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Toe syndactyly

MedGen UID:
75581
Concept ID:
C0265660
Congenital Abnormality
Synonym: Syndactyly of toes
SNOMED CT: Syndactyly of the toes (32113001); Syndactyly of toes (32113001); Webbing of toes (32113001)
 
HPO: HP:0001770

Definition

Webbing or fusion of the toes, involving soft parts only or including bone structure. Bony fusions are referred to as "bony" Syndactyly if the fusion occurs in a radio-ulnar axis. Fusions of bones of the toes in a proximo-distal axis are referred to as "Symphalangism". [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Focal dermal hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
42055
Concept ID:
C0016395
Disease or Syndrome
Focal dermal hypoplasia is a multisystem disorder characterized primarily by involvement of the skin, skeletal system, eyes, and face. Skin manifestations present at birth include atrophic and hypoplastic areas of skin; cutis aplasia; fat nodules in the dermis manifesting as soft, yellow-pink cutaneous nodules; and pigmentary changes. Verrucoid papillomas of the skin and mucous membranes may appear later. The nails can be ridged, dysplastic, or hypoplastic; hair can be sparse or absent. Limb malformations include oligo-/syndactyly and split hand/foot. Developmental abnormalities of the eye can include anophthalmia/microphthalmia, iris and chorioretinal coloboma, and lacrimal duct abnormalities. Craniofacial findings can include facial asymmetry, notched alae nasi, cleft lip and palate, and pointed chin. Occasional findings include dental anomalies, abdominal wall defects, diaphragmatic hernia, and renal anomalies. Psychomotor development is usually normal; some individuals have cognitive impairment.
Saethre-Chotzen syndrome
MedGen UID:
64221
Concept ID:
C0175699
Disease or Syndrome
Classic Saethre-Chotzen syndrome (SCS) is characterized by coronal synostosis (unilateral or bilateral), facial asymmetry (particularly in individuals with unicoronal synostosis), strabismus, ptosis, and characteristic appearance of the ear (small pinna with a prominent superior and/or inferior crus). Syndactyly of digits two and three of the hand is variably present. Cognitive development is usually normal, although those with a large genomic deletion are at an increased risk for intellectual challenges. Less common manifestations of SCS include other skeletal findings (parietal foramina, vertebral segmentation defects, radioulnar synostosis, maxillary hypoplasia, ocular hypertelorism, hallux valgus, duplicated or curved distal hallux), hypertelorism, palatal anomalies, obstructive sleep apnea, increased intracranial pressure, short stature, and congenital heart malformations.
Craniofrontonasal syndrome
MedGen UID:
65095
Concept ID:
C0220767
Disease or Syndrome
Craniofrontonasal syndrome is an X-linked developmental disorder that shows paradoxically greater severity in heterozygous females than in hemizygous males. Females have frontonasal dysplasia, craniofacial asymmetry, craniosynostosis, bifid nasal tip, grooved nails, wiry hair, and abnormalities of the thoracic skeleton, whereas males typically show only hypertelorism (Twigg et al., 2004; Wieland et al., 2004).
Pallister-Hall syndrome
MedGen UID:
120514
Concept ID:
C0265220
Disease or Syndrome
GLI3-related Pallister-Hall syndrome (GLI3-PHS) is characterized by a spectrum of anomalies ranging from polydactyly, asymptomatic bifid epiglottis, and hypothalamic hamartoma at the mild end to laryngotracheal cleft with neonatal lethality at the severe end. Individuals with mild GLI3-PHS may be incorrectly diagnosed as having isolated postaxial polydactyly type A. Individuals with GLI3-PHS can have pituitary insufficiency and may die as neonates from undiagnosed and untreated adrenal insufficiency.
Nager syndrome
MedGen UID:
120519
Concept ID:
C0265245
Disease or Syndrome
Nager syndrome is the prototype for a group of disorders collectively referred to as the acrofacial dysostoses (AFDs), which are characterized by malformation of the craniofacial skeleton and the limbs. The major facial features of Nager syndrome include downslanted palpebral fissures, midface retrusion, and micrognathia, the latter of which often requires the placement of a tracheostomy in early childhood. Limb defects typically involve the anterior (radial) elements of the upper limbs and manifest as small or absent thumbs, triphalangeal thumbs, radial hypoplasia or aplasia, and radioulnar synostosis. Phocomelia of the upper limbs and, occasionally, lower-limb defects have also been reported. The presence of anterior upper-limb defects and the typical lack of lower-limb involvement distinguishes Nager syndrome from Miller syndrome (263750), another rare AFD; however, distinguishing Nager syndrome from other AFDs, including Miller syndrome, can be challenging (summary by Bernier et al., 2012).
Oto-palato-digital syndrome, type I
MedGen UID:
78542
Concept ID:
C0265251
Disease or Syndrome
The X-linked otopalatodigital (X-OPD) spectrum disorders, characterized primarily by skeletal dysplasia, include the following: Otopalatodigital syndrome type 1 (OPD1). Otopalatodigital syndrome type 2 (OPD2). Frontometaphyseal dysplasia type 1 (FMD1). Melnick-Needles syndrome (MNS). Terminal osseous dysplasia with pigmentary skin defects (TODPD). In OPD1, most manifestations are present at birth; females can present with severity similar to affected males, although some have only mild manifestations. In OPD2, females are less severely affected than related affected males. Most males with OPD2 die during the first year of life, usually from thoracic hypoplasia resulting in pulmonary insufficiency. Males who live beyond the first year of life are usually developmentally delayed and require respiratory support and assistance with feeding. In FMD1, females are less severely affected than related affected males. Males do not experience a progressive skeletal dysplasia but may have joint contractures and hand and foot malformations. Progressive scoliosis is observed in both affected males and females. In MNS, wide phenotypic variability is observed; some individuals are diagnosed in adulthood, while others require respiratory support and have reduced longevity. MNS in males results in perinatal lethality in all recorded cases. TODPD, seen only in females, is characterized by a skeletal dysplasia that is most prominent in the digits, pigmentary defects of the skin, and recurrent digital fibromata.
Femoral hypoplasia - unusual facies syndrome
MedGen UID:
120523
Concept ID:
C0265263
Disease or Syndrome
Femoral-facial syndrome (FFS), also known as femoral hypoplasia-unusual facies syndrome (FHUFS), is a rare and sporadic multiple congenital anomaly syndrome comprising bilateral femoral hypoplasia and characteristic facial features, such as long philtrum, thin upper lip, micrognathia with or without cleft palate, upward-slanting palpebral fissures, and a short nose with broad tip. Other features, such as renal anomalies, are more variable (summary by Nowaczyk et al., 2010).
Hamartoma of hypothalamus
MedGen UID:
137970
Concept ID:
C0342418
Finding
Pallister-Hall-like syndrome (PHLS) is a pleiotropic autosomal recessive disorder characterized by phenotypic variability. Patients exhibit postaxial polydactyly as well as hypothalamic hamartoma, cardiac and skeletal anomalies, and craniofacial dysmorphisms. Hirschsprung disease has also been observed (Rubino et al., 2018; Le et al., 2020). Pallister-Hall syndrome (146510) is an autosomal dominant disorder with features overlapping those of PHLS, caused by mutation in the GLI3 gene (165240).
Orofacial-digital syndrome IV
MedGen UID:
98358
Concept ID:
C0406727
Disease or Syndrome
Oral-facial-digital syndrome is actually a group of related conditions that affect the development of the oral cavity (the mouth and teeth), facial features, and digits (fingers and toes).\n\nDistinctive facial features often associated with oral-facial-digital syndrome include a split in the lip (a cleft lip); a wide nose with a broad, flat nasal bridge; and widely spaced eyes (hypertelorism).\n\nAbnormalities of the digits can affect both the fingers and the toes in people with oral-facial-digital syndrome. These abnormalities include fusion of certain fingers or toes (syndactyly), digits that are shorter than usual (brachydactyly), or digits that are unusually curved (clinodactyly). The presence of extra digits (polydactyly) is also seen in most forms of oral-facial-digital syndrome.\n\nResearchers have identified at least 13 potential forms of oral-facial-digital syndrome. The different types are classified by their patterns of signs and symptoms. However, the features of the various types overlap significantly, and some types are not well defined. The classification system for oral-facial-digital syndrome continues to evolve as researchers find more affected individuals and learn more about this disorder.\n\nThe signs and symptoms of oral-facial-digital syndrome vary widely. However, most forms of this disorder involve problems with development of the oral cavity, facial features, and digits. Most forms are also associated with brain abnormalities and some degree of intellectual disability.\n\nAbnormalities of the oral cavity that occur in many types of oral-facial-digital syndrome include a split (cleft) in the tongue, a tongue with an unusual lobed shape, and the growth of noncancerous tumors or nodules on the tongue. Affected individuals may also have extra, missing, or defective teeth. Another common feature is an opening in the roof of the mouth (a cleft palate). Some people with oral-facial-digital syndrome have bands of extra tissue (called hyperplastic frenula) that abnormally attach the lip to the gums.\n\nOther features occur in only one or a few types of oral-facial digital syndrome. These features help distinguish the different forms of the disorder. For example, the most common form of oral-facial-digital syndrome, type I, is associated with polycystic kidney disease. This kidney disease is characterized by the growth of fluid-filled sacs (cysts) that interfere with the kidneys' ability to filter waste products from the blood. Other forms of oral-facial-digital syndrome are characterized by neurological problems, particular changes in the structure of the brain, bone abnormalities, vision loss, and heart defects.
Deletion of short arm of chromosome 18
MedGen UID:
96604
Concept ID:
C0432442
Disease or Syndrome
The main clinical manifestations of chromosome 18p deletion syndrome are mental retardation, growth retardation, craniofacial dysmorphism including round face, dysplastic ears, wide mouth and dental anomalies, and abnormalities of the limbs, genitalia, brain, eyes, and heart. The round face characteristic in the neonatal period and childhood may change to a long face with linear growth of the height of the face (summary by Tsukahara et al., 2001).
Deletion of long arm of chromosome 18
MedGen UID:
96605
Concept ID:
C0432443
Disease or Syndrome
Monosomy 18q is a partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 18 characterized by highly variable phenotype, most commonly including hypotonia, developmental delay, short stature, growth hormone deficiency, hearing loss and external ear anomalies, intellectual disability, palatal defects, dysmorphic facial features, skeletal anomalies (foot deformities, tapering fingers, scoliosis) and mood disorders.
Microphthalmia with limb anomalies
MedGen UID:
154638
Concept ID:
C0599973
Disease or Syndrome
Microphthalmia with limb anomalies (MLA), also known as Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome or ophthalmoacromelic syndrome (OAS), is a rare autosomal recessive developmental disorder characterized by unilateral or bilateral microphthalmia, clinical anophthalmia, syndactyly, polydactyly, synostosis, or oligodactyly. Long-bone hypoplasia and renal, venous, and vertebral anomalies may also be present. Impaired intellectual development is present in about half of affected individuals (summary by Tekin et al., 2000, Abouzeid et al., 2011).
C syndrome
MedGen UID:
167105
Concept ID:
C0796095
Disease or Syndrome
The C syndrome, also known as Opitz trigonocephaly syndrome, is a malformation syndrome characterized by trigonocephaly, severe mental retardation, hypotonia, variable cardiac defects, redundant skin, and dysmorphic facial features, including upslanted palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, depressed nasal bridge, and low-set, posteriorly rotated ears (summary by Kaname et al., 2007). C syndrome shows phenotypic overlap with Bohring-Opitz syndrome, or C-like syndrome (605039), a disorder with more severe features than C syndrome, caused by heterozygous mutation in the ASXL1 gene (612990) on chromosome 20q11.
Orofaciodigital syndrome IX
MedGen UID:
162908
Concept ID:
C0796102
Disease or Syndrome
Syndrome with characteristics of highly arched palate with bifid tongue and bilateral supernumerary lower canines, hamartomatous tongue, multiple frenula, hypertelorism, telecanthus, strabismus, broad and/or bifid nasal tip, short stature, bifid hallux, forked metatarsal, poly and syndactyly, mild intellectual deficit and specific retinal abnormalities (bilateral optic disc coloboma and retinal dysplasia with partial detachment). Less than ten cases have been described in the literature. The causative gene has not yet been identified.
Acrocallosal syndrome
MedGen UID:
162915
Concept ID:
C0796147
Disease or Syndrome
Classic Joubert syndrome (JS) is characterized by three primary findings: A distinctive cerebellar and brain stem malformation called the molar tooth sign (MTS). Hypotonia. Developmental delays. Often these findings are accompanied by episodic tachypnea or apnea and/or atypical eye movements. In general, the breathing abnormalities improve with age, truncal ataxia develops over time, and acquisition of gross motor milestones is delayed. Cognitive abilities are variable, ranging from severe intellectual disability to normal. Additional findings can include retinal dystrophy, renal disease, ocular colobomas, occipital encephalocele, hepatic fibrosis, polydactyly, oral hamartomas, and endocrine abnormalities. Both intra- and interfamilial variation are seen.
Andersen Tawil syndrome
MedGen UID:
327586
Concept ID:
C1563715
Disease or Syndrome
Andersen-Tawil syndrome (ATS) is characterized by a triad of: episodic flaccid muscle weakness (i.e., periodic paralysis); ventricular arrhythmias and prolonged QT interval; and anomalies including low-set ears, widely spaced eyes, small mandible, fifth-digit clinodactyly, syndactyly, short stature, and scoliosis. Affected individuals present in the first or second decade with either cardiac symptoms (palpitations and/or syncope) or weakness that occurs spontaneously following prolonged rest or following rest after exertion. Mild permanent weakness is common. Mild learning difficulties and a distinct neurocognitive phenotype (i.e., deficits in executive function and abstract reasoning) have been described.
Diaphragmatic defect-limb deficiency-skull defect syndrome
MedGen UID:
371377
Concept ID:
C1832668
Disease or Syndrome
Diaphragmatic defect-limb deficiency-skull defect syndrome is characterized by the association of classical diaphragmatic hernia (Bochdalek type) with severe lung hypoplasia, and variable associated malformations.
Synpolydactyly type 2
MedGen UID:
331290
Concept ID:
C1842422
Disease or Syndrome
Any non-syndromic synpolydactyly in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the FBLN1 gene.
Oto-palato-digital syndrome, type II
MedGen UID:
337064
Concept ID:
C1844696
Disease or Syndrome
The X-linked otopalatodigital (X-OPD) spectrum disorders, characterized primarily by skeletal dysplasia, include the following: Otopalatodigital syndrome type 1 (OPD1). Otopalatodigital syndrome type 2 (OPD2). Frontometaphyseal dysplasia type 1 (FMD1). Melnick-Needles syndrome (MNS). Terminal osseous dysplasia with pigmentary skin defects (TODPD). In OPD1, most manifestations are present at birth; females can present with severity similar to affected males, although some have only mild manifestations. In OPD2, females are less severely affected than related affected males. Most males with OPD2 die during the first year of life, usually from thoracic hypoplasia resulting in pulmonary insufficiency. Males who live beyond the first year of life are usually developmentally delayed and require respiratory support and assistance with feeding. In FMD1, females are less severely affected than related affected males. Males do not experience a progressive skeletal dysplasia but may have joint contractures and hand and foot malformations. Progressive scoliosis is observed in both affected males and females. In MNS, wide phenotypic variability is observed; some individuals are diagnosed in adulthood, while others require respiratory support and have reduced longevity. MNS in males results in perinatal lethality in all recorded cases. TODPD, seen only in females, is characterized by a skeletal dysplasia that is most prominent in the digits, pigmentary defects of the skin, and recurrent digital fibromata.
Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip-palate syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
343663
Concept ID:
C1851841
Disease or Syndrome
An EEC syndrome characterized by autosomal dominant inheritance that has material basis in variation in the chromosome region 7q11.2-q21.3.
Cornelia de Lange syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
339902
Concept ID:
C1853099
Disease or Syndrome
Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) encompasses a spectrum of findings from mild to severe. Severe (classic) CdLS is characterized by distinctive facial features, growth restriction (prenatal onset; <5th centile throughout life), hypertrichosis, and upper-limb reduction defects that range from subtle phalangeal abnormalities to oligodactyly (missing digits). Craniofacial features include synophrys, highly arched and/or thick eyebrows, long eyelashes, short nasal bridge with anteverted nares, small widely spaced teeth, and microcephaly. Individuals with a milder phenotype have less severe growth, cognitive, and limb involvement, but often have facial features consistent with CdLS. Across the CdLS spectrum IQ ranges from below 30 to 102 (mean: 53). Many individuals demonstrate autistic and self-destructive tendencies. Other frequent findings include cardiac septal defects, gastrointestinal dysfunction, hearing loss, myopia, and cryptorchidism or hypoplastic genitalia.
Fuhrmann syndrome
MedGen UID:
346429
Concept ID:
C1856728
Disease or Syndrome
This syndrome has main characteristics of bowing of the femora, aplasia or hypoplasia of the fibulae and poly, oligo and syndactyly. It has been reported in 11 patients. Most of the patients also had a hypoplastic pelvis and hypoplasia of the fingers and fingernails. Some had congenital dislocation of the hip, absence or fusion of tarsal bones, absence of various metatarsals and hypoplasia and aplasia of the toes. The syndrome is caused by a partial loss of WNT7A function (gene mapped to 3p25).
Yunis-Varon syndrome
MedGen UID:
341818
Concept ID:
C1857663
Disease or Syndrome
Yunis-Varon syndrome (YVS) is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by skeletal defects, including cleidocranial dysplasia and digital anomalies, and severe neurologic involvement with neuronal loss. Enlarged cytoplasmic vacuoles are found in neurons, muscle, and cartilage. The disorder is usually lethal in infancy (summary by Campeau et al., 2013).
Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip-palate syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
347666
Concept ID:
C1858562
Disease or Syndrome
The TP63-related disorders comprise six overlapping phenotypes: Ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate (AEC) syndrome (which includes Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome). Acro-dermo-ungual-lacrimal-tooth (ADULT) syndrome. Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, cleft lip/palate syndrome 3 (EEC3). Limb-mammary syndrome. Split-hand/foot malformation type 4 (SHFM4). Isolated cleft lip/cleft palate (orofacial cleft 8). Individuals typically have varying combinations of ectodermal dysplasia (hypohidrosis, nail dysplasia, sparse hair, tooth abnormalities), cleft lip/palate, split-hand/foot malformation/syndactyly, lacrimal duct obstruction, hypopigmentation, hypoplastic breasts and/or nipples, and hypospadias. Findings associated with a single phenotype include ankyloblepharon filiforme adnatum (tissue strands that completely or partially fuse the upper and lower eyelids), skin erosions especially on the scalp associated with areas of scarring, and alopecia, trismus, and excessive freckling.
Acro-renal-mandibular syndrome
MedGen UID:
395425
Concept ID:
C1860166
Disease or Syndrome
A very rare multiple congenital anomalies syndrome with characteristics of limb deficiencies and renal anomalies that include split hand-split foot malformation, renal agenesis, polycystic kidneys, uterine anomalies and severe mandibular hypoplasia.
Ablepharon macrostomia syndrome
MedGen UID:
395439
Concept ID:
C1860224
Disease or Syndrome
Ablepharon-macrostomia syndrome (AMS) is a congenital ectodermal dysplasia characterized by absent eyelids, macrostomia, microtia, redundant skin, sparse hair, dysmorphic nose and ears, variable abnormalities of the nipples, genitalia, fingers, and hands, largely normal intellectual and motor development, and poor growth (summary by Marchegiani et al., 2015).
Syndactyly type 3
MedGen UID:
396117
Concept ID:
C1861366
Disease or Syndrome
A rare congenital distal limb malformation with complete and bilateral syndactyly between the fourth and fifth fingers. In most cases, it is a soft tissue syndactyly, but occasionally the distal phalanges may be fused. The feet are not affected. Inherited in an autosomal dominant manner.
ADULT syndrome
MedGen UID:
400232
Concept ID:
C1863204
Disease or Syndrome
The TP63-related disorders comprise six overlapping phenotypes: Ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate (AEC) syndrome (which includes Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome). Acro-dermo-ungual-lacrimal-tooth (ADULT) syndrome. Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, cleft lip/palate syndrome 3 (EEC3). Limb-mammary syndrome. Split-hand/foot malformation type 4 (SHFM4). Isolated cleft lip/cleft palate (orofacial cleft 8). Individuals typically have varying combinations of ectodermal dysplasia (hypohidrosis, nail dysplasia, sparse hair, tooth abnormalities), cleft lip/palate, split-hand/foot malformation/syndactyly, lacrimal duct obstruction, hypopigmentation, hypoplastic breasts and/or nipples, and hypospadias. Findings associated with a single phenotype include ankyloblepharon filiforme adnatum (tissue strands that completely or partially fuse the upper and lower eyelids), skin erosions especially on the scalp associated with areas of scarring, and alopecia, trismus, and excessive freckling.
Acropectorovertebral dysplasia
MedGen UID:
400262
Concept ID:
C1863307
Disease or Syndrome
Acropectorovertebral dysgenesis, or F syndrome, is an autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasia characterized by carpal and tarsal synostoses, syndactyly between the first and second fingers, hypodactyly and polydactyly of feet, and abnormalities of the sternum and spine (summary by Thiele et al., 2004).
Microphthalmia with brain and digit anomalies
MedGen UID:
355268
Concept ID:
C1864689
Disease or Syndrome
This syndrome has characteristics of anophthalmia or microphthalmia, retinal dystrophy, and/or myopia, associated in some cases with cerebral anomalies. It has been described in two families. Polydactyly may also be present. Linkage analysis allowed identification of mutations in the BMP4 gene, which has already been shown to play a role in eye development.
Brachyphalangy, polydactyly, and tibial aplasia/hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
355340
Concept ID:
C1864965
Disease or Syndrome
Stapes ankylosis with broad thumbs and toes
MedGen UID:
357104
Concept ID:
C1866656
Disease or Syndrome
This syndrome has characteristics of congenital conductive deafness due to stapes ankylosis, broad thumbs and first toes and hyperopia. So far, it has been described in multiple members of six families. Other skeletal malformations were also reported including short distal phalanges and syndactyly, but symphalangism is usually absent. Transmission is autosomal dominant and the syndrome is caused by mutations in the NOG gene (17q22).
Distal 10q deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
436306
Concept ID:
C2674937
Disease or Syndrome
10q26 deletion syndrome is a condition that results from the loss (deletion) of a small piece of chromosome 10 in each cell. The deletion occurs on the long (q) arm of the chromosome at a position designated 10q26.\n\nThe signs and symptoms of 10q26 deletion syndrome vary widely, even among affected members of the same family. Among the more common features associated with this chromosomal change are distinctive facial features, mild to moderate intellectual disability, growth problems, and developmental delay. People with 10q26 deletion syndrome often have delayed development of speech and of motor skills such as sitting, crawling, and walking. Some have limited speech throughout life. Affected individuals may experience seizures, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), poor impulse control (impulsivity), or exhibit autistic behaviors that affect communication and social interaction.\n\nA range of facial features is seen in people with 10q26 deletion syndrome, but not all affected individuals have these features. Facial features of people with 10q26 deletion syndrome may include a prominent or beaked nose, a broad nasal bridge, a small jaw (micrognathia), malformed ears that are low set, a thin upper lip, and an unusually small head size (microcephaly). Many affected individuals have widely spaced eyes (hypertelorism) that do not look in the same direction (strabismus). Some people with this condition have a short neck with extra folds of skin (webbed neck).\n\nLess common signs and symptoms can occur in 10q26 deletion syndrome. Skeletal problems include a spine that curves to the side (scoliosis), limited movement in the elbows or other joints, or curved fifth fingers and toes (clinodactyly). Slow growth before and after birth can also occur in affected individuals. Males with this condition may have genital abnormalities, such as a small penis (micropenis), undescended testes (cryptorchidism), or the urethra opening on the underside of the penis (hypospadias). Some people with 10q26 deletion syndrome have kidney abnormalities, heart defects, breathing problems, recurrent infections, or hearing or vision problems.
Autosomal dominant deafness - onychodystrophy syndrome
MedGen UID:
382676
Concept ID:
C2675730
Disease or Syndrome
The DDOD syndrome is characterized by autosomal dominant inheritance of congenital deafness and onychodystrophy. Conical, hypoplastic teeth is also a feature (Robinson et al., 1962). See also DOOR syndrome (220500), an autosomal recessive disorder, which includes congenital deafness, onychodystrophy, osteodystrophy, and mental retardation.
Syndactyly-telecanthus-anogenital and renal malformations syndrome
MedGen UID:
394424
Concept ID:
C2678045
Disease or Syndrome
Syndrome with the association of toe syndactyly, facial dysmorphism including telecanthus and a broad nasal tip, urogenital malformations and anal atresia. Around ten cases have been reported so far. The syndrome is caused by mutations in the FAM58A gene (located on the X chromosome) encoding a protein of unknown function.
Orofaciodigital syndrome type 6
MedGen UID:
411200
Concept ID:
C2745997
Disease or Syndrome
Orofaciodigital syndrome type VI (OFD6), or Varadi syndrome, is a rare autosomal recessive disorder distinguished from other orofaciodigital syndromes by metacarpal abnormalities with central polydactyly and by cerebellar abnormalities, including the molar tooth sign (summary by Doss et al., 1998 and Lopez et al., 2014).
Split hand-foot malformation 6
MedGen UID:
440845
Concept ID:
C2749665
Disease or Syndrome
Split-hand/split-foot malformation (SHFM) is a limb malformation involving the central rays of the autopod and presenting with syndactyly, median clefts of the hands and feet, and aplasia and/or hypoplasia of the phalanges, metacarpals, and metatarsals. Some patients with SHFM have been found to have mental retardation, ectodermal and craniofacial findings, and orofacial clefting (Elliott and Evans, 2006). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of split-hand/foot malformations, see SHFM1 (183600).
Cornelia de Lange syndrome 5
MedGen UID:
763817
Concept ID:
C3550903
Disease or Syndrome
Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) encompasses a spectrum of findings from mild to severe. Severe (classic) CdLS is characterized by distinctive facial features, growth restriction (prenatal onset; <5th centile throughout life), hypertrichosis, and upper-limb reduction defects that range from subtle phalangeal abnormalities to oligodactyly (missing digits). Craniofacial features include synophrys, highly arched and/or thick eyebrows, long eyelashes, short nasal bridge with anteverted nares, small widely spaced teeth, and microcephaly. Individuals with a milder phenotype have less severe growth, cognitive, and limb involvement, but often have facial features consistent with CdLS. Across the CdLS spectrum IQ ranges from below 30 to 102 (mean: 53). Many individuals demonstrate autistic and self-destructive tendencies. Other frequent findings include cardiac septal defects, gastrointestinal dysfunction, hearing loss, myopia, and cryptorchidism or hypoplastic genitalia.
Neu-Laxova syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
863456
Concept ID:
C4015019
Disease or Syndrome
Neu-Laxova syndrome-2 (NLS2) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a recognizable pattern of severe congenital malformations leading to prenatal or early postnatal lethality. Affected individuals have abnormal craniofacial features, microcephaly, intrauterine growth retardation, ichthyosis, flexion deformities, limb malformations, and edema of the hands and feet. Some patients have malformations of the central nervous system, such as abnormal gyration (summary by Acuna-Hidalgo et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Neu-Laxova syndrome, see NLS1 (256520).
Hyperphosphatasia with intellectual disability syndrome 6
MedGen UID:
906509
Concept ID:
C4225201
Disease or Syndrome
Hyperphosphatasia with impaired intellectual development syndrome-6 (HPMRS6) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by global developmental delay, dysmorphic features, seizures, and congenital cataracts. Severity is variable, and the disorder may show a range of phenotypic and biochemical abnormalities, including increased serum alkaline phosphatase levels (summary by Ilkovski et al., 2015). The disorder is caused by a defect in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HPMRS, see HPMRS1 (239300). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293).
SIN3A-related intellectual disability syndrome due to a point mutation
MedGen UID:
934771
Concept ID:
C4310804
Disease or Syndrome
Witteveen-Kolk syndrome (WITKOS) is an autosomal dominant disorder with characteristic distinctive facial features, microcephaly, short stature, and mildly impaired intellectual development with delayed cognitive and motor development and subtle anomalies on MRI-brain imaging (summary by Balasubramanian et al., 2021).
Neu-Laxova syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1633287
Concept ID:
C4551478
Disease or Syndrome
Any Neu-Laxova syndrome in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the PHGDH gene.
Adams-Oliver syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1635567
Concept ID:
C4551482
Disease or Syndrome
Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS) is characterized by aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) of the scalp and terminal transverse limb defects (TTLD). ACC lesions usually occur in the midline of the parietal or occipital regions, but can also occur on the abdomen or limbs. At birth, an ACC lesion may already have the appearance of a healed scar. ACC lesions less than 5 cm often involve only the skin and almost always heal over a period of months; larger lesions are more likely to involve the skull and possibly the dura, and are at greater risk for complications, which can include infection, hemorrhage, or thrombosis, and can result in death. The limb defects range from mild (unilateral or bilateral short distal phalanges) to severe (complete absence of all toes or fingers, feet or hands, or more, often resembling an amputation). The lower extremities are almost always more severely affected than the upper extremities. Additional major features frequently include cardiovascular malformations/dysfunction (23%), brain anomalies, and less frequently renal, liver, and eye anomalies.
RAB23-related Carpenter syndrome
MedGen UID:
1644017
Concept ID:
C4551510
Disease or Syndrome
Carpenter syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with the cardinal features of acrocephaly with variable synostosis of the sagittal, lambdoid, and coronal sutures; peculiar facies; brachydactyly of the hands with syndactyly; preaxial polydactyly and syndactyly of the feet; congenital heart defects; growth retardation; mental retardation; hypogenitalism; and obesity. In addition, cerebral malformations, oral and dental abnormalities, coxa valga, genu valgum, hydronephrosis, precocious puberty, and hearing loss may be observed (summary by Altunhan et al., 2011). Genetic Heterogeneity of Carpenter Syndrome Carpenter syndrome-2 (CRPT2; 614976), in which the features of Carpenter syndrome are sometimes associated with defective lateralization, is caused by mutation in the MEGF8 gene (604267).
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 47
MedGen UID:
1775535
Concept ID:
C5436476
Disease or Syndrome
Endove syndrome, limb-brain type
MedGen UID:
1782954
Concept ID:
C5543142
Disease or Syndrome
Limb-brain ENDOVE syndrome (ENDOVESLB) is characterized by marked mesomelic shortening of the lower limbs due to severe hypoplasia of the tibia and fibula. The talus is absent and foot bones are rudimentary. Hands show short and malformed fingers with a missing digit, and nails are absent on some fingers. In addition, there is cerebellar aplasia with hypoplasia of the brainstem (Allou et al., 2021).
Short stature, oligodontia, dysmorphic facies, and motor delay
MedGen UID:
1787876
Concept ID:
C5543206
Disease or Syndrome
SOFM is characterized by marked short stature, oligodontia, mild facial dysmorphism, and motor delay. Endosteal hyperostosis has also been observed, and patients may exhibit some features of progeria (Terhal et al., 2020; Beauregard-Lacroix et al., 2020).
DEGCAGS syndrome
MedGen UID:
1794177
Concept ID:
C5561967
Disease or Syndrome
DEGCAGS syndrome is an autosomal recessive syndromic neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay, coarse and dysmorphic facial features, and poor growth and feeding apparent from infancy. Affected individuals have variable systemic manifestations often with significant structural defects of the cardiovascular, genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and/or skeletal systems. Additional features may include sensorineural hearing loss, hypotonia, anemia or pancytopenia, and immunodeficiency with recurrent infections. Death in childhood may occur (summary by Bertoli-Avella et al., 2021).
Zaki syndrome
MedGen UID:
1794247
Concept ID:
C5562037
Disease or Syndrome
Zaki syndrome (ZKS) is characterized by developmental delay, progressive microcephaly, and short stature, as well as dysmorphic features including sparse scalp hair, cupped ears, wide nose and mouth, short philtrum, and high-arched palate. Other variable features have been observed, including ocular, skeletal, cardiac, and renal anomalies (Chai et al., 2021).
Congenital heart defects, multiple types, 8, with or without heterotaxy
MedGen UID:
1794252
Concept ID:
C5562042
Disease or Syndrome
Multiple types of congenital heart defects-8 (CHTD8) is characterized by cardiac septal defects, double-outlet right ventricle, unbalanced complete atrioventricular canal, and valvular anomalies, as well as vascular anomalies including dextroposition of the great arteries, anomalous pulmonary venous return, and superior vena cava to left atrium defect. Patients may also exhibit laterality defects, including dextrocardia, atrial isomerism, dextrogastria, left-sided gallbladder, and intestinal malrotation (Zaidi et al., 2013; Granadillo et al., 2018).
Patterson-Stevenson-Fontaine syndrome
MedGen UID:
1808766
Concept ID:
C5574964
Disease or Syndrome
A very rare variant of acrofacial dysostosis with characteristics of mandibulofacial dysostosis and limb anomalies. It has been described in less than ten patients. The mandibulofacial dysostosis consists of retrognathism, complete or occult posterior cleft palate and anomalies of the external ears. Limb anomalies consist of split-foot deformity with syndactyly of some toes. The condition is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with variable penetrance and expressivity.
Bryant-Li-Bhoj neurodevelopmental syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1801103
Concept ID:
C5676905
Disease or Syndrome
Bryant-Li-Bhoj neurodevelopmental syndrome-1 (BRYLIB1) is a highly variable phenotype characterized predominantly by moderate to severe global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development, poor or absent speech, and delayed motor milestones. Most patients have hypotonia, although some have peripheral hypertonia. Common features include abnormal head shape, variable dysmorphic facial features, oculomotor abnormalities, feeding problems, and nonspecific brain imaging abnormalities. Additional features may include hearing loss, seizures, short stature, and mild skeletal defects (summary by Bryant et al., 2020). Genetic Heterogeneity of Bryant-Li-Bhoj Neurodevelopmental Syndrome See also BRYLIB2 (619721), caused by heterozygous mutation in the H3F3B gene (601058).
Orofaciodigital syndrome 19
MedGen UID:
1824021
Concept ID:
C5774248
Disease or Syndrome
Orofaciodigital syndrome XIX (OFD19) is an autosomal recessive ciliopathy characterized by tongue nodules; dental anomalies including congenital absence or abnormal shape of incisors; narrow, high-arched or cleft palate; retrognathia; and digital anomalies. Some patients have notching of the upper or lower lip (Iturrate et al., 2022).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Langlais T, Rougereau G, Marty-Diloy T, Bachy M, Barret H, Vialle R, Fitoussi F
Foot Ankle Surg 2022 Jan;28(1):107-113. Epub 2021 Feb 19 doi: 10.1016/j.fas.2021.02.006. PMID: 33642221

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Schierz IAM, Piro E, Giuffrè M, Pinello G, Angelini A, Antona V, Cimador M, Corsello G
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2022 Dec;35(23):4513-4520. Epub 2020 Dec 1 doi: 10.1080/14767058.2020.1854213. PMID: 36062518
Langlais T, Rougereau G, Marty-Diloy T, Bachy M, Barret H, Vialle R, Fitoussi F
Foot Ankle Surg 2022 Jan;28(1):107-113. Epub 2021 Feb 19 doi: 10.1016/j.fas.2021.02.006. PMID: 33642221
McGarry K, Martin S, McBride M, Beswick W, Lewis H
Ulster Med J 2021 Jan;90(1):3-6. Epub 2021 Feb 26 PMID: 33642625Free PMC Article
Al-Owain M, Imtiaz F, Shuaib T, Edrees A, Al-Amoudi M, Sakati N, Al-Hassnan Z, Bamashmous H, Rahbeeni Z, Al-Ameer S, Faqeih E, Meyer B, Al-Hashem A, Garout W, Al-Odaib A, Rashed M, Al-Aama JY
Clin Genet 2012 Aug;82(2):165-72. Epub 2011 Jul 18 doi: 10.1111/j.1399-0004.2011.01742.x. PMID: 21696385
Marsh DJ, Floyd D
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg 2011 Apr;64(4):535-40. Epub 2010 Aug 14 doi: 10.1016/j.bjps.2010.07.016. PMID: 20708986

Diagnosis

Schierz IAM, Piro E, Giuffrè M, Pinello G, Angelini A, Antona V, Cimador M, Corsello G
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2022 Dec;35(23):4513-4520. Epub 2020 Dec 1 doi: 10.1080/14767058.2020.1854213. PMID: 36062518
Pecimonova M, Radvanszky J, Smolak D, Budis J, Lichvar M, Kristinova D, Rozova I, Turna J, Szemes T
Medicine (Baltimore) 2021 Jun 4;100(22):e26136. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000026136. PMID: 34087865Free PMC Article
Blackburn C
Adv Neonatal Care 2015 Aug;15(4):269-73. doi: 10.1097/ANC.0000000000000207. PMID: 26225595
Lalani FK, Elsner GL, Lebel RR, Beg MB
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2015 Jun;60(6):799-801. doi: 10.1097/MPG.0000000000000622. PMID: 25373857
Al-Owain M, Imtiaz F, Shuaib T, Edrees A, Al-Amoudi M, Sakati N, Al-Hassnan Z, Bamashmous H, Rahbeeni Z, Al-Ameer S, Faqeih E, Meyer B, Al-Hashem A, Garout W, Al-Odaib A, Rashed M, Al-Aama JY
Clin Genet 2012 Aug;82(2):165-72. Epub 2011 Jul 18 doi: 10.1111/j.1399-0004.2011.01742.x. PMID: 21696385

Therapy

Pecimonova M, Radvanszky J, Smolak D, Budis J, Lichvar M, Kristinova D, Rozova I, Turna J, Szemes T
Medicine (Baltimore) 2021 Jun 4;100(22):e26136. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000026136. PMID: 34087865Free PMC Article
Ryan AK, Bartlett K, Clayton P, Eaton S, Mills L, Donnai D, Winter RM, Burn J
J Med Genet 1998 Jul;35(7):558-65. doi: 10.1136/jmg.35.7.558. PMID: 9678700Free PMC Article

Prognosis

McGarry K, Martin S, McBride M, Beswick W, Lewis H
Ulster Med J 2021 Jan;90(1):3-6. Epub 2021 Feb 26 PMID: 33642625Free PMC Article
Uehara T, Takenouchi T, Yamaguchi Y, Daimon Y, Suzuki H, Sakaguchi Y, Kosaki K
Am J Med Genet A 2019 Apr;179(4):659-662. Epub 2019 Feb 15 doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.61068. PMID: 30768759
Aizawa T, Togashi S, Haga Y, Nakayama Y, Sekido M, Kiyosawa T
Ann Plast Surg 2017 Mar;78(3):311-314. doi: 10.1097/SAP.0000000000000864. PMID: 27404473
Marsh DJ, Floyd D
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg 2011 Apr;64(4):535-40. Epub 2010 Aug 14 doi: 10.1016/j.bjps.2010.07.016. PMID: 20708986
Orrison WW, Schnitzler ER, Chun RW
Am J Med Genet 1980;7(2):155-70. doi: 10.1002/ajmg.1320070209. PMID: 6258433

Clinical prediction guides

Schierz IAM, Piro E, Giuffrè M, Pinello G, Angelini A, Antona V, Cimador M, Corsello G
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2022 Dec;35(23):4513-4520. Epub 2020 Dec 1 doi: 10.1080/14767058.2020.1854213. PMID: 36062518
Langlais T, Rougereau G, Marty-Diloy T, Bachy M, Barret H, Vialle R, Fitoussi F
Foot Ankle Surg 2022 Jan;28(1):107-113. Epub 2021 Feb 19 doi: 10.1016/j.fas.2021.02.006. PMID: 33642221
Aizawa T, Togashi S, Haga Y, Nakayama Y, Sekido M, Kiyosawa T
Ann Plast Surg 2017 Mar;78(3):311-314. doi: 10.1097/SAP.0000000000000864. PMID: 27404473
Marsh DJ, Floyd D
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg 2011 Apr;64(4):535-40. Epub 2010 Aug 14 doi: 10.1016/j.bjps.2010.07.016. PMID: 20708986
Orrison WW, Schnitzler ER, Chun RW
Am J Med Genet 1980;7(2):155-70. doi: 10.1002/ajmg.1320070209. PMID: 6258433

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