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Amblyopia

MedGen UID:
8009
Concept ID:
C0002418
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
Synonym: Amblyopias
SNOMED CT: Amblyopia (387742006); Amblyopic (387742006)
 
HPO: HP:0000646
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0001020

Definition

Reduced visual acuity that is uncorrectable by lenses in the absence of detectable anatomic defects in the eye or visual pathways. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVAmblyopia

Conditions with this feature

DiGeorge syndrome
MedGen UID:
4297
Concept ID:
C0012236
Disease or Syndrome
Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) can present with a wide range of features that are highly variable, even within families. The major clinical manifestations of 22q11.2DS include congenital heart disease, particularly conotruncal malformations (ventricular septal defect, tetralogy of Fallot, interrupted aortic arch, and truncus arteriosus), palatal abnormalities (velopharyngeal incompetence, submucosal cleft palate, bifid uvula, and cleft palate), immune deficiency, characteristic facial features, and learning difficulties. Hearing loss can be sensorineural and/or conductive. Laryngotracheoesophageal, gastrointestinal, ophthalmologic, central nervous system, skeletal, and genitourinary anomalies also occur. Psychiatric illness and autoimmune disorders are more common in individuals with 22q11.2DS.
Williams syndrome
MedGen UID:
59799
Concept ID:
C0175702
Disease or Syndrome
Williams syndrome (WS) is characterized by cardiovascular disease (elastin arteriopathy, peripheral pulmonary stenosis, supravalvar aortic stenosis, hypertension), distinctive facies, connective tissue abnormalities, intellectual disability (usually mild), a specific cognitive profile, unique personality characteristics, growth abnormalities, and endocrine abnormalities (hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria, hypothyroidism, and early puberty). Feeding difficulties often lead to poor weight gain in infancy. Hypotonia and hyperextensible joints can result in delayed attainment of motor milestones.
Symphalangism-brachydactyly syndrome
MedGen UID:
90977
Concept ID:
C0342282
Disease or Syndrome
Multiple synostoses syndrome is characterized by multiple joint fusions, usually commencing in the hands, conductive deafness, and characteristic facial features, including a broad, tubular-shaped nose and a thin upper vermilion. Other features include brachydactyly, hypoplastic or absent middle phalanges, radial head dislocation, and pectus carinatum (summary by Takahashi et al., 2001). Genetic Heterogeneity of Multiple Synostoses Syndrome Other forms of multiple synostoses syndrome include SYNS2 (610017), caused by mutation in the GDF5 gene (601146) on chromosome 20q11; SYNS3 (612961), caused by mutation in the FGF9 gene (600921) on chromosome 13q12; and SYNS4 (617898), caused by mutation in the GDF6 gene (601147) on chromosome 8q22.
Aniridia 2
MedGen UID:
138010
Concept ID:
C0344543
Congenital Abnormality
Duane retraction syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
196721
Concept ID:
C0751083
Disease or Syndrome
Duane syndrome is a strabismus condition clinically characterized by congenital non-progressive limited horizontal eye movement accompanied by globe retraction which results in narrowing of the palpebral fissure. The lateral movement anomaly results from failure of the abducens nucleus and nerve (cranial nerve VI) to fully innervate the lateral rectus muscle; globe retraction occurs as a result of abnormal innervation of the lateral rectus muscle by the oculomotor nerve (cranial nerve III). At birth, affected infants have restricted ability to move the affected eye(s) outward (abduction) and/or inward (adduction), though the limitations may not be recognized in early infancy. In addition, the globe retracts into the orbit with attempted adduction, accompanied by narrowing of the palpebral fissure. Many individuals with Duane syndrome have strabismus in primary gaze but can use a compensatory head turn to align the eyes, and thus can preserve binocular vision and avoid diplopia. Individuals with Duane syndrome who lack binocular vision are at risk for amblyopia. The majority of affected individuals with Duane syndrome have isolated Duane syndrome (i.e., they do not have other detected congenital anomalies). Other individuals with Duane syndrome fall into well-defined syndromic diagnoses. However, many individuals with Duane syndrome have non-ocular findings that do not fit a known syndrome; these individuals are included as part of the discussion of nonsyndromic Duane syndrome.
11q partial monosomy syndrome
MedGen UID:
162878
Concept ID:
C0795841
Disease or Syndrome
Jacobsen syndrome (JBS) is a contiguous gene deletion syndrome with major clinical features of growth retardation, psychomotor retardation, trigonocephaly, divergent intermittent strabismus, epicanthus, telecanthus, broad nasal bridge, short nose with anteverted nostrils, carp-shaped upper lip, retrognathia, low-set dysmorphic ears, bilateral camptodactyly, hammertoes, and isoimmune thrombocytopenia (Fryns et al., 1986, Epstein, 1986).
Curry-Jones syndrome
MedGen UID:
167083
Concept ID:
C0795915
Disease or Syndrome
Curry-Jones syndrome (CRJS) is a multisystem disorder characterized by patchy skin lesions, polysyndactyly, diverse cerebral malformations, unicoronal craniosynostosis, iris colobomas, microphthalmia, and intestinal malrotation with myofibromas or hamartomas (summary by Twigg et al., 2016).
Cataract 24
MedGen UID:
371364
Concept ID:
C1832609
Disease or Syndrome
Anterior polar cataracts are small opacities on the anterior surface of the lens. They usually do not interfere with vision (Moross et al., 1984). The preferred title/symbol of this entry was formerly 'Cataract, Anterior Polar, 2; CTAA2.'
Mental and growth retardation with amblyopia
MedGen UID:
331885
Concept ID:
C1835028
Disease or Syndrome
Bencze syndrome
MedGen UID:
330655
Concept ID:
C1841640
Disease or Syndrome
A malformation syndrome involving the abnormal growth of the facial skeleton as well as its soft tissue structure and organs. The syndrome has characteristics of mild facial asymmetry with unaffected neurocranium and eyeballs, along with esotropia, amblyopia and/or convergent strabismus and occasionally submucous cleft palate. Transmission is autosomal dominant. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1979.
Senior-Loken syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
337697
Concept ID:
C1846979
Disease or Syndrome
Leber congenital amaurosis primarily affects the retina, which is the specialized tissue at the back of the eye that detects light and color. This condition causes vision problems, including an increased sensitivity to light (photophobia), involuntary movements of the eyes (nystagmus), and extreme farsightedness (hyperopia). Some people with Senior-Løken syndrome develop the signs of Leber congenital amaurosis within the first few years of life, while others do not develop vision problems until later in childhood.\n\nNephronophthisis causes fluid-filled cysts to develop in the kidneys beginning in childhood. These cysts impair kidney function, initially causing increased urine production (polyuria), excessive thirst (polydipsia), general weakness, and extreme tiredness (fatigue). Nephronophthisis leads to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) later in childhood or in adolescence. ESRD is a life-threatening failure of kidney function that occurs when the kidneys are no longer able to filter fluids and waste products from the body effectively.\n\nSenior-Løken syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the combination of two specific features: a kidney condition called nephronophthisis and an eye condition known as Leber congenital amaurosis.
Ophthalmoplegia totalis with ptosis and miosis
MedGen UID:
342471
Concept ID:
C1850314
Disease or Syndrome
Total ophthalmoplegia involves total paralysis of all extra- and intraocular muscles. If one or more of the external muscles, including the levator palpebrae, is not affected, the condition is known as incomplete or partial ophthalmoplegia. If only 1 nerve is affected, the palsy is named after that nerve (see, e.g., abducens palsy, 100200) (Waardenburg, 1963).
Cataract 9 multiple types
MedGen UID:
347693
Concept ID:
C1858679
Disease or Syndrome
Mutations in the CRYAA gene have been found to cause multiple types of cataract, which have been described as nuclear, zonular central nuclear, laminar, lamellar, anterior polar, posterior polar, cortical, embryonal, anterior subcapsular, fan-shaped, and total. Cataract associated with microcornea, sometimes called the cataract-microcornea syndrome, is also caused by mutation in the CRYAA gene. Both autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive modes of inheritance have been reported. The symbol CATC1 was formerly used for the autosomal recessive form of cataract caused by mutation in the CRYAA gene.
Muenke syndrome
MedGen UID:
355217
Concept ID:
C1864436
Disease or Syndrome
Muenke syndrome is defined by the presence of the specific FGFR3 pathogenic variant – c.749C>G – that results in the protein change p.Pro250Arg. Muenke syndrome is characterized by considerable phenotypic variability: features may include coronal synostosis (more often bilateral than unilateral); synostosis of other sutures, all sutures (pan synostosis), or no sutures; or macrocephaly. Bilateral coronal synostosis typically results in brachycephaly (reduced anteroposterior dimension of the skull), although turribrachycephaly (a "tower-shaped" skull) or a cloverleaf skull can be observed. Unilateral coronal synostosis results in anterior plagiocephaly (asymmetry of the skull and face). Other craniofacial findings typically include: temporal bossing; widely spaced eyes, ptosis or proptosis (usually mild); midface retrusion (usually mild); and highly arched palate or cleft lip and palate. Strabismus is common. Other findings can include: hearing loss (in 33%-100% of affected individuals); developmental delay (~33%); epilepsy; intracranial anomalies; intellectual disability; carpal bone and/or tarsal bone fusions; brachydactyly, broad toes, broad thumbs, and/or clinodactyly; and radiographic findings of thimble-like (short and broad) middle phalanges and/or cone-shaped epiphyses. Phenotypic variability is considerable even within the same family. Of note, some individuals who have the p.Pro250Arg pathogenic variant may have no signs of Muenke syndrome on physical or radiographic examination.
Fibrosis of extraocular muscles, congenital, 2
MedGen UID:
356119
Concept ID:
C1865915
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital fibrosis of extraocular muscles-2 (CFEOM2) is an autosomal recessive disorder in which affected individuals are born with bilateral ptosis and restrictive ophthalmoplegia with the globes fixed in extreme abduction (exotropia) (Wang et al., 1998, Nakano et al., 2001). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of various forms of CFEOM, see CFEOM1 (135700).
Ring dermoid of cornea
MedGen UID:
357922
Concept ID:
C1867155
Disease or Syndrome
Ring dermoid of cornea (RDC) is an autosomal dominant condition characterized by bilateral annular limbal dermoids with corneal and conjunctival extension (summary by Xia et al., 2004).
Fibrosis of extraocular muscles, congenital, 3A, with or without extraocular involvement
MedGen UID:
412638
Concept ID:
C2748801
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles (CFEOM) encompasses several different inherited strabismus syndromes characterized by congenital restrictive ophthalmoplegia affecting extraocular muscles innervated by the oculomotor and/or trochlear nerves. If all affected members of a family have classic CFEOM with bilateral involvement and inability to raise the eyes above midline, the phenotype is classified as CFEOM1 (135700). CFEOM2 (602078) shows autosomal recessive inheritance. CFEOM3 is characterized by autosomal dominant inheritance of a more variable phenotype than classic CFEOM1. Individuals with CFEOM3 may not have bilateral involvement, may be able to raise the eyes above midline, or may not have blepharoptosis (reviews by Yamada et al., 2004 and Heidary et al., 2008). Yamada et al. (2003) concluded that CFEOM3 is a relatively rare form of CFEOM. Genetic Heterogeneity of CFEOM3 The CFEOM3 phenotype is genetically heterogeneous; see also CFEOM3B (135700), caused by mutation in the KIF21A gene on chromosome 12q12, and CFEOM3C (609384), which maps to chromosome 13q.
Isolated microphthalmia 6
MedGen UID:
462107
Concept ID:
C3150757
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive isolated posterior microphthalmos defines a rare distinct phenotype restricted to the posterior segment of the eye. In adults, it is clinically characterized by extreme hyperopia (from +7.5 to +21 diopters) due to short axial length (14 mm to 20 mm; normal is greater than 21 mm). Other features include an essentially normal anterior segment, steep corneal curvatures, shallow anterior chamber, thick lenses, and thickened scleral wall. The palpebral fissures appear narrow because of relatively deep-set eyes, visual acuity is mildly to moderately reduced, and anisometropic or strabismic amblyopia is common. The fundus of the eye shows crowded optical discs, tortuous vessels, and an abnormal foveal avascular zone; in addition, papillomacular folds are often reported. Morphometric features of the small eyes predispose to complications such as narrow-angle glaucoma and uveal effusion (summary by Gal et al., 2011). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of isolated microphthalmia, see MCOP1 (251600).
Intellectual disability, anterior maxillary protrusion, and strabismus
MedGen UID:
462274
Concept ID:
C3150924
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic multiple congenital anomalies/dysmorphic syndrome with the association of severe intellectual disability, strabismus and anterior maxillary protrusion with vertical maxillary excess, open bite and prominent crowded teeth. Mild cochlear hearing loss has been reported in addition.
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 51
MedGen UID:
462406
Concept ID:
C3151056
Disease or Syndrome
AP-4-associated hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), also known as AP-4 deficiency syndrome, is a group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by a progressive, complex spastic paraplegia with onset typically in infancy or early childhood. Early-onset hypotonia evolves into progressive lower-extremity spasticity. The majority of children become nonambulatory and usually wheelchair bound. Over time spasticity progresses to involve the upper extremities, resulting in a spastic tetraplegia. Associated complications include dysphagia, contractures, foot deformities, dysregulation of bladder and bowel function, and a pseudobulbar affect. About 50% of affected individuals have seizures. Postnatal microcephaly (usually in the -2SD to -3SD range) is common. All have developmental delay. Speech development is significantly impaired and many affected individuals remain nonverbal. Intellectual disability in older children is usually moderate to severe.
Nystagmus 6, congenital, X-linked
MedGen UID:
463102
Concept ID:
C3151752
Disease or Syndrome
Classic congenital or infantile nystagmus presents as conjugate, horizontal oscillations of the eyes, in primary or eccentric gaze, often with a preferred head turn or tilt. Other associated features may include mildly decreased visual acuity, strabismus, astigmatism, and occasionally head nodding. Eye movement recordings reveal that infantile nystagmus is predominantly a horizontal jerk waveform, with a diagnostic accelerating velocity slow phase. However, pendular and triangular waveforms may also be present. The nystagmus may rarely be vertical. As these patients often have normal visual acuity, it is presumed that the nystagmus represents a primary defect in the parts of the brain responsible for ocular motor control; thus the disorder has sometimes been termed 'congenital motor nystagmus' (Tarpey et al., 2006; Shiels et al., 2007). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital nystagmus, see NYS1 (310700).
X-linked cone dysfunction syndrome with myopia
MedGen UID:
463611
Concept ID:
C3159311
Disease or Syndrome
Bornholm eye disease consists of X-linked high myopia, amblyopia, and deuteranopia. Associated signs include optic nerve hypoplasia, reduced electroretinographic (ERG) flicker, and nonspecific retinal pigment abnormalities (Schwartz et al., 1990).
Larsen-like syndrome, B3GAT3 type
MedGen UID:
480034
Concept ID:
C3278404
Disease or Syndrome
CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia is characterized by short stature of prenatal onset, joint dislocations (knees, hips, radial heads), clubfeet, and limitation of range of motion that can involve all large joints. Kyphosis and occasionally scoliosis with slight shortening of the trunk develop in childhood. Minor heart valve dysplasia has been described in several persons. Intellect and vision are normal.
Multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
481405
Concept ID:
C3279775
Disease or Syndrome
Multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by neonatal hypotonia, lack of psychomotor development, seizures, dysmorphic features, and variable congenital anomalies involving the cardiac, urinary, and gastrointestinal systems. Most affected individuals die before 3 years of age (summary by Maydan et al., 2011). The disorder is caused by a defect in glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis; see GPIBD1 (610293). Genetic Heterogeneity of Multiple Congenital Anomalies-Hypotonia-Seizures Syndrome MCAHS2 (300868) is caused by mutation in the PIGA gene (311770) on chromosome Xp22, MCAHS3 (615398) is caused by mutation in the PIGT gene (610272) on chromosome 20q13, and MCAHS4 (618548) is caused by mutation in the PIGQ gene (605754) on chromosome 16p13. Knaus et al. (2018) provided a review of the main clinical features of the different types of MCAHS, noting that patients with mutations in the PIGN, PIGA, and PIGT genes have distinct patterns of facial anomalies that can be detected by computer-assisted comparison. Some individuals with MCAHS may have variable increases in alkaline phosphatase (AP) as well as variable decreases in GPI-linked proteins that can be detected by flow cytometry. However, there was no clear correlation between AP levels or GPI-linked protein abnormalities and degree of neurologic involvement, mutation class, or gene involved. Knaus et al. (2018) concluded that a distinction between MCAHS and HPMRS1 (239300), which is also caused by mutation in genes involved in GPI biosynthesis, may be artificial and even inaccurate, and that all these disorders should be considered and classified together under the more encompassing term of 'GPI biosynthesis defects' (GPIBD).
Cognitive impairment with or without cerebellar ataxia
MedGen UID:
482045
Concept ID:
C3280415
Disease or Syndrome
SCN8A-related epilepsy with encephalopathy is characterized by developmental delay, seizure onset in the first 18 months of life (mean 4 months), and intractable epilepsy characterized by multiple seizure types (generalized tonic-clonic seizures, infantile spasms, and absence and focal seizures). Epilepsy syndromes can include Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, West syndrome, and epileptic encephalopathies (e.g., Dravet syndrome). Hypotonia and movement disorders including dystonia, ataxia, and choreoathetosis are common. Psychomotor development varies from normal prior to seizure onset (with subsequent slowing or regression after seizure onset) to abnormal from birth. Intellectual disability, present in all, ranges from mild to severe (in ~50% of affected individuals). Autistic features are noted in some. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) of unknown cause has been reported in approximately 10% of published cases. To date SCN8A-related epilepsy with encephalopathy has been reported in the literature in about 50 individuals.
Goldenhar syndrome
MedGen UID:
501171
Concept ID:
C3495417
Congenital Abnormality
Craniofacial microsomia-1 (CFM1) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by mandibular hypoplasia, microtia, facial and preauricular skin tags, epibulbar dermoids, and lateral oral clefts, in addition to skeletal and cardiac abnormalities. Inter- and intrafamilial variability has been observed (Timberlake et al., 2021). Hemifacial microsomia is a common birth defect involving the first and second branchial arch derivatives. It typically affects the external ear, middle ear, mandible and temporomandibular joint, muscles of mastication and facial muscles, and other facial soft tissues on the affected side. In some cases, other facial structures, such as the orbit, eye, nose, cranium, or neck, may be involved. Involvement is usually limited to one side, but bilateral involvement is known. In addition to craniofacial anomalies, there may be cardiac, vertebral, and central nervous system defects. The phenotype is highly variable. Most cases are sporadic, but there are rare familial cases that exhibit autosomal dominant inheritance (summary by Poole, 1989 and Hennekam et al., 2010). Genetic Heterogeneity of Craniofacial Microsomia CFM2 (620444) is caused by mutation in the FOXI3 gene (612351) on chromosome 2p11. See also hemifacial microsomia with radial defects (141400) and oculoauriculofrontonasal dysplasia (OAFNS; 601452), which may be part of the OAV spectrum. Another disorder that overlaps clinically with CFM is Townes-Brocks syndrome (TBS; 107480). Reviews Ronde et al. (2023) reviewed the international classification and clinical management strategies for craniofacial microsomia and microtia, and tabulated survey responses from 57 professionals involved in management of CFM patients. The authors noted that although the International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM) criteria for CFM exclude isolated microtia from the phenotypic spectrum of CFM, the question of whether isolated microtia can be considered the mildest form of CFM is debated in the literature. No consensus was reached in their survey, as a majority of respondents agreed with the ICHOM criteria but also considered isolated microtia to be a mild form of CFM. In addition, the authors noted that although vertebral, cardiac, and renal anomalies have been reported in CFM patients, there was no consensus on screening for such extracraniofacial anomalies.
Cataract 19 multiple types
MedGen UID:
815334
Concept ID:
C3809004
Disease or Syndrome
CTRCT19 is characterized by autosomal dominant or recessive cataract of various types, including pulverulent, late-onset cortical pulverulent, total, nuclear, membranous, lamellar, sutural, and posterior polar cataract. Other ocular features include nystagmus, amblyopia, and esotropia. Intrafamilial and intraindividual variability has been reported (Pras et al., 2002; Ponnam et al., 2008; Berry et al., 2020; Pei et al., 2020; Wang et al., 2021; Fernandez-Alcalde et al., 2021; Berry et al., 2022).
Proximal myopathy with extrapyramidal signs
MedGen UID:
816615
Concept ID:
C3810285
Disease or Syndrome
Myopathy with extrapyramidal signs is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early childhood onset of proximal muscle weakness and learning disabilities. While the muscle weakness is static, most patients develop progressive extrapyramidal signs that may become disabling (summary by Logan et al., 2014). Brain MRI in 1 patient showed congenital malformations, including polymicrogyria and cerebellar dysplasia (Wilton et al., 2020).
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 6
MedGen UID:
854714
Concept ID:
C3888007
Disease or Syndrome
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, a bleeding diathesis, and, in some individuals, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. Ocular findings include reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in variable bruising, epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects occur primarily in individuals with pathogenic variants in AP3B1 and AP3D1.
Cataract 17 multiple types
MedGen UID:
854781
Concept ID:
C3888124
Disease or Syndrome
Mutations in the CRYBB1 gene have been found to cause multiple types of cataract, which have been described as congenital nuclear, congenital nuclear with anterior and posterior Y-suture and polar opacities, and pulverulent. The preferred title/symbol for this entry was formerly 'Cataract, Congenital Nuclear, Autosomal Recessive 3; CATCN3.'
Ataxia - intellectual disability - oculomotor apraxia - cerebellar cysts syndrome
MedGen UID:
863258
Concept ID:
C4014821
Disease or Syndrome
Poretti-Boltshauser syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cerebellar dysplasia, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, cerebellar cysts in most patients, high myopia, variable retinal dystrophy, and eye movement abnormalities. Affected individuals have delayed motor development and often have speech delay. Cognitive function can range from normal to intellectually disabled (summary by Aldinger et al., 2014).
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 33
MedGen UID:
899389
Concept ID:
C4225375
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Any autosomal dominant non-syndromic intellectual disability in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the DPP6 gene.
Autosomal dominant intellectual disability-craniofacial anomalies-cardiac defects syndrome
MedGen UID:
903767
Concept ID:
C4225396
Disease or Syndrome
Arboleda-Tham syndrome (ARTHS) is an autosomal dominant disorder with the core features of impaired intellectual development, speech delay, microcephaly, cardiac anomalies, and gastrointestinal complications (summary by Kennedy et al., 2019).
Spondylo-ocular syndrome
MedGen UID:
900371
Concept ID:
C4225412
Disease or Syndrome
Spondylo-ocular syndrome is a very rare association of spinal and ocular manifestations that is characterized by dense cataracts, and retinal detachment along with generalized osteoporosis and platyspondyly. Mild craniofacial dysphormism has been reported including short neck, large head and prominent eyebrows.
Optic atrophy 11
MedGen UID:
934595
Concept ID:
C4310628
Disease or Syndrome
OPA11 is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, intellectual disability, ataxia, optic atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy on brain imaging. Laboratory studies are consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction (summary by Hartmann et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of optic atrophy, see OPA1 (165500).
Intellectual disability, X-linked 106
MedGen UID:
1389156
Concept ID:
C4478379
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Neurodevelopmental disorder with midbrain and hindbrain malformations
MedGen UID:
1385580
Concept ID:
C4479613
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with midbrain and hindbrain malformations (NEDMHM) is an autosomal recessive disorder comprising impaired intellectual development, speech delay, mild microcephaly, and midbrain-hindbrain malformation (Ravindran et al., 2017).
Rahman syndrome
MedGen UID:
1388282
Concept ID:
C4479637
Disease or Syndrome
The name HIST1H1E syndrome has been proposed as a mnemonic for the characteristic features of this emerging, recognizable phenotype: hypotonia; intellectual disability with behavioral issues; skeletal; testes (undescended) and thyroid; heart anomalies (most commonly atrial septal defect); and ectodermal issues (including sparse hair, thin nails, and abnormal dentition). In the 47 affected individuals reported to date, predominant findings were intellectual disability (ranging from mild to profound) and behavioral problems (combinations of anxiety/phobias, obsessive behaviors, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and autistic spectrum disorder/traits among others). Skeletal involvement can include scoliosis and decreased bone mineral density. Other findings in some include seizures, craniosynostosis, and hearing loss. Life expectancy does not appear to be reduced in HIST1H1E syndrome.
Skraban-Deardorff syndrome
MedGen UID:
1627555
Concept ID:
C4539927
Disease or Syndrome
WDR26-related intellectual disability (ID) is characterized by developmental delay / intellectual disability, characteristic facial features, hypotonia, epilepsy, and infant feeding difficulties. To date 15 individuals, ages 24 months to 34 years, have been reported. Developmental delay is present in all individuals and ranges from mild to severe. All individuals have delayed speech. Although some begin to develop speech in the second year, others have remained nonverbal. Seizures, present in all affected individuals reported to date, can be febrile or non-febrile (tonic-clonic, absence, rolandic seizures); most seizures are self limited or respond well to standard treatment. Affected individuals are generally described as happy and socially engaging; several have stereotypies / autistic features (repetitive or rocking behavior, abnormal hand movements or posturing, and at times self-stimulation).
Neurodevelopmental disorder, mitochondrial, with abnormal movements and lactic acidosis, with or without seizures
MedGen UID:
1619876
Concept ID:
C4540192
Disease or Syndrome
NEMMLAS is an autosomal recessive multisystemic disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, intellectual disability, and abnormal motor function, including hypotonia, dystonia, ataxia, and spasticity. Patient tissues may show deficiencies in one or more of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) enzymes, but this is not a constant finding (summary by Wortmann et al., 2017).
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 33
MedGen UID:
1623699
Concept ID:
C4540209
Disease or Syndrome
COXPD33 is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder resulting from a defect in mitochondrial energy metabolism. The phenotype is highly variable, ranging from death in infancy to adult-onset progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO) and myopathy. A common finding is cardiomyopathy and increased serum lactate (summary by Feichtinger et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Brain small vessel disease 1 with or without ocular anomalies
MedGen UID:
1647320
Concept ID:
C4551998
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of COL4A1-related disorders includes: small-vessel brain disease of varying severity including porencephaly, variably associated with eye defects (retinal arterial tortuosity, Axenfeld-Rieger anomaly, cataract) and systemic findings (kidney involvement, muscle cramps, cerebral aneurysms, Raynaud phenomenon, cardiac arrhythmia, and hemolytic anemia). On imaging studies, small-vessel brain disease is manifest as diffuse periventricular leukoencephalopathy, lacunar infarcts, microhemorrhage, dilated perivascular spaces, and deep intracerebral hemorrhages. Clinically, small-vessel brain disease manifests as infantile hemiparesis, seizures, single or recurrent hemorrhagic stroke, ischemic stroke, and isolated migraine with aura. Porencephaly (fluid-filled cavities in the brain detected by CT or MRI) is typically manifest as infantile hemiparesis, seizures, and intellectual disability; however, on occasion it can be an incidental finding. HANAC (hereditary angiopathy with nephropathy, aneurysms, and muscle cramps) syndrome usually associates asymptomatic small-vessel brain disease, cerebral large vessel involvement (i.e., aneurysms), and systemic findings involving the kidney, muscle, and small vessels of the eye. Two additional phenotypes include isolated retinal artery tortuosity and nonsyndromic autosomal dominant congenital cataract.
Leukodystrophy, hypomyelinating, 15
MedGen UID:
1633653
Concept ID:
C4693733
Disease or Syndrome
Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy-15 is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by onset of motor and cognitive impairment in the first or second decade of life. Features include dystonia, ataxia, spasticity, and dysphagia. Most patients develop severe optic atrophy, and some have hearing loss. Brain imaging shows hypomyelinating leukodystrophy with thin corpus callosum. The severity of the disorder is variable (summary by Mendes et al., 2018) For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HLD, see 312080.
Cataract 2, multiple types
MedGen UID:
1648415
Concept ID:
C4721890
Disease or Syndrome
Mutations in the CRYGC gene have been found to cause several types of cataract, which have been described as Coppock-like; embryonic, fetal, infantile nuclear; zonular pulverulent; and lamellar. Some patients also exhibit microcornea. Before it was known that mutations in the CRYGC gene cause several types of cataract, this entry was titled 'Cataract, Coppock-like,' with the symbol CCL.
Intellectual developmental disorder with or without epilepsy or cerebellar ataxia
MedGen UID:
1648354
Concept ID:
C4748041
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with spasticity and poor growth
MedGen UID:
1648309
Concept ID:
C4748081
Disease or Syndrome
Cataract 48
MedGen UID:
1684457
Concept ID:
C5193082
Disease or Syndrome
Cataract-48 (CTRCT48) is characterized by infantile or early-childhood cataracts and visual impairment (Ansar et al., 2018).
Hypotonia, hypoventilation, impaired intellectual development, dysautonomia, epilepsy, and eye abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1672905
Concept ID:
C5193124
Disease or Syndrome
Hypotonia, hypoventilation, impaired intellectual development, dysautonomia, epilepsy, and eye abnormalities (HIDEA) is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental syndrome characterized by global developmental delay, poor or absent speech, hypotonia, variable ocular movement and visual abnormalities, and respiratory difficulties, including hypoventilation, and sleep apnea. Patients may have significant breathing problems during respiratory infections that may lead to early death (summary by Rahikkala et al., 2019).
Noonan syndrome 12
MedGen UID:
1684730
Concept ID:
C5231432
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population.
Neurodevelopmental disorder with dysmorphic facies and distal skeletal anomalies
MedGen UID:
1684792
Concept ID:
C5231448
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with dysmorphic facies and distal skeletal anomalies (NEDDFSA) is a global neurodevelopmental disorder with highly variable features. Patients often show poor feeding, poor overall growth, and hypotonia from early infancy, followed by mildly delayed motor development, poor language acquisition, and behavioral abnormalities. Intellectual development varies from severe with absent speech to mild with the ability to attend special schools. Common features include dysmorphic facial features with notable eye anomalies, joint hypermobility, and mild skeletal anomalies of the hands and feet (summary by Carapito et al., 2019).
Catifa syndrome
MedGen UID:
1684686
Concept ID:
C5231492
Disease or Syndrome
CATIFA syndrome is characterized by global developmental delay and impaired intellectual development ranging from mild to severe, with most patients exhibiting attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Patients show an elongated face with long philtrum and small ears. Ocular anomalies include congenital cataracts, strabismus, and amblyopia, which may be associated with reduced vision; other anomalies include cleft lip and/or palate and misaligned teeth with extensive caries (Unlu et al., 2020).
Suleiman-El-Hattab syndrome
MedGen UID:
1738652
Concept ID:
C5436458
Disease or Syndrome
Suleiman-El-Hattab syndrome (SULEHS) is an autosomal recessive multisystem developmental disorder characterized by hypotonia and feeding difficulties soon after birth, global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development and poor expressive speech, and a general happy demeanor. There is a distinctive facial appearance with microcephaly, thick arched eyebrows with synophrys, hypertelorism, epicanthal folds, low-set ears, broad nasal bridge, and thin upper lip. Additional more variable features include recurrent respiratory infections, cardiovascular malformations, cryptorchidism, seizures, and distal anomalies of the hands and feet (summary by Suleiman et al., 2019).
Neurodegeneration, childhood-onset, with hypotonia, respiratory insufficiency, and brain imaging abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1781967
Concept ID:
C5543020
Disease or Syndrome
Childhood-onset neurodegeneration with hypotonia, respiratory insufficiency, and brain imaging abnormalities (CONRIBA) is characterized by severe global developmental delay apparent in infancy or early childhood. Affected individuals have hypotonia with impaired motor development, respiratory insufficiency, and feeding difficulties requiring intervention. Intellectual and speech development is also delayed, and most have visual defects, including cortical visual blindness, nystagmus, and esotropia. The disorder is progressive, as manifest by developmental regression consistent with neurodegeneration. Although overt seizures are not observed, some patients may have episodic hypertonia or apnea, and EEG may show nonspecific abnormalities. Brain imaging shows unique diffusion restriction signal abnormalities affecting the brainstem, cerebellum, and corticospinal tracts. Early death may occur (summary by Polovitskaya et al., 2020).
Short stature, oligodontia, dysmorphic facies, and motor delay
MedGen UID:
1787876
Concept ID:
C5543206
Disease or Syndrome
SOFM is characterized by marked short stature, oligodontia, mild facial dysmorphism, and motor delay. Endosteal hyperostosis has also been observed, and patients may exhibit some features of progeria (Terhal et al., 2020; Beauregard-Lacroix et al., 2020).
Neuroocular syndrome
MedGen UID:
1790414
Concept ID:
C5551362
Disease or Syndrome
Neuroocular syndrome (NOC) encompasses a broad spectrum of overlapping anomalies, with developmental delay or impaired intellectual development as a consistent finding. Eye abnormalities show marked variability in the type and severity of defects, and include anophthalmia, microphthalmia, and coloboma. Other common systemic features include congenital heart and kidney defects, hypotonia, failure to thrive, and microcephaly (summary by Chowdhury et al., 2021).
Intellectual developmental disorder, X-linked, syndromic, with pigmentary mosaicism and coarse facies
MedGen UID:
1794140
Concept ID:
C5561930
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked syndromic intellectual developmental disorder with pigmentary mosaicism and coarse facies (MRXSPF) is characterized by a phenotypic triad of severe developmental delay, coarse facial dysmorphisms, and Blaschkoid pigmentary mosaicism. Additional clinical features may include epilepsy, orthopedic abnormalities, hypotonia, and growth abnormalities. The disorder affects both males and females (Villegas et al., 2019; Diaz et al., 2020).
Usmani-Riazuddin syndrome, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1794162
Concept ID:
C5561952
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant Usmani-Riazzudin syndrome (USRISD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development and speech delay, hypotonia, and behavioral abnormalities, most commonly aggressive behavior. More variable additional features may include seizures and distal limb anomalies (summary by Usmani et al., 2021).
Developmental delay with variable neurologic and brain abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1794270
Concept ID:
C5562060
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental delay with variable neurologic and brain abnormalities (DENBA) is characterized most often by motor and speech delay apparent from early childhood. Most patients have delayed walking and variably impaired intellectual development. Additional neurologic features may include seizures, spasticity, and ocular abnormalities. Brain imaging often shows thin corpus callosum and may show white matter atrophy, myelination abnormalities, or enlarged ventricles. The severity of the disorder and clinical manifestations are highly variable (summary by Malhotra et al., 2021).
Dystonia 34, myoclonic
MedGen UID:
1805016
Concept ID:
C5676907
Disease or Syndrome
Myoclonic dystonia-34 (DYT34) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by childhood-onset dystonia primarily involving the hands and neck, with a fast tremor with superimposed myoclonus (Balint et al., 2020).
Tessadori-van Haaften neurodevelopmental syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1810348
Concept ID:
C5676922
Disease or Syndrome
Tessadori-Bicknell-van Haaften neurodevelopmental syndrome-1 (TEBIVANED1) is characterized by poor overall growth with short stature, microcephaly, hypotonia, profound global developmental delay often with poor or absent speech, and characteristic dysmorphic facial features, including hypertelorism and abnormal nose. Other variable neurologic and systemic features may also occur (Tessadori et al., 2017). Genetic Heterogeneity of Tessadori-van Haaften Neurodevelopmental Syndrome See also TEBIVANED2 (619759), caused by mutation in the H4C11 gene (602826); TEBIVANED3 (619950), caused by mutation in the H4C5 gene (602830); and TEBIVANED4 (619951), caused by mutation in the H4C9 gene (602833).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with central hypotonia and dysmorphic facies
MedGen UID:
1807420
Concept ID:
C5676944
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with central hypotonia and dysmorphic facies (NEDCHF) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by global developmental delay, impaired intellectual development, seizures, distinctive facial features, scoliosis, delayed closure of the anterior fontanel, and nonspecific brain abnormalities (Wakeling et al., 2021).
Chilton-Okur-Chung neurodevelopmental syndrome
MedGen UID:
1803276
Concept ID:
C5677022
Disease or Syndrome
Chilton-Okur-Chung neurodevelopmental syndrome (CHOCNS) is characterized mainly by global developmental delay with variably impaired intellectual development and occasional speech delay. Most patients have behavioral abnormalities, including autism spectrum disorder, ADHD, and aggression. About half of patients have dysmorphic facial features, and about half have nonspecific brain abnormalities, including thin corpus callosum. Rare involvement of other organ systems may be present. At least 1 child with normal development at age 2.5 years has been reported (Chilton et al., 2020).
Intellectual developmental disorder with autism and dysmorphic facies
MedGen UID:
1823979
Concept ID:
C5774206
Disease or Syndrome
Intellectual developmental disorder with autism and dysmorphic facies (IDDADF) is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by moderate to severely impaired cognitive development associated with behavioral abnormalities, including autism spectrum disorder. Affected individuals have variable dysmorphic facial features (Al-Amri et al., 2022)
Branchial arch abnormalities, choanal atresia, athelia, hearing loss, and hypothyroidism syndrome
MedGen UID:
1824056
Concept ID:
C5774283
Disease or Syndrome
Branchial arch abnormalities, choanal atresia, athelia, hearing loss, and hypothyroidism syndrome (BCAHH) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by choanal atresia, athelia or hypoplastic nipples, branchial sinus abnormalities, neck pits, lacrimal duct anomalies, hearing loss, external ear malformations, and thyroid abnormalities. Additional features may include developmental delay, impaired intellectual development, and growth failure/retardation (summary by Cuvertino et al., 2020 and Baldridge et al., 2020).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

McConaghy JR, McGuirk R
Am Fam Physician 2019 Dec 15;100(12):745-750. PMID: 31845774
Park SH
Korean J Ophthalmol 2019 Dec;33(6):557-568. doi: 10.3341/kjo.2019.0061. PMID: 31833253Free PMC Article
Papageorgiou E, Asproudis I, Maconachie G, Tsironi EE, Gottlob I
Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol 2019 Jun;257(6):1061-1078. Epub 2019 Jan 31 doi: 10.1007/s00417-019-04254-w. PMID: 30706134

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

McConaghy JR, McGuirk R
Am Fam Physician 2019 Dec 15;100(12):745-750. PMID: 31845774
Hunter D, Cotter S
Vis Neurosci 2018 Jan;35:E013. doi: 10.1017/S0952523817000207. PMID: 29905128
DeSantis D
Pediatr Clin North Am 2014 Jun;61(3):505-18. Epub 2014 Apr 14 doi: 10.1016/j.pcl.2014.03.006. PMID: 24852148
Barrett BT, Bradley A, Candy TR
Prog Retin Eye Res 2013 Sep;36:120-58. Epub 2013 Jun 15 doi: 10.1016/j.preteyeres.2013.05.001. PMID: 23773832Free PMC Article
Birch EE
Prog Retin Eye Res 2013 Mar;33:67-84. Epub 2012 Nov 29 doi: 10.1016/j.preteyeres.2012.11.001. PMID: 23201436Free PMC Article

Diagnosis

Levi DM
Handb Clin Neurol 2021;178:13-30. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-12-821377-3.00002-7. PMID: 33832673
Levi DM
Vision Res 2020 Nov;176:118-129. Epub 2020 Aug 28 doi: 10.1016/j.visres.2020.07.014. PMID: 32866759Free PMC Article
McConaghy JR, McGuirk R
Am Fam Physician 2019 Dec 15;100(12):745-750. PMID: 31845774
Park SH
Korean J Ophthalmol 2019 Dec;33(6):557-568. doi: 10.3341/kjo.2019.0061. PMID: 31833253Free PMC Article
DeSantis D
Pediatr Clin North Am 2014 Jun;61(3):505-18. Epub 2014 Apr 14 doi: 10.1016/j.pcl.2014.03.006. PMID: 24852148

Therapy

Xiao S, Angjeli E, Wu HC, Gaier ED, Gomez S, Travers DA, Binenbaum G, Langer R, Hunter DG, Repka MX; Luminopia Pivotal Trial Group
Ophthalmology 2022 Jan;129(1):77-85. Epub 2021 Sep 14 doi: 10.1016/j.ophtha.2021.09.001. PMID: 34534556
Park SH
Korean J Ophthalmol 2019 Dec;33(6):557-568. doi: 10.3341/kjo.2019.0061. PMID: 31833253Free PMC Article
Williams C
BMJ Clin Evid 2009 Sep 16;2009 PMID: 21726480Free PMC Article
Holmes JM, Clarke MP
Lancet 2006 Apr 22;367(9519):1343-51. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(06)68581-4. PMID: 16631913
Fleck BW
Br J Ophthalmol 2003 Mar;87(3):255-6. doi: 10.1136/bjo.87.3.255. PMID: 12598430Free PMC Article

Prognosis

Lenhart PD, Lambert SR
Surv Ophthalmol 2022 Sep-Oct;67(5):1476-1505. Epub 2022 Mar 17 doi: 10.1016/j.survophthal.2022.03.005. PMID: 35307324Free PMC Article
Parikh RN, Simon JW, Zobal-Ratner JL, Barry GP
J Binocul Vis Ocul Motil 2018 Oct-Dec;68(4):137-139. Epub 2018 Oct 17 doi: 10.1080/2576117X.2018.1527639. PMID: 30332338
Gencarelli JR, Murphy A, Samargandi OA, Bezuhly M
J Craniofac Surg 2016 Oct;27(7):1629-1635. doi: 10.1097/SCS.0000000000003085. PMID: 27648656
Kanonidou E
Int Ophthalmol 2011 Jun;31(3):249-56. Epub 2011 Mar 20 doi: 10.1007/s10792-011-9434-z. PMID: 21424553
Zetterström C, Lundvall A, Kugelberg M
J Cataract Refract Surg 2005 Apr;31(4):824-40. doi: 10.1016/j.jcrs.2005.01.012. PMID: 15899463

Clinical prediction guides

Ghasia F, Wang J
J Neurol Sci 2022 Oct 15;441:120373. Epub 2022 Aug 3 doi: 10.1016/j.jns.2022.120373. PMID: 36007287
Papageorgiou E, Asproudis I, Maconachie G, Tsironi EE, Gottlob I
Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol 2019 Jun;257(6):1061-1078. Epub 2019 Jan 31 doi: 10.1007/s00417-019-04254-w. PMID: 30706134
Holmes JM, Levi DM
Vis Neurosci 2018 Jan;35:E015. doi: 10.1017/S0952523817000220. PMID: 29905125
West S, Williams C
BMJ Clin Evid 2011 Jun 30;2011 PMID: 21714945Free PMC Article
Williams C
BMJ Clin Evid 2009 Sep 16;2009 PMID: 21726480Free PMC Article

Recent systematic reviews

Smith SM, Wallace E, O'Dowd T, Fortin M
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2021 Jan 15;1(1):CD006560. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD006560.pub4. PMID: 33448337Free PMC Article
Taylor K, Elliott S
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2014 Jul 23;(7):CD006461. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD006461.pub4. PMID: 25051925
West S, Williams C
BMJ Clin Evid 2011 Jun 30;2011 PMID: 21714945Free PMC Article
Carlton J, Kaltenthaler E
Eye (Lond) 2011 Apr;25(4):403-13. Epub 2011 Jan 28 doi: 10.1038/eye.2011.4. PMID: 21274010Free PMC Article
Williams C
BMJ Clin Evid 2009 Sep 16;2009 PMID: 21726480Free PMC Article

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