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Mitral regurgitation

MedGen UID:
7670
Concept ID:
C0026266
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: Incompetence, Mitral; Incompetence, Mitral Valve; Insufficiency, Mitral; Insufficiency, Mitral Valve; Mitral Incompetence; Mitral Insufficiency; Mitral Regurgitation; Mitral Valve Incompetence; Mitral Valve Insufficiency; Mitral Valve Regurgitation; Regurgitation, Mitral; Regurgitation, Mitral Valve; Valve Incompetence, Mitral; Valve Insufficiency, Mitral; Valve Regurgitation, Mitral
SNOMED CT: MI - Mitral incompetence (48724000); MR - Mitral regurgitation (48724000); Mitral insufficiency (48724000); Regurgitation of left atrioventricular valve (48724000); Mitral valve regurgitation (48724000); Mitral valve incompetence (48724000); Mitral valve insufficiency (48724000); Mitral regurgitation (48724000)
 
HPO: HP:0001653

Definition

An abnormality of the mitral valve characterized by insufficiency or incompetence of the mitral valve resulting in retrograde leaking of blood through the mitral valve upon ventricular contraction. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Marfan syndrome
MedGen UID:
44287
Concept ID:
C0024796
Disease or Syndrome
FBN1-related Marfan syndrome (Marfan syndrome), a systemic disorder of connective tissue with a high degree of clinical variability, comprises a broad phenotypic continuum ranging from mild (features of Marfan syndrome in one or a few systems) to severe and rapidly progressive neonatal multiorgan disease. Cardinal manifestations involve the ocular, skeletal, and cardiovascular systems. Ocular findings include myopia (>50% of affected individuals); ectopia lentis (seen in approximately 60% of affected individuals); and an increased risk for retinal detachment, glaucoma, and early cataracts. Skeletal system manifestations include bone overgrowth and joint laxity; disproportionately long extremities for the size of the trunk (dolichostenomelia); overgrowth of the ribs that can push the sternum in (pectus excavatum) or out (pectus carinatum); and scoliosis that ranges from mild to severe and progressive. The major morbidity and early mortality in Marfan syndrome relate to the cardiovascular system and include dilatation of the aorta at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva (predisposing to aortic tear and rupture), mitral valve prolapse with or without regurgitation, tricuspid valve prolapse, and enlargement of the proximal pulmonary artery. Severe and prolonged regurgitation of the mitral and/or aortic valve can predispose to left ventricular dysfunction and occasionally heart failure. With proper management, the life expectancy of someone with Marfan syndrome approximates that of the general population.
Mucopolysaccharidosis type 6
MedGen UID:
44514
Concept ID:
C0026709
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (MPS6) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from a deficiency of arylsulfatase B. Clinical features and severity are variable, but usually include short stature, hepatosplenomegaly, dysostosis multiplex, stiff joints, corneal clouding, cardiac abnormalities, and facial dysmorphism. Intelligence is usually normal (Azevedo et al., 2004).
Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-I-H/S
MedGen UID:
88566
Concept ID:
C0086431
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a progressive multisystem disorder with features ranging over a continuum of severity. While affected individuals have traditionally been classified as having one of three MPS I syndromes (Hurler syndrome, Hurler-Scheie syndrome, or Scheie syndrome), no easily measurable biochemical differences have been identified and the clinical findings overlap. Affected individuals are best described as having either a phenotype consistent with either severe (Hurler syndrome) or attenuated MPS I, a distinction that influences therapeutic options. Severe MPS I. Infants appear normal at birth. Typical early manifestations are nonspecific (e.g., umbilical or inguinal hernia, frequent upper respiratory tract infections before age 1 year). Coarsening of the facial features may not become apparent until after age one year. Gibbus deformity of the lower spine is common and often noted within the first year. Progressive skeletal dysplasia (dysostosis multiplex) involving all bones is universal, as is progressive arthropathy involving most joints. By age three years, linear growth decreases. Intellectual disability is progressive and profound but may not be readily apparent in the first year of life. Progressive cardiorespiratory involvement, hearing loss, and corneal clouding are common. Without treatment, death (typically from cardiorespiratory failure) usually occurs within the first ten years of life. Attenuated MPS I. Clinical onset is usually between ages three and ten years. The severity and rate of disease progression range from serious life-threatening complications leading to death in the second to third decade, to a normal life span complicated by significant disability from progressive joint manifestations and cardiorespiratory disease. While some individuals have no neurologic involvement and psychomotor development may be normal in early childhood, learning disabilities and psychiatric manifestations can be present later in life. Hearing loss, cardiac valvular disease, respiratory involvement, and corneal clouding are common.
Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-III-D
MedGen UID:
88602
Concept ID:
C0086650
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III) is a multisystem lysosomal storage disease characterized by progressive central nervous system degeneration manifest as severe intellectual disability (ID), developmental regression, and other neurologic manifestations including autism spectrum disorder (ASD), behavioral problems, and sleep disturbances. Disease onset is typically before age ten years. Disease course may be rapidly or slowly progressive; some individuals with an extremely attenuated disease course present in mid-to-late adulthood with early-onset dementia with or without a history of ID. Systemic manifestations can include musculoskeletal problems (joint stiffness, contractures, scoliosis, and hip dysplasia), hearing loss, respiratory tract and sinopulmonary infections, and cardiac disease (valvular thickening, defects in the cardiac conduction system). Neurologic decline is seen in all affected individuals; however, clinical severity varies within and among the four MPS III subtypes (defined by the enzyme involved) and even among members of the same family. Death usually occurs in the second or third decade of life secondary to neurologic regression or respiratory tract infections.
Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-IV-B
MedGen UID:
43376
Concept ID:
C0086652
Disease or Syndrome
GLB1-related disorders comprise two phenotypically distinct lysosomal storage disorders: GM1 gangliosidosis and mucopolysaccharidosis type IVB (MPS IVB). The phenotype of GM1 gangliosidosis constitutes a spectrum ranging from severe (infantile) to intermediate (late-infantile and juvenile) to mild (chronic/adult). Type I (infantile) GM1 gangliosidosis begins before age 12 months. Prenatal manifestations may include nonimmune hydrops fetalis, intrauterine growth restriction, and placental vacuolization; congenital dermal melanocytosis (Mongolian spots) may be observed. Macular cherry-red spot is detected on eye exam. Progressive central nervous system dysfunction leads to spasticity and rapid regression; blindness, deafness, decerebrate rigidity, seizures, feeding difficulties, and oral secretions are observed. Life expectancy is two to three years. Type II can be subdivided into the late-infantile (onset age 1-3 years) and juvenile (onset age 3-10 years) phenotypes. Central nervous system dysfunction manifests as progressive cognitive, motor, and speech decline as measured by psychometric testing. There may be mild corneal clouding, hepatosplenomegaly, and/or cardiomyopathy; the typical course is characterized by progressive neurologic decline, progressive skeletal disease in some individuals (including kyphosis and avascular necrosis of the femoral heads), and progressive feeding difficulties leading to aspiration risk. Type III begins in late childhood to the third decade with generalized dystonia leading to unsteady gait and speech disturbance followed by extrapyramidal signs including akinetic-rigid parkinsonism. Cardiomyopathy develops in some and skeletal involvement occurs in most. Intellectual impairment is common late in the disease with prognosis directly related to the degree of neurologic impairment. MPS IVB is characterized by skeletal dysplasia with specific findings of axial and appendicular dysostosis multiplex, short stature (below 15th centile in adults), kyphoscoliosis, coxa/genu valga, joint laxity, platyspondyly, and odontoid hypoplasia. First signs and symptoms may be apparent at birth. Bony involvement is progressive, with more than 84% of adults requiring ambulation aids; life span does not appear to be limited. Corneal clouding is detected in some individuals and cardiac valvular disease may develop.
Hurler syndrome
MedGen UID:
39698
Concept ID:
C0086795
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a progressive multisystem disorder with features ranging over a continuum of severity. While affected individuals have traditionally been classified as having one of three MPS I syndromes (Hurler syndrome, Hurler-Scheie syndrome, or Scheie syndrome), no easily measurable biochemical differences have been identified and the clinical findings overlap. Affected individuals are best described as having either a phenotype consistent with either severe (Hurler syndrome) or attenuated MPS I, a distinction that influences therapeutic options. Severe MPS I. Infants appear normal at birth. Typical early manifestations are nonspecific (e.g., umbilical or inguinal hernia, frequent upper respiratory tract infections before age 1 year). Coarsening of the facial features may not become apparent until after age one year. Gibbus deformity of the lower spine is common and often noted within the first year. Progressive skeletal dysplasia (dysostosis multiplex) involving all bones is universal, as is progressive arthropathy involving most joints. By age three years, linear growth decreases. Intellectual disability is progressive and profound but may not be readily apparent in the first year of life. Progressive cardiorespiratory involvement, hearing loss, and corneal clouding are common. Without treatment, death (typically from cardiorespiratory failure) usually occurs within the first ten years of life. Attenuated MPS I. Clinical onset is usually between ages three and ten years. The severity and rate of disease progression range from serious life-threatening complications leading to death in the second to third decade, to a normal life span complicated by significant disability from progressive joint manifestations and cardiorespiratory disease. While some individuals have no neurologic involvement and psychomotor development may be normal in early childhood, learning disabilities and psychiatric manifestations can be present later in life. Hearing loss, cardiac valvular disease, respiratory involvement, and corneal clouding are common.
Congenital heart block
MedGen UID:
57432
Concept ID:
C0149530
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital heart block (CHB) is a rare disorder of atrioventricular conduction, characterized by absence of conduction of atrial impulses to the ventricles with slower ventricular rhythm (atrioventricular dissociation). CHB can occur in association with immunological evidence of maternal connective disease (autoimmune CHD), fetal structural CHD or can be idiopathic.
Williams syndrome
MedGen UID:
59799
Concept ID:
C0175702
Disease or Syndrome
Williams syndrome (WS) is characterized by cardiovascular disease (elastin arteriopathy, peripheral pulmonary stenosis, supravalvar aortic stenosis, hypertension), distinctive facies, connective tissue abnormalities, intellectual disability (usually mild), a specific cognitive profile, unique personality characteristics, growth abnormalities, and endocrine abnormalities (hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria, hypothyroidism, and early puberty). Feeding difficulties often lead to poor weight gain in infancy. Hypotonia and hyperextensible joints can result in delayed attainment of motor milestones.
Congenital contractural arachnodactyly
MedGen UID:
67391
Concept ID:
C0220668
Congenital Abnormality
Congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA) appears to comprise a broad phenotypic spectrum. Classic CCA is characterized by arachnodactyly; flexion contractures of multiple joints including elbows, knees, hips, ankles, and/or fingers; kyphoscoliosis (usually progressive); a marfanoid habitus (a long and slender build, dolichostenomelia, pectus deformity, muscular hypoplasia, highly arched palate); and abnormal "crumpled" ears. At the mildest end, parents who are diagnosed retrospectively upon evaluation of their more severely affected child may show a lean body build, mild arachnodactyly, mild contractures without impairment, and minor ear abnormalities. At the most severe end is "severe CCA with cardiovascular and/or gastrointestinal anomalies," a rare phenotype in infants with pronounced features of CCA (severe crumpling of the ears, arachnodactyly, contractures, congenital scoliosis, and/or hypotonia) and severe cardiovascular and/or gastrointestinal anomalies. Phenotypic expression can vary within and between families.
Cardiac valvular dysplasia, X-linked
MedGen UID:
78083
Concept ID:
C0262436
Disease or Syndrome
FLNA deficiency is associated with a phenotypic spectrum that includes FLNA-related periventricular nodular heterotopia (Huttenlocher syndrome), congenital heart disease (patent ductus arteriosus, atrial and ventricular septal defects), valvular dystrophy, dilation and rupture of the thoracic aortic, pulmonary disease (pulmonary hypertension, alveolar hypoplasia, emphysema, asthma, chronic bronchitis), gastrointestinal dysmotility and obstruction, joint hypermobility, and macrothrombocytopenia.
Coffin-Lowry syndrome
MedGen UID:
75556
Concept ID:
C0265252
Disease or Syndrome
Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS) is usually characterized by severe-to-profound intellectual disability in males; less severely impaired individuals have been reported. Neuropsychiatric concerns can include behavioral problems, loss of strength, progressive spasticity or paraplegia, sleep apnea, or stroke. Stimulus-induced drop attacks (SIDAs) in which unexpected tactile or auditory stimuli or excitement triggers a brief collapse but no loss of consciousness are present in approximately 20% of affected individuals. Typically SIDAs begin between mid-childhood and the teens. Characteristic facial features may be more apparent with age. Upper-extremity differences may be subtle and include short, soft, fleshy hands with tapered fingers as well as fleshy forearms. Progressive kyphoscoliosis is one of the most difficult aspects of long-term care. Affected females tend to have intellectual disability in the mild-to-moderate range and may also have the typical facial, hand, and skeletal findings noted in males.
Aspartylglucosaminuria
MedGen UID:
78649
Concept ID:
C0268225
Disease or Syndrome
Aspartylglucosaminuria (AGU) is a severe autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder that involves the central nervous system and causes skeletal abnormalities as well as connective tissue lesions. The most characteristic feature is progressive mental retardation. The disorder is caused by deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme glycosylasparaginase, which results in body fluid and tissue accumulation of a series of glycoasparagines, i.e., glycoconjugates with an aspartylglucosamine moiety at the reducing end. AGU belongs to the group of disorders commonly referred to as the Finnish disease heritage (summary by Mononen et al., 1993 and Arvio and Arvio, 2002).
Renal carnitine transport defect
MedGen UID:
90999
Concept ID:
C0342788
Disease or Syndrome
Systemic primary carnitine deficiency (CDSP) is a disorder of the carnitine cycle that results in defective fatty acid oxidation. It encompasses a broad clinical spectrum including the following: Metabolic decompensation in infancy typically presenting between age three months and two years with episodes of hypoketotic hypoglycemia, poor feeding, irritability, lethargy, hepatomegaly, elevated liver transaminases, and hyperammonemia triggered by fasting or common illnesses such as upper respiratory tract infection or gastroenteritis. Childhood myopathy involving heart and skeletal muscle with onset between age two and four years. Pregnancy-related decreased stamina or exacerbation of cardiac arrhythmia. Fatigability in adulthood. Absence of symptoms. The latter two categories often include mothers diagnosed with CDSP after newborn screening has identified low carnitine levels in their infants.
Dilated cardiomyopathy-hypergonadotropic hypogonadism syndrome
MedGen UID:
162901
Concept ID:
C0796031
Disease or Syndrome
This syndrome is characterized by the association of dilated cardiomyopathy and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism (DCM-HH).
Juvenile polyposis/hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia syndrome
MedGen UID:
331400
Concept ID:
C1832942
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is characterized by the presence of multiple arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) that lack intervening capillaries and result in direct connections between arteries and veins. The most common clinical manifestation is spontaneous and recurrent nosebleeds (epistaxis) beginning on average at age 12 years. Telangiectases (small AVMs) are characteristically found on the lips, tongue, buccal and gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa, face, and fingers. The appearance of telangiectases is generally later than epistaxis but may be during childhood. Large AVMs occur most often in the lungs, liver, or brain; complications from bleeding or shunting may be sudden and catastrophic. A minority of individuals with HHT have GI bleeding, which is rarely seen before age 50 years.
Dilated cardiomyopathy 1S
MedGen UID:
371831
Concept ID:
C1834481
Disease or Syndrome
Any familial isolated dilated cardiomyopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the MYH7 gene.
MVP1
MedGen UID:
320443
Concept ID:
C1834819
Disease or Syndrome
Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) has a prevalence of approximately 2 to 3% in the general population. It is characterized by fibromyxomatous changes in mitral leaflet tissue, with upward displacement of 1 or both leaflets into the left atrium during systole; MVP is diagnosed when the movement of the mitral leaflets exceeds 2 mm. In classic MVP, leaflets are at least 5 mm thick, whereas in nonclassic MVP, they are less than 5 mm thick. Auscultatory findings, when present, consist of a midsystolic click and/or a late systolic murmur. The natural history of MVP varies from benign, with a normal life expectancy, to severe complications associated with the development of significant mitral regurgitation, including congestive heart failure, bacterial endocarditis, atrial fibrillation, thromboembolism, and even sudden death. However, complications are uncommon, affecting less than 3% of individuals with MVP (Freed et al., 1999; Grau et al., 2007; Delling and Vasan, 2014). Grau et al. (2007) provided a detailed review of the genetics of mitral valve prolapse. Delling and Vasan (2014) reviewed the epidemiology and pathophysiology of MVP, with discussion of disease progression, genetics, and molecular basis. Genetic Heterogeneity of Familial Mitral Valve Prolapse The locus for MVP1 has been mapped to chromosome 16p; the locus for MVP2 (607829) has been mapped to chromosome 11p. Mitral valve prolapse-3 (MVP3; 610840) is caused by mutation in the DZIP1 gene (608671) on chromosome 13q32.
Mitral valve prolapse, myxomatous 3
MedGen UID:
372132
Concept ID:
C1835814
Disease or Syndrome
Patients with mitral valve prolapse-3 (MVP3) have nonsyndromic MVP of variable severity with an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitral valve prolapse, see MVP1 (157700).
Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia with congenital joint dislocations
MedGen UID:
373381
Concept ID:
C1837657
Disease or Syndrome
CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia is characterized by short stature of prenatal onset, joint dislocations (knees, hips, radial heads), clubfeet, and limitation of range of motion that can involve all large joints. Kyphosis and occasionally scoliosis with slight shortening of the trunk develop in childhood. Minor heart valve dysplasia has been described in several persons. Intellect and vision are normal.
Atrial septal defect 2
MedGen UID:
334249
Concept ID:
C1842778
Congenital Abnormality
Any atrial heart septal defect in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the GATA4 gene.
Mitral valve prolapse, myxomatous 2
MedGen UID:
335856
Concept ID:
C1843003
Disease or Syndrome
Patients with MVP2 have nonsyndromic MVP of variable severity inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitral valve prolapse, see MVP1 (157700).
Sensory ataxic neuropathy, dysarthria, and ophthalmoparesis
MedGen UID:
375302
Concept ID:
C1843851
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life and about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called "chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus," or "CPEO+").
Uruguay Faciocardiomusculoskeletal syndrome
MedGen UID:
335320
Concept ID:
C1846010
Disease or Syndrome
Uruguay faciocardiomusculoskeletal syndrome (FCMSU) is an X-linked disorder in which affected males have a distinctive facial appearance, muscular hypertrophy, and cardiac ventricular hypertrophy leading to premature death. Additional features include large, broad, and deformed hands and feet, congenital hip dislocation, and scoliosis (summary by Xue et al., 2016).
Pili torti-developmental delay-neurological abnormalities syndrome
MedGen UID:
342358
Concept ID:
C1849811
Disease or Syndrome
Abnormal hair, joint laxity, and developmental delay (HJDD) is characterized by normal hair at birth that gradually becomes sparse, twisted, brittle, and easily broken, with pili torti and trichorrhexis nodosa observed on light microscopy. Other features include increased joint mobility and cognitive delay (Sharma et al., 2019).
Endocardial fibroelastosis and coarctation of abdominal aorta
MedGen UID:
341665
Concept ID:
C1856971
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital lactic acidosis, Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean type
MedGen UID:
387801
Concept ID:
C1857355
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency nuclear type 5 (MC4DN5) is an autosomal recessive severe metabolic multisystemic disorder with onset in infancy. Features include delayed psychomotor development, impaired intellectual development with speech delay, mild dysmorphic facial features, hypotonia, ataxia, and seizures. There is increased serum lactate and episodic hypoglycemia. Some patients may have cardiomyopathy, abnormal breathing, or liver abnormalities, reflecting systemic involvement. Brain imaging shows lesions in the brainstem and basal ganglia, consistent with a diagnosis of Leigh syndrome (see 256000). Affected individuals tend to have episodic metabolic and/or neurologic crises in early childhood, which often lead to early death (summary by Debray et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) deficiency, see 220110.
Left ventricular noncompaction 1
MedGen UID:
349005
Concept ID:
C1858725
Disease or Syndrome
Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is characterized by numerous prominent trabeculations and deep intertrabecular recesses in hypertrophied and hypokinetic segments of the left ventricle (Sasse-Klaassen et al., 2004). The mechanistic basis is thought to be an intrauterine arrest of myocardial development with lack of compaction of the loose myocardial meshwork. LVNC may occur in isolation or in association with congenital heart disease. Distinctive morphologic features can be recognized on 2-dimensional echocardiography (Kurosaki et al., 1999). Noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium is sometimes referred to as spongy myocardium. Stollberger et al. (2002) commented that the term 'isolated LVNC,' meaning LVNC without coexisting cardiac abnormalities, is misleading, because additional cardiac abnormalities are found in nearly all patients with LVNC. Genetic Heterogeneity of Left Ventricular Noncompaction A locus for autosomal dominant left ventricular noncompaction has been identified on chromosome 11p15 (LVNC2; 609470). LVNC3 (see 605906) is caused by mutation in the LDB3 gene (605906) on chromosome 10q23. LVNC4 (see 613424) is caused by mutation in the ACTC1 gene (102540) on chromosome 15q14. LVNC5 (see 613426) is caused by mutation in the MYH7 gene (160760) on chromosome 14q12. LVNC6 (see 601494) is caused by mutation in the TNNT2 gene (191045) on chromosome 1q32. LVNC7 (615092) is caused by mutation in the MIB1 gene (608677) on chromosome 18q11. LVNC8 (615373) is caused by mutation in the PRDM16 gene (605557) on chromosome 1p36. LVNC9 (see 611878) is caused by mutation in the TPM1 gene (191010) on chromosome 15q22. LVNC10 (615396) is caused by mutation in the MYBPC3 gene (600958) on chromosome 11p11. LVNC can also occur as part of an X-linked disorder, Barth syndrome (302060), caused by mutation in the TAZ gene (300394) on chromosome Xq28.
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, musculocontractural type
MedGen UID:
356497
Concept ID:
C1866294
Disease or Syndrome
Bleeding problems are common in the vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and are caused by unpredictable tearing (rupture) of blood vessels and organs. These complications can lead to easy bruising, internal bleeding, a hole in the wall of the intestine (intestinal perforation), or stroke. During pregnancy, women with vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome may experience rupture of the uterus. Additional forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome that involve rupture of the blood vessels include the kyphoscoliotic, classical, and classical-like types.\n\nOther types of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome have additional signs and symptoms. The cardiac-valvular type causes severe problems with the valves that control the movement of blood through the heart. People with the kyphoscoliotic type experience severe curvature of the spine that worsens over time and can interfere with breathing by restricting lung expansion. A type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome called brittle cornea syndrome is characterized by thinness of the clear covering of the eye (the cornea) and other eye abnormalities. The spondylodysplastic type features short stature and skeletal abnormalities such as abnormally curved (bowed) limbs. Abnormalities of muscles, including hypotonia and permanently bent joints (contractures), are among the characteristic signs of the musculocontractural and myopathic forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. The periodontal type causes abnormalities of the teeth and gums.\n\nMany people with the Ehlers-Danlos syndromes have soft, velvety skin that is highly stretchy (elastic) and fragile. Affected individuals tend to bruise easily, and some types of the condition also cause abnormal scarring. People with the classical form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome experience wounds that split open with little bleeding and leave scars that widen over time to create characteristic "cigarette paper" scars. The dermatosparaxis type of the disorder is characterized by loose skin that sags and wrinkles, and extra (redundant) folds of skin may be present.\n\nAn unusually large range of joint movement (hypermobility) occurs in most forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and it is a hallmark feature of the hypermobile type. Infants and children with hypermobility often have weak muscle tone (hypotonia), which can delay the development of motor skills such as sitting, standing, and walking. The loose joints are unstable and prone to dislocation and chronic pain. In the arthrochalasia type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, infants have hypermobility and dislocations of both hips at birth.\n\nThe various forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome have been classified in several different ways. Originally, 11 forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome were named using Roman numerals to indicate the types (type I, type II, and so on). In 1997, researchers proposed a simpler classification (the Villefranche nomenclature) that reduced the number of types to six and gave them descriptive names based on their major features. In 2017, the classification was updated to include rare forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome that were identified more recently. The 2017 classification describes 13 types of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.\n\nEhlers-Danlos syndrome is a group of disorders that affect connective tissues supporting the skin, bones, blood vessels, and many other organs and tissues. Defects in connective tissues cause the signs and symptoms of these conditions, which range from mildly loose joints to life-threatening complications.
Weill-Marchesani syndrome 2, dominant
MedGen UID:
358388
Concept ID:
C1869115
Disease or Syndrome
Weill-Marchesani syndrome (WMS) is a connective tissue disorder characterized by abnormalities of the lens of the eye, short stature, brachydactyly, joint stiffness, and cardiovascular defects. The ocular problems, typically recognized in childhood, include microspherophakia (small spherical lens), myopia secondary to the abnormal shape of the lens, ectopia lentis (abnormal position of the lens), and glaucoma, which can lead to blindness. Height of adult males is 142-169 cm; height of adult females is 130-157 cm. Autosomal recessive WMS cannot be distinguished from autosomal dominant WMS by clinical findings alone.
Gaucher disease type I
MedGen UID:
409531
Concept ID:
C1961835
Disease or Syndrome
Gaucher disease (GD) encompasses a continuum of clinical findings from a perinatal lethal disorder to an asymptomatic type. The identification of three major clinical types (1, 2, and 3) and two other subtypes (perinatal-lethal and cardiovascular) is useful in determining prognosis and management. GD type 1 is characterized by the presence of clinical or radiographic evidence of bone disease (osteopenia, focal lytic or sclerotic lesions, and osteonecrosis), hepatosplenomegaly, anemia and thrombocytopenia, lung disease, and the absence of primary central nervous system disease. GD types 2 and 3 are characterized by the presence of primary neurologic disease; in the past, they were distinguished by age of onset and rate of disease progression, but these distinctions are not absolute. Disease with onset before age two years, limited psychomotor development, and a rapidly progressive course with death by age two to four years is classified as GD type 2. Individuals with GD type 3 may have onset before age two years, but often have a more slowly progressive course, with survival into the third or fourth decade. The perinatal-lethal form is associated with ichthyosiform or collodion skin abnormalities or with nonimmune hydrops fetalis. The cardiovascular form is characterized by calcification of the aortic and mitral valves, mild splenomegaly, corneal opacities, and supranuclear ophthalmoplegia. Cardiopulmonary complications have been described with all the clinical subtypes, although varying in frequency and severity.
Craniofacial dysplasia - osteopenia syndrome
MedGen UID:
370148
Concept ID:
C1970027
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic developmental defect during embryogenesis disorder with characteristics of craniofacial dysmorphism (including brachycephaly, prominent forehead, sparse lateral eyebrows, severe hypertelorism, upslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, protruding ears, broad nasal bridge, pointed nasal tip, flat philtrum, anteverted nostrils, large mouth, thin upper vermilion border, highly arched palate and mild micrognathia) associated with osteopenia leading to repeated long bone fractures, severe myopia, mild to moderate sensorineural or mixed hearing loss, enamel hypoplasia, sloping shoulders and mild intellectual disability. There is evidence the disease can be caused by homozygous mutation in the IRX5 gene on chromosome 16q11.2.
Mucolipidosis type II
MedGen UID:
435914
Concept ID:
C2673377
Disease or Syndrome
GNPTAB-related disorders comprise the phenotypes mucolipidosis II (ML II) and mucolipidosis IIIa/ß (ML IIIa/ß), and phenotypes intermediate between ML II and ML IIIa/ß. ML II is evident at birth and slowly progressive; death most often occurs in early childhood. Orthopedic abnormalities present at birth may include thoracic deformity, kyphosis, clubfeet, deformed long bones, and/or dislocation of the hip(s). Growth often ceases in the second year of life; contractures develop in all large joints. The skin is thickened, facial features are coarse, and gingiva are hypertrophic. All children have cardiac involvement, most commonly thickening and insufficiency of the mitral valve and, less frequently, the aortic valve. Progressive mucosal thickening narrows the airways, and gradual stiffening of the thoracic cage contributes to respiratory insufficiency, the most common cause of death. ML IIIa/ß becomes evident at about age three years with slow growth rate and short stature; joint stiffness and pain initially in the shoulders, hips, and fingers; gradual mild coarsening of facial features; and normal to mildly impaired cognitive development. Pain from osteoporosis becomes more severe during adolescence. Cardiorespiratory complications (restrictive lung disease, thickening and insufficiency of the mitral and aortic valves, left and/or right ventricular hypertrophy) are common causes of death, typically in early to middle adulthood. Phenotypes intermediate between ML II and ML IIIa/ß are characterized by physical growth in infancy that resembles that of ML II and neuromotor and speech development that resemble that of ML IIIa/ß.
Hypothyroidism, congenital, nongoitrous, 5
MedGen UID:
388687
Concept ID:
C2673630
Disease or Syndrome
Any hypothyroidism, congenital, nongoitrous in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the NKX2-5 gene.
Hunter-Macdonald syndrome
MedGen UID:
383181
Concept ID:
C2677745
Disease or Syndrome
Dilated cardiomyopathy 1Y
MedGen UID:
437215
Concept ID:
C2678476
Disease or Syndrome
Dilated cardiomyopathy-1Y (CMD1Y) is characterized by severe progressive cardiac failure, resulting in death in the third to sixth decades of life in some patients. Electron microscopy shows an abnormal sarcomere structure (Olson et al., 2001). In left ventricular noncompaction-9 (LVNC9), patients may present with cardiac failure or may be asymptomatic. Echocardiography shows noncompaction of the apex and midventricular wall of the left ventricle (Probst et al., 2011). Some patients also exhibit Ebstein anomaly of the tricuspid valve (Kelle et al., 2016) and some have mitral valve insufficiency (Nijak et al., 2018).
Autosomal recessive severe congenital neutropenia due to G6PC3 deficiency
MedGen UID:
414066
Concept ID:
C2751630
Disease or Syndrome
G6PC3 deficiency is characterized by severe congenital neutropenia which occurs in a phenotypic continuum that includes the following: Isolated severe congenital neutropenia (nonsyndromic). Classic G6PC3 deficiency (severe congenital neutropenia plus cardiovascular and/or urogenital abnormalities). Severe G6PC3 deficiency (classic G6PC3 deficiency plus involvement of non-myeloid hematopoietic cell lines, additional extra-hematologic features, and pulmonary hypertension; known as Dursun syndrome). Neutropenia usually presents with recurrent bacterial infections in the first few months of life. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), failure to thrive (FTT), and poor postnatal growth are common. Other findings in classic and severe G6PC3 deficiency can include inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) resembling Crohn's disease, and endocrine disorders (growth hormone deficiency, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and delayed puberty).
Myofibrillar myopathy 6
MedGen UID:
414119
Concept ID:
C2751831
Disease or Syndrome
Myofibrillar myopathy-6 is an autosomal dominant severe neuromuscular disorder characterized by onset in the first decade of rapidly progressive generalized and proximal muscle weakness, respiratory insufficiency, cardiomyopathy, and skeletal deformities related to muscle weakness. Muscle biopsy shows fiber-type grouping, disruption of the Z lines, and filamentous inclusions, and sural nerve biopsy shows a neuropathy, often with giant axonal neurons. Most patients are severely affected by the second decade and need cardiac transplant, ventilation, and/or a wheelchair (summary by Jaffer et al., 2012). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of myofibrillar myopathy (MFM), see MFM1 (601419).
Cardiospondylocarpofacial syndrome
MedGen UID:
444060
Concept ID:
C2931461
Disease or Syndrome
Cardiospondylocarpofacial syndrome (CSCF) is characterized by growth retardation, dysmorphic facial features, brachydactyly with carpal-tarsal fusion, extensive posterior cervical vertebral synostosis, cardiac septal defects with valve dysplasia, and deafness with inner ear malformations (summary by Le Goff et al., 2016).
Camurati-Engelmann disease, type 2
MedGen UID:
419470
Concept ID:
C2931683
Disease or Syndrome
Camurati-Engelmann Disease not associated with TGFB1. This is an n-of-1 use case where only one patient or family has been described with this disorder.
Diamond-Blackfan anemia 6
MedGen UID:
419918
Concept ID:
C2931850
Disease or Syndrome
Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is characterized by a profound normochromic and usually macrocytic anemia with normal leukocytes and platelets, congenital malformations in up to 50%, and growth deficiency in 30% of affected individuals. The hematologic complications occur in 90% of affected individuals during the first year of life. The phenotypic spectrum ranges from a mild form (e.g., mild anemia or no anemia with only subtle erythroid abnormalities, physical malformations without anemia) to a severe form of fetal anemia resulting in nonimmune hydrops fetalis. DBA is associated with an increased risk for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and solid tumors including osteogenic sarcoma.
Polycystic kidney disease, adult type
MedGen UID:
461191
Concept ID:
C3149841
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is generally a late-onset multisystem disorder characterized by bilateral kidney cysts, liver cysts, and an increased risk of intracranial aneurysms. Other manifestations include: cysts in the pancreas, seminal vesicles, and arachnoid membrane; dilatation of the aortic root and dissection of the thoracic aorta; mitral valve prolapse; and abdominal wall hernias. Kidney manifestations include early-onset hypertension, kidney pain, and kidney insufficiency. Approximately 50% of individuals with ADPKD have end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) by age 60 years. The prevalence of liver cysts increases with age and occasionally results in clinically significant severe polycystic liver disease (PLD), most often in females. Overall, the prevalence of intracranial aneurysms is fivefold higher than in the general population and further increased in those with a positive family history of aneurysms or subarachnoid hemorrhage. There is substantial variability in the severity of kidney disease and other extra-kidney manifestations.
CBL-related disorder
MedGen UID:
462153
Concept ID:
C3150803
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome-like disorder is a developmental disorder resembling Noonan syndrome (NS1; 163950) and characterized by facial dysmorphism, a wide spectrum of cardiac disease, reduced growth, variable cognitive deficits, and ectodermal and musculoskeletal anomalies. There is extensive phenotypic heterogeneity and variable expressivity (summary by Martinelli et al., 2010). Patients with heterozygous germline CBL mutations have an increased risk for certain malignancies, particularly juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML; 607785), as also seen in patients with Noonan syndrome (summary by Niemeyer et al., 2010).
Aneurysm-osteoarthritis syndrome
MedGen UID:
462437
Concept ID:
C3151087
Disease or Syndrome
Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is characterized by vascular findings (cerebral, thoracic, and abdominal arterial aneurysms and/or dissections), skeletal manifestations (pectus excavatum or pectus carinatum, scoliosis, joint laxity, arachnodactyly, talipes equinovarus, cervical spine malformation and/or instability), craniofacial features (widely spaced eyes, strabismus, bifid uvula / cleft palate, and craniosynostosis that can involve any sutures), and cutaneous findings (velvety and translucent skin, easy bruising, and dystrophic scars). Individuals with LDS are predisposed to widespread and aggressive arterial aneurysms and pregnancy-related complications including uterine rupture and death. Individuals with LDS can show a strong predisposition for allergic/inflammatory disease including asthma, eczema, and reactions to food or environmental allergens. There is also an increased incidence of gastrointestinal inflammation including eosinophilic esophagitis and gastritis or inflammatory bowel disease. Wide variation in the distribution and severity of clinical features can be seen in individuals with LDS, even among affected individuals within a family who have the same pathogenic variant.
Nestor-Guillermo progeria syndrome
MedGen UID:
462796
Concept ID:
C3151446
Disease or Syndrome
Nestor-Guillermo progeria syndrome (NGPS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by lipoatrophy, osteoporosis, and very severe osteolysis. Patients have no cardiovascular impairment, diabetes mellitus, or hypertriglyceridemia, but suffer profound skeletal abnormalities that affect their quality of life. Onset is after 2 years of age, and lifespan is relatively long (summary by Cabanillas et al., 2011).
Arterial calcification, generalized, of infancy, 2
MedGen UID:
477791
Concept ID:
C3276161
Disease or Syndrome
Generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI) is characterized by infantile onset of widespread arterial calcification and/or narrowing of large and medium-sized vessels resulting in cardiovascular findings (which can include heart failure, respiratory distress, edema, cyanosis, hypertension, and/or cardiomegaly). Additional findings can include typical skin and retinal manifestations of pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), periarticular calcifications, development of rickets after infancy, cervical spine fusion, and hearing loss. While mortality in infancy is high, survival into the third and fourth decades has occurred.
Cutis laxa, autosomal dominant 1
MedGen UID:
478169
Concept ID:
C3276539
Disease or Syndrome
FBLN5-related cutis laxa is characterized by cutis laxa, early childhood-onset pulmonary emphysema, peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, and other evidence of a generalized connective disorder such as inguinal hernias and hollow viscus diverticula (e.g., intestine, bladder). Occasionally, supravalvar aortic stenosis is observed. Intrafamilial variability in age of onset is observed. Cardiorespiratory failure from complications of pulmonary emphysema (respiratory or cardiac insufficiency) is the most common cause of death.
Geleophysic dysplasia 2
MedGen UID:
481684
Concept ID:
C3280054
Disease or Syndrome
Geleophysic dysplasia, a progressive condition resembling a lysosomal storage disorder, is characterized by short stature, short hands and feet, progressive joint limitation and contractures, distinctive facial features, progressive cardiac valvular disease, and thickened skin. Intellect is normal. Major findings are likely to be present in the first year of life. Cardiac, respiratory, and lung involvement result in death before age five years in approximately 33% of individuals with ADAMTSL2-related geleophysic dysplasia.
Cutis laxa, autosomal dominant 2
MedGen UID:
482424
Concept ID:
C3280794
Disease or Syndrome
FBLN5-related cutis laxa is characterized by cutis laxa, early childhood-onset pulmonary emphysema, peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, and other evidence of a generalized connective disorder such as inguinal hernias and hollow viscus diverticula (e.g., intestine, bladder). Occasionally, supravalvar aortic stenosis is observed. Intrafamilial variability in age of onset is observed. Cardiorespiratory failure from complications of pulmonary emphysema (respiratory or cardiac insufficiency) is the most common cause of death.
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, kyphoscoliotic and deafness type
MedGen UID:
482790
Concept ID:
C3281160
Disease or Syndrome
FKBP14 kyphoscoliotic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (FKBP14-kEDS) is characterized by congenital muscle hypotonia and weakness (typically improving during childhood), progressive scoliosis, joint hypermobility, hyperelastic skin, gross motor developmental delay, myopathy, and hearing impairment. Most affected children achieve independent walking between ages two and four years. A decline of motor function in adulthood may be seen, but affected individuals are likely to be able to participate in activities of daily living in adulthood and maintain independent walking. Occasional features underlying systemic connective tissue involvement include aortic rupture and arterial dissection, subdural hygroma, insufficiency of cardiac valves, bluish sclerae, bladder diverticula, inguinal or umbilical herniae, and premature rupture of membranes during pregnancy. Rarer findings may include bifid uvula with submucous or frank cleft palate, speech/language delay without true cognitive impairment, and rectal prolapse.
Aortic valve disease 2
MedGen UID:
762200
Concept ID:
C3542024
Disease or Syndrome
Any aortic valve disease in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the SMAD6 gene.
Deafness-encephaloneuropathy-obesity-valvulopathy syndrome
MedGen UID:
766268
Concept ID:
C3553354
Disease or Syndrome
Primary coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency is usually associated with multisystem involvement, including neurologic manifestations such as fatal neonatal encephalopathy with hypotonia; a late-onset slowly progressive multiple-system atrophy-like phenotype (neurodegeneration with autonomic failure and various combinations of parkinsonism and cerebellar ataxia, and pyramidal dysfunction); and dystonia, spasticity, seizures, and intellectual disability. Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS), the hallmark renal manifestation, is often the initial manifestation either as isolated renal involvement that progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), or associated with encephalopathy (seizures, stroke-like episodes, severe neurologic impairment) resulting in early death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), retinopathy or optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss can also be seen.
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 5A (Zellweger)
MedGen UID:
766854
Concept ID:
C3553940
Disease or Syndrome
The peroxisomal biogenesis disorder (PBD) Zellweger syndrome (ZS) is an autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly syndrome. Affected children present in the newborn period with profound hypotonia, seizures, and inability to feed. Characteristic craniofacial anomalies, eye abnormalities, neuronal migration defects, hepatomegaly, and chondrodysplasia punctata are present. Children with this condition do not show any significant development and usually die in the first year of life (summary by Steinberg et al., 2006). For a complete phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Zellweger syndrome, see 214100. Individuals with PBDs of complementation group 5 (CG5, equivalent to CG10 and CGF) have mutations in the PEX2 gene. For information on the history of PBD complementation groups, see 214100.
Dilated cardiomyopathy 1II
MedGen UID:
767563
Concept ID:
C3554649
Disease or Syndrome
Any familial isolated dilated cardiomyopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the CRYAB gene.
Dilated cardiomyopathy 1KK
MedGen UID:
811544
Concept ID:
C3714995
Disease or Syndrome
Any dilated cardiomyopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the MYPN gene.
Noonan syndrome 8
MedGen UID:
815563
Concept ID:
C3809233
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population.
Left ventricular noncompaction 8
MedGen UID:
815618
Concept ID:
C3809288
Disease or Syndrome
Some individuals with left ventricular noncompaction experience no symptoms at all; others have heart problems that can include sudden cardiac death. Additional signs and symptoms include abnormal blood clots, irregular heart rhythm (arrhythmia), a sensation of fluttering or pounding in the chest (palpitations), extreme fatigue during exercise (exercise intolerance), shortness of breath (dyspnea), fainting (syncope), swelling of the legs (lymphedema), and trouble laying down flat. Some affected individuals have features of other heart defects. Left ventricular noncompaction can be diagnosed at any age, from birth to late adulthood. Approximately two-thirds of individuals with left ventricular noncompaction develop heart failure.\n\nLeft ventricular noncompaction is a heart (cardiac) muscle disorder that occurs when the lower left chamber of the heart (left ventricle), which helps the heart pump blood, does not develop correctly. Instead of the muscle being smooth and firm, the cardiac muscle in the left ventricle is thick and appears spongy. The abnormal cardiac muscle is weak and has an impaired ability to pump blood because it either cannot completely contract or it cannot completely relax. For the heart to pump blood normally, cardiac muscle must contract and relax fully.
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, musculocontractural type 2
MedGen UID:
816175
Concept ID:
C3809845
Disease or Syndrome
The musculocontractural type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDSMC2) is characterized by progressive multisystem fragility-related manifestations, including joint dislocations and deformities; skin hyperextensibility, bruisability, and fragility, with recurrent large subcutaneous hematomas; cardiac valvular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and ophthalmologic complications; and myopathy, featuring muscle hypoplasia, muscle weakness, and an abnormal muscle fiber pattern in histology in adulthood, resulting in gross motor developmental delay (summary by Muller et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of the musculocontractural type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, see EDSMC1 (601776).
Rienhoff syndrome
MedGen UID:
816342
Concept ID:
C3810012
Disease or Syndrome
Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is characterized by vascular findings (cerebral, thoracic, and abdominal arterial aneurysms and/or dissections), skeletal manifestations (pectus excavatum or pectus carinatum, scoliosis, joint laxity, arachnodactyly, talipes equinovarus, cervical spine malformation and/or instability), craniofacial features (widely spaced eyes, strabismus, bifid uvula / cleft palate, and craniosynostosis that can involve any sutures), and cutaneous findings (velvety and translucent skin, easy bruising, and dystrophic scars). Individuals with LDS are predisposed to widespread and aggressive arterial aneurysms and pregnancy-related complications including uterine rupture and death. Individuals with LDS can show a strong predisposition for allergic/inflammatory disease including asthma, eczema, and reactions to food or environmental allergens. There is also an increased incidence of gastrointestinal inflammation including eosinophilic esophagitis and gastritis or inflammatory bowel disease. Wide variation in the distribution and severity of clinical features can be seen in individuals with LDS, even among affected individuals within a family who have the same pathogenic variant.
Megalencephaly-polymicrogyria-polydactyly-hydrocephalus syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
861164
Concept ID:
C4012727
Disease or Syndrome
MPPH (megalencephaly-postaxial polydactyly-polymicrogyria-hydrocephalus) syndrome is a developmental brain disorder characterized by megalencephaly (brain overgrowth) with the cortical malformation bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria (BPP). At birth the occipital frontal circumference (OFC) ranges from normal to 6 standard deviations (SD) above the mean for age, sex, and gestational age; in older individuals the range is from 3 to 10 SD above the mean. A variable degree of ventriculomegaly is seen in almost all children with MPPH syndrome; nearly 50% of individuals have frank hydrocephalus. Neurologic problems associated with BPP include oromotor dysfunction (100%), epilepsy (50%), and mild-to-severe intellectual disability (100%). Postaxial hexadactyly occurs in 50% of individuals with MPPH syndrome.
ADNP-related multiple congenital anomalies - intellectual disability - autism spectrum disorder
MedGen UID:
862975
Concept ID:
C4014538
Disease or Syndrome
ADNP-related disorder is characterized by hypotonia, severe speech and motor delay, mild-to-severe intellectual disability, and characteristic facial features (prominent forehead, high anterior hairline, wide and depressed nasal bridge, and short nose with full, upturned nasal tip) based on a cohort of 78 individuals. Features of autism spectrum disorder are common (stereotypic behavior, impaired social interaction). Other common findings include additional behavioral problems, sleep disturbance, brain abnormalities, seizures, feeding issues, gastrointestinal problems, visual dysfunction (hypermetropia, strabismus, cortical visual impairment), musculoskeletal anomalies, endocrine issues including short stature and hormonal deficiencies, cardiac and urinary tract anomalies, and hearing loss.
Tatton-Brown-Rahman overgrowth syndrome
MedGen UID:
862982
Concept ID:
C4014545
Disease or Syndrome
Tatton-Brown-Rahman syndrome (TBRS) is an overgrowth / intellectual disability syndrome characterized by length/height and/or head circumference =2 SD above the mean for age and sex, obesity / increased weight, intellectual disability that ranges from mild to severe, joint hypermobility, hypotonia, behavioral/psychiatric issues, kyphoscoliosis, and seizures. Individuals with TBRS have subtle dysmorphic features, including a round face with coarse features, thick horizontal low-set eyebrows, narrow (as measured vertically) palpebral fissures, and prominent upper central incisors. The facial gestalt is most easily recognizable in the teenage years. TBRS may be associated with an increased risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia. There are less clear associations with aortic root dilatation and increased risk of other hematologic and solid tumors.
Dilated cardiomyopathy 1NN
MedGen UID:
863093
Concept ID:
C4014656
Disease or Syndrome
Any familial isolated dilated cardiomyopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the RAF1 gene.
Myopathy, centronuclear, 5
MedGen UID:
863251
Concept ID:
C4014814
Disease or Syndrome
Centronuclear myopathy-5 (CNM5) is an autosomal recessive congenital myopathy characterized by severe neonatal hypotonia with respiratory insufficiency and difficulty feeding. Some patients die in infancy, and some develop dilated cardiomyopathy. Children show severely delayed motor development (summary by Agrawal et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of centronuclear myopathy, see CNM1 (160150).
Chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia
MedGen UID:
863911
Concept ID:
C4015474
Disease or Syndrome
Syndrome with characteristics of sick sinus syndrome and intestinal pseudo-obstruction. The heart and digestive issues develop at the same time, usually by age 20. The syndrome is caused by mutations in the SGO1 gene. This gene provides instructions for making part of a protein complex cohesin. This protein complex helps control the placement of chromosomes during cell division. Research suggests that SGO1 gene mutations may result in a cohesin complex that is less able to hold sister chromatids together, resulting in decreased chromosomal stability during cell division. This instability is thought to cause senescence of cells in the intestinal muscle and in the sinoatrial node, resulting in problems maintaining proper rhythmic movements of the heart and intestines.
Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with joint laxity, type 1, with or without fractures
MedGen UID:
865814
Concept ID:
C4017377
Disease or Syndrome
Any spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with joint laxity in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the B3GALT6 gene.
Optic atrophy 8
MedGen UID:
898923
Concept ID:
C4085249
Disease or Syndrome
Optic atrophy-8 (OPA8) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by progressive visual loss during the first or second decade of life. Some patients may have additional features, mainly late-onset sensorineural hearing loss. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of optic atrophy, see OPA1 (165500).
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal recessive 1
MedGen UID:
897191
Concept ID:
C4225153
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life and about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called "chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus," or "CPEO+").
Noonan syndrome 10
MedGen UID:
902892
Concept ID:
C4225280
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population.
Aortic aneurysm, familial thoracic 10
MedGen UID:
924785
Concept ID:
C4284414
Disease or Syndrome
Any familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the LOX gene.
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, cardiac valvular type
MedGen UID:
929458
Concept ID:
C4303789
Disease or Syndrome
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a group of disorders that affect connective tissues supporting the skin, bones, blood vessels, and many other organs and tissues. Defects in connective tissues cause the signs and symptoms of these conditions, which range from mildly loose joints to life-threatening complications.\n\nThe various forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome have been classified in several different ways. Originally, 11 forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome were named using Roman numerals to indicate the types (type I, type II, and so on). In 1997, researchers proposed a simpler classification (the Villefranche nomenclature) that reduced the number of types to six and gave them descriptive names based on their major features. In 2017, the classification was updated to include rare forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome that were identified more recently. The 2017 classification describes 13 types of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.\n\nMany people with the Ehlers-Danlos syndromes have soft, velvety skin that is highly stretchy (elastic) and fragile. Affected individuals tend to bruise easily, and some types of the condition also cause abnormal scarring. People with the classical form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome experience wounds that split open with little bleeding and leave scars that widen over time to create characteristic "cigarette paper" scars. The dermatosparaxis type of the disorder is characterized by loose skin that sags and wrinkles, and extra (redundant) folds of skin may be present.\n\nAn unusually large range of joint movement (hypermobility) occurs in most forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and it is a hallmark feature of the hypermobile type. Infants and children with hypermobility often have weak muscle tone (hypotonia), which can delay the development of motor skills such as sitting, standing, and walking. The loose joints are unstable and prone to dislocation and chronic pain. In the arthrochalasia type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, infants have hypermobility and dislocations of both hips at birth.\n\nOther types of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome have additional signs and symptoms. The cardiac-valvular type causes severe problems with the valves that control the movement of blood through the heart. People with the kyphoscoliotic type experience severe curvature of the spine that worsens over time and can interfere with breathing by restricting lung expansion. A type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome called brittle cornea syndrome is characterized by thinness of the clear covering of the eye (the cornea) and other eye abnormalities. The spondylodysplastic type features short stature and skeletal abnormalities such as abnormally curved (bowed) limbs. Abnormalities of muscles, including hypotonia and permanently bent joints (contractures), are among the characteristic signs of the musculocontractural and myopathic forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. The periodontal type causes abnormalities of the teeth and gums.\n\nBleeding problems are common in the vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and are caused by unpredictable tearing (rupture) of blood vessels and organs. These complications can lead to easy bruising, internal bleeding, a hole in the wall of the intestine (intestinal perforation), or stroke. During pregnancy, women with vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome may experience rupture of the uterus. Additional forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome that involve rupture of the blood vessels include the kyphoscoliotic, classical, and classical-like types.
Myofibrillar myopathy 8
MedGen UID:
934612
Concept ID:
C4310645
Disease or Syndrome
Myofibrillar myopathy-8 (MFM8) is an autosomal recessive myopathy characterized by slowly progressive proximal muscle weakness and atrophy affecting the upper and lower limbs, resulting in increased falls, gait problems, difficulty running or climbing stairs, and upper limb weakness or scapular winging. Some patients develop distal muscle weakness and atrophy. The phenotype may also be consistent with a clinical diagnosis of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). Age at symptom onset ranges from infancy to adulthood. Ambulation is generally preserved and cardiac involvement is rare, but respiratory compromise with decreased forced vital capacity often occurs. Muscle biopsy shows a mix of myopathic features, including myofibrillar inclusions and sarcomeric disorganization; some patients have been reported to have dystrophic changes on muscle biopsy (O'Grady et al., 2016; Daimaguler et al., 2021). There is significant phenotypic variation, even in patients with the same mutation, which must be taken into account when counseling affecting individuals (Woods et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of myofibrillar myopathy, see MFM1 (601419).
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 26
MedGen UID:
934716
Concept ID:
C4310749
Disease or Syndrome
Familial cardiomyopathy caused by mutation in the FLNC gene has been described as hypertrophic, restrictive, dilated, or arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. Affected individuals, especially those with dilated cardiomyopathy, are at risk for arrhythmias and sudden death. Arrhythmias without cardiomyopathy, and left ventricular noncompaction, have also been reported (Ortiz-Genga et al., 2016; Verdonschot et al., 2020).
Noonan syndrome-like disorder with loose anagen hair 2
MedGen UID:
1376945
Concept ID:
C4479577
Disease or Syndrome
An inherited condition caused by autosomal dominant mutation(s) in the PPP1CB gene, encoding serine/threonine-protein phosphatase PP1-beta catalytic subunit. The condition is characterized by facial features similar to those seen in Noonan syndrome but may also include short stature, cognitive deficits, relative macrocephaly, small posterior fossa resulting in Chiari I malformation, hypernasal voice, cardiac defects, and ectodermal abnormalities, which typically presents as slow-growing, sparse, and/or unruly hair.
Geleophysic dysplasia 3
MedGen UID:
1615724
Concept ID:
C4540511
Congenital Abnormality
Geleophysic dysplasia, a progressive condition resembling a lysosomal storage disorder, is characterized by short stature, short hands and feet, progressive joint limitation and contractures, distinctive facial features, progressive cardiac valvular disease, and thickened skin. Intellect is normal. Major findings are likely to be present in the first year of life. Cardiac, respiratory, and lung involvement result in death before age five years in approximately 33% of individuals with ADAMTSL2-related geleophysic dysplasia.
Weill-Marchesani syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1637058
Concept ID:
C4552002
Disease or Syndrome
Weill-Marchesani syndrome (WMS) is a connective tissue disorder characterized by abnormalities of the lens of the eye, short stature, brachydactyly, joint stiffness, and cardiovascular defects. The ocular problems, typically recognized in childhood, include microspherophakia (small spherical lens), myopia secondary to the abnormal shape of the lens, ectopia lentis (abnormal position of the lens), and glaucoma, which can lead to blindness. Height of adult males is 142-169 cm; height of adult females is 130-157 cm. Autosomal recessive WMS cannot be distinguished from autosomal dominant WMS by clinical findings alone.
Cardiomyopathy, familial hypertrophic 27
MedGen UID:
1648325
Concept ID:
C4748014
Disease or Syndrome
CMH27 is a severe, early-onset cardiomyopathy with morphologic features of both dilated and hypertrophic disease, characterized by biventricular involvement and atypical distribution of hypertrophy. Heterozygotes are at increased risk of developing cardiomyopathy (Almomani et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, see CMH1 (192600). An oligogenic form of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, involving heterozygous mutations in the ALPK3, TTN (188840), and MYL3 (160790) genes has also been reported in 1 family.
Intellectual developmental disorder, X-linked, syndromic, Hackmann-Di Donato type
MedGen UID:
1716269
Concept ID:
C5393302
Disease or Syndrome
Hackmann-Di Donato-type X-linked syndromic intellectual developmental disorder (MRXSHD) is an X-linked recessive phenotype characterized by global developmental delay with hypotonia, delayed speech, and mildly delayed walking associated with somatic marfanoid features, including tall stature, long fingers, and mildly dysmorphic facies. Some patients may have cardiac defects, such as mitral valve regurgitation, as well as other anomalies related to connective tissue defects, such as scoliosis (summary by Fiordaliso et al., 2019).
Noonan syndrome 13
MedGen UID:
1761918
Concept ID:
C5436773
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population.
Mandibuloacral dysplasia progeroid syndrome
MedGen UID:
1741713
Concept ID:
C5436867
Disease or Syndrome
Mandibuloacral dysplasia progeroid syndrome (MDPS) is an autosomal recessive severe laminopathy-like disorder characterized by growth retardation, bone resorption, arterial calcification, renal glomerulosclerosis, and hypertension (Elouej et al., 2020).
Mitochondrial complex 2 deficiency, nuclear type 3
MedGen UID:
1751884
Concept ID:
C5436934
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex II deficiency nuclear type 3 (MC2DN3) is an autosomal recessive multisystemic metabolic disorder with a highly variable phenotype. Some patients may have an encephalomyopathic picture with episodic developmental regression, loss of motor skills, hypotonia, ataxia, dystonia, and seizures or myoclonus. Other patients present in infancy with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which may be fatal. Laboratory studies show increased serum lactate and mitochondrial complex II deficiency in muscle and fibroblasts (summary by Jackson et al., 2014 and Alston et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of MC2DN, see MC2DN1 (252011).
Cardiomyopathy, dilated, 2D
MedGen UID:
1782612
Concept ID:
C5543535
Disease or Syndrome
Dilated cardiomyopathy-2D (CMD2D) is characterized by neonatal onset of severe cardiomyopathy, with rapid progression to cardiac decompensation and death unless the patient undergoes heart transplantation (Ganapathi et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of dilated cardiomyopathy, see 115200.
Myopathy, myofibrillar, 12, infantile-onset, with cardiomyopathy
MedGen UID:
1794147
Concept ID:
C5561937
Disease or Syndrome
Infantile-onset myofibrillar myopathy-12 with cardiomyopathy (MFM12) is a severe autosomal recessive disorder affecting both skeletal and cardiac muscle tissue that is apparent in the first weeks of life. Affected infants show tremor or clonus at birth, followed by onset of rapidly progressive generalized muscle weakness and dilated cardiomyopathy and cardiac failure, usually resulting in death by 6 months of age. Skeletal and cardiac muscle tissues show hypotrophy of type I muscle fibers and evidence of myofibrillar disorganization (summary by Weterman et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of myofibrillar myopathy, see MFM1 (601419).
Cerebellar ataxia, brain abnormalities, and cardiac conduction defects
MedGen UID:
1794215
Concept ID:
C5562005
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebellar ataxia, brain abnormalities, and cardiac conduction defects (CABAC) is an autosomal recessive primarily neurologic disorder with variable manifestations. Common features included infantile-onset hypotonia, poor motor development, poor feeding and overall growth, and ataxic gait due to cerebellar ataxia. Other features include dysarthria, nystagmus, variable ocular anomalies, spasticity, hyperreflexia, and nonspecific dysmorphic features. Most, but not all, patients have global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development and speech delay. Brain imaging shows cerebellar hypoplasia, often with brainstem hypoplasia, enlarged ventricles, delayed myelination, and thin corpus callosum. A significant number of patients develop cardiac conduction defects in childhood or adolescence, often requiring pacemaker placement (summary by Slavotinek et al., 2020).
Systemic lupus erythematosus 17
MedGen UID:
1804329
Concept ID:
C5676884
Disease or Syndrome
Systemic lupus erythematosus-17 (SLE17) is an X-linked dominant autoimmune disorder characterized by onset of systemic autoinflammatory symptoms in the first decades of life. Only affected females have been reported. Features may include classic features of SLE, such as malar rash and arthralgias, or can include less common entities such as hemiplegia and neuromyelitis optica (NMO). Laboratory studies show the presence of autoantibodies and enhanced NFKB (164011) signaling, the latter being consistent with a gain-of-function effect (Brown et al., 2022). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), see 152700.
Immunodeficiency 94 with autoinflammation and dysmorphic facies
MedGen UID:
1802872
Concept ID:
C5676918
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-94 with autoinflammation and dysmorphic facies (IMD94) is a systemic immunologic disorder with onset in early infancy. Primary features include lymphadenopathy, autoinflammation, immunodeficiency with hypogammaglobulinemia, and dysmorphic facial features. Intellectual development is normal and serum IgE is not elevated. The disease results from constitutive activation of the IL6 signaling cascade, resulting in immune dysregulation and a hyperinflammatory state (summary by Materna-Kiryluk et al., 2021).
Meckel syndrome 14
MedGen UID:
1809650
Concept ID:
C5676989
Disease or Syndrome
Meckel syndrome-14 (MKS14) is a lethal disorder characterized by occipital encephalocele, postaxial polydactyly of the hands and feet, and polycystic kidneys. Stillbirth has been reported, as well as death within hours in a live-born affected individual (Shaheen et al., 2016; Ridnoi et al., 2019). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Meckel syndrome, see MKS1 (249000).
Cardiomyopathy, dilated, 2G
MedGen UID:
1801983
Concept ID:
C5676995
Disease or Syndrome
Dilated cardiomyopathy-2G (CMD2G) is characterized by early-onset severe dilated cardiomyopathy that progresses rapidly to heart failure in the neonatal period without evidence of intervening hypertrophy. Cardiac tissue exhibits markedly shortened thin filaments, disorganized myofibrils, and reduced contractile force generation, resulting in the severe ventricular dysfunction observed. There is no evidence of skeletal muscle hypertrophy (Ahrens-Nicklas et al., 2019). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of dilated cardiomyopathy, see 115200.
Cardiac valvular defect, developmental
MedGen UID:
1823949
Concept ID:
C5774175
Disease or Syndrome
Cardiac valvular dysplasia-1 (CVDP1) is characterized by congenital malformations of the pulmonic, tricuspid, and mitral valves. Structural cardiac defects, including atrial and ventricular septal defects, single left ventricle, and hypoplastic right ventricle have also been observed in affected individuals (Ta-Shma et al., 2017). Genetic Heterogeneity of Cardiac Valvular Dysplasia CVDP2 (620067) is caused by mutation in the ADAMTS19 gene (607513) on chromosome 5q23.
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly, cerebral atrophy, and visual impairment
MedGen UID:
1823998
Concept ID:
C5774225
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly, cerebral atrophy, and visual impairment (NEDMVIC) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by global developmental delay, impaired intellectual development, facial dysmorphism, and microcephaly (Ziegler et al., 2022).
Cardiomyopathy, familial hypertrophic, 29, with polyglucosan bodies
MedGen UID:
1824081
Concept ID:
C5774308
Disease or Syndrome
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-29 (CMH29) is characterized by recurrent syncope, dyspnea on exertion, and palpitations. The clinical phenotype is associated with a poor prognosis due to lethal arrhythmias and cardiac failure. Cardiac muscle biopsies show intermyofibrillar accumulation of glycogen and polyglucosan bodies within cardiomyocytes, and skeletal muscle accumulation of glycogen has also been observed (Hedberg-Oldfors et al., 2019). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, see CMH1 (192600).
Lymphatic malformation 13
MedGen UID:
1840915
Concept ID:
C5830279
Disease or Syndrome
Lymphatic malformation-13 (LMPHM13) is characterized by the presence of nonimmune hydrops fetalis which often resolves with age. Capillary or cavernous hemangiomas are present in most patients, as are cardiac defects, often mild (Abdelrahman et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lymphatic malformation, see 153100.
Mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency 2
MedGen UID:
1841010
Concept ID:
C5830374
Disease or Syndrome
The mitochondrial trifunctional protein, composed of 4 alpha and 4 beta subunits, catalyzes 3 steps in mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids: long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD), long-chain enoyl-CoA hydratase, and long-chain thiolase activities. Trifunctional protein deficiency is characterized by decreased activity of all 3 enzymes. Clinically, classic trifunctional protein deficiency can be classified into 3 main clinical phenotypes: neonatal onset of a severe, lethal condition resulting in sudden unexplained infant death (SIDS; 272120), infantile onset of a hepatic Reye-like syndrome, and late-adolescent onset of primarily a skeletal myopathy (summary by Spiekerkoetter et al., 2003). Some patients with MTP deficiency show a protracted progressive course associated with myopathy, recurrent rhabdomyolysis, and sensorimotor axonal neuropathy. These patients tend to survive into adolescence and adulthood (den Boer et al., 2003). See mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency-1 (609015), caused by mutation in the HADHA gene (600890), the alpha subunit of mitochondrial trifunctional protein.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Heidenreich PA, Bozkurt B, Aguilar D, Allen LA, Byun JJ, Colvin MM, Deswal A, Drazner MH, Dunlay SM, Evers LR, Fang JC, Fedson SE, Fonarow GC, Hayek SS, Hernandez AF, Khazanie P, Kittleson MM, Lee CS, Link MS, Milano CA, Nnacheta LC, Sandhu AT, Stevenson LW, Vardeny O, Vest AR, Yancy CW
Circulation 2022 May 3;145(18):e876-e894. Epub 2022 Apr 1 doi: 10.1161/CIR.0000000000001062. PMID: 35363500
Heidenreich PA, Bozkurt B, Aguilar D, Allen LA, Byun JJ, Colvin MM, Deswal A, Drazner MH, Dunlay SM, Evers LR, Fang JC, Fedson SE, Fonarow GC, Hayek SS, Hernandez AF, Khazanie P, Kittleson MM, Lee CS, Link MS, Milano CA, Nnacheta LC, Sandhu AT, Stevenson LW, Vardeny O, Vest AR, Yancy CW
Circulation 2022 May 3;145(18):e895-e1032. Epub 2022 Apr 1 doi: 10.1161/CIR.0000000000001063. PMID: 35363499
Otto CM, Nishimura RA, Bonow RO, Carabello BA, Erwin JP 3rd, Gentile F, Jneid H, Krieger EV, Mack M, McLeod C, O'Gara PT, Rigolin VH, Sundt TM 3rd, Thompson A, Toly C
Circulation 2021 Feb 2;143(5):e35-e71. Epub 2020 Dec 17 doi: 10.1161/CIR.0000000000000932. PMID: 33332149

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Eleid MF, Nkomo VT, Pislaru SV, Gersh BJ
Annu Rev Med 2023 Jan 27;74:155-170. Epub 2022 Nov 18 doi: 10.1146/annurev-med-042921-122533. PMID: 36400067
Asch FM, Medvedofsky D
Curr Opin Cardiol 2020 Sep;35(5):464-473. doi: 10.1097/HCO.0000000000000770. PMID: 32649357
Soulat-Dufour L, Addetia K
Curr Opin Cardiol 2020 Sep;35(5):454-463. doi: 10.1097/HCO.0000000000000769. PMID: 32649356
Pibarot P, Delgado V, Bax JJ
Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging 2019 Jun 1;20(6):620-624. doi: 10.1093/ehjci/jez073. PMID: 31115470Free PMC Article
Althunayyan A, Petersen SE, Lloyd G, Bhattacharyya S
Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther 2019 Jan;17(1):43-51. Epub 2018 Dec 3 doi: 10.1080/14779072.2019.1553619. PMID: 30484338

Diagnosis

Farhan S, Silbiger JJ, Halperin JL, Zhang L, Dukkipati SR, Vogel B, Kini A, Sharma S, Lerakis S
J Am Coll Cardiol 2022 Dec 13;80(24):2314-2330. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2022.09.046. PMID: 36480974
Zoghbi WA, Levine RA, Flachskampf F, Grayburn P, Gillam L, Leipsic J, Thomas JD, Kwong RY, Vandervoort P, Chandrashekhar Y
JACC Cardiovasc Imaging 2022 Nov;15(11):1870-1882. doi: 10.1016/j.jcmg.2022.08.016. PMID: 36357130
Grayburn PA, Thomas JD
JACC Cardiovasc Imaging 2021 Apr;14(4):843-853. Epub 2021 Jan 13 doi: 10.1016/j.jcmg.2020.06.049. PMID: 33454273
Chehab O, Roberts-Thomson R, Ng Yin Ling C, Marber M, Prendergast BD, Rajani R, Redwood SR
Heart 2020 May;106(10):716-723. Epub 2020 Feb 13 doi: 10.1136/heartjnl-2019-316238. PMID: 32054671
Enriquez-Sarano M, Akins CW, Vahanian A
Lancet 2009 Apr 18;373(9672):1382-94. Epub 2009 Apr 6 doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(09)60692-9. PMID: 19356795

Therapy

Stone GW, Abraham WT, Lindenfeld J, Kar S, Grayburn PA, Lim DS, Mishell JM, Whisenant B, Rinaldi M, Kapadia SR, Rajagopal V, Sarembock IJ, Brieke A, Marx SO, Cohen DJ, Asch FM, Mack MJ; COAPT Investigators
N Engl J Med 2023 Jun 1;388(22):2037-2048. Epub 2023 Mar 5 doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa2300213. PMID: 36876756
Chehab O, Roberts-Thomson R, Ng Yin Ling C, Marber M, Prendergast BD, Rajani R, Redwood SR
Heart 2020 May;106(10):716-723. Epub 2020 Feb 13 doi: 10.1136/heartjnl-2019-316238. PMID: 32054671
Grayburn PA, Sannino A, Packer M
JACC Cardiovasc Imaging 2019 Feb;12(2):353-362. Epub 2018 Dec 12 doi: 10.1016/j.jcmg.2018.11.006. PMID: 30553663
Stone GW, Lindenfeld J, Abraham WT, Kar S, Lim DS, Mishell JM, Whisenant B, Grayburn PA, Rinaldi M, Kapadia SR, Rajagopal V, Sarembock IJ, Brieke A, Marx SO, Cohen DJ, Weissman NJ, Mack MJ; COAPT Investigators
N Engl J Med 2018 Dec 13;379(24):2307-2318. Epub 2018 Sep 23 doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1806640. PMID: 30280640
Asgar AW, Mack MJ, Stone GW
J Am Coll Cardiol 2015 Mar 31;65(12):1231-1248. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2015.02.009. PMID: 25814231

Prognosis

Kouris NT, Kostakou PM, Tryfou ES, Olympios CD
Hellenic J Cardiol 2023 Jan-Feb;69:51-56. Epub 2022 Sep 29 doi: 10.1016/j.hjc.2022.09.013. PMID: 36181999
Mack M, Carroll JD, Thourani V, Vemulapalli S, Squiers J, Manandhar P, Deeb GM, Batchelor W, Herrmann HC, Cohen DJ, Hanzel G, Gleason T, Kirtane A, Desai N, Guibone K, Hardy K, Michaels J, DiMaio JM, Christensen B, Fitzgerald S, Krohn C, Brindis RG, Masoudi F, Bavaria J
J Am Coll Cardiol 2021 Dec 7;78(23):2326-2353. Epub 2021 Oct 25 doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2021.07.058. PMID: 34711430
Nunes MCP, Levine RA, Braulio R, Pascoal-Xavier MA, Elmariah S, Gomes NFA, Soares JR, Esteves WAM, Zeng X, Dal-Bianco JP, Passos LSA, Passaglia LG, Ribeiro VT, Gelape CL, Costa PHN, Lodi-Junqueira L, Dutra W, Tan TC, Aikawa E, Hung J
JACC Cardiovasc Imaging 2020 Dec;13(12):2513-2526. Epub 2020 Sep 16 doi: 10.1016/j.jcmg.2020.07.020. PMID: 32950446Free PMC Article
Feldman T, Kar S, Elmariah S, Smart SC, Trento A, Siegel RJ, Apruzzese P, Fail P, Rinaldi MJ, Smalling RW, Hermiller JB, Heimansohn D, Gray WA, Grayburn PA, Mack MJ, Lim DS, Ailawadi G, Herrmann HC, Acker MA, Silvestry FE, Foster E, Wang A, Glower DD, Mauri L; EVEREST II Investigators
J Am Coll Cardiol 2015 Dec 29;66(25):2844-2854. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2015.10.018. PMID: 26718672
Shekar PS, Couper GS, Cohn LH
J Heart Valve Dis 2005 Sep;14(5):583-7. PMID: 16245495

Clinical prediction guides

Zoghbi WA, Levine RA, Flachskampf F, Grayburn P, Gillam L, Leipsic J, Thomas JD, Kwong RY, Vandervoort P, Chandrashekhar Y
JACC Cardiovasc Imaging 2022 Nov;15(11):1870-1882. doi: 10.1016/j.jcmg.2022.08.016. PMID: 36357130
Doldi P, Stolz L, Orban M, Karam N, Praz F, Kalbacher D, Lubos E, Braun D, Adamo M, Giannini C, Melica B, Näbauer M, Higuchi S, Wild M, Neuss M, Butter C, Kassar M, Petrescu A, Pfister R, Iliadis C, Unterhuber M, Thiele H, Baldus S, von Bardeleben RS, Schofer N, Hagl C, Petronio AS, Massberg S, Windecker S, Lurz P, Metra M, Hausleiter J
JACC Cardiovasc Imaging 2022 Nov;15(11):1843-1851. Epub 2022 Jul 13 doi: 10.1016/j.jcmg.2022.05.009. PMID: 35842361
Essayagh B, Sabbag A, Antoine C, Benfari G, Batista R, Yang LT, Maalouf J, Thapa P, Asirvatham S, Michelena HI, Enriquez-Sarano M
JACC Cardiovasc Imaging 2021 Nov;14(11):2073-2087. Epub 2021 Jun 16 doi: 10.1016/j.jcmg.2021.04.029. PMID: 34147457
Grayburn PA, Thomas JD
JACC Cardiovasc Imaging 2021 Apr;14(4):843-853. Epub 2021 Jan 13 doi: 10.1016/j.jcmg.2020.06.049. PMID: 33454273
Enriquez-Sarano M, Michelena HI
Prog Cardiovasc Dis 2017 Nov-Dec;60(3):285-288. Epub 2017 Nov 20 doi: 10.1016/j.pcad.2017.11.007. PMID: 29158077

Recent systematic reviews

Kaddoura R, Bhattarai S, Abushanab D, Al-Hijji M
Am J Cardiol 2023 Nov 15;207:159-169. Epub 2023 Sep 21 doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2023.08.097. PMID: 37741106
Watkins AR, Fialka N, El-Andari R, Kang JJH, Bozso SJ, Moon MC, Nagendran J, Nagendran J
J Card Surg 2022 Sep;37(9):2752-2760. Epub 2022 Jun 2 doi: 10.1111/jocs.16653. PMID: 35652892
Galusko V, Sekar B, Ricci F, Wong K, Bhattacharyya S, Mullen M, Gallina S, Ionescu A, Khanji MY
Eur Heart J Qual Care Clin Outcomes 2022 Aug 17;8(5):481-495. doi: 10.1093/ehjqcco/qcab082. PMID: 34878118
Ben-Ali W, Ibrahim R, Rodès-Cabeau J, von Bardeleben RS, Mylotte D, Granada J, Modine T
Curr Cardiol Rep 2021 Mar 9;23(4):37. doi: 10.1007/s11886-021-01466-7. PMID: 33687594
Anantha Narayanan M, Aggarwal S, Reddy YNV, Alla VM, Baskaran J, Kanmanthareddy A, Suri RM
Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2017 Sep;65(6):447-456. Epub 2017 Jan 21 doi: 10.1055/s-0036-1598012. PMID: 28109210

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