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Leukoencephalopathy

MedGen UID:
78722
Concept ID:
C0270612
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: Leukoencephalopathies; White Matter Disease; White Matter Diseases
SNOMED CT: White matter disease (16058431000119104); Leukoencephalopathy (22811006)
 
HPO: HP:0002352

Definition

This term describes abnormality of the white matter of the cerebrum resulting from damage to the myelin sheaths of nerve cells. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVLeukoencephalopathy

Conditions with this feature

3-methylglutaconic aciduria type 1
MedGen UID:
90994
Concept ID:
C0342727
Disease or Syndrome
3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency is an inherited condition that causes neurological problems. Beginning in infancy to early childhood, children with this condition often have delayed development of mental and motor skills (psychomotor delay), speech delay, involuntary muscle cramping (dystonia), and spasms and weakness of the arms and legs (spastic quadriparesis). Affected individuals can also have optic atrophy, which is the breakdown (atrophy) of nerve cells that carry visual information from the eyes to the brain.\n\nIn some cases, signs and symptoms of 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency begin in adulthood, often in a person's twenties or thirties. These individuals have damage to a type of brain tissue called white matter (leukoencephalopathy). This damage likely contributes to progressive problems with speech (dysarthria), difficulty coordinating movements (ataxia), stiffness (spasticity), optic atrophy, and a decline in intellectual function (dementia).\n\nAffected individuals who show symptoms of 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency in childhood often go on to develop leukoencephalopathy and other neurological problems in adulthood.\n\nAll people with 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency accumulate large amounts of a substance called 3-methylglutaconic acid in their body fluids. As a result, they have elevated levels of acid in their blood (metabolic acidosis) and excrete large amounts of acid in their urine (aciduria). 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency is one of a group of metabolic disorders that can be diagnosed by the presence of increased levels 3-methylglutaconic acid in urine (3-methylglutaconic aciduria). People with 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency also have high urine levels of another acid called 3-methylglutaric acid.
Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
162912
Concept ID:
C0796126
Disease or Syndrome
Most characteristically, Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) manifests as an early-onset encephalopathy that usually, but not always, results in severe intellectual and physical disability. A subgroup of infants with AGS present at birth with abnormal neurologic findings, hepatosplenomegaly, elevated liver enzymes, and thrombocytopenia, a picture highly suggestive of congenital infection. Otherwise, most affected infants present at variable times after the first few weeks of life, frequently after a period of apparently normal development. Typically, they demonstrate the subacute onset of a severe encephalopathy characterized by extreme irritability, intermittent sterile pyrexias, loss of skills, and slowing of head growth. Over time, as many as 40% develop chilblain skin lesions on the fingers, toes, and ears. It is becoming apparent that atypical, sometimes milder, cases of AGS exist, and thus the true extent of the phenotype associated with pathogenic variants in the AGS-related genes is not yet known.
Deficiency of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase
MedGen UID:
220946
Concept ID:
C1291609
Disease or Syndrome
Ribose-5-P isomerase deficiency is an extremely rare, hereditary, disorder of pentose phosphate metabolism characterized by progressive leukoencephalopathy and a highly increased ribitol and D-arabitol levels in the brain and body fluids. Clinical presentation includes psychomotor delay, epilepsy, and childhood-onset slow neurological regression with ataxia, spasticity, optic atrophy and sensorimotor neuropathy.
CARASIL syndrome
MedGen UID:
325051
Concept ID:
C1838577
Disease or Syndrome
HTRA1 disorder is a phenotypic spectrum in which some individuals have few to no symptoms and others manifest with the more severe CARASIL (cerebral autosomal recessive arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy) phenotype. Those who have a heterozygous HTRA1 pathogenic variant may have mild neurologic findings (sometimes identified only on neuroimaging) or mild-to-moderate neurologic signs and symptoms of CARASIL. In this chapter, the term "classic CARASIL" refers to the more severe phenotype associated with biallelic pathogenic variants, and "HTRA1 cerebral small vessel disease" (HTRA1-CSVD) refers to the milder phenotype associated with a heterozygous HTRA1 pathogenic variant. Classic CARASIL is characterized by early-onset changes in the deep white matter of the brain observed on MRI, and associated neurologic findings. The most frequent initial symptom is gait disturbance from spasticity beginning between ages 20 and 40 years. Forty-four percent of affected individuals have stroke-like episodes before age 40 years. Mood changes (apathy and irritability), pseudobulbar palsy, and cognitive dysfunction begin between ages 20 and 50 years. The disease progresses slowly following the onset of neurologic symptoms. Scalp alopecia and acute mid- to lower-back pain (lumbago) before age 30 years are characteristic. The most frequent initial symptom in individuals with HTRA1-CSVD is slowly progressive gait disturbance after age 40 years, which may be followed by the development of mood changes and cognitive dysfunction. A majority of affected individuals have a stroke-like episode after age 40 years. Spondylosis and alopecia are seen in a minority of individuals with HTRA1-CSVD.
Mitochondrial complex I deficiency
MedGen UID:
374101
Concept ID:
C1838979
Disease or Syndrome
Isolated complex I deficiency is a rare inborn error of metabolism due to mutations in nuclear or mitochondrial genes encoding subunits or assembly factors of the human mitochondrial complex I (NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase) and is characterized by a wide range of manifestations including marked and often fatal lactic acidosis, cardiomyopathy, leukoencephalopathy, pure myopathy and hepatopathy with tubulopathy. Among the numerous clinical phenotypes observed are Leigh syndrome, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and MELAS syndrome (see these terms).
Chromosome 1p36 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
334629
Concept ID:
C1842870
Disease or Syndrome
The constitutional deletion of chromosome 1p36 results in a syndrome with multiple congenital anomalies and mental retardation (Shapira et al., 1997). Monosomy 1p36 is the most common terminal deletion syndrome in humans, occurring in 1 in 5,000 births (Shaffer and Lupski, 2000; Heilstedt et al., 2003). See also neurodevelopmental disorder with or without anomalies of the brain, eye, or heart (NEDBEH; 616975), which shows overlapping features and is caused by heterozygous mutation in the RERE gene (605226) on proximal chromosome 1p36. See also Radio-Tartaglia syndrome (RATARS; 619312), caused by mutation in the SPEN gene (613484) on chromosome 1p36, which shows overlapping features.
Muscular dystrophy, adult-onset, with leukoencephalopathy
MedGen UID:
340269
Concept ID:
C1854646
Disease or Syndrome
L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria
MedGen UID:
341029
Concept ID:
C1855995
Disease or Syndrome
2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria is a condition that causes progressive damage to the brain. The major types of this disorder are called D-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria (D-2-HGA), L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria (L-2-HGA), and combined D,L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria (D,L-2-HGA).\n\nThe main features of D-2-HGA are delayed development, seizures, weak muscle tone (hypotonia), and abnormalities in the largest part of the brain (the cerebrum), which controls many important functions such as muscle movement, speech, vision, thinking, emotion, and memory. Researchers have described two subtypes of D-2-HGA, type I and type II. The two subtypes are distinguished by their genetic cause and pattern of inheritance, although they also have some differences in signs and symptoms. Type II tends to begin earlier and often causes more severe health problems than type I. Type II may also be associated with a weakened and enlarged heart (cardiomyopathy), a feature that is typically not found with type I.\n\nL-2-HGA particularly affects a region of the brain called the cerebellum, which is involved in coordinating movements. As a result, many affected individuals have problems with balance and muscle coordination (ataxia). Additional features of L-2-HGA can include delayed development, seizures, speech difficulties, and an unusually large head (macrocephaly). Typically, signs and symptoms of this disorder begin during infancy or early childhood. The disorder worsens over time, usually leading to severe disability by early adulthood.\n\nCombined D,L-2-HGA causes severe brain abnormalities that become apparent in early infancy. Affected infants have severe seizures, weak muscle tone (hypotonia), and breathing and feeding problems. They usually survive only into infancy or early childhood.
Neuronal intranuclear inclusion disease
MedGen UID:
355075
Concept ID:
C1863843
Disease or Syndrome
Neuronal intranuclear inclusion disease (NIID) is an autosomal dominant, slowly progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a wide range of clinical manifestations, including pyramidal and extrapyramidal symptoms, cerebellar ataxia, cognitive decline and dementia, peripheral neuropathy, and autonomic dysfunction. The age at onset varies, but most individuals present as adults between about 30 and 70 years of age. Pathologic investigation shows eosinophilic intranuclear inclusions in almost all cell types, including neurons, skin cells, fibroblasts, and skeletal muscle. Brain imaging shows a characteristic leukoencephalopathy with high intensity signals in the corticomedullary junction on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), as well as white matter abnormalities in subcortical and brainstem regions. Skin biopsy combined with brain imaging is useful for diagnosis (summary by Sone et al., 2016). The phenotype in some cases is suggestive of Parkinson disease (see 168600) and/or Alzheimer disease (see 104300), consistent with an evolving phenotypic spectrum of adult-onset NIID (summary by Tian et al., 2019).
Spastic ataxia 3
MedGen UID:
370715
Concept ID:
C1969645
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic autosomal recessive spastic ataxia disease with characteristics of cerebellar ataxia, spasticity, cerebellar (and in some cases cerebral) atrophy, dystonia and leucoencephalopathy. Caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous complex genomic rearrangements involving the MARS2 gene on chromosome 2q33.
Leukoencephalopathy with brain stem and spinal cord involvement-high lactate syndrome
MedGen UID:
370845
Concept ID:
C1970180
Disease or Syndrome
Leukoencephalopathy with brain stem and spinal cord involvement and lactate elevation (LBSL) is characterized by slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia and spasticity with dorsal column dysfunction (decreased position and vibration sense) in most individuals. The neurologic dysfunction involves the legs more than the arms. The tendon reflexes are retained. Deterioration of motor skills usually starts in childhood or adolescence, but occasionally not until adulthood. Dysarthria develops over time. Occasional findings include epilepsy; learning problems; cognitive decline; and reduced consciousness, neurologic deterioration, and fever following minor head trauma. Individuals with neonatal or early-infantile onset have a severe disease course often associated with early death. Those with childhood onset have slow progression with wheelchair dependence in the teens or twenties. Adult onset is associated with slow progression and mild impairment.
Hypotonia with lactic acidemia and hyperammonemia
MedGen UID:
435972
Concept ID:
C2673642
Disease or Syndrome
This syndrome is characterized by severe hypotonia, lactic acidemia and congenital hyperammonemia. It has been described in three newborns born to consanguineous parents. Ultrasound examination during the 36th week of pregnancy revealed generalized edema. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and tubulopathy developed within the first week of life and the infants died within the first month. The activities of enzymes in the mitochondrial respiratory chain were reduced in the muscles of the patients. Mutations were identified in the MRPS22 gene on chromosome 3q23, encoding a mitochondrial ribosomal protein
Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 5
MedGen UID:
413116
Concept ID:
C2749659
Disease or Syndrome
Most characteristically, Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) manifests as an early-onset encephalopathy that usually, but not always, results in severe intellectual and physical disability. A subgroup of infants with AGS present at birth with abnormal neurologic findings, hepatosplenomegaly, elevated liver enzymes, and thrombocytopenia, a picture highly suggestive of congenital infection. Otherwise, most affected infants present at variable times after the first few weeks of life, frequently after a period of apparently normal development. Typically, they demonstrate the subacute onset of a severe encephalopathy characterized by extreme irritability, intermittent sterile pyrexias, loss of skills, and slowing of head growth. Over time, as many as 40% develop chilblain skin lesions on the fingers, toes, and ears. It is becoming apparent that atypical, sometimes milder, cases of AGS exist, and thus the true extent of the phenotype associated with pathogenic variants in the AGS-related genes is not yet known.
Cystic leukoencephalopathy without megalencephaly
MedGen UID:
416646
Concept ID:
C2751843
Disease or Syndrome
RNAse T2-deficient leukoencephalopathy is a disorder that affects the brain. People with RNAse T2-deficient leukoencephalopathy have neurological problems that become apparent during infancy; the problems generally do not worsen over time (progress). Most affected individuals have severe intellectual disability; muscle stiffness (spasticity); and a delay in developing motor skills such as sitting, crawling, and walking. Some do not learn to walk, and most do not develop the ability to speak. Other neurological features that can occur in RNAse T2-deficient leukoencephalopathy include hearing loss caused by abnormalities in the inner ear (sensorineural deafness), seizures, involuntary writhing movements of the hands (athetosis), uncontrolled muscle tensing (dystonia), and involuntary eye movements (nystagmus). In addition to the neurological problems associated with this disorder, some affected individuals have unusual facial features sometimes described as a "doll-like face."\n\nThe neurological problems in this disorder are caused by abnormalities in the brain. People with this condition have leukoencephalopathy, an abnormality of the brain's white matter that can be detected with medical imaging. White matter consists of nerve fibers covered by a fatty substance called myelin. Myelin insulates nerve fibers and promotes the rapid transmission of nerve impulses. In people with RNAse T2-deficient leukoencephalopathy, myelin is not made in sufficient amounts during development, leading to patchy white matter abnormalities (lesions) in the brain. In addition, individuals with RNAse T2-deficient leukoencephalopathy may have cysts in regions of the brain called the temporal lobes and enlargement of the fluid-filled cavities (ventricles) near the center of the brain. The white matter lesions are primarily concentrated around the cysts and the ventricles. An abnormally small head and brain size (microcephaly) often occurs in this disorder.
Sterol carrier protein 2 deficiency
MedGen UID:
462340
Concept ID:
C3150990
Disease or Syndrome
Leukoencephalopathy-dystonia-motor neuropathy syndrome is a peroxisomal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by spasmodic torticollis, dystonic head tremor, intention tremor, nystagmus, hyposmia, and hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism with azoospermia. Slight cerebellar signs (left-sided intention tremor, balance and gait impairment) are also noted. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows bilateral hyperintense signals in the thalamus, butterfly-like lesions in the pons, and lesions in the occipital region, whereas nerve conduction studies of the lower extremities shows a predominantly motor and slight sensory neuropathy.
Multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
478062
Concept ID:
C3276432
Disease or Syndrome
Multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome is a severe autosomal recessive disorder of systemic energy metabolism, resulting in weakness, respiratory failure, lack of neurologic development, lactic acidosis, and early death (summary by Seyda et al., 2001). Genetic Heterogeneity of Multiple Mitochondrial Dysfunctions Syndrome See also MMDS2 (614299), caused by mutation in the BOLA3 gene (613183) on chromosome 2p13; MMDS3 (615330), caused by mutation in the IBA57 gene (615316) on chromosome 1q42; MMDS4 (616370), caused by mutation in the ISCA2 gene (615317) on chromosome 14q24; MMDS5 (617613), caused by mutation in the ISCA1 gene (611006) on chromosome 9q21; MMDS6 (617954), caused by mutation in the PMPCB gene (603131) on chromosome 7q22; and MMDS7 (620423), caused by mutation in the GCSH gene (238330) on chromosome 16q23.
Mitochondrial complex V (ATP synthase) deficiency nuclear type 2
MedGen UID:
481329
Concept ID:
C3279699
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial encephalo-cardio-myopathy due to <i>TMEM70</i> mutation is characterized by early neonatal onset of hypotonia, hypetrophic cardiomyopathy and apneic spells within hours after birth accompanied by lactic acidosis, hyperammonemia and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria.
Leukoencephalopathy with calcifications and cysts
MedGen UID:
482830
Concept ID:
C3281200
Disease or Syndrome
Leukoencephalopathy, brain calcifications, and cysts (LCC), also known as Labrune syndrome, is characterized by a constellation of features restricted to the central nervous system, including leukoencephalopathy, brain calcifications, and cysts, resulting in spasticity, dystonia, seizures, and cognitive decline (summary by Labrune et al., 1996). See also cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts (CRMCC; 612199), an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutation in the CTC1 gene (613129) that shows phenotypic similarities to Labrune syndrome. CRMCC includes the neurologic findings of intracranial calcifications, leukodystrophy, and brain cysts, but also includes retinal vascular abnormalities and other systemic manifestations, such as osteopenia with poor bone healing, a high risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, hair, skin, and nail changes, and anemia and thrombocytopenia. Although Coats plus syndrome and Labrune syndrome were initially thought to be manifestations of the same disorder, namely CRMCC, molecular evidence has excluded mutations in the CTC1 gene in patients with Labrune syndrome, suggesting that the 2 disorders are not allelic (Anderson et al., 2012; Polvi et al., 2012).
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (congenital with brain and eye anomalies), type a, 11
MedGen UID:
767552
Concept ID:
C3554638
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies (type A) is an autosomal recessive disorder with congenital muscular dystrophy resulting in muscle weakness early in life and brain and eye anomalies. It is usually associated with delayed psychomotor development and shortened life expectancy. The phenotype includes the alternative clinical designations Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) and muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB). The disorder represents the most severe end of a phenotypic spectrum of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (summary by Stevens et al., 2013). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type A, see MDDGA1 (236670).
Cobblestone lissencephaly without muscular or ocular involvement
MedGen UID:
767571
Concept ID:
C3554657
Disease or Syndrome
Lissencephaly-5 (LIS5) is an autosomal recessive brain malformation characterized by cobblestone changes in the cortex, more severe in the posterior region, and subcortical band heterotopia. Affected individuals have hydrocephalus, seizures, and severely delayed psychomotor development (Radmanesh et al., 2013). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lissencephaly, see LIS1 (607432).
Leukoencephalopathy, progressive, with ovarian failure
MedGen UID:
863025
Concept ID:
C4014588
Disease or Syndrome
Progressive leukoencephalopathy with ovarian failure is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of motor and cognitive skills, usually with onset in young adulthood. Some patients may have a history of delayed motor development or learning difficulties in early childhood. Neurologic decline is severe, usually resulting in gait difficulties, ataxia, spasticity, and cognitive decline and dementia. Most patients lose speech and become wheelchair-bound or bedridden. Brain MRI shows progressive white matter signal abnormalities in the deep white matter. Affected females develop premature ovarian failure (summary by Dallabona et al., 2014).
Optic atrophy 11
MedGen UID:
934595
Concept ID:
C4310628
Disease or Syndrome
Optic atrophy-11 (OPA11) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, intellectual disability, ataxia, optic atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy on brain imaging. Laboratory studies are consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction (summary by Hartmann et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of optic atrophy, see OPA1 (165500).
Encephalopathy, progressive, early-onset, with brain edema and/or leukoencephalopathy, 1
MedGen UID:
934642
Concept ID:
C4310675
Disease or Syndrome
Early-onset progressive encephalopathy with brain edema and/or leukoencephalopathy-1 (PEBEL1) is an autosomal recessive severe neurometabolic disorder characterized by rapidly progressive neurologic deterioration that is usually associated with a febrile illness. Affected infants tend to show normal early development followed by acute psychomotor regression with ataxia, hypotonia, respiratory insufficiency, and seizures, resulting in coma and death in the first years of life. Brain imaging shows multiple abnormalities, including brain edema and signal abnormalities in the cortical and subcortical regions (summary by Kremer et al., 2016). Genetic Heterogeneity of PEBEL See also PEBEL2 (618321), caused by mutation in the NAXD gene (615910) on chromosome 13q34.
Neurodevelopmental disorder, mitochondrial, with abnormal movements and lactic acidosis, with or without seizures
MedGen UID:
1619876
Concept ID:
C4540192
Disease or Syndrome
NEMMLAS is an autosomal recessive multisystemic disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, intellectual disability, and abnormal motor function, including hypotonia, dystonia, ataxia, and spasticity. Patient tissues may show deficiencies in one or more of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) enzymes, but this is not a constant finding (summary by Wortmann et al., 2017).
Immunodeficiency, developmental delay, and hypohomocysteinemia
MedGen UID:
1616061
Concept ID:
C4540293
Disease or Syndrome
IMDDHH is a multisystem disorder characterized by immunodeficiency, mildly delayed psychomotor development, poor overall growth from infancy, and hypohomocysteinemia. Additional features, such as congenital heart defects and liver involvement, are more variable (summary by Huppke et al., 2017).
Cerebral arteriopathy, autosomal dominant, with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, type 1
MedGen UID:
1634330
Concept ID:
C4551768
Disease or Syndrome
CADASIL (cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy) is characterized by mid-adult onset of recurrent ischemic stroke, cognitive decline progressing to dementia, a history of migraine with aura, mood disturbance, apathy, and diffuse white matter lesions and subcortical infarcts on neuroimaging.
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1631838
Concept ID:
C4551995
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy (MNGIE) disease is characterized by progressive gastrointestinal dysmotility (manifesting as early satiety, nausea, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux, postprandial emesis, episodic abdominal pain and/or distention, and diarrhea); cachexia; ptosis/ophthalmoplegia or ophthalmoparesis; leukoencephalopathy; and demyelinating peripheral neuropathy (manifesting as paresthesias (tingling, numbness, and pain) and symmetric and distal weakness more prominently affecting the lower extremities). The order in which manifestations appear is unpredictable. Onset is usually between the first and fifth decades; in about 60% of individuals, symptoms begin before age 20 years.
Brain small vessel disease 1 with or without ocular anomalies
MedGen UID:
1647320
Concept ID:
C4551998
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of COL4A1-related disorders includes: small-vessel brain disease of varying severity including porencephaly, variably associated with eye defects (retinal arterial tortuosity, Axenfeld-Rieger anomaly, cataract) and systemic findings (kidney involvement, muscle cramps, cerebral aneurysms, Raynaud phenomenon, cardiac arrhythmia, and hemolytic anemia). On imaging studies, small-vessel brain disease is manifest as diffuse periventricular leukoencephalopathy, lacunar infarcts, microhemorrhage, dilated perivascular spaces, and deep intracerebral hemorrhages. Clinically, small-vessel brain disease manifests as infantile hemiparesis, seizures, single or recurrent hemorrhagic stroke, ischemic stroke, and isolated migraine with aura. Porencephaly (fluid-filled cavities in the brain detected by CT or MRI) is typically manifest as infantile hemiparesis, seizures, and intellectual disability; however, on occasion it can be an incidental finding. HANAC (hereditary angiopathy with nephropathy, aneurysms, and muscle cramps) syndrome usually associates asymptomatic small-vessel brain disease, cerebral large vessel involvement (i.e., aneurysms), and systemic findings involving the kidney, muscle, and small vessels of the eye. Two additional phenotypes include isolated retinal artery tortuosity and nonsyndromic autosomal dominant congenital cataract.
Cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts 1
MedGen UID:
1636142
Concept ID:
C4552029
Disease or Syndrome
Dyskeratosis congenita and related telomere biology disorders (DC/TBD) are caused by impaired telomere maintenance resulting in short or very short telomeres. The phenotypic spectrum of telomere biology disorders is broad and includes individuals with classic dyskeratosis congenita (DC) as well as those with very short telomeres and an isolated physical finding. Classic DC is characterized by a triad of dysplastic nails, lacy reticular pigmentation of the upper chest and/or neck, and oral leukoplakia, although this may not be present in all individuals. People with DC/TBD are at increased risk for progressive bone marrow failure (BMF), myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myelogenous leukemia, solid tumors (usually squamous cell carcinoma of the head/neck or anogenital cancer), and pulmonary fibrosis. Other findings can include eye abnormalities (epiphora, blepharitis, sparse eyelashes, ectropion, entropion, trichiasis), taurodontism, liver disease, gastrointestinal telangiectasias, and avascular necrosis of the hips or shoulders. Although most persons with DC/TBD have normal psychomotor development and normal neurologic function, significant developmental delay is present in both forms; additional findings include cerebellar hypoplasia (Hoyeraal Hreidarsson syndrome) and bilateral exudative retinopathy and intracranial calcifications (Revesz syndrome and Coats plus syndrome). Onset and progression of manifestations of DC/TBD vary: at the mild end of the spectrum are those who have only minimal physical findings with normal bone marrow function, and at the severe end are those who have the diagnostic triad and early-onset BMF.
Leukoencephalopathy with mild cerebellar ataxia and white matter edema
MedGen UID:
1638681
Concept ID:
C4554120
Disease or Syndrome
CLCN2-related leukoencephalopathy is characterized by nonspecific neurologic findings, mild visual impairment from chorioretinopathy or optic atrophy, male infertility, and characteristic findings on brain MRI. Neurologic findings include mild ataxia (action tremor and gait instability following initially normal motor development; occasionally, mild spasticity), cognitive impairment in some (typically mild, rarely severe), psychiatric symptoms in some (depression and schizophrenia-like symptoms), headaches in some (usually intermittent, severe, and diffuse) and auditory symptoms in some (hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo). Affected individuals remain ambulatory, do not require support for walking, and rarely become blind. To date CLCN2-related leukoencephalopathy has been reported or identified in 31 individuals from 30 families. It is not yet known if the findings occurring in a few individuals (i.e., epilepsy and paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia) are part of the phenotypic spectrum or unrelated findings.
Multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome 6
MedGen UID:
1643082
Concept ID:
C4693741
Disease or Syndrome
Multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome-6 is an autosomal recessive severe neurodegenerative disorder with onset in early childhood. Affected individuals may have initial normal development, but show neurologic regression in the first year of life. They have hypotonia, inability to walk, poor speech, intellectual disability, and motor abnormalities, such as ataxia, dystonia, and spasticity. Some patients may die in childhood. Laboratory evidence indicates that the disorder results from mitochondrial dysfunction (summary by Vogtle et al., 2018). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome, see MMDS1 (605711).
Leukoencephalopathy-thalamus and brainstem anomalies-high lactate syndrome
MedGen UID:
1645614
Concept ID:
C4706421
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-12 (COXPD12) is an autosomal recessive mitochondrial neurologic disorder characterized by onset in infancy of hypotonia and delayed psychomotor development, or early developmental regression, associated with T2-weighted hyperintensities in the deep cerebral white matter, brainstem, and cerebellar white matter. Serum lactate is increased due to a defect in mitochondrial respiration. There are 2 main phenotypic groups: those with a milder disease course and some recovery of skills after age 2 years, and those with a severe disease course resulting in marked disability (summary by Steenweg et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy 1
MedGen UID:
1648386
Concept ID:
C4721893
Disease or Syndrome
Polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy (PLOSL) is characterized by fractures (resulting from radiologically demonstrable polycystic osseous lesions), frontal lobe syndrome, and progressive presenile dementia beginning in the fourth decade. The clinical course of PLOSL can be divided into four stages: 1. The latent stage is characterized by normal early development. 2. The osseous stage (3rd decade of life) is characterized by pain and tenderness, mostly in ankles and feet, usually following strain or injury. Fractures are typically diagnosed several years later, most commonly in the bones of the extremities. 3. In the early neurologic stage (4th decade of life), a change of personality begins to develop insidiously. Affected individuals show a frontal lobe syndrome (loss of judgment, euphoria, loss of social inhibitions, disturbance of concentration, and lack of insight, libido, and motor persistence) leading to serious social problems. 4. The late neurologic stage is characterized by progressive dementia and loss of mobility. Death usually occurs before age 50 years.
Polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy 2
MedGen UID:
1648374
Concept ID:
C4748657
Disease or Syndrome
Polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy-2 (PLOSL2), or Nasu-Hakola disease, is a recessively inherited presenile frontal dementia with leukoencephalopathy and basal ganglia calcification. In most cases the disorder first manifests in early adulthood as pain and swelling in ankles and feet, followed by bone fractures. Neurologic symptoms manifest in the fourth decade of life as a frontal lobe syndrome with loss of judgment, euphoria, and disinhibition. Progressive decline in other cognitive domains begins to develop at about the same time. The disorder culminates in a profound dementia and death by age 50 years (summary by Klunemann et al., 2005). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy, see 221770.
Mitochondrial complex 1 deficiency, nuclear type 5
MedGen UID:
1648292
Concept ID:
C4748754
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex 1 deficiency, nuclear type 10
MedGen UID:
1648426
Concept ID:
C4748768
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex 1 deficiency, nuclear type 21
MedGen UID:
1648383
Concept ID:
C4748792
Disease or Syndrome
Hypomyelination with brain stem and spinal cord involvement and leg spasticity
MedGen UID:
1667792
Concept ID:
C4755254
Disease or Syndrome
Hypomyelination with brainstem and spinal cord involvement and leg spasticity is an autosomal recessive leukoencephalopathy characterized by onset in the first year of life of severe spasticity, mainly affecting the lower limbs and resulting in an inability to achieve independent ambulation. Affected individuals show delayed motor development and nystagmus; some may have mild mental retardation. Brain MRI shows hypomyelination and white matter lesions in the cerebrum, brainstem, cerebellum, and spinal cord (summary by Taft et al., 2013).
Brain small vessel disease 3
MedGen UID:
1677948
Concept ID:
C5193053
Disease or Syndrome
Brain small vessel disease-3 (BSVD3) is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from fragility of cerebral vessels causing an increased risk of intracranial bleeding. The resultant phenotype is highly variable depending on timing and location of the intracranial bleed. Some patients may have onset in utero or early infancy, with subsequent global developmental delay, spasticity, and porencephaly on brain imaging. Other patients may have normal or mildly delayed development with sudden onset of intracranial hemorrhage causing acute neurologic deterioration (summary by Miyatake et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of brain small vessel disease, see BSVD1 (175780).
Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive, with axonal neuropathy 3
MedGen UID:
1673607
Concept ID:
C5193070
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy-3 (SCAN3) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized by onset in the first decade of slowly progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy and distal sensory impairment due to an axonal peripheral neuropathy. Affected individuals have gait disturbances and sometimes manual dexterity difficulties, as well as cerebellar ataxia associated with cerebellar atrophy on brain imaging. Additional features usually include dysarthria, hyporeflexia, and increased serum creatine kinase. Some patients may have impaired intellectual development (summary by Higuchi et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of SCAN, see SCAN1 (607250).
Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency, nuclear type 1
MedGen UID:
1750917
Concept ID:
C5435656
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency nuclear type 1 (MC4DN1) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by rapidly progressive neurodegeneration and encephalopathy with loss of motor and cognitive skills between about 5 and 18 months of age after normal early development. Affected individuals show hypotonia, failure to thrive, loss of the ability to sit or walk, poor communication, and poor eye contact. Other features may include oculomotor abnormalities, including slow saccades, strabismus, ophthalmoplegia, and nystagmus, as well as deafness, apneic episodes, ataxia, tremor, and brisk tendon reflexes. Brain imaging shows bilateral symmetric lesions in the basal ganglia, consistent with a clinical diagnosis of Leigh syndrome (see 256000). Some patients may also have abnormalities in the brainstem and cerebellum. Laboratory studies usually show increased serum and CSF lactate and decreased levels and activity of mitochondrial respiratory complex IV in patient tissues. There is phenotypic variability, but death in childhood, often due to central respiratory failure, is common (summary by Tiranti et al., 1998; Tiranti et al., 1999; Teraoka et al., 1999; Poyau et al., 2000) Genetic Heterogeneity of Mitochondrial Complex IV Deficiency Most isolated COX deficiencies are inherited as autosomal recessive disorders caused by mutations in nuclear-encoded genes; mutations in the mtDNA-encoded COX subunit genes are relatively rare (Shoubridge, 2001; Sacconi et al., 2003). Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency caused by mutation in nuclear-encoded genes, in addition to MC4DN1, include MC4DN2 (604377), caused by mutation in the SCO2 gene (604272); MC4DN3 (619046), caused by mutation in the COX10 gene (602125); MC4DN4 (619048), caused by mutation in the SCO1 gene (603664); MC4DN5 (220111), caused by mutation in the LRPPRC gene (607544); MC4DN6 (615119), caused by mutation in the COX15 gene (603646); MC4DN7 (619051), caused by mutation in the COX6B1 gene (124089); MC4DN8 (619052), caused by mutation in the TACO1 gene (612958); MC4DN9 (616500), caused by mutation in the COA5 gene (613920); MC4DN10 (619053), caused by mutation in the COX14 gene (614478); MC4DN11 (619054), caused by mutation in the COX20 gene (614698); MC4DN12 (619055), caused by mutation in the PET100 gene (614770); MC4DN13 (616501), caused by mutation in the COA6 gene (614772); MC4DN14 (619058), caused by mutation in the COA3 gene (614775); MC4DN15 (619059), caused by mutation in the COX8A gene (123870); MC4DN16 (619060), caused by mutation in the COX4I1 gene (123864); MC4DN17 (619061), caused by mutation in the APOPT1 gene (616003); MC4DN18 (619062), caused by mutation in the COX6A2 gene (602009); MC4DN19 (619063), caused by mutation in the PET117 gene (614771); MC4DN20 (619064), caused by mutation in the COX5A gene (603773); MC4DN21 (619065), caused by mutation in the COXFA4 gene (603883); MC4DN22 (619355), caused by mutation in the COX16 gene (618064); and MC4DN23 (620275), caused by mutation in the COX11 gene (603648). Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency has been associated with mutations in several mitochondrial genes, including MTCO1 (516030), MTCO2 (516040), MTCO3 (516050), MTTS1 (590080), MTTL1 (590050), and MTTN (590010).
Mitochondrial complex 2 deficiency, nuclear type 2
MedGen UID:
1742371
Concept ID:
C5436933
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex II deficiency nuclear type 2 (MC2DN2) is an autosomal recessive multisystemic metabolic disorder with variable severity and features. Most patients present with neurologic deterioration in infancy or early childhood after normal early development. Features include loss of motor skills, spastic paresis, dystonia, and loss of speech associated with increased serum and CSF lactate. Some patients may have mental decline or visual loss. Skeletal muscle samples show isolated complex II deficiency, and proton MRS shows increased succinate levels in the CSF and brain white matter. Brain imaging usually shows progressive leukoencephalopathy. Although the pattern of brain involvement may not be characteristic of Leigh syndrome (see 256000), postmortem examination in 1 patient showed multifocal spongiform encephalomyelopathy consistent with a diagnosis of Leigh syndrome. The most severely affected patients die of multiorgan failure and lactic acidosis, whereas others who survive may stabilize and regain some skills. Treatment with riboflavin may offer clinical improvement (summary by Brockmann et al., 2002 and Bugiani et al., 2006). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of MC2DN, see MC2DN1 (252011).
Leukoencephalopathy, progressive, infantile-onset, with or without deafness
MedGen UID:
1779519
Concept ID:
C5542996
Disease or Syndrome
Infantile-onset progressive leukoencephalopathy with or without deafness (LEPID) is an autosomal recessive complex neurodegenerative disorder with onset of symptoms in infancy or early childhood. Most patients present with sensorineural deafness or hypoacousia and global developmental delay. Affected individuals show episodic regression with progressive motor deterioration resulting in spastic tetraplegia and loss of ambulation, as well as impaired intellectual development with poor or absent speech. Additional more variable features may include poor overall growth with microcephaly, seizures, visual loss, microcytic anemia, and hepatic enlargement or abnormal liver enzymes. Brain imaging shows deep white matter abnormalities consistent with a progressive leukoencephalopathy. The brain and spinal cord are usually both involved; calcifications of these regions are often observed. Laboratory studies show increased serum lactate and deficiencies of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, consistent with global mitochondrial dysfunction. Early death often occurs (summary by Itoh et al., 2019).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with cerebral atrophy and variable facial dysmorphism
MedGen UID:
1786662
Concept ID:
C5543228
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with cerebral atrophy and facial dysmorphism (NEDCAFD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by global developmental delay apparent from birth. Affected individuals have hypotonia with inability to walk and severely impaired intellectual development with absent language. Most patients have variable dysmorphic facial features including prominent eyes, protruding and low-set ears, and thin upper lip. Brain imaging shows cerebral atrophy, corpus callosum hypoplasia, and a simplified gyral pattern (summary by Rasheed et al., 2021).
Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, sensorineural hearing loss, impaired intellectual development, and leber congenital amaurosis
MedGen UID:
1780157
Concept ID:
C5543257
Disease or Syndrome
SHILCA is characterized by early-onset retinal degeneration in association with sensorineural hearing loss, short stature, vertebral anomalies, and epiphyseal dysplasia, as well as motor and intellectual delay. Delayed myelination, leukoencephalopathy, and hypoplasia of the corpus callosum and cerebellum have been observed on brain MRI (Bedoni et al., 2020).
Ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal, 6B (Kufs type)
MedGen UID:
1794137
Concept ID:
C5561927
Disease or Syndrome
Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis-6B (CLN6B) is an autosomal recessive form of 'Kufs disease,' which refers in general to adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis without retinal involvement. CLN6B is a neurodegenerative disorder with a mean onset of symptoms at around age 28 years, although onset in the teens and later adulthood may also occur. Patients typically present with progressive myoclonus epilepsy, ataxia, loss of motor function, dysarthria, progressive dementia, and progressive cerebral and cerebellar atrophy on brain imaging. Ultrastructural examination typically shows fingerprint profiles and granular osmiophilic deposits in some tissues, including brain samples (summary by Arsov et al., 2011 and Berkovic et al., 2019). However, pathologic findings in peripheral tissues in adults is not as accurate for diagnosis as it is in children with the disease (Cherian et al., 2021). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CLN, see CLN1 (256730).
Leukoencephalopathy, diffuse hereditary, with spheroids 1
MedGen UID:
1794139
Concept ID:
C5561929
Disease or Syndrome
CSF1R-related adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP) is characterized by executive dysfunction, memory decline, personality changes, motor impairments, and seizures. A frontal lobe syndrome (e.g., loss of judgment, lack of social inhibitors, lack of insight, and motor persistence) usually appears early in the disease course. The mean age of onset is usually in the fourth decade. Affected individuals eventually become bedridden with spasticity and rigidity. The disease course ranges from two to 30 or more years (mean: 8 years).
Oculopharyngodistal myopathy 3
MedGen UID:
1794166
Concept ID:
C5561956
Disease or Syndrome
Oculopharyngodistal myopathy-3 (OPDM3) is a neuromyodegenerative disease characterized by progressive muscle weakness with ocular, facial, pharyngeal, and distal limb involvement, resulting in dysarthria and gait difficulties. The onset of the disorder is usually in adulthood, although childhood onset has rarely been reported. Additional features include hyporeflexia, proximal muscle weakness, neck muscle weakness, dysarthria, dysphagia, and ptosis. Some patients may develop pigmentary retinopathy, peripheral neuropathy, or hearing loss. Cognition is usually not affected, but there may be deficits or psychiatric manifestations. Brain imaging tends to show a leukoencephalopathy, often with a characteristic linear signal along the corticomedullary junction on brain imaging. Skin and muscle biopsy show intranuclear inclusions and rimmed vacuoles. Many of the clinical features are reminiscent of NIID, suggesting that these disorders likely fall within a broad phenotypic spectrum of diseases with neuromyodegenerative features associated with abnormal repeat expansions in this gene (summary by Ogasawara et al., 2020 and Yu et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of OPDM, see OPDM1 (164310).
Leukoencephalopathy, hereditary diffuse, with spheroids 2
MedGen UID:
1794254
Concept ID:
C5562044
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids-2 (HDLS2) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive cognitive and executive dysfunction, psychiatric disturbances, and neurologic symptoms, such as gait abnormalities, paresis, seizures, and rigidity. Symptom onset is usually in adulthood, although earlier onset has been reported. Some patients have an acute encephalopathic course with severe neurologic decline resulting in early death, whereas other patients have a more protracted and chronic disease course. Neuropathologic examination shows a leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and myelination defects (summary by Sundal et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HDLS, see HDLS1 (221820).
Mitochondrial complex II deficiency, nuclear type 1
MedGen UID:
1814582
Concept ID:
C5700310
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex II deficiency is an autosomal recessive multisystemic metabolic disorder with a highly variable phenotype. Some patients have multisystem involvement of the brain, heart, and muscle with onset in infancy, whereas others have only isolated cardiac or muscle involvement. Measurement of complex II activity in muscle is the most reliable means of diagnosis; however, there is no clear correlation between residual complex II activity and severity or clinical outcome. In some cases, treatment with riboflavin may have clinical benefit (summary by Jain-Ghai et al., 2013). Complex II, also known as succinate dehydrogenase, is part of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Genetic Heterogeneity of Mitochondrial Complex II Deficiency See MC2DN2 (619166), caused by mutation in the SDHAF1 gene (612848) on chromosome 19q13; MC2DN3 (619167), caused by mutation in the SDHD gene (602690) on chromosome 11q23; and MC2DN4 (619224), caused by mutation in the SDHB gene (185470) on chromosome 1p36. Fullerton et al. (2020) reviewed the genetic basis of isolated mitochondrial complex II deficiency.
Neurodevelopmental disorder with seizures, microcephaly, and brain abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1823982
Concept ID:
C5774209
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with seizures, microcephaly, and brain abnormalities (NEDSMBA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a core phenotype of moderate to profound developmental delay, progressive microcephaly, epilepsy, and periventricular calcifications (summary by Rosenhahn et al., 2022).
Leukoencephalopathy with vanishing white matter 1
MedGen UID:
1830482
Concept ID:
C5779972
Disease or Syndrome
Any leukoencephalopathy with vanishing white matter in which the cause of the disease is a variation in the EIF2B1 gene.
Leukoencephalopathy with vanishing white matter 2
MedGen UID:
1841040
Concept ID:
C5830404
Disease or Syndrome
Leukoencephalopathy with vanishing white matter-2 (VWM2) is a chronic and progressive autosomal recessive leukoencephalopathy characterized by neurologic deterioration with cerebellar ataxia, spasticity, and relatively mild mental decline. Severity ranges from onset at birth with death in infancy to mild cases with later and even adult onset. Initial development may be normal. Episodes of rapid deterioration occur following febrile infection or minor head trauma. Death occurs after a variable period usually of a few years to a few decades, usually following an episode of fever and coma. Affected females may have ovarian failure manifest as primary or secondary amenorrhea. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are diagnostic and show a diffuse abnormality of the cerebral white matter beginning in the presymptomatic stage, with increasing amounts of the abnormal white matter vanishing and being replaced by cerebrospinal fluid; autopsy confirms these findings (summary by Leegwater et al., 2001, van der Knaap et al., 2003). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of VWM, see 603896.
Leukoencephalopathy with vanishing white matter 3
MedGen UID:
1841041
Concept ID:
C5830405
Disease or Syndrome
Leukoencephalopathy with vanishing white matter-3 (VWM3) is an autosomal recessive leukoencephalopathy characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia, spasticity, and mental decline. The course is chronic and progressive, with episodes of rapid deterioration following minor head trauma. Affected females may have amenorrhea. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reveals diffuse leukoencephalopathy with lesions having cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-like signals (summary by Matsukawa et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of VWM, see 603896.
Leukoencephalopathy with vanishing white matter 4
MedGen UID:
1841042
Concept ID:
C5830406
Disease or Syndrome
Leukoencephalopathy with vanishing white matter-4 (VWM4) is a chronic and progressive autosomal recessive leukoencephalopathy characterized by neurologic deterioration with cerebellar ataxia, spasticity, and relatively mild mental decline. Onset is usually in childhood; early development may be normal. Female patients may experience ovarian failure. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are diagnostic and show a diffuse abnormality of the cerebral white matter beginning in the presymptomatic stage, with increasing amounts of the abnormal white matter vanishing and being replaced by cerebrospinal fluid; autopsy confirms these findings (summary by van der Knaap et al., 2002, Fogli et al., 2003). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of VWM, see 603896.
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly and speech delay, with or without brain abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1841049
Concept ID:
C5830413
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with microcephaly and speech delay, with or without brain abnormalities (NEDMSBA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by global developmental delay, hypotonia, delayed or absent walking, impaired intellectual development, and poor or absent speech, apparent from early infancy. Affected individuals have postnatal progressive microcephaly and may show poor overall growth and dysmorphic facial features. Additional more variable features include cortical visual impairment, seizures, hypotonia, spasticity, and sensorineural deafness. Brain imaging is abnormal in most patients, showing myelination defects, cortical atrophy, or thin corpus callosum. There is phenotypic variability, even within families (Bogershausen et al., 2022; Lin et al., 2022).
Cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts 3
MedGen UID:
1841133
Concept ID:
C5830497
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts-3 (CRMCC3) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by intrauterine growth retardation, retinal exudates, intracranial calcifications, and leukoencephalopathy. Additional features may include global developmental delay and gastrointestinal ectasias. Telomeres may be elongated, but truncated shortened telomeres are present in some tissues (Takai et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CRMCC, see CRMCC1 (612199).
Congenital myopathy 22B, severe fetal
MedGen UID:
1841137
Concept ID:
C5830501
Disease or Syndrome
Severe fetal congenital myopathy-22B (CMYP22B) is an autosomal recessive muscle disorder characterized by in utero onset of severe muscle weakness manifest as fetal akinesia. The pregnancies are often complicated by polyhydramnios, and affected individuals develop fetal hydrops with pulmonary hypoplasia, severe joint contractures, and generalized muscle hypoplasia. Those who are born have respiratory failure resulting in death. Dysmorphic facial features may be present. The features in these patients overlap with fetal akinesia deformation sequence (FADS; see 208150) and lethal congenital contractures syndrome (LCCS; see 253310) (Zaharieva et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Rose JJ, Wang L, Xu Q, McTiernan CF, Shiva S, Tejero J, Gladwin MT
Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2017 Mar 1;195(5):596-606. doi: 10.1164/rccm.201606-1275CI. PMID: 27753502Free PMC Article
Bowen LN, Smith B, Reich D, Quezado M, Nath A
Nat Rev Neurol 2016 Oct 27;12(11):662-674. doi: 10.1038/nrneurol.2016.149. PMID: 27786246
Berger JR, Aksamit AJ, Clifford DB, Davis L, Koralnik IJ, Sejvar JJ, Bartt R, Major EO, Nath A
Neurology 2013 Apr 9;80(15):1430-8. doi: 10.1212/WNL.0b013e31828c2fa1. PMID: 23568998Free PMC Article

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Schweitzer F, Laurent S, Cortese I, Fink GR, Silling S, Skripuletz T, Metz I, Wattjes MP, Warnke C
Neurology 2023 Oct 17;101(16):700-713. Epub 2023 Jul 24 doi: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000207622. PMID: 37487750Free PMC Article
Cortese I, Reich DS, Nath A
Nat Rev Neurol 2021 Jan;17(1):37-51. Epub 2020 Nov 20 doi: 10.1038/s41582-020-00427-y. PMID: 33219338Free PMC Article
Grebenciucova E, Berger JR
Neurol Clin 2018 Nov;36(4):739-750. doi: 10.1016/j.ncl.2018.06.002. PMID: 30366552
Tan CS, Koralnik IJ
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Filley CM
Clin Neuropharmacol 1999 Sep-Oct;22(5):249-60. PMID: 10516874

Diagnosis

Manikandan M, Azariah B, Sharma R
J Cancer Res Ther 2023 Oct 1;19(7):2076-2078. Epub 2023 Jan 12 doi: 10.4103/jcrt.jcrt_2165_21. PMID: 38376324
Partap S, Russo S, Esfahani B, Yeom K, Mazewski C, Embry L, Wheeler G, Ullrich NJ, Bowers DC
Pediatr Neurol 2019 Dec;101:2-10. Epub 2019 Mar 21 doi: 10.1016/j.pediatrneurol.2019.03.006. PMID: 31047756
Zhai S, Brew BJ
Handb Clin Neurol 2018;152:123-137. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-444-63849-6.00010-4. PMID: 29604971
Fischer M, Schmutzhard E
J Neurol 2017 Aug;264(8):1608-1616. Epub 2017 Jan 4 doi: 10.1007/s00415-016-8377-8. PMID: 28054130Free PMC Article
Tormoehlen LM
Psychiatr Clin North Am 2013 Jun;36(2):277-92. Epub 2013 Apr 12 doi: 10.1016/j.psc.2013.02.006. PMID: 23688692

Therapy

Manikandan M, Azariah B, Sharma R
J Cancer Res Ther 2023 Oct 1;19(7):2076-2078. Epub 2023 Jan 12 doi: 10.4103/jcrt.jcrt_2165_21. PMID: 38376324
Bernard-Valnet R, Koralnik IJ, Du Pasquier R
Ann Neurol 2021 Dec;90(6):865-873. Epub 2021 Sep 7 doi: 10.1002/ana.26198. PMID: 34405435Free PMC Article
Cortese I, Muranski P, Enose-Akahata Y, Ha SK, Smith B, Monaco M, Ryschkewitsch C, Major EO, Ohayon J, Schindler MK, Beck E, Reoma LB, Jacobson S, Reich DS, Nath A
N Engl J Med 2019 Apr 25;380(17):1597-1605. Epub 2019 Apr 10 doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1815039. PMID: 30969503
Colombel JF, Sands BE, Rutgeerts P, Sandborn W, Danese S, D'Haens G, Panaccione R, Loftus EV Jr, Sankoh S, Fox I, Parikh A, Milch C, Abhyankar B, Feagan BG
Gut 2017 May;66(5):839-851. Epub 2016 Feb 18 doi: 10.1136/gutjnl-2015-311079. PMID: 26893500Free PMC Article
Tormoehlen LM
Psychiatr Clin North Am 2013 Jun;36(2):277-92. Epub 2013 Apr 12 doi: 10.1016/j.psc.2013.02.006. PMID: 23688692

Prognosis

Chakraborty T, Kramer CL, Wijdicks EFM, Rabinstein AA
Neurocrit Care 2020 Feb;32(1):113-120. doi: 10.1007/s12028-019-00781-w. PMID: 31297663
Zambrano MD, Miller EC
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Joint Bone Spine 2017 Dec;84(6):671-675. Epub 2017 Mar 18 doi: 10.1016/j.jbspin.2017.03.002. PMID: 28323224
Donmez FY, Agildere AM
Neurol Sci 2015 Sep;36(9):1603-9. Epub 2015 Apr 18 doi: 10.1007/s10072-015-2212-3. PMID: 25894844
Lastilla M
Clin Exp Hypertens 2006 Apr-May;28(3-4):205-15. doi: 10.1080/10641960600549082. PMID: 16833026

Clinical prediction guides

Schweitzer F, Laurent S, Cortese I, Fink GR, Silling S, Skripuletz T, Metz I, Wattjes MP, Warnke C
Neurology 2023 Oct 17;101(16):700-713. Epub 2023 Jul 24 doi: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000207622. PMID: 37487750Free PMC Article
Singhal AB
Int J Stroke 2023 Dec;18(10):1151-1160. Epub 2023 Jun 12 doi: 10.1177/17474930231181250. PMID: 37246916
Chakraborty T, Kramer CL, Wijdicks EFM, Rabinstein AA
Neurocrit Care 2020 Feb;32(1):113-120. doi: 10.1007/s12028-019-00781-w. PMID: 31297663
Sone J, Mori K, Inagaki T, Katsumata R, Takagi S, Yokoi S, Araki K, Kato T, Nakamura T, Koike H, Takashima H, Hashiguchi A, Kohno Y, Kurashige T, Kuriyama M, Takiyama Y, Tsuchiya M, Kitagawa N, Kawamoto M, Yoshimura H, Suto Y, Nakayasu H, Uehara N, Sugiyama H, Takahashi M, Kokubun N, Konno T, Katsuno M, Tanaka F, Iwasaki Y, Yoshida M, Sobue G
Brain 2016 Dec;139(Pt 12):3170-3186. Epub 2016 Oct 25 doi: 10.1093/brain/aww249. PMID: 27797808Free PMC Article
Lesnik Oberstein SA, van den Boom R, Middelkoop HA, Ferrari MD, Knaap YM, van Houwelingen HC, Breuning MH, van Buchem MA, Haan J
Arch Neurol 2003 May;60(5):707-12. doi: 10.1001/archneur.60.5.707. PMID: 12756134

Recent systematic reviews

Rindi LV, Zaçe D, Braccialarghe N, Massa B, Barchi V, Iannazzo R, Fato I, De Maria F, Kontogiannis D, Malagnino V, Sarmati L, Iannetta M
Drug Saf 2024 Apr;47(4):333-354. Epub 2024 Feb 7 doi: 10.1007/s40264-023-01383-4. PMID: 38321317
Mickeviciute GC, Valiuskyte M, Plattén M, Wszolek ZK, Andersen O, Danylaité Karrenbauer V, Ineichen BV, Granberg T
J Intern Med 2022 Mar;291(3):269-282. Epub 2021 Dec 22 doi: 10.1111/joim.13420. PMID: 34875121
Battle CE, Abdul-Rahim AH, Shenkin SD, Hewitt J, Quinn TJ
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2021 Feb 22;2(2):CD013306. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD013306.pub2. PMID: 33704781Free PMC Article
Palazzo P, Le Guyader G, Neau JP
Rev Neurol (Paris) 2021 Apr;177(4):422-430. Epub 2021 Jan 19 doi: 10.1016/j.neurol.2020.10.009. PMID: 33478738
Müller M, Wandel S, Colebunders R, Attia S, Furrer H, Egger M; IeDEA Southern and Central Africa
Lancet Infect Dis 2010 Apr;10(4):251-61. doi: 10.1016/S1473-3099(10)70026-8. PMID: 20334848Free PMC Article

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