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Growth abnormality

MedGen UID:
808205
Concept ID:
C0262361
Finding
Synonyms: Abnormal growth; Growth issue
 
HPO: HP:0001507

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVGrowth abnormality

Conditions with this feature

Acrocephalosyndactyly type I
MedGen UID:
7858
Concept ID:
C0001193
Congenital Abnormality
Apert syndrome is characterized by the presence of multisuture craniosynostosis, midface retrusion, and syndactyly of the hands with fusion of the second through fourth nails. Almost all affected individuals have coronal craniosynostosis, and a majority also have involvement of the sagittal and lambdoid sutures. The midface in Apert syndrome is underdeveloped as well as retruded; a subset of affected individuals have cleft palate. The hand in Apert syndrome always includes fusion of the middle three digits; the thumb and fifth finger are sometimes also involved. Feeding issues, dental abnormalities, hearing loss, hyperhidrosis, and progressive synostosis of multiple bones (skull, hands, feet, carpus, tarsus, and cervical vertebrae) are also common. Multilevel airway obstruction may be present and can be due to narrowing of the nasal passages, tongue-based airway obstruction, and/or tracheal anomalies. Nonprogressive ventriculomegaly is present in a majority of individuals, with a small subset having true hydrocephalus. Most individuals with Apert syndrome have normal intelligence or mild intellectual disability; moderate-to-severe intellectual disability has been reported in some individuals. A minority of affected individuals have structural cardiac abnormalities, true gastrointestinal malformations, and anomalies of the genitourinary tract.
Alkaptonuria
MedGen UID:
1413
Concept ID:
C0002066
Disease or Syndrome
Alkaptonuria is caused by deficiency of homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, an enzyme that converts homogentisic acid (HGA) to maleylacetoacetic acid in the tyrosine degradation pathway. The three major features of alkaptonuria are dark urine or urine that turns dark on standing, ochronosis (bluish-black pigmentation in connective tissue), and arthritis of the spine and larger joints. Ochronosis generally occurs after age 30 years; arthritis often begins in the third decade. Other manifestations can include pigment in the sclera, ear cartilage, and skin of the hands; aortic or mitral valve calcification or regurgitation and occasionally aortic dilatation; renal stones; prostate stones; and hypothyroidism.
Osteogenesis imperfecta type I
MedGen UID:
9799
Concept ID:
C0023931
Disease or Syndrome
COL1A1/2 osteogenesis imperfecta (COL1A1/2-OI) is characterized by fractures with minimal or absent trauma, variable dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI), and, in adult years, hearing loss. The clinical features of COL1A1/2-OI represent a continuum ranging from perinatal lethality to individuals with severe skeletal deformities, mobility impairments, and very short stature to nearly asymptomatic individuals with a mild predisposition to fractures, normal dentition, normal stature, and normal life span. Fractures can occur in any bone but are most common in the extremities. DI is characterized by gray or brown teeth that may appear translucent, wear down, and break easily. COL1A1/2-OI has been classified into four types based on clinical presentation and radiographic findings. This classification system can be helpful in providing information about prognosis and management for a given individual. The four more common OI types are now referred to as follows: Classic non-deforming OI with blue sclerae (previously OI type I). Perinatally lethal OI (previously OI type II). Progressively deforming OI (previously OI type III). Common variable OI with normal sclerae (previously OI type IV).
Androgen resistance syndrome
MedGen UID:
21102
Concept ID:
C0039585
Disease or Syndrome
Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is typically characterized by evidence of feminization (i.e., undermasculinization) of the external genitalia at birth, abnormal secondary sexual development in puberty, and infertility in individuals with a 46,XY karyotype. AIS represents a spectrum of defects in androgen action and can be subdivided into three broad phenotypes: Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS), with typical female external genitalia. Partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS) with predominantly female, predominantly male, or ambiguous external genitalia. Mild androgen insensitivity syndrome (MAIS) with typical male external genitalia.
Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-III-A
MedGen UID:
39264
Concept ID:
C0086647
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III) is a multisystem lysosomal storage disease characterized by progressive central nervous system degeneration manifest as severe intellectual disability (ID), developmental regression, and other neurologic manifestations including autism spectrum disorder (ASD), behavioral problems, and sleep disturbances. Disease onset is typically before age ten years. Disease course may be rapidly or slowly progressive; some individuals with an extremely attenuated disease course present in mid-to-late adulthood with early-onset dementia with or without a history of ID. Systemic manifestations can include musculoskeletal problems (joint stiffness, contractures, scoliosis, and hip dysplasia), hearing loss, respiratory tract and sinopulmonary infections, and cardiac disease (valvular thickening, defects in the cardiac conduction system). Neurologic decline is seen in all affected individuals; however, clinical severity varies within and among the four MPS III subtypes (defined by the enzyme involved) and even among members of the same family. Death usually occurs in the second or third decade of life secondary to neurologic regression or respiratory tract infections.
Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-III-C
MedGen UID:
39477
Concept ID:
C0086649
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III) is a multisystem lysosomal storage disease characterized by progressive central nervous system degeneration manifest as severe intellectual disability (ID), developmental regression, and other neurologic manifestations including autism spectrum disorder (ASD), behavioral problems, and sleep disturbances. Disease onset is typically before age ten years. Disease course may be rapidly or slowly progressive; some individuals with an extremely attenuated disease course present in mid-to-late adulthood with early-onset dementia with or without a history of ID. Systemic manifestations can include musculoskeletal problems (joint stiffness, contractures, scoliosis, and hip dysplasia), hearing loss, respiratory tract and sinopulmonary infections, and cardiac disease (valvular thickening, defects in the cardiac conduction system). Neurologic decline is seen in all affected individuals; however, clinical severity varies within and among the four MPS III subtypes (defined by the enzyme involved) and even among members of the same family. Death usually occurs in the second or third decade of life secondary to neurologic regression or respiratory tract infections.
Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-III-D
MedGen UID:
88602
Concept ID:
C0086650
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III) is a multisystem lysosomal storage disease characterized by progressive central nervous system degeneration manifest as severe intellectual disability (ID), developmental regression, and other neurologic manifestations including autism spectrum disorder (ASD), behavioral problems, and sleep disturbances. Disease onset is typically before age ten years. Disease course may be rapidly or slowly progressive; some individuals with an extremely attenuated disease course present in mid-to-late adulthood with early-onset dementia with or without a history of ID. Systemic manifestations can include musculoskeletal problems (joint stiffness, contractures, scoliosis, and hip dysplasia), hearing loss, respiratory tract and sinopulmonary infections, and cardiac disease (valvular thickening, defects in the cardiac conduction system). Neurologic decline is seen in all affected individuals; however, clinical severity varies within and among the four MPS III subtypes (defined by the enzyme involved) and even among members of the same family. Death usually occurs in the second or third decade of life secondary to neurologic regression or respiratory tract infections.
Juvenile myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis AND stroke
MedGen UID:
56485
Concept ID:
C0162671
Disease or Syndrome
MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes) is a multisystem disorder with protean manifestations. The vast majority of affected individuals develop signs and symptoms of MELAS between ages two and 40 years. Common clinical manifestations include stroke-like episodes, encephalopathy with seizures and/or dementia, muscle weakness and exercise intolerance, normal early psychomotor development, recurrent headaches, recurrent vomiting, hearing impairment, peripheral neuropathy, learning disability, and short stature. During the stroke-like episodes neuroimaging shows increased T2-weighted signal areas that do not correspond to the classic vascular distribution (hence the term "stroke-like"). Lactic acidemia is very common and muscle biopsies typically show ragged red fibers.
Cat eye syndrome
MedGen UID:
120543
Concept ID:
C0265493
Disease or Syndrome
Cat eye syndrome (CES) is characterized clinically by the combination of coloboma of the iris and anal atresia with fistula, downslanting palpebral fissures, preauricular tags and/or pits, frequent occurrence of heart and renal malformations, and normal or near-normal mental development. A small supernumerary chromosome (smaller than chromosome 21) is present, frequently has 2 centromeres, is bisatellited, and represents an inv dup(22)(q11).
Anonychia
MedGen UID:
120563
Concept ID:
C0265998
Congenital Abnormality
Congenital anonychia is defined as the absence of fingernails and toenails. Anonychia and its milder phenotypic variant, hyponychia, usually occur as a feature of genetic syndromes, in association with significant skeletal and limb anomalies. Isolated nonsyndromic congenital anonychia/hyponychia is a rare entity that usually follows autosomal recessive inheritance with variable expression, even within a given family. The nail phenotypes observed range from no nail field to a nail field of reduced size with an absent or rudimentary nail (summary by Bruchle et al., 2008). This form of nail disorder is referred to here as nonsyndromic congenital nail disorder-4 (NDNC4). For a list of other nonsyndromic congenital nail disorders and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity, see NDNC1 (161050).
Congenital secretory diarrhea, chloride type
MedGen UID:
78631
Concept ID:
C0267662
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital secretory chloride diarrhea is an autosomal recessive form of severe chronic diarrhea characterized by excretion of large amounts of watery stool containing high levels of chloride, resulting in dehydration, hypokalemia, and metabolic alkalosis. The electrolyte disorder resembles the renal disorder Bartter syndrome (see 607364), except that chloride diarrhea is not associated with calcium level abnormalities (summary by Choi et al., 2009). Genetic Heterogeneity of Diarrhea Other forms of diarrhea include DIAR2 (251850), caused by mutation in the MYO5B gene (606540) on 18q21; DIAR3 (270420), caused by mutation in the SPINT2 gene (605124) on 19q13; DIAR4 (610370), caused by mutation in the NEUROG3 gene (604882) on 10q21; DIAR5 (613217), caused by mutation in the EPCAM gene (185535) on 2p21; DIAR6 (614616), caused by mutation in the GUCY2C gene (601330) on 12p12; DIAR7 (615863) caused by mutation in the DGAT1 gene (604900) on 8q24; DIAR8 (616868), caused by mutation in the SLC9A3 gene (182307) on 5p15; DIAR9 (618168), caused by mutation in the WNT2B gene (601968) on 1p13; DIAR10 (618183), caused by mutation in the PLVAP gene (607647) on 19p13; DIAR11 (618662), caused by deletion of the intestine critical region (ICR) on chromosome 16p13, resulting in loss of expression of the flanking gene PERCC1 (618656); DIAR12 (619445), caused by mutation in the STX3 gene (600876) on 11q12; and DIAR13 (620357), caused by mutation in the ACSL5 gene (605677) on chromosome 10q25.
Hooft disease
MedGen UID:
75686
Concept ID:
C0268479
Disease or Syndrome
Juvenile nephropathic cystinosis
MedGen UID:
75701
Concept ID:
C0268626
Congenital Abnormality
Cystinosis comprises three allelic phenotypes: Nephropathic cystinosis in untreated children is characterized by renal Fanconi syndrome, poor growth, hypophosphatemic/calcipenic rickets, impaired glomerular function resulting in complete glomerular failure, and accumulation of cystine in almost all cells, leading to cellular dysfunction with tissue and organ impairment. The typical untreated child has short stature, rickets, and photophobia. Failure to thrive is generally noticed after approximately age six months; signs of renal tubular Fanconi syndrome (polyuria, polydipsia, dehydration, and acidosis) appear as early as age six months; corneal crystals can be present before age one year and are always present after age 16 months. Prior to the use of renal transplantation and cystine-depleting therapy, the life span in nephropathic cystinosis was no longer than ten years. With these interventions, affected individuals can survive at least into the mid-forties or fifties with satisfactory quality of life. Intermediate cystinosis is characterized by all the typical manifestations of nephropathic cystinosis, but onset is at a later age. Renal glomerular failure occurs in all untreated affected individuals, usually between ages 15 and 25 years. The non-nephropathic (ocular) form of cystinosis is characterized clinically only by photophobia resulting from corneal cystine crystal accumulation.
Sialuria
MedGen UID:
137980
Concept ID:
C0342853
Disease or Syndrome
Sialuria is a rare inborn error of metabolism in which excessive free sialic acid is synthesized. Clinical features include hepatosplenomegaly, coarse facial features, and varying degrees of developmental delay (summary by Enns et al., 2001).
Worth disease
MedGen UID:
140932
Concept ID:
C0432273
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant endosteal hyperostosis is a generalized bone dysplasia characterized by a cortical thickening of the long bones, with no alteration in external shape, and a remarkable resistance of the bone to fracture. The skeleton is normal in childhood. Facial metamorphoses occur in adolescence, as the forehead flattens, the mandible becomes elongated, and the gonial angle decreases. An enlarging osseous prominence (torus palatinus) develops in the hard palate, which may lead to malocclusion or loss of teeth (summary by Van Wesenbeeck et al., 2003).
Perlman syndrome
MedGen UID:
162909
Concept ID:
C0796113
Disease or Syndrome
Perlman syndrome (PRLMNS) is an autosomal recessive congenital overgrowth syndrome with similarities to Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS; 130650). Affected children are large at birth, are hypotonic, and show organomegaly, characteristic facial dysmorphisms (inverted V-shaped upper lip, prominent forehead, deep-set eyes, broad and flat nasal bridge, and low-set ears), renal anomalies (nephromegaly and hydronephrosis), frequent neurodevelopmental delay, and high neonatal mortality. Perlman syndrome is associated with a high risk of Wilms tumor, with a 64% incidence in infants surviving beyond the neonatal period. The tumor is diagnosed at an earlier age in these individuals compared with sporadic cases (less than 2 years and 3-4 years of age, respectively), and there is a high frequency of bilateral tumors (55%). Histologic examination of the kidneys in children with Perlman syndrome shows frequent nephroblastomatosis, which is a precursor lesion for Wilms tumor (summary by Astuti et al., 2012).
Andersen Tawil syndrome
MedGen UID:
327586
Concept ID:
C1563715
Disease or Syndrome
Andersen-Tawil syndrome (ATS) is characterized by a triad of: episodic flaccid muscle weakness (i.e., periodic paralysis); ventricular arrhythmias and prolonged QT interval; and anomalies including low-set ears, widely spaced eyes, small mandible, fifth-digit clinodactyly, syndactyly, short stature, and scoliosis. Affected individuals present in the first or second decade with either cardiac symptoms (palpitations and/or syncope) or weakness that occurs spontaneously following prolonged rest or following rest after exertion. Mild permanent weakness is common. Mild learning difficulties and a distinct neurocognitive phenotype (i.e., deficits in executive function and abstract reasoning) have been described.
Laterality defects, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
322042
Concept ID:
C1832813
Disease or Syndrome
Epiphyseal dysplasia, Baumann type
MedGen UID:
322764
Concept ID:
C1835830
Disease or Syndrome
Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia with metatarsal shortening
MedGen UID:
324580
Concept ID:
C1836683
Congenital Abnormality
Czech dysplasia is an autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasia characterized by early-onset, progressive pseudorheumatoid arthritis, platyspondyly, and short third and fourth toes (Marik et al., 2004; Kozlowski et al., 2004).
CHIME syndrome
MedGen UID:
341214
Concept ID:
C1848392
Disease or Syndrome
CHIME syndrome, also known as Zunich neuroectodermal syndrome, is an extremely rare autosomal recessive multisystem disorder clinically characterized by colobomas, congenital heart defects, migratory ichthyosiform dermatosis, mental retardation, and ear anomalies (CHIME). Other clinical features include distinctive facial features, abnormal growth, genitourinary abnormalities, seizures, and feeding difficulties (summary by Ng et al., 2012). The disorder is caused by a defect in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293).
Keutel syndrome
MedGen UID:
383722
Concept ID:
C1855607
Disease or Syndrome
Keutel syndrome (KTLS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by multiple peripheral pulmonary stenoses, brachytelephalangy, inner ear deafness, and abnormal cartilage ossification or calcification (summary by Khosroshahi et al., 2014).
Verloove Vanhorick-Brubakk syndrome
MedGen UID:
395171
Concept ID:
C1859082
Disease or Syndrome
A multiple congenital anomalies/dysmorphic syndrome with characteristics of multiple skeletal malformations (short femora and humeri, bilateral absence of metatarsal and metacarpal bone in hands and feet, bilateral partial syndactyly of fingers and toes or oligo/polysyndactyly, deformed lumbosacral spine), congenital heart disease (truncus arteriosus), lung and urogenital malformations (bilateral bilobar lungs, horseshoe kidney, cryptorchidism), and facial malformations (bilateral cleft lip and palate, micrognathia, small, low-set ears without external meatus). It is lethal in the neonatal period. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1981.
Neutropenia, severe congenital, 1, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
348506
Concept ID:
C1859966
Disease or Syndrome
ELANE-related neutropenia includes congenital neutropenia and cyclic neutropenia, both of which are primary hematologic disorders characterized by recurrent fever, skin and oropharyngeal inflammation (i.e., mouth ulcers, gingivitis, sinusitis, and pharyngitis), and cervical adenopathy. Infectious complications are generally more severe in congenital neutropenia than in cyclic neutropenia. In congenital neutropenia, omphalitis immediately after birth may be the first sign; in untreated children diarrhea, pneumonia, and deep abscesses in the liver, lungs, and subcutaneous tissues are common in the first year of life. After 15 years with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment, the risk of developing myelodysplasia (MDS) or acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is approximately 15%-25%. Cyclic neutropenia is usually diagnosed within the first year of life based on approximately three-week intervals of fever and oral ulcerations and regular oscillations of blood cell counts. Cellulitis, especially perianal cellulitis, is common during neutropenic periods. Between neutropenic periods, affected individuals are generally healthy. Symptoms improve in adulthood. Cyclic neutropenia is not associated with risk of malignancy or conversion to leukemia.
Premature aging syndrome, Okamoto type
MedGen UID:
356468
Concept ID:
C1866183
Disease or Syndrome
Maple syrup urine disease type 1A
MedGen UID:
443950
Concept ID:
C2930989
Disease or Syndrome
A maple syrup urine disease caused by mutations in BCKDHA.
Classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency
MedGen UID:
424833
Concept ID:
C2936858
Congenital Abnormality
21-hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD) is the most common cause of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), a family of autosomal recessive disorders involving impaired synthesis of cortisol from cholesterol by the adrenal cortex. In 21-OHD CAH, excessive adrenal androgen biosynthesis results in virilization in all individuals and salt wasting in some individuals. A classic form with severe enzyme deficiency and prenatal onset of virilization is distinguished from a non-classic form with mild enzyme deficiency and postnatal onset. The classic form is further divided into the simple virilizing form (~25% of affected individuals) and the salt-wasting form, in which aldosterone production is inadequate (=75% of individuals). Newborns with salt-wasting 21-OHD CAH are at risk for life-threatening salt-wasting crises. Individuals with the non-classic form of 21-OHD CAH present postnatally with signs of hyperandrogenism; females with the non-classic form are not virilized at birth.
Encephalopathy, progressive, with amyotrophy and optic atrophy
MedGen UID:
934634
Concept ID:
C4310667
Disease or Syndrome
Progressive encephalopathy with amyotrophy and optic atrophy (PEAMO) is a severe autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by delayed development with hypotonia apparent in infancy and subsequent motor regression. Most affected individuals are unable to or lose the ability to sit and show distal amyotrophy and weakness of all 4 limbs. The patients are cognitively impaired and unable to speak or have severe dysarthria. Additional features include optic atrophy, thin corpus callosum, and cerebellar atrophy (Sferra et al., 2016).
Zimmermann-Laband syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1639277
Concept ID:
C4551773
Disease or Syndrome
Zimmermann-Laband syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by gingival fibromatosis, dysplastic or absent nails, hypoplasia of the distal phalanges, scoliosis, hepatosplenomegaly, hirsutism, and abnormalities of the cartilage of the nose and/or ears (summary by Balasubramanian and Parker, 2010). Genetic Heterogeneity of Zimmermann-Laband Syndrome ZLS2 (616455) is caused by mutation in the ATP6V1B2 gene (606939) on chromosome 8p21. ZLS3 (618658) is caused by mutation in the KCNN3 gene (602983) on chromosome 1q21.
Arterial calcification, generalized, of infancy, 1
MedGen UID:
1631685
Concept ID:
C4551985
Disease or Syndrome
Generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI) is characterized by infantile onset of widespread arterial calcification and/or narrowing of large and medium-sized vessels resulting in cardiovascular findings (which can include heart failure, respiratory distress, edema, cyanosis, hypertension, and/or cardiomegaly). Additional findings can include typical skin and retinal manifestations of pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), periarticular calcifications, development of rickets after infancy, cervical spine fusion, and hearing loss. While mortality in infancy is high, survival into the third and fourth decades has occurred.
Proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1648310
Concept ID:
C4746851
Disease or Syndrome
Proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome-1 (PRAAS1) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early childhood onset of annular erythematous plaques on the face and extremities with subsequent development of partial lipodystrophy and laboratory evidence of immune dysregulation. More variable features include recurrent fever, severe joint contractures, muscle weakness and atrophy, hepatosplenomegaly, basal ganglia calcifications, and microcytic anemia (summary by Agarwal et al., 2010; Kitamura et al., 2011; Arima et al., 2011). This disorder encompasses Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome (NKJO); joint contractures, muscular atrophy, microcytic anemia, and panniculitis-induced lipodystrophy (JMP syndrome); and chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature syndrome (CANDLE). Among Japanese patients, this disorder is best described as Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome, since both Nakajo (1939) and Nishimura et al. (1950) contributed to the original phenotypic descriptions. Genetic Heterogeneity of Proteasome-Associated Autoinflammatory Syndrome See also PRAAS2 (618048), caused by mutation in the POMP gene (613386) on chromosome 13q12; PRAAS3 (617591), caused by mutation in the PSMB4 gene (602177) on chromosome 1q21; PRAAS4 (619183), caused by mutation in the PSMG2 gene (609702) on chromosome 18p11; PRAAS5 (619175), caused by mutation in the PSMB10 gene (176847) on chromosome 16q22; and PRAAS6 (620796), caused by mutation in the PSMB9 gene (177045) on chromosome 6p21.
Isolated anhidrosis with normal sweat glands
MedGen UID:
1800259
Concept ID:
C5568836
Disease or Syndrome
Isolated anhidrosis with normal sweat glands (ANHD) is characterized by absence of perspiration and subsequent heat intolerance with normal morphology and number of sweat glands. Teeth, hair, nails, and skin are normal (Klar et al., 2014).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

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Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Madoki A, Tuerlinckx C, Rausin G, Guiraud K, Docquier PL
Acta Orthop Belg 2022 Mar;88(1):198-205. doi: 10.52628/88.1.25. PMID: 35512172
Raneen AS, Lina DS, Safrai M, Matan L, Porat S
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2022 Dec;35(25):9792-9799. Epub 2022 Mar 25 doi: 10.1080/14767058.2022.2053843. PMID: 35337236
Deter RL, Lee W, Dicker P, Tully EC, Cody F, Malone FD, Flood KM
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2022 Jul;35(14):2808-2817. Epub 2020 Sep 16 doi: 10.1080/14767058.2020.1803262. PMID: 32938245
Deter RL, Lee W, Dicker P, Tully EC, Cody F, Malone FD, Flood KM
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2021 Sep;34(18):3029-3038. Epub 2019 Oct 21 doi: 10.1080/14767058.2019.1677592. PMID: 31630585
Chauhan SP, Magann EF
Clin Obstet Gynecol 2006 Jun;49(2):284-94. doi: 10.1097/00003081-200606000-00010. PMID: 16721107

Diagnosis

Takaya J, Higashino H, Takaya R, Sakaguchi H, Tanoue J, Higashide T, Moriguchi H, Nakao M, Shigematsu S
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Therapy

Wanyonyi SZ, Orwa J, Ozelle H, Martinez J, Atsali E, Vinayak S, Temmerman M, Figueras F
Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol 2021 Jun;57(6):910-916. doi: 10.1002/uog.23618. PMID: 33619823
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Prognosis

Lee S, Han Y, Lim MK, Lee HJ
PLoS One 2023;18(11):e0294435. Epub 2023 Nov 16 doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0294435. PMID: 37972123Free PMC Article
Raneen AS, Lina DS, Safrai M, Matan L, Porat S
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2022 Dec;35(25):9792-9799. Epub 2022 Mar 25 doi: 10.1080/14767058.2022.2053843. PMID: 35337236
Wanyonyi SZ, Orwa J, Ozelle H, Martinez J, Atsali E, Vinayak S, Temmerman M, Figueras F
Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol 2021 Jun;57(6):910-916. doi: 10.1002/uog.23618. PMID: 33619823
Courtney J, Troja W, Owens KJ, Brockway HM, Hinton AC, Hinton RB, Cnota JF, Jones HN
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Clinical prediction guides

Raneen AS, Lina DS, Safrai M, Matan L, Porat S
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2022 Dec;35(25):9792-9799. Epub 2022 Mar 25 doi: 10.1080/14767058.2022.2053843. PMID: 35337236
Deter RL, Lee W, Dicker P, Tully EC, Cody F, Malone FD, Flood KM
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2022 Jul;35(14):2808-2817. Epub 2020 Sep 16 doi: 10.1080/14767058.2020.1803262. PMID: 32938245
Wanyonyi SZ, Orwa J, Ozelle H, Martinez J, Atsali E, Vinayak S, Temmerman M, Figueras F
Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol 2021 Jun;57(6):910-916. doi: 10.1002/uog.23618. PMID: 33619823
Deter RL, Lee W, Dicker P, Tully EC, Cody F, Malone FD, Flood KM
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