed. All affected individuals show developmental delay, resulting in intellectual disability of variable degree, from low-normal intelligence to severe intellectual disability. Other findings may include short stature, seizures, eye anomalies, and hypogonadism.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Tritos NA, Miller KK
JAMA 2023 Apr 25;329(16):1386-1398. doi: 10.1001/jama.2023.5444. PMID: 37097352
Butler MG, Miller JL, Forster JL
Curr Pediatr Rev 2019;15(4):207-244. doi: 10.2174/1573396315666190716120925. PMID: 31333129Free PMC Article
Gravholt CH, Viuff MH, Brun S, Stochholm K, Andersen NH
Nat Rev Endocrinol 2019 Oct;15(10):601-614. Epub 2019 Jun 18 doi: 10.1038/s41574-019-0224-4. PMID: 31213699

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Bandeira L, Silva BC, Bilezikian JP
Arch Endocrinol Metab 2022 Nov 11;66(5):739-747. doi: 10.20945/2359-3997000000563. PMID: 36382763Free PMC Article
Mian AH, Yang DY, Kohler TS
Urol Clin North Am 2022 Nov;49(4):583-592. Epub 2022 Oct 7 doi: 10.1016/j.ucl.2022.07.003. PMID: 36309415
Salonia A, Rastrelli G, Hackett G, Seminara SB, Huhtaniemi IT, Rey RA, Hellstrom WJG, Palmert MR, Corona G, Dohle GR, Khera M, Chan YM, Maggi M
Nat Rev Dis Primers 2019 May 30;5(1):38. doi: 10.1038/s41572-019-0087-y. PMID: 31147553Free PMC Article
Tsametis CP, Isidori AM
Metabolism 2018 Sep;86:69-78. Epub 2018 Mar 9 doi: 10.1016/j.metabol.2018.03.007. PMID: 29530796
Bonomi M, Rochira V, Pasquali D, Balercia G, Jannini EA, Ferlin A; Klinefelter ItaliaN Group (KING)
J Endocrinol Invest 2017 Feb;40(2):123-134. Epub 2016 Sep 19 doi: 10.1007/s40618-016-0541-6. PMID: 27644703Free PMC Article

Diagnosis

Young J, Xu C, Papadakis GE, Acierno JS, Maione L, Hietamäki J, Raivio T, Pitteloud N
Endocr Rev 2019 Apr 1;40(2):669-710. doi: 10.1210/er.2018-00116. PMID: 30698671
Richard-Eaglin A
Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Sep;53(3):395-405. doi: 10.1016/j.cnur.2018.04.006. PMID: 30100005
Tsametis CP, Isidori AM
Metabolism 2018 Sep;86:69-78. Epub 2018 Mar 9 doi: 10.1016/j.metabol.2018.03.007. PMID: 29530796
Rahnema CD, Lipshultz LI, Crosnoe LE, Kovac JR, Kim ED
Fertil Steril 2014 May;101(5):1271-9. Epub 2014 Mar 14 doi: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2014.02.002. PMID: 24636400
Fraietta R, Zylberstejn DS, Esteves SC
Clinics (Sao Paulo) 2013;68 Suppl 1(Suppl 1):81-8. doi: 10.6061/clinics/2013(sup01)09. PMID: 23503957Free PMC Article

Therapy

Snyder PJ, Bauer DC, Ellenberg SS, Cauley JA, Buhr KA, Bhasin S, Miller MG, Khan NS, Li X, Nissen SE
N Engl J Med 2024 Jan 18;390(3):203-211. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa2308836. PMID: 38231621
Leisegang K, Finelli R, Sikka SC, Panner Selvam MK
Medicina (Kaunas) 2022 Aug 4;58(8) doi: 10.3390/medicina58081047. PMID: 36013514Free PMC Article
Huijben M, Lock MTWT, de Kemp VF, de Kort LMO, van Breda HMK
Andrology 2022 Mar;10(3):451-469. Epub 2022 Jan 8 doi: 10.1111/andr.13146. PMID: 34933414
Federici S, Goggi G, Quinton R, Giovanelli L, Persani L, Cangiano B, Bonomi M
Endocr Rev 2022 Sep 26;43(5):824-851. doi: 10.1210/endrev/bnab043. PMID: 34864951
Solomon ZJ, Mirabal JR, Mazur DJ, Kohn TP, Lipshultz LI, Pastuszak AW
Sex Med Rev 2019 Jan;7(1):84-94. Epub 2018 Nov 30 doi: 10.1016/j.sxmr.2018.09.006. PMID: 30503797Free PMC Article

Prognosis

Di Lodovico E, Facondo P, Delbarba A, Pezzaioli LC, Maffezzoni F, Cappelli C, Ferlin A
Circ Heart Fail 2022 Jul;15(7):e008755. Epub 2022 Apr 8 doi: 10.1161/CIRCHEARTFAILURE.121.008755. PMID: 35392658
Fung C, Dinh PC, Fossa SD, Travis LB
J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2019 Dec;17(12):1557-1568. doi: 10.6004/jnccn.2019.7369. PMID: 31805527
Krzastek SC, Sharma D, Abdullah N, Sultan M, Machen GL, Wenzel JL, Ells A, Chen X, Kavoussi M, Costabile RA, Smith RP, Kavoussi PK
J Urol 2019 Nov;202(5):1029-1035. Epub 2019 Oct 9 doi: 10.1097/JU.0000000000000396. PMID: 31216250
Vander Borght M, Wyns C
Clin Biochem 2018 Dec;62:2-10. Epub 2018 Mar 16 doi: 10.1016/j.clinbiochem.2018.03.012. PMID: 29555319
Davis AS, Viera AJ, Mead MD
Am Fam Physician 2014 May 1;89(9):731-8. PMID: 24784336

Clinical prediction guides

Corona G, Vena W, Pizzocaro A, Vignozzi L, Sforza A, Maggi M
Andrology 2023 Feb;11(2):204-214. Epub 2022 Dec 29 doi: 10.1111/andr.13367. PMID: 36542412
Bandeira L, Silva BC, Bilezikian JP
Arch Endocrinol Metab 2022 Nov 11;66(5):739-747. doi: 10.20945/2359-3997000000563. PMID: 36382763Free PMC Article
Isidori AM, Aversa A, Calogero A, Ferlin A, Francavilla S, Lanfranco F, Pivonello R, Rochira V, Corona G, Maggi M
J Endocrinol Invest 2022 Dec;45(12):2385-2403. Epub 2022 Aug 26 doi: 10.1007/s40618-022-01859-7. PMID: 36018454Free PMC Article
Thurston L, Abbara A, Dhillo WS
J Clin Pathol 2019 Sep;72(9):579-587. Epub 2019 Jul 11 doi: 10.1136/jclinpath-2018-205579. PMID: 31296604
Howard SR, Dunkel L
Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab 2018 Aug;32(4):355-372. Epub 2018 Jun 6 doi: 10.1016/j.beem.2018.05.011. PMID: 30086863

Recent systematic reviews

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