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Desbuquois dysplasia 1(DBQD1)

MedGen UID:
860583
Concept ID:
C4012146
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: DBQD1; DESBUQUOIS DYSPLASIA 1, KIM VARIANT; MICROMELIC DWARFISM WITH VERTEBRAL AND METAPHYSEAL ABNORMALITIES AND ADVANCED CARPOTARSAL OSSIFICATION
 
Gene (location): CANT1 (17q25.3)
 
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0009629
OMIM®: 251450

Definition

Desbuquois dysplasia (DBQD) is an autosomal recessive chondrodysplasia belonging to the multiple dislocation group and characterized by severe prenatal and postnatal growth retardation (stature less than -5 SD), joint laxity, short extremities, and progressive scoliosis. The main radiologic features are short long bones with metaphyseal splay, a 'Swedish key' appearance of the proximal femur (exaggerated trochanter), and advanced carpal and tarsal bone age with a delta phalanx (summary by Huber et al., 2009). Desbuquois dysplasia is clinically and radiographically heterogeneous, and had been classified into 2 types based on the presence (type 1) or absence (type 2) of characteristic hand anomalies, including an extra ossification center distal to the second metacarpal, delta phalanx, bifid distal thumb phalanx, and dislocation of the interphalangeal joints (Faivre et al., 2004). However, patients with and without these additional hand anomalies have been reported to have mutations in the same gene (see, e.g., CANT1); thus, these features are not distinctive criteria to predict the molecular basis of DBQD (Furuichi et al., 2011). In addition, Kim et al. (2010) described another milder variant of DBQD with almost normal outwardly appearing hands, but significant radiographic changes, including short metacarpals, elongated phalanges, and remarkably advanced carpal bone age. However, there is no accessory ossification center distal to the second metacarpal, and patients do not have thumb anomalies. Similar changes occur in the feet. These patients also tend to develop precocious osteoarthritis of the hand and spine with age. This phenotype is sometimes referred to as the 'Kim variant' of DBQD (Furuichi et al., 2011). Genetic Heterogeneity of Desbuquois Dysplasia DBQD2 (615777) is caused by mutation in the XYLT1 gene (608124) on chromosome 16p12. Two unrelated patients with immunodeficiency-23 (IMD23; 615816), due to mutation in the PGM3 gene (172100), were reported to have skeletal features reminiscent of DBQD. [from OMIM]

Clinical features

From HPO
Clubfoot
MedGen UID:
3130
Concept ID:
C0009081
Congenital Abnormality
Clubfoot is a congenital limb deformity defined as fixation of the foot in cavus, adductus, varus, and equinus (i.e., inclined inwards, axially rotated outwards, and pointing downwards) with concomitant soft tissue abnormalities (Cardy et al., 2007). Clubfoot may occur in isolation or as part of a syndrome (e.g., diastrophic dysplasia, 222600). Clubfoot has been reported with deficiency of long bones and mirror-image polydactyly (Gurnett et al., 2008; Klopocki et al., 2012).
Pes planus
MedGen UID:
42034
Concept ID:
C0016202
Anatomical Abnormality
A foot where the longitudinal arch of the foot is in contact with the ground or floor when the individual is standing; or, in a patient lying supine, a foot where the arch is in contact with the surface of a flat board pressed against the sole of the foot by the examiner with a pressure similar to that expected from weight bearing; or, the height of the arch is reduced.
Brachydactyly
MedGen UID:
67454
Concept ID:
C0221357
Congenital Abnormality
Digits that appear disproportionately short compared to the hand/foot. The word brachydactyly is used here to describe a series distinct patterns of shortened digits (brachydactyly types A-E). This is the sense used here.
Coxa valga
MedGen UID:
116080
Concept ID:
C0239137
Finding
Coxa valga is a deformity of the hip in which the angle between the femoral shaft and the femoral neck is increased compared to age-adjusted values (about 150 degrees in newborns gradually reducing to 120-130 degrees in adults).
Genu varum
MedGen UID:
154257
Concept ID:
C0544755
Finding
A positional abnormality marked by outward bowing of the legs in which the knees stay wide apart when a person stands with the feet and ankles together.
Flat acetabular roof
MedGen UID:
373340
Concept ID:
C1837485
Finding
Flattening of the superior part of the acetabulum, which is a cup-shaped cavity at the base of the hipbone into which the ball-shaped head of the femur fits. The acetabular roof thereby appears horizontal rather than arched, as it normally does.
Sandal gap
MedGen UID:
374376
Concept ID:
C1840069
Finding
A widely spaced gap between the first toe (the great toe) and the second toe.
Radial deviation of the 2nd finger
MedGen UID:
335012
Concept ID:
C1844709
Finding
Displacement of the 2nd finger towards the radial side.
Broad femoral neck
MedGen UID:
376496
Concept ID:
C1849016
Finding
An abnormally wide femoral neck (which is the process of bone, connecting the femoral head with the femoral shaft).
Advanced ossification of carpal bones
MedGen UID:
341422
Concept ID:
C1849292
Finding
Ossification of carpal bones at an abnormally early age.
Short 1st metacarpal
MedGen UID:
376561
Concept ID:
C1849311
Finding
A developmental defect characterized by reduced length of the first metacarpal (long bone) of the hand.
Broad first metatarsal
MedGen UID:
341001
Concept ID:
C1855899
Finding
Increased side-to-side width of the first metatarsal bone.
Bifid distal phalanx of the thumb
MedGen UID:
348557
Concept ID:
C1860162
Congenital Abnormality
Partial duplication of the distal phalanx of the thumb. Depending on the severity, the appearance on x-ray can vary from a notched phalanx (the duplicated bone is almost completely fused with the phalanx) to a partially fused appearance of the two bones.
Radioulnar dislocation
MedGen UID:
388624
Concept ID:
C2673394
Finding
Proximal fibular overgrowth
MedGen UID:
392909
Concept ID:
C2673395
Finding
Overgrowth of the proximal part of the fibula.
Phalangeal dislocation
MedGen UID:
388625
Concept ID:
C2673396
Finding
Triangular shaped phalanges of the hand
MedGen UID:
382090
Concept ID:
C2673397
Finding
Medial deviation of the foot
MedGen UID:
388626
Concept ID:
C2673401
Finding
Monkey wrench femoral neck
MedGen UID:
862736
Concept ID:
C4014299
Anatomical Abnormality
The femoral neck region shows medial metaphyseal beaking and a significant enlargement of the lesser trochanter (with some enlargement also of the greater trochanter), producing a monkey wrench (Swedish key) configuration of the proximal femur. A monkey wrench refers to a type of adjustable wrench with one fixed and one adjustable jaw at right angles to a straight handle.
Partial duplication of the distal phalanx of the hallux
MedGen UID:
866980
Concept ID:
C4021337
Anatomical Abnormality
Coxa vara
MedGen UID:
1790477
Concept ID:
C5551440
Anatomical Abnormality
Coxa vara includes all forms of decrease of the femoral neck shaft angle (the angle between the neck and the shaft of the femur) to less than 120 degrees.
Severe short stature
MedGen UID:
3931
Concept ID:
C0013336
Disease or Syndrome
A severe degree of short stature, more than -4 SD from the mean corrected for age and sex.
Fetal growth restriction
MedGen UID:
4693
Concept ID:
C0015934
Pathologic Function
An abnormal restriction of fetal growth with fetal weight below the tenth percentile for gestational age.
Obesity
MedGen UID:
18127
Concept ID:
C0028754
Disease or Syndrome
Accumulation of substantial excess body fat.
Growth delay
MedGen UID:
99124
Concept ID:
C0456070
Pathologic Function
A deficiency or slowing down of growth pre- and postnatally.
Disproportionate short-limb short stature
MedGen UID:
342370
Concept ID:
C1849937
Finding
A type of disproportionate short stature characterized by a short limbs but an average-sized trunk.
Waddling gait
MedGen UID:
66667
Concept ID:
C0231712
Finding
Weakness of the hip girdle and upper thigh muscles, for instance in myopathies, leads to an instability of the pelvis on standing and walking. If the muscles extending the hip joint are affected, the posture in that joint becomes flexed and lumbar lordosis increases. The patients usually have difficulties standing up from a sitting position. Due to weakness in the gluteus medius muscle, the hip on the side of the swinging leg drops with each step (referred to as Trendelenburg sign). The gait appears waddling. The patients frequently attempt to counteract the dropping of the hip on the swinging side by bending the trunk towards the side which is in the stance phase (in the German language literature this is referred to as Duchenne sign). Similar gait patterns can be caused by orthopedic conditions when the origin and the insertion site of the gluteus medius muscle are closer to each other than normal, for instance due to a posttraumatic elevation of the trochanter or pseudarthrosis of the femoral neck.
Motor delay
MedGen UID:
381392
Concept ID:
C1854301
Finding
A type of Developmental delay characterized by a delay in acquiring motor skills.
Intellectual disability
MedGen UID:
811461
Concept ID:
C3714756
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Intellectual disability, previously referred to as mental retardation, is characterized by subnormal intellectual functioning that occurs during the developmental period. It is defined by an IQ score below 70.
Joint dislocation
MedGen UID:
41614
Concept ID:
C0012691
Injury or Poisoning
Displacement or malalignment of joints.
Kyphosis
MedGen UID:
44042
Concept ID:
C0022821
Anatomical Abnormality
Exaggerated anterior convexity of the thoracic vertebral column.
Hyperlordosis
MedGen UID:
9805
Concept ID:
C0024003
Finding
Abnormally increased curvature (anterior concavity) of the lumbar or cervical spine.
Hypotonia
MedGen UID:
10133
Concept ID:
C0026827
Finding
Hypotonia is an abnormally low muscle tone (the amount of tension or resistance to movement in a muscle). Even when relaxed, muscles have a continuous and passive partial contraction which provides some resistance to passive stretching. Hypotonia thus manifests as diminished resistance to passive stretching. Hypotonia is not the same as muscle weakness, although the two conditions can co-exist.
Osteoarthritis
MedGen UID:
45244
Concept ID:
C0029408
Disease or Syndrome
Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease of the joints characterized by degradation of the hyaline articular cartilage and remodeling of the subchondral bone with sclerosis (Meulenbelt et al., 2006). Clinical problems include pain and joint stiffness often leading to significant disability and joint replacement. Osteoarthritis exhibits a clear predilection for specific joints; it appears most commonly in the hip and knee joints and lumbar and cervical spine, as well as in the distal interphalangeal and the first carpometacarpal (base of thumb) and proximal interphalangeal joints of the hand; however, patients with osteoarthritis may have 1, a few, or all of these sites affected (Stefansson et al., 2003). According to a conservative estimate, greater than 70% of the population of the United States at age 65 years is affected by the disease, reflecting its age dependence. Genetic Heterogeneity of Susceptibility to Osteoarthritis Susceptibility to osteoarthritis has been associated with variation in other genes: OS2 (140600) with variation in the MATN3 gene (602109) on chromosome 2p24; OS3 (607850) with variation in the ASPN gene (608135) on chromosome 9q22; and OS5 (612400) with variation in the GDF5 gene (601146) on chromosome 20q11. Other susceptibility loci for osteoarthritis have been mapped to chromosomes 2q33 (OS4; 610839) and 3p24 (OS6; 612401).
Osteoporosis
MedGen UID:
14535
Concept ID:
C0029456
Disease or Syndrome
Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disease characterized by low bone density and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue with a consequent increase in bone fragility. According to the WHO criteria, osteoporosis is defined as a BMD that lies 2.5 standard deviations or more below the average value for young healthy adults (a T-score below -2.5 SD).
Scoliosis
MedGen UID:
11348
Concept ID:
C0036439
Disease or Syndrome
The presence of an abnormal lateral curvature of the spine.
Narrow chest
MedGen UID:
96528
Concept ID:
C0426790
Finding
Reduced width of the chest from side to side, associated with a reduced distance from the sternal notch to the tip of the shoulder.
Short femoral neck
MedGen UID:
373033
Concept ID:
C1836184
Finding
An abnormally short femoral neck (which is the process of bone, connecting the femoral head with the femoral shaft).
Microretrognathia
MedGen UID:
326907
Concept ID:
C1839546
Finding
A form of developmental hypoplasia of the mandible in which the mandible is mislocalised posteriorly.
Platyspondyly
MedGen UID:
335010
Concept ID:
C1844704
Finding
A flattened vertebral body shape with reduced distance between the vertebral endplates.
Joint hypermobility
MedGen UID:
336793
Concept ID:
C1844820
Finding
The capability that a joint (or a group of joints) has to move, passively and/or actively, beyond normal limits along physiological axes.
Short metatarsal
MedGen UID:
341358
Concept ID:
C1849020
Finding
Diminished length of a metatarsal bone, with resultant proximal displacement of the associated toe.
Metaphyseal widening
MedGen UID:
341364
Concept ID:
C1849039
Finding
Abnormal widening of the metaphyseal regions of long bones.
Advanced tarsal ossification
MedGen UID:
376557
Concept ID:
C1849293
Finding
Precocious (accelerated) maturation and calcification of any of the tarsal bones, seven bones of the foot comprising the calcaneus, talus, cuboid, navicular, and the cuneiform bones.
Flattened epiphysis
MedGen UID:
387844
Concept ID:
C1857527
Finding
Abnormal flatness (decreased height) of epiphyses.
Malar flattening
MedGen UID:
347616
Concept ID:
C1858085
Finding
Underdevelopment of the malar prominence of the jugal bone (zygomatic bone in mammals), appreciated in profile, frontal view, and/or by palpation.
Generalized hypotonia
MedGen UID:
346841
Concept ID:
C1858120
Finding
Generalized muscular hypotonia (abnormally low muscle tone).
Neonatal respiratory distress
MedGen UID:
924182
Concept ID:
C4281993
Finding
Respiratory difficulty as newborn.
Narrow mouth
MedGen UID:
44435
Concept ID:
C0026034
Congenital Abnormality
Distance between the commissures of the mouth more than 2 SD below the mean. Alternatively, an apparently decreased width of the oral aperture (subjective).
Round face
MedGen UID:
116087
Concept ID:
C0239479
Finding
The facial appearance is more circular than usual as viewed from the front.
Concave nasal ridge
MedGen UID:
78105
Concept ID:
C0264169
Finding
Nasal ridge curving posteriorly to an imaginary line that connects the nasal root and tip.
Short neck
MedGen UID:
99267
Concept ID:
C0521525
Finding
Diminished length of the neck.
Smooth philtrum
MedGen UID:
222980
Concept ID:
C1142533
Finding
Flat skin surface, with no ridge formation in the central region of the upper lip between the nasal base and upper vermilion border.
Depressed nasal bridge
MedGen UID:
373112
Concept ID:
C1836542
Finding
Posterior positioning of the nasal root in relation to the overall facial profile for age.
Midface retrusion
MedGen UID:
339938
Concept ID:
C1853242
Anatomical Abnormality
Posterior positions and/or vertical shortening of the infraorbital and perialar regions, or increased concavity of the face and/or reduced nasolabial angle.
Short nose
MedGen UID:
343052
Concept ID:
C1854114
Finding
Distance from nasion to subnasale more than two standard deviations below the mean, or alternatively, an apparently decreased length from the nasal root to the nasal tip.
Long philtrum
MedGen UID:
351278
Concept ID:
C1865014
Finding
Distance between nasal base and midline upper lip vermilion border more than 2 SD above the mean. Alternatively, an apparently increased distance between nasal base and midline upper lip vermilion border.
Proptosis
MedGen UID:
41917
Concept ID:
C0015300
Disease or Syndrome
An eye that is protruding anterior to the plane of the face to a greater extent than is typical.
Myopia
MedGen UID:
44558
Concept ID:
C0027092
Disease or Syndrome
Nearsightedness, also known as myopia, is an eye condition that causes blurry distance vision. People who are nearsighted have more trouble seeing things that are far away (such as when driving) than things that are close up (such as when reading or using a computer). If it is not treated with corrective lenses or surgery, nearsightedness can lead to squinting, eyestrain, headaches, and significant visual impairment.\n\nNearsightedness usually begins in childhood or adolescence. It tends to worsen with age until adulthood, when it may stop getting worse (stabilize). In some people, nearsightedness improves in later adulthood.\n\nFor normal vision, light passes through the clear cornea at the front of the eye and is focused by the lens onto the surface of the retina, which is the lining of the back of the eye that contains light-sensing cells. People who are nearsighted typically have eyeballs that are too long from front to back. As a result, light entering the eye is focused too far forward, in front of the retina instead of on its surface. It is this change that causes distant objects to appear blurry. The longer the eyeball is, the farther forward light rays will be focused and the more severely nearsighted a person will be.\n\nNearsightedness is measured by how powerful a lens must be to correct it. The standard unit of lens power is called a diopter. Negative (minus) powered lenses are used to correct nearsightedness. The more severe a person's nearsightedness, the larger the number of diopters required for correction. In an individual with nearsightedness, one eye may be more nearsighted than the other.\n\nEye doctors often refer to nearsightedness less than -5 or -6 diopters as "common myopia." Nearsightedness of -6 diopters or more is commonly called "high myopia." This distinction is important because high myopia increases a person's risk of developing other eye problems that can lead to permanent vision loss or blindness. These problems include tearing and detachment of the retina, clouding of the lens (cataract), and an eye disease called glaucoma that is usually related to increased pressure within the eye. The risk of these other eye problems increases with the severity of the nearsightedness. The term "pathological myopia" is used to describe cases in which high myopia leads to tissue damage within the eye.
Glaucoma of childhood
MedGen UID:
453382
Concept ID:
C2981140
Disease or Syndrome
Other individuals experience early onset of primary open-angle glaucoma, the most common adult form of glaucoma. If primary open-angle glaucoma develops during childhood or early adulthood, it is called juvenile open-angle glaucoma.\n\nStructural abnormalities that impede fluid drainage in the eye increase ocular pressure. These abnormalities may be present at birth and usually become apparent during the first year of life. Such structural abnormalities may be part of a genetic disorder that affects many body systems, called a syndrome. If glaucoma appears before the age of 3 without other associated abnormalities, it is called primary congenital glaucoma.\n\nUsually glaucoma develops in older adults, in whom the risk of developing the disorder may be affected by a variety of medical conditions including high blood pressure (hypertension) and diabetes mellitus, as well as family history. The risk of early-onset glaucoma depends mainly on heredity.\n\nIn most people with glaucoma, the damage to the optic nerves is caused by increased pressure within the eyes (intraocular pressure). Intraocular pressure depends on a balance between fluid entering and leaving the eyes.\n\nGlaucoma is a group of eye disorders in which the optic nerves connecting the eyes and the brain are progressively damaged. This damage can lead to reduction in side (peripheral) vision and eventual blindness. Other signs and symptoms may include bulging eyes, excessive tearing, and abnormal sensitivity to light (photophobia). The term "early-onset glaucoma" may be used when the disorder appears before the age of 40.

Professional guidelines

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Nayır Büyükşahin H, Emiralioglu N, Simşek Kiper PÖ, Sunman B, Güzelkaş I, Alboğa D, Akgül Erdal M, Boduroglu K, Utine GE, Yalcın E, Doğru D, Kiper N, Ozcelik U
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Recent clinical studies

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Faivre L, Cormier-Daire V, Eliott AM, Field F, Munnich A, Maroteaux P, Le Merrer M, Lachman R
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Nayır Büyükşahin H, Emiralioglu N, Simşek Kiper PÖ, Sunman B, Güzelkaş I, Alboğa D, Akgül Erdal M, Boduroglu K, Utine GE, Yalcın E, Doğru D, Kiper N, Ozcelik U
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J Med Genet 2011 Jan;48(1):32-7. Epub 2010 Oct 30 doi: 10.1136/jmg.2010.080226. PMID: 21037275
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Nayır Büyükşahin H, Emiralioglu N, Simşek Kiper PÖ, Sunman B, Güzelkaş I, Alboğa D, Akgül Erdal M, Boduroglu K, Utine GE, Yalcın E, Doğru D, Kiper N, Ozcelik U
J Sleep Res 2023 Oct;32(5):e13914. Epub 2023 May 1 doi: 10.1111/jsr.13914. PMID: 37128177
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J Med Genet 2011 Jan;48(1):32-7. Epub 2010 Oct 30 doi: 10.1136/jmg.2010.080226. PMID: 21037275

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