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3-Methylglutaconic aciduria

MedGen UID:
777186
Concept ID:
C3696376
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: 3-Methylglutaconic Aciduria; 3mga (3-Methylglutaconic Aciduria)
SNOMED CT: 3-Methylglutaconic aciduria (237950009)
 
Related genes: DNAJC19, TIMM50, SERAC1, CLPB, OPA3, HTRA2, TAFAZZIN, AUH
 
HPO: HP:0003535
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0017359
OMIM®: 590050
OMIM® Phenotypic series: PS250950
Orphanet: ORPHA289902

Definition

An increased amount of 3-methylglutaconic acid in the urine. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Progressive sclerosing poliodystrophy
MedGen UID:
60012
Concept ID:
C0205710
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life and about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called "chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus," or "CPEO+").
3-methylglutaconic aciduria type 1
MedGen UID:
90994
Concept ID:
C0342727
Disease or Syndrome
3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency is an inherited condition that causes neurological problems. Beginning in infancy to early childhood, children with this condition often have delayed development of mental and motor skills (psychomotor delay), speech delay, involuntary muscle cramping (dystonia), and spasms and weakness of the arms and legs (spastic quadriparesis). Affected individuals can also have optic atrophy, which is the breakdown (atrophy) of nerve cells that carry visual information from the eyes to the brain.\n\nIn some cases, signs and symptoms of 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency begin in adulthood, often in a person's twenties or thirties. These individuals have damage to a type of brain tissue called white matter (leukoencephalopathy). This damage likely contributes to progressive problems with speech (dysarthria), difficulty coordinating movements (ataxia), stiffness (spasticity), optic atrophy, and a decline in intellectual function (dementia).\n\nAffected individuals who show symptoms of 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency in childhood often go on to develop leukoencephalopathy and other neurological problems in adulthood.\n\nAll people with 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency accumulate large amounts of a substance called 3-methylglutaconic acid in their body fluids. As a result, they have elevated levels of acid in their blood (metabolic acidosis) and excrete large amounts of acid in their urine (aciduria). 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency is one of a group of metabolic disorders that can be diagnosed by the presence of increased levels 3-methylglutaconic acid in urine (3-methylglutaconic aciduria). People with 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency also have high urine levels of another acid called 3-methylglutaric acid.
3-Methylglutaconic aciduria type 2
MedGen UID:
107893
Concept ID:
C0574083
Disease or Syndrome
Barth syndrome is characterized in affected males by cardiomyopathy, neutropenia, skeletal myopathy, prepubertal growth delay, and distinctive facial gestalt (most evident in infancy); not all features may be present in a given affected male. Cardiomyopathy, which is almost always present before age five years, is typically dilated cardiomyopathy with or without endocardial fibroelastosis or left ventricular noncompaction; hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can also occur. Heart failure is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality; risk of arrhythmia and sudden death is increased. Neutropenia is most often associated with mouth ulcers, pneumonia, and sepsis. The nonprogressive myopathy predominantly affects the proximal muscles, and results in early motor delays. Prepubertal growth delay is followed by a postpubertal growth spurt with remarkable "catch-up" growth. Heterozygous females who have a normal karyotype are asymptomatic and have normal biochemical studies.
3-Methylglutaconic aciduria type 3
MedGen UID:
108273
Concept ID:
C0574084
Disease or Syndrome
Costeff syndrome is characterized by optic atrophy and/or choreoathetoid movement disorder with onset before age ten years. Optic atrophy is associated with progressive decrease in visual acuity within the first years of life, sometimes associated with infantile-onset horizontal nystagmus. Most individuals have chorea, often severe enough to restrict ambulation. Some are confined to a wheelchair from an early age. Although most individuals develop spastic paraparesis, mild ataxia, and occasional mild cognitive deficit in their second decade, the course of the disease is relatively stable.
3-methylglutaconic aciduria type 5
MedGen UID:
347542
Concept ID:
C1857776
Disease or Syndrome
3-Methylglutaconic aciduria type V (MGCA5) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the onset of dilated or noncompaction cardiomyopathy in infancy or early childhood. Many patients die of cardiac failure. Other features include microcytic anemia, growth retardation, mild ataxia, mild muscle weakness, genital anomalies in males, and increased urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid. Some patients may have optic atrophy or delayed psychomotor development (summary by Davey et al., 2006 and Ojala et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, see MGCA type I (250950).
Sengers syndrome
MedGen UID:
395228
Concept ID:
C1859317
Disease or Syndrome
Sengers syndrome is an autosomal recessive mitochondrial disorder characterized by congenital cataracts, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, skeletal myopathy, exercise intolerance, and lactic acidosis. Mental development is normal, but affected individuals may die early from cardiomyopathy (summary by Mayr et al., 2012). Skeletal muscle biopsies of 2 affected individuals showed severe mtDNA depletion (Calvo et al., 2012).
Mitochondrial complex V (ATP synthase) deficiency, nuclear type 1
MedGen UID:
477906
Concept ID:
C3276276
Disease or Syndrome
A distinct group of inborn defects of complex V (ATP synthase) is represented by the enzyme deficiency due to nuclear genome mutations characterized by a selective inhibition of ATP synthase biogenesis. Biochemically, the patients show a generalized decrease in the content of ATP synthase complex which is less than 30% of normal. Most cases present with neonatal-onset hypotonia, lactic acidosis, hyperammonemia, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Many patients die within a few months or years (summary by Mayr et al., 2010). Genetic Heterogeneity of Mitochondrial Complex V Deficiency Other nuclear types of mitochondrial complex V deficiency include MC5DN2 (614052), caused by mutation in the TMEM70 gene (612418) on chromosome 8q21; MC5DN3 (614053), caused by mutation in the ATP5E gene (ATP5F1E; 606153) on chromosome 20q13; MC5DN4A (620358) and MC5DN4B (615228), both caused by mutation in the ATP5A1 gene (ATP5F1A; 164360) on chromosome 18q; MC5DN5 (618120), caused by mutation in the ATP5D gene (ATP5F1D; 603150) on chromosome 19p13; MC5DN6 (618683), caused by mutation in the USMG5 gene (ATP5MD; 615204) on chromosome 10q24; and MC5DN7 (620359), caused by mutation in the ATP5PO gene (600828) on chromosome 21q22. Mutations in the mitochondrial-encoded MTATP6 (516060) and MTATP8 (516070) genes can also cause mitochondrial complex V deficiency (see, e.g., 500015).
Mitochondrial complex V (ATP synthase) deficiency nuclear type 2
MedGen UID:
481329
Concept ID:
C3279699
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial encephalo-cardio-myopathy due to <i>TMEM70</i> mutation is characterized by early neonatal onset of hypotonia, hypetrophic cardiomyopathy and apneic spells within hours after birth accompanied by lactic acidosis, hyperammonemia and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria.
Mitochondrial complex V (ATP synthase) deficiency nuclear type 3
MedGen UID:
481338
Concept ID:
C3279708
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex V (ATP synthase) deficiency, nuclear type 3 (MC5DN3) is an autosomal recessive disorder with variable manifestations. Affected individuals present soon after birth or in early infancy with hypotonia, respiratory distress, and poor sucking. They have global developmental delay with mildly impaired intellectual disability. Additional features may include dystonia, ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, and seizures. Congenital cataracts, hearing impairment, and mild left cardiac ventricular hypertrophy have been reported in 1 patient each. Laboratory studies show increased lactate; some patients have hyperammonemia, 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, and hyperCKemia (Mayr et al., 2010; Zech et al., 2022). For a general phenotypic description of the nuclear type of mitochondrial complex V deficiency and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial complex V deficiency, see 604273.
Mitochondrial complex V (ATP synthase) deficiency nuclear type 4B
MedGen UID:
815229
Concept ID:
C3808899
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex V deficiency is a shortage (deficiency) of a protein complex called complex V or a loss of its function. Complex V is found in cell structures called mitochondria, which convert the energy from food into a form that cells can use. Complex V is the last of five mitochondrial complexes that carry out a multistep process called oxidative phosphorylation, through which cells derive much of their energy.\n\nMitochondrial complex V deficiency can cause a wide variety of signs and symptoms affecting many organs and systems of the body, particularly the nervous system and the heart. The disorder can be life-threatening in infancy or early childhood. Affected individuals may have feeding problems, slow growth, low muscle tone (hypotonia), extreme fatigue (lethargy), and developmental delay. They tend to develop elevated levels of lactic acid in the blood (lactic acidosis), which can cause nausea, vomiting, weakness, and rapid breathing. High levels of ammonia in the blood (hyperammonemia) can also occur in affected individuals, and in some cases result in abnormal brain function (encephalopathy) and damage to other organs.\n\nAnother common feature of mitochondrial complex V deficiency is hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. This condition is characterized by thickening (hypertrophy) of the heart (cardiac) muscle that can lead to heart failure. People with mitochondrial complex V deficiency may also have a characteristic pattern of facial features, including a high forehead, curved eyebrows, outside corners of the eyes that point downward (downslanting palpebral fissures), a prominent bridge of the nose, low-set ears, thin lips, and a small chin (micrognathia).\n\nSome people with mitochondrial complex V deficiency have groups of signs and symptoms that are classified as a specific syndrome. For example, mitochondrial complex V deficiency can cause a condition called neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP). NARP causes a variety of signs and symptoms chiefly affecting the nervous system. Beginning in childhood or early adulthood, most people with NARP experience numbness, tingling, or pain in the arms and legs (sensory neuropathy); muscle weakness; and problems with balance and coordination (ataxia). Many affected individuals also have cognitive impairment and an eye disorder called retinitis pigmentosa that causes vision loss.\n\nA condition called Leigh syndrome can also be caused by mitochondrial complex V deficiency. Leigh syndrome is characterized by progressive loss of mental and movement abilities (developmental or psychomotor regression) and typically results in death within 2 to 3 years after the onset of symptoms. Both NARP and Leigh syndrome can also have other causes.
3-methylglutaconic aciduria with deafness, encephalopathy, and Leigh-like syndrome
MedGen UID:
873604
Concept ID:
C4040739
Disease or Syndrome
The phenotypic spectrum of SERAC1 deficiency comprises MEGD(H)EL syndrome (3-methylglutaconic aciduria with deafness-dystonia, [hepatopathy], encephalopathy, and Leigh-like syndrome), juvenile-onset complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia (in 1 consanguineous family), and adult-onset generalized dystonia (in 1 adult male). MEGD(H)EL syndrome is characterized in neonates by hypoglycemia and a sepsis-like clinical picture for which no infectious agent can be found. During the first year of life feeding problems, failure to thrive, and/or truncal hypotonia become evident; many infants experience (transient) liver involvement ranging from undulating transaminases to prolonged hyperbilirubinemia and near-fatal liver failure. By age two years progressive deafness, dystonia, and spasticity prevent further psychomotor development and/or result in loss of acquired skills. Affected children are completely dependent on care for all activities of daily living; speech is absent.
3-methylglutaconic aciduria type 8
MedGen UID:
934617
Concept ID:
C4310650
Disease or Syndrome
MGCA8 is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder resulting in death in infancy. Features include hypotonia, abnormal movements, respiratory insufficiency with apneic episodes, and lack of developmental progress, often with seizures. Brain imaging is variable, but may show progressive cerebral atrophy. Laboratory studies show increased serum lactate and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, suggesting a mitochondrial defect (summary by Mandel et al., 2016). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, see MGCA type I (250950).
3-methylglutaconic aciduria type 9
MedGen UID:
1622927
Concept ID:
C4540171
Disease or Syndrome
3-Methylglutaconic aciduria type IX (MGCA9) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early-onset seizures, severely delayed psychomotor development and intellectual disability. Patients have hypotonia or spasticity, and laboratory investigations show increased serum lactate and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, suggestive of a mitochondrial defect (summary by Shahrour et al., 2017). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, see MGCA type I (250950).
Mitochondrial complex 5 (ATP synthase) deficiency nuclear type 5
MedGen UID:
1648429
Concept ID:
C4748269
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 37
MedGen UID:
1675208
Concept ID:
C5193031
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-37 is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder apparent at birth or in the first months of life. Affected individuals have hypotonia, failure to thrive, and neurodegeneration with loss of developmental milestones, as well as liver dysfunction. Some patients may have hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, loss of vision and hearing, and/or seizures. Mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction is apparent in liver and skeletal muscle tissue. Most patients die in childhood (summary by Zeharia et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Mitochondrial myopathy, episodic, with optic atrophy and reversible leukoencephalopathy
MedGen UID:
1679560
Concept ID:
C5193223
Disease or Syndrome
Episodic mitochondrial myopathy with or without optic atrophy and reversible leukoencephalopathy (MEOAL) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized mainly by childhood onset of progressive muscle weakness and exercise intolerance. Patients have episodic exacerbation, which may be associated with increased serum creatine kinase or lactic acid. Additional more variable features may include optic atrophy, reversible leukoencephalopathy, and later onset of a sensorimotor polyneuropathy. The disorder results from impaired formation of Fe-S clusters, which are essential cofactors for proper mitochondrial function (summary by Gurgel-Giannetti et al., 2018)
Neurodegeneration with ataxia and late-onset optic atrophy
MedGen UID:
1779901
Concept ID:
C5543254
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodegeneration with ataxia and late-onset optic atrophy (NDAXOA) is an autosomal dominant disorder with somewhat variable manifestations. Most affected individuals present in mid-adulthood with slowly progressive cerebellar and gait ataxia, optic atrophy, and myopathy or myalgia. Some patients may have a childhood history of neurologic features, including limited extraocular movements. Additional features can include cardiomyopathy, psychiatric disturbances, and peripheral sensory impairment (summary by Taylor et al., 1996 and Courage et al., 2017).
3-methylglutaconic aciduria, type VIIB
MedGen UID:
1810214
Concept ID:
C5676893
Disease or Syndrome
CLPB (caseinolytic peptidase B) deficiency is characterized by neurologic involvement and neutropenia, which can range from severe to mild. In severe CLPB deficiency, death usually occurs at a few months of age due to significant neonatal neurologic involvement (hyperekplexia or absence of voluntary movements, hypotonia or hypertonia, swallowing problems, respiratory insufficiency, and epilepsy) and severe neutropenia associated with life-threatening infections. Individuals with moderate CLPB deficiency present with neurologic abnormalities in infancy including hypotonia and feeding problems, and develop spasticity, a progressive movement disorder (ataxia, dystonia, and/or dyskinesia), epilepsy, and intellectual disability. Neutropenia is variable, but not life threatening. In those with mild CLPB deficiency there is no neurologic involvement, intellect is normal, neutropenia is mild and intermittent, and life expectancy is normal.
Neutropenia, severe congenital, 9, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1802793
Concept ID:
C5676954
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant severe congenital neutropenia-9 (SCN9) is characterized by onset of neutropenia in the first years of life. Most patients have recurrent infections; bone marrow examination shows a myeloid maturation arrest. Rare patients may exhibit additional features such as seizures, learning difficulties, or cataracts, which are more commonly observed in patients with MGCA7 (616271). However, patients with SCN9 do not have 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, and most have normal neurologic function (Warren et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of severe congenital neutropenia, see SCN1 (202700).
3-methylglutaconic aciduria, type VIIA
MedGen UID:
1813022
Concept ID:
C5676967
Disease or Syndrome
3-Methylglutaconic aciduria (MGCA7) is an inborn error of metabolism characterized primarily by increased levels of 3-methylglutaconic acid (3-MGA) associated with variable neurologic deficits and neutropenia. The phenotype is highly variable: most patients have infantile onset of a severe progressive encephalopathy with various movement abnormalities and delayed psychomotor development. Other common variable features include seizures, recurrent infections due to neutropenia, anemia, and brain imaging abnormalities (Wortmann et al., 2021). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, see MGCA1 (250950).
Neurodegeneration, childhood-onset, with multisystem involvement due to mitochondrial dysfunction
MedGen UID:
1824013
Concept ID:
C5774240
Disease or Syndrome
Childhood-onset neurodegeneration with multisystem involvement due to mitochondrial dysfunction (CONDMIM) is an autosomal recessive syndromic disorder characterized primarily by neurologic deficits. Patients show global developmental delay and variably impaired intellectual development with speech delay apparent from infancy. Affected individuals have hypotonia, poor feeding, poor overall growth, and respiratory distress early in life. Other features include visual impairment due to optic atrophy, sensorineural hearing loss, and neuromuscular abnormalities. The severity is highly variable. The disorder is progressive; about half of patients show developmental regression with loss of previous skills. Features suggestive of a mitochondrial disorder include cataracts, cardiomyopathy, diabetes mellitus, combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, and increased lactate. Some patients develop seizures, some have dysmorphic facial features, and some have nonspecific abnormalities on brain imaging. Death in childhood may occur (Kaiyrzhanov et al., 2022).
Congenital disorder of deglycosylation 1
MedGen UID:
989503
Concept ID:
CN306977
Disease or Syndrome
Individuals with NGLY1-related congenital disorder of deglycosylation (NGLY1-CDDG) typically display a clinical tetrad of developmental delay / intellectual disability in the mild to profound range, hypo- or alacrima, elevated liver transaminases that may spontaneously resolve in childhood, and a complex hyperkinetic movement disorder that can include choreiform, athetoid, dystonic, myoclonic, action tremor, and dysmetric movements. About half of affected individuals will develop clinical seizures. Other findings may include obstructive and/or central sleep apnea, oral motor defects that affect feeding ability, auditory neuropathy, constipation, scoliosis, and peripheral neuropathy.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Zegallai HM, Hatch GM
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Curated

American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics, Newborn Screening ACT Sheet, Elevated C5-OH Acylcarnitine, Organic Acidemias, 2022

American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics, Algorithm, Organic Acidemias: Elevated C5-OH, 2022

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Zapolnik P, Sykut-Cegielska J, Pyrkosz A
Acta Biochim Pol 2020 Jun 8;67(2):263-266. doi: 10.18388/abp.2020_5355. PMID: 32511901
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Diagnosis

Ziats CA, Burns WB, Tedder ML, Pollard L, Wood T, Champaigne NL
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Therapy

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Prognosis

Huna-Baron R, Yahalom G, Anikster Y, Ben Zeev B, Hoffmann C, Hassin-Baer S
J Neuroophthalmol 2022 Mar 1;42(1):e147-e152. Epub 2021 Apr 14 doi: 10.1097/WNO.0000000000001249. PMID: 33870938
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Clinical prediction guides

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    • ACMG ACT, 2022
      American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics, Newborn Screening ACT Sheet, Elevated C5-OH Acylcarnitine, Organic Acidemias, 2022
    • ACMG Algorithm, 2022
      American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics, Algorithm, Organic Acidemias: Elevated C5-OH, 2022

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