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Difficulty walking

MedGen UID:
86319
Concept ID:
C0311394
Finding
Synonyms: Ambulation Difficulties; Ambulation Difficulty; Ambulatory Difficulties; Ambulatory Difficulty; Difficulties, Ambulation; Difficulties, Ambulatory; Difficulty Ambulation; Difficulty Walking; Difficulty, Ambulation; Walking, Difficulty
SNOMED CT: Difficulty walking (719232003)
 
HPO: HP:0002355

Definition

Reduced ability to walk (ambulate). [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVDifficulty walking

Conditions with this feature

5p partial monosomy syndrome
MedGen UID:
41345
Concept ID:
C0010314
Disease or Syndrome
Cri-du-chat syndrome was first described by Lejeune et al. (1963) as a hereditary congenital syndrome associated with deletion of part of the short arm of chromosome 5. The deletions can vary in size from extremely small and involving only band 5p15.2 to the entire short arm. Although the majority of deletions arise as new mutations, approximately 12% result from unbalanced segregation of translocations or recombination involving a pericentric inversion in one of the parents.
Glycogen storage disease, type II
MedGen UID:
5340
Concept ID:
C0017921
Disease or Syndrome
Pompe disease is classified by age of onset, organ involvement, severity, and rate of progression. Infantile-onset Pompe disease (IOPD; individuals with onset before age 12 months with cardiomyopathy) may be apparent in utero but more typically onset is at the median age of four months with hypotonia, generalized muscle weakness, feeding difficulties, failure to thrive, respiratory distress, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Without treatment by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), IOPD commonly results in death by age two years from progressive left ventricular outflow obstruction and respiratory insufficiency. Late-onset Pompe disease (LOPD; including: (a) individuals with onset before age 12 months without cardiomyopathy; and (b) all individuals with onset after age 12 months) is characterized by proximal muscle weakness and respiratory insufficiency; clinically significant cardiac involvement is uncommon.
Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-III-D
MedGen UID:
88602
Concept ID:
C0086650
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III) is a multisystem lysosomal storage disease characterized by progressive central nervous system degeneration manifest as severe intellectual disability (ID), developmental regression, and other neurologic manifestations including autism spectrum disorder (ASD), behavioral problems, and sleep disturbances. Disease onset is typically before age ten years. Disease course may be rapidly or slowly progressive; some individuals with an extremely attenuated disease course present in mid-to-late adulthood with early-onset dementia with or without a history of ID. Systemic manifestations can include musculoskeletal problems (joint stiffness, contractures, scoliosis, and hip dysplasia), hearing loss, respiratory tract and sinopulmonary infections, and cardiac disease (valvular thickening, defects in the cardiac conduction system). Neurologic decline is seen in all affected individuals; however, clinical severity varies within and among the four MPS III subtypes (defined by the enzyme involved) and even among members of the same family. Death usually occurs in the second or third decade of life secondary to neurologic regression or respiratory tract infections.
Cholestanol storage disease
MedGen UID:
116041
Concept ID:
C0238052
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) is a lipid storage disease characterized by infantile-onset diarrhea, childhood-onset cataract, adolescent- to young adult-onset tendon xanthomas, and adult-onset progressive neurologic dysfunction (dementia, psychiatric disturbances, pyramidal and/or cerebellar signs, dystonia, atypical parkinsonism, peripheral neuropathy, and seizures). Chronic diarrhea from infancy and/or neonatal cholestasis may be the earliest clinical manifestation. In approximately 75% of affected individuals, cataracts are the first finding, often appearing in the first decade of life. Xanthomas appear in the second or third decade; they occur on the Achilles tendon, the extensor tendons of the elbow and hand, the patellar tendon, and the neck tendons. Xanthomas have been reported in the lung, bones, and central nervous system. Some individuals show cognitive impairment from early infancy, whereas the majority have normal or only slightly impaired intellectual function until puberty; dementia with slow deterioration in intellectual abilities occurs in the third decade in more than 50% of individuals. Neuropsychiatric symptoms such as behavioral changes, hallucinations, agitation, aggression, depression, and suicide attempts may be prominent. Pyramidal signs (i.e., spasticity) and/or cerebellar signs almost invariably become evident between ages 20 and 30 years. The biochemical abnormalities that distinguish CTX from other conditions with xanthomas include high plasma and tissue cholestanol concentration, normal-to-low plasma cholesterol concentration, decreased chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), increased concentration of bile alcohols and their glyconjugates, and increased concentrations of cholestanol and apolipoprotein B in cerebrospinal fluid.
Vitamin D-dependent rickets, type 1
MedGen UID:
124344
Concept ID:
C0268689
Disease or Syndrome
Vitamin D-dependent rickets is a disorder of bone development that leads to softening and weakening of the bones (rickets). There are several forms of the condition that are distinguished primarily by their genetic causes: type 1A (VDDR1A), type 1B (VDDR1B), and type 2A (VDDR2A). There is also evidence of a very rare form of the condition, called type 2B (VDDR2B), although not much is known about this form.\n\nHair loss (alopecia) can occur in VDDR2A, although not everyone with this form of the condition has alopecia. Affected individuals can have sparse or patchy hair or no hair at all on their heads. Some affected individuals are missing body hair as well.\n\nThe signs and symptoms of vitamin D-dependent rickets begin within months after birth, and most are the same for all types of the condition. The weak bones often cause bone pain and delayed growth and have a tendency to fracture. When affected children begin to walk, they may develop abnormally curved (bowed) legs because the bones are too weak to bear weight. Impaired bone development also results in widening of the areas near the ends of bones where new bone forms (metaphyses), especially in the knees, wrists, and ribs. Some people with vitamin D-dependent rickets have dental abnormalities such as thin tooth enamel and frequent cavities. Poor muscle tone (hypotonia) and muscle weakness are also common in this condition, and some affected individuals develop seizures.\n\nIn vitamin D-dependent rickets, there is an imbalance of certain substances in the blood. An early sign in all types of the condition is low levels of the mineral calcium (hypocalcemia), which is essential for the normal formation of bones and teeth. Affected individuals also develop high levels of a hormone involved in regulating calcium levels called parathyroid hormone (PTH), which leads to a condition called secondary hyperparathyroidism. Low levels of a mineral called phosphate (hypophosphatemia) also occur in affected individuals. Vitamin D-dependent rickets types 1 and 2 can be grouped by blood levels of a hormone called calcitriol, which is the active form of vitamin D; individuals with VDDR1A and VDDR1B have abnormally low levels of calcitriol and individuals with VDDR2A and VDDR2B have abnormally high levels.
Vitamin D-dependent rickets type II with alopecia
MedGen UID:
90989
Concept ID:
C0342646
Disease or Syndrome
Vitamin D-dependent rickets type 2A (VDDR2A) is caused by a defect in the vitamin D receptor gene. This defect leads to an increase in the circulating ligand, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Most patients have total alopecia in addition to rickets. VDDR2B (600785) is a form of vitamin D-dependent rickets with a phenotype similar to VDDR2A but a normal vitamin D receptor, in which end-organ resistance to vitamin D has been shown to be caused by a nuclear ribonucleoprotein that interferes with the vitamin D receptor-DNA interaction. For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of rickets due to disorders in vitamin D metabolism or action, see vitamin D-dependent rickets type 1A (VDDR1A; 264700).
Troyer syndrome
MedGen UID:
97950
Concept ID:
C0393559
Disease or Syndrome
Troyer syndrome is characterized by progressive spastic paraparesis, dysarthria, pseudobulbar palsy, distal amyotrophy, short stature, and subtle skeletal abnormalities. Most affected children exhibit delays in walking and speech and difficulty in managing oral secretions, followed by increased lower-limb spasticity and slow deterioration in both gait and speech. Mild cerebellar signs are common. The most severely affected individuals have choreoathetosis. Emotional lability / difficulty in controlling emotions and affective disorders, such as inappropriate euphoria and/or crying, are frequently described. Life expectancy is normal.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease X-linked dominant 1
MedGen UID:
98290
Concept ID:
C0393808
Disease or Syndrome
GJB1 disorders are typically characterized by peripheral motor and sensory neuropathy with or without fixed CNS abnormalities and/or acute, self-limited episodes of transient neurologic dysfunction (especially weakness and dysarthria). Peripheral neuropathy typically manifests in affected males between ages five and 25 years. Although both men and women are affected, manifestations tend to be less severe in women, some of whom may remain asymptomatic. Less commonly, initial manifestations in some affected individuals are stroke-like episodes (acute fulminant episodes of reversible CNS dysfunction).
Progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia
MedGen UID:
96581
Concept ID:
C0432215
Congenital Abnormality
Progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia (PPD) is a skeletal dysplasia characterized by predominant involvement of articular cartilage with progressive joint stiffness and enlargement in the absence of inflammation. Onset – typically between ages three and six years – begins with the involvement of the interphalangeal joints. Over time, involvement of large joints and the spine causes significant joint contractures, gait disturbance, and scoliosis and/or kyphosis, resulting in abnormal posture and significant morbidity. Despite the considerable arthropathy, pain is not a major presenting feature of this condition. Initially height is normal; however, short stature (<3rd centile) becomes evident in adolescence as the skeletal changes progress.
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2F
MedGen UID:
331308
Concept ID:
C1832525
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-6 (LGMDR6) is a very rare and severe neuromuscular disorder with onset in most patients in the first decade of life. Generalized muscle weakness affecting predominantly proximal and distal muscles of the limbs is progressive, and patients require walking aids or become wheelchair-bound. Some patients have cardiomyopathy or heart rhythm abnormalities, or require ventilatory support (Alonso-Perez et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, see LGMDR1 (253600).
Spinal muscular atrophy-progressive myoclonic epilepsy syndrome
MedGen UID:
371854
Concept ID:
C1834569
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of ASAH1-related disorders ranges from Farber disease (FD) to spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMA-PME). Classic FD is characterized by onset in the first weeks of life of painful, progressive deformity of the major joints; palpable subcutaneous nodules of joints and mechanical pressure points; and a hoarse cry resulting from granulomas of the larynx and epiglottis. Life expectancy is usually less than two years. In the other less common types of FD, onset, severity, and primary manifestations vary. SMA-PME is characterized by early-childhood-onset progressive lower motor neuron disease manifest typically between ages three and seven years as proximal lower-extremity weakness, followed by progressive myoclonic and atonic seizures, tremulousness/tremor, and sensorineural hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy typically begins in late childhood after the onset of weakness and can include jerking of the upper limbs, action myoclonus, myoclonic status, and eyelid myoclonus. Other findings include generalized tremor, and cognitive decline. The time from disease onset to death from respiratory complications is usually five to 15 years.
Neuronopathy, distal hereditary motor, type 7A
MedGen UID:
322474
Concept ID:
C1834703
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant distal hereditary motor neuronopathy-7 (HMND7) is a neurologic disorder characterized by onset in the second decade of progressive distal muscle wasting and weakness affecting the upper and lower limbs and resulting in walking difficulties and hand grip. There is significant muscle atrophy of the hands and lower limbs. The disorder is associated with vocal cord paresis due to involvement of the tenth cranial nerve (summary by Barwick et al., 2012). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant distal HMN, see HMND1 (182960).
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 28
MedGen UID:
332174
Concept ID:
C1836295
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia-29 (SPG28) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by early-onset, slowly progressive lower-limb spasticity resulting in walking difficulties. Some patients also have distal sensory impairment (summary by Tesson et al., 2012). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia, see 270800.
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2K
MedGen UID:
332193
Concept ID:
C1836373
Disease or Syndrome
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239) represent the mildest end of the phenotypic spectrum of muscular dystrophies collectively known as dystroglycanopathies. The limb-girdle phenotype is characterized by onset of muscular weakness apparent after ambulation is achieved; mental retardation and mild brain anomalies are variable (Balci et al., 2005; review by Godfrey et al., 2007). The most severe end of the phenotypic spectrum of dystroglycanopathies is represented by congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies (type A; see MDDGA1, 236670), previously designated Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) or muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB), and the intermediate range of the spectrum is represented by congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with or without mental retardation (type B; see MDDGB1, 613155). Genetic Heterogeneity of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy-Dystroglycanopathy (Type C) Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy due to defective glycosylation of DAG1 is genetically heterogeneous. See also MDDGC2 (613158), caused by mutation in the POMT2 gene (607439); MDDGC3 (613157), caused by mutation in the POMGNT1 gene (606822); MDDGC4 (611588), caused by mutation in the FKTN gene (607440); MDDGC5 (607155), caused by mutation in the FKRP gene (606596); MDDGC7 (616052), caused by mutation in the ISPD gene (CRPPA; 614631); MDDGC8 (618135), caused by mutation in the POMGNT2 gene (614828); MDDGC9 (613818) caused by mutation in the DAG1 gene (128239); MDDGC12 (616094), caused by mutation in the POMK gene (615247); MDDGC14 (615352) caused by mutation in the GMPPB gene (615320); and MDDGC15 (612937), caused by mutation in the DPM3 gene (605951).
Nemaline myopathy 4
MedGen UID:
324513
Concept ID:
C1836447
Disease or Syndrome
Nemaline myopathy is divided into six types. In order of decreasing severity, the types are: severe congenital, Amish, intermediate congenital, typical congenital, childhood-onset, and adult-onset. The types are distinguished by the age when symptoms first appear and the severity of symptoms; however, there is overlap among the various types. The severe congenital type is the most life-threatening. Most individuals with this type do not survive past early childhood due to respiratory failure. The Amish type solely affects the Old Order Amish population of Pennsylvania and is typically fatal in early childhood. The most common type of nemaline myopathy is the typical congenital type, which is characterized by muscle weakness and feeding problems beginning in infancy. Most of these individuals do not have severe breathing problems and can walk unassisted. People with the childhood-onset type usually develop muscle weakness in adolescence. The adult-onset type is the mildest of all the various types. People with this type usually develop muscle weakness between ages 20 and 50.\n\nNemaline myopathy is a disorder that primarily affects skeletal muscles, which are muscles that the body uses for movement. People with nemaline myopathy have muscle weakness (myopathy) throughout the body, but it is typically most severe in the muscles of the face; neck; trunk; and other muscles close to the center of the body (proximal muscles), such as those of the upper arms and legs. This weakness can worsen over time. Affected individuals may have feeding and swallowing difficulties, foot deformities, abnormal curvature of the spine (scoliosis), and joint deformities (contractures). Most people with nemaline myopathy are able to walk, although some affected children may begin walking later than usual. As the condition progresses, some people may require wheelchair assistance. In severe cases, the muscles used for breathing are affected and life-threatening breathing difficulties can occur.
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 26
MedGen UID:
373138
Concept ID:
C1836632
Disease or Syndrome
SPG26 is an autosomal recessive form of complicated spastic paraplegia characterized by onset in the first 2 decades of life of gait abnormalities due to lower limb spasticity and muscle weakness. Some patients have upper limb involvement. Additional features include intellectual disability, peripheral neuropathy, dysarthria, cerebellar signs, extrapyramidal signs, and cortical atrophy. The disorder is slowly progressive (summary by Boukhris et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive SPG, see SPG5A (270800).
Vitamin D hydroxylation-deficient rickets, type 1B
MedGen UID:
374020
Concept ID:
C1838657
Disease or Syndrome
Vitamin D hydroxylation-deficient rickets type 1B (VDDR1B) is caused by a defect in vitamin D 25-hydroxylation (Molin et al., 2017). The major function of vitamin D is to maintain calcium and phosphate levels in the normal range to support metabolic functions, neuromuscular transmission, and bone mineralization. Disorders of vitamin D metabolism or action lead to defective bone mineralization and clinical features including intestinal malabsorption of calcium, hypocalcemia, secondary hyperparathyroidism, increased renal clearance of phosphorus, and hypophosphatemia. The combination of hypocalcemia and hypophosphatemia causes impaired mineralization of bone that results in rickets and osteomalacia (summary by Liberman and Marx, 2001). Rickets can occur because of inadequate dietary intake or sun exposure or because of genetic disorders. Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) is taken in the diet or synthesized in the skin from 7-dehydrocholesterol by ultraviolet irradiation. For vitamin D to be active, it needs to be converted to its active form, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Vitamin D is transported in the blood by the vitamin D binding protein (DBP; 139200) to the liver, where vitamin D 25-hydroxylase (CYP2R1; 608713) is the key enzyme for 25-hydroxylation. Vitamin D 25(OH)D3, the major circulating form of vitamin D, is then transported to the kidney, where 25(OH)D3 is hydroxylated at the position of carbon 1 of the A ring, resulting in the active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) (summary by Christakos et al., 2010).
Striatonigral degeneration, infantile, mitochondrial
MedGen UID:
374113
Concept ID:
C1839022
Disease or Syndrome
Myopathy and diabetes mellitus
MedGen UID:
333236
Concept ID:
C1839028
Disease or Syndrome
A rare, genetic, mitochondrial DNA-related mitochondrial myopathy disorder characterized by slowly progressive muscular weakness (proximal greater than distal), predominantly involving the facial muscles and scapular girdle, associated with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Neurological involvement and congenital myopathy may be variably observed.
Myosin storage myopathy
MedGen UID:
374868
Concept ID:
C1842160
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant myosin storage congenital myopathy-7A (CMYP7A) is a skeletal muscle disorder with wide phenotypic variability. The age at symptom onset can range from early childhood to late adulthood. Affected individuals have proximal muscle weakness affecting the upper and lower limbs and distal muscle weakness of the lower limbs, resulting in gait difficulties and scapular winging (scapuloperoneal myopathy). Additional features may include thin habitus, high-arched palate, foot drop, pes cavus, calf pseudohypertrophy, and decreased reflexes. The severity is also variable: some patients develop respiratory insufficiency, joint contractures, and scoliosis in the first decades, whereas others are clinically unaffected, but show subtle signs of the disorder on examination. Serum creatine kinase may be normal or elevated. The disease is usually slowly progressive and most patients remain ambulatory. Skeletal muscle biopsy can show different abnormalities, including hyaline bodies, type 1 fiber predominance, congenital fiber-type disproportion (CFTD), and nonspecific myopathic changes with myofibrillar disarray. Intrafamilial variability is common (Dye et al., 2006; Pegoraro et al., 2007; review by Tajsharghi and Oldfors, 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease dominant intermediate C
MedGen UID:
334023
Concept ID:
C1842237
Disease or Syndrome
A rare hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy characterized by intermediate motor median nerve conduction velocities (usually between 25 and 60 m/s). It presents with moderately severe, slowly progressive usual clinical features of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (muscle weakness and atrophy of the distal extremities, distal sensory loss, reduced or absent deep tendon reflexes, feet deformities, extensor digitorum brevis atrophy). Findings in nerve biopsies include age-dependent axonal degeneration, reduced number of large myelinated fibers, segmental remyelination, and no onion bulbs.
Uruguay Faciocardiomusculoskeletal syndrome
MedGen UID:
335320
Concept ID:
C1846010
Disease or Syndrome
Uruguay faciocardiomusculoskeletal syndrome (FCMSU) is an X-linked disorder in which affected males have a distinctive facial appearance, muscular hypertrophy, and cardiac ventricular hypertrophy leading to premature death. Additional features include large, broad, and deformed hands and feet, congenital hip dislocation, and scoliosis (summary by Xue et al., 2016).
MEHMO syndrome
MedGen UID:
375855
Concept ID:
C1846278
Disease or Syndrome
MEHMO syndrome is a rare intellectual disability disorder that exhibits phenotypic heterogeneity and is variably characterized by mental retardation, epileptic seizures, hypogonadism with hypogenitalism, microcephaly, and obesity. Life expectancy ranges from less than 1 year to adulthood, and the condition is associated with significant morbidity and mortality (summary by Gregory et al., 2019).
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I
MedGen UID:
339580
Concept ID:
C1846672
Disease or Syndrome
MDGDC5 is an autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy characterized by variable age at onset, normal cognition, and no structural brain changes (Brockington et al., 2001). It is part of a group of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Mercuri et al., 2006). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type C, see MDDGC1 (609308).
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type B5
MedGen UID:
335764
Concept ID:
C1847759
Disease or Syndrome
MDDGB5 is an autosomal recessive congenital muscular dystrophy with impaired intellectual development and structural brain abnormalities (Brockington et al., 2001). It is part of a group of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Mercuri et al., 2006). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type B, see MDDGB1 (613155).
Hereditary myopathy with lactic acidosis due to ISCU deficiency
MedGen UID:
342573
Concept ID:
C1850718
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary myopathy with lactic acidosis (HML) is an autosomal recessive muscular disorder characterized by childhood onset of exercise intolerance with muscle tenderness, cramping, dyspnea, and palpitations. Biochemical features include lactic acidosis and, rarely, rhabdomyolysis. It is a chronic disorder with remission and exacerbation of the muscle phenotype (summary by Sanaker et al., 2010).
Neutral lipid storage myopathy
MedGen UID:
339913
Concept ID:
C1853136
Disease or Syndrome
Neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy is an autosomal recessive muscle disorder characterized by adult onset of slowly progressive proximal muscle weakness affecting the upper and lower limbs and associated with increased serum creatine kinase; distal muscle weakness may also occur. About half of patients develop cardiomyopathy later in the disease course. Other variable features include diabetes mellitus, hepatic steatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, and possibly sensorineural hearing loss. Leukocytes and muscle cells show cytoplasmic accumulation of triglycerides (summary by Reilich et al., 2011). Neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy belongs to a group of disorders termed neutral lipid storage disorders (NLSDs). These disorders are characterized by the presence of triglyceride-containing cytoplasmic droplets in leukocytes and in other tissues, including bone marrow, skin, and muscle. Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome (CDS; 275630) is defined as NLSD with ichthyosis (NLSDI). Patients with NLSDM present with myopathy but without ichthyosis (summary by Fischer et al., 2007).
Autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic bone disease
MedGen UID:
501133
Concept ID:
C1853271
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets with hypercalciuria is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the presence of hypophosphatemia secondary to renal phosphate wasting, radiographic and/or histologic evidence of rickets, limb deformities, muscle weakness, and bone pain. HHRH is distinct from other forms of hypophosphatemic rickets in that affected individuals present with hypercalciuria due to increased serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels and increased intestinal calcium absorption (summary by Bergwitz et al., 2006).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4G
MedGen UID:
343122
Concept ID:
C1854449
Disease or Syndrome
HMSNR is an autosomal recessive progressive complex peripheral neuropathy characterized by onset in the first decade of distal lower limb weakness and muscle atrophy resulting in walking difficulties. Distal impairment of the upper limbs usually occurs later, as does proximal lower limb weakness. There is distal sensory impairment, with pes cavus and areflexia. Laboratory studies suggest that it is a myelinopathy resulting in reduced nerve conduction velocities in the demyelinating range as well as a length-dependent axonopathy (summary by Sevilla et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, also known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, see CMT4A (214400).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4B2
MedGen UID:
346869
Concept ID:
C1858278
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4B is a demyelinating hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy characterized by abnormal folding of myelin sheaths. CMT4B1 (601382) is a clinically similar disorder caused by mutation in the MTMR2 gene (603557) on 11q22. For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive demyelinating CMT, see CMT4A (214400).
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis type 2, juvenile
MedGen UID:
349246
Concept ID:
C1859807
Disease or Syndrome
ALS2-related disorder involves retrograde degeneration of the upper motor neurons of the pyramidal tracts and comprises a clinical continuum of the following three phenotypes: Infantile ascending hereditary spastic paraplegia (IAHSP), characterized by onset of spasticity with increased reflexes and sustained clonus of the lower limbs within the first two years of life, progressive weakness and spasticity of the upper limbs by age seven to eight years, and wheelchair dependence in the second decade with progression toward severe spastic tetraparesis and a pseudobulbar syndrome caused by progressive cranial nerve involvement. Juvenile primary lateral sclerosis (JPLS), characterized by upper motor neuron findings of pseudobulbar palsy and spastic quadriplegia without dementia or cerebellar, extrapyramidal, or sensory signs. Juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (JALS or ALS2), characterized by onset between ages three and 20 years. All affected individuals show a spastic pseudobulbar syndrome (spasticity of speech and swallowing) together with spastic paraplegia. Some individuals are bedridden by age 12 to 50 years.
Myopathy, myofibrillar, 9, with early respiratory failure
MedGen UID:
350930
Concept ID:
C1863599
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure (HMERF) is a slowly progressive myopathy that typically begins in the third to fifth decades of life. The usual presenting findings are gait disturbance relating to distal leg weakness or nocturnal respiratory symptoms due to respiratory muscle weakness. Weakness eventually generalizes and affects both proximal and distal muscles. Most affected individuals require walking aids within a few years of onset; some progress to wheelchair dependence and require nocturnal noninvasive ventilatory support about ten years after onset. The phenotype varies even among individuals within the same family: some remain ambulant until their 70s whereas others may require ventilator support in their 40s.
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis type 4
MedGen UID:
355983
Concept ID:
C1865409
Disease or Syndrome
Juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-4 (ALS4) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by distal muscle weakness and atrophy, normal sensation, and pyramidal signs, with onset of symptoms before the age of 25 years, a slow rate of progression, and a normal life span (summary by Chen et al., 2004). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, see ALS1 (105400).
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2G
MedGen UID:
400895
Concept ID:
C1866008
Disease or Syndrome
A mild form of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy with characteristics of muscle weakness in the four limbs, mild scapular winging, severe atrophy of the quadriceps and anterior tibialis muscles, calf hypertrophy and lack of respiratory and cardiac involvement.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4C
MedGen UID:
356581
Concept ID:
C1866636
Disease or Syndrome
SH3TC2-related hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (SH3TC2-HMSN) is a demyelinating neuropathy characterized by severe spine deformities (scoliosis or kyphoscoliosis) and foot deformities (pes cavus, pes planus, or pes valgus) that typically present in the first decade of life or early adolescence. Other findings can include cranial nerve involvement (most commonly tongue involvement, facial weakness/paralysis, hearing impairment, dysarthria) and respiratory problems.
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A
MedGen UID:
358391
Concept ID:
C1869123
Disease or Syndrome
Calpainopathy is characterized by symmetric and progressive weakness of proximal limb-girdle muscles. The age at onset of muscle weakness ranges from two to 40 years. The phenotype shows intra- and interfamilial variability ranging from severe to mild. Three autosomal recessive calpainopathy phenotypes have been identified based on the distribution of muscle weakness and age at onset: Pelvifemoral limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) (Leyden-Möbius LGMD) phenotype, the most frequently observed calpainopathy phenotype, in which muscle weakness is first evident in the pelvic girdle and later in the shoulder girdle, with onset that may occur as early as before age 12 years or as late as after age 30 years. Scapulohumeral LGMD (Erb LGMD) phenotype, usually a milder phenotype with infrequent early onset, in which muscle weakness is first evident in the shoulder girdle and later in the pelvic girdle. HyperCKemia, usually observed in children or young individuals, in which individuals are asymptomatic and have high serum creatine kinase (CK) concentrations. The autosomal dominant form of calpainopathy shows a variability of clinical phenotype, ranging from almost asymptomatic to wheelchair dependence after age 60 years in few cases with a generally milder phenotype than the recessive form. Clinical findings of calpainopathy include the tendency to walk on tiptoe, difficulty in running, scapular winging, waddling gait, and slight hyperlordosis. Other findings include symmetric weakness of proximal more than distal muscles in the limbs, trunk, and periscapular area; laxity of the abdominal muscles; Achilles tendon shortening; scoliosis; and joint contractures. Affected individuals typically do not have cardiac involvement or intellectual disability.
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 32
MedGen UID:
409967
Concept ID:
C1970009
Disease or Syndrome
A rare complex type of hereditary spastic paraplegia with characteristics of slowly progressive spastic paraplegia (with walking difficulties appearing at onset at 6-7 years of age) associated with mild intellectual disability. Brain imaging reveals thin corpus callosum, cortical and cerebellar atrophy, and pontine dysraphia. The SPG32 phenotype has been mapped to a locus on chromosome 14q12-q21.
Polyhydramnios, megalencephaly, and symptomatic epilepsy
MedGen UID:
370203
Concept ID:
C1970203
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic neurological disorder with characteristics of pregnancy complicated by polyhydramnios, severe intractable epilepsy presenting in infancy, severe hypotonia, decreased muscle mass, global developmental delay, craniofacial dysmorphism (long face, large forehead, peaked eyebrows, broad nasal bridge, hypertelorism, large mouth with thick lips), and macrocephaly due to megalencephaly and hydrocephalus in most patients. Additional features that have been reported include cardiac anomalies like atrial septal defects, diabetes insipidus and nephrocalcinosis among others.
Autosomal recessive lower motor neuron disease with childhood onset
MedGen UID:
369682
Concept ID:
C1970211
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic neuromuscular disease characterized by proximal muscle weakness with an early involvement of foot and hand muscles following normal motor development in early childhood, a rapidly progressive disease course leading to generalized areflexic tetraplegia with contractures, severe scoliosis, hyperlordosis, and progressive respiratory insufficiency leading to assisted ventilation. Cranial nerve functions are normal and tongue wasting and fasciculations are absent. Milder phenotype with a moderate generalized weakness and slower disease progress was reported. There is evidence the disease is caused by homozygous mutation in the gene encoding pleckstrin homology domain-containing protein, family G member 5 (PLEKHG5) on chromosome 1p36.
Brain-lung-thyroid syndrome
MedGen UID:
369694
Concept ID:
C1970269
Disease or Syndrome
NKX2-1-related disorders range from benign hereditary chorea (BHC) to choreoathetosis, congenital hypothyroidism, and neonatal respiratory distress (also known as brain-lung-thyroid syndrome). Childhood-onset chorea, the hallmark of NKX2-1-related disorders, may or may not be associated with respiratory distress syndrome or congenital hypothyroidism. Chorea generally begins in early infancy or about age one year (most commonly) or in late childhood or adolescence, and progresses into the second decade after which it remains static or (rarely) remits. Pulmonary disease, the second most common manifestation, can include respiratory distress syndrome in neonates, interstitial lung disease in young children, and pulmonary fibrosis in older persons. The risk for pulmonary carcinoma is increased in young adults with an NKX2-1-related disorder. Thyroid dysfunction, the result of dysembryogenesis, can present as congenital hypothyroidism or compensated hypothyroidism. The risk for thyroid cancer is unknown and may not be increased. In one review, 50% of affected individuals had the full brain-lung-thyroid syndrome, 30% had involvement of brain and thyroid only, and 13% had isolated chorea only.
Neuronopathy, distal hereditary motor, type 2B
MedGen UID:
382017
Concept ID:
C2608087
Disease or Syndrome
Some individuals with distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II have weakening of the muscles in the hands and forearms. This weakening is less pronounced than in the lower limbs and does not usually result in paralysis.\n\nOnset of distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II ranges from the teenage years through mid-adulthood. The initial symptoms of the disorder are cramps or weakness in the muscles of the big toe and later, the entire foot. Over a period of approximately 5 to 10 years, affected individuals experience a gradual loss of muscle tissue (atrophy) in the lower legs. They begin to have trouble walking and running, and eventually may have complete paralysis of the lower legs. The thigh muscles may also be affected, although generally this occurs later and is less severe.\n\nDistal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II is a progressive disorder that affects nerve cells in the spinal cord. It results in muscle weakness and affects movement, primarily in the legs.
Combined immunodeficiency due to ORAI1 deficiency
MedGen UID:
440578
Concept ID:
C2748568
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-9 (IMD9) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early onset of recurrent infections due to defective T-cell activation. Affected individuals also have congenital myopathy resulting in muscle weakness as well as features of ectodermal dysplasia, including soft dental enamel (summary by McCarl et al., 2009).
Neuronopathy, distal hereditary motor, type 2C
MedGen UID:
461969
Concept ID:
C3150619
Disease or Syndrome
Any neuronopathy, distal hereditary motor in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the HSPB3 gene.
Epilepsy, familial adult myoclonic, 3
MedGen UID:
462210
Concept ID:
C3150860
Disease or Syndrome
Familial adult myoclonic epilepsy-3 (FAME3) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by onset of cortical tremor, mainly affecting the hands and voice, between 10 and 40 years of age, with adult onset being more common. Most affected individuals develop epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures; some may have partial or absence seizures. The disorder is nonprogressive or slowly progressive, and most patients respond to antiseizure medication (summary by Florian et al., 2019). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial adult myoclonic epilepsy, see FAME1 (601068).
Progressive demyelinating neuropathy with bilateral striatal necrosis
MedGen UID:
462323
Concept ID:
C3150973
Disease or Syndrome
Thiamine metabolism dysfunction syndrome-4 is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by childhood onset of episodic encephalopathy, often associated with a febrile illness, and causing transient neurologic dysfunction. Most patients recover fully, but some may have mild residual weakness. Affected individuals also develop a slowly progressive axonal polyneuropathy beginning in childhood. Brain imaging during the acute episodes shows lesions consistent with bilateral striatal degeneration or necrosis (summary by Spiegel et al., 2009). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of disorders due to thiamine metabolism dysfunction, see THMD1 (249270).
Childhood encephalopathy due to thiamine pyrophosphokinase deficiency
MedGen UID:
482496
Concept ID:
C3280866
Disease or Syndrome
Thiamine metabolism dysfunction syndrome-5 (THMD5) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder due to an inborn error of thiamine metabolism. The phenotype is highly variable, but in general, affected individuals have onset in early childhood of acute encephalopathic episodes associated with increased serum and CSF lactate. These episodes result in progressive neurologic dysfunction manifest as gait disturbances, ataxia, dystonia, and spasticity, which in some cases may result in loss of ability to walk. Cognitive function is usually preserved, although mildly delayed development has been reported. These episodes are usually associated with infection and metabolic decompensation. Some patients may have recovery of some neurologic deficits (Mayr et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of disorders due to thiamine metabolism dysfunction, see THMD1 (249270).
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 35
MedGen UID:
501249
Concept ID:
C3496228
Disease or Syndrome
Fatty acid hydroxylase-associated neurodegeneration (FAHN) is characterized early in the disease course by central nervous system involvement including corticospinal tract involvement (spasticity), mixed movement disorder (ataxia/dystonia), and eye findings (optic atrophy, oculomotor abnormalities), and later in the disease course by progressive intellectual impairment and seizures. With disease progression, dystonia and spasticity compromise the ability to ambulate, leading to wheelchair dependence. Life expectancy is variable. FAHN is considered to be a subtype of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA).
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 55
MedGen UID:
761342
Concept ID:
C3539506
Disease or Syndrome
A rare complex type of hereditary spastic paraplegia with characteristics of childhood onset of progressive spastic paraplegia associated with optic atrophy (with reduced visual acuity and central scotoma), ophthalmoplegia, reduced upper-extremity strength and dexterity, muscular atrophy in the lower extremities and sensorimotor neuropathy. Caused by mutations in the C12ORF65 gene (12q24.31) encoding probable peptide chain release factor C12ORF65, mitochondrial.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4F
MedGen UID:
761704
Concept ID:
C3540453
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4F is an autosomal recessive demyelinating neuropathy characterized by distal sensory impairment and distal muscle weakness and atrophy affecting the lower more than the upper limbs. Nerve conduction velocities are decreased and sural nerve biopsy shows loss of myelinated fibers. The age at onset is variable and can range from childhood to adult years. When the onset is in infancy, the phenotype is characterized as Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS; 145900). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, see CMT4A (214400).
Congenital myopathy 10b, mild variant
MedGen UID:
762102
Concept ID:
C3541476
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-10B (CMYP10B) is an autosomal recessive skeletal muscle disorder characterized by infantile- or childhood-onset myopathy, areflexia, dysphagia, and respiratory distress that usually requires nocturnal ventilation. Other common features include facial and neck muscle weakness, feeding difficulties, contractures, scoliosis, high-arched palate, hyporeflexia, and difficulties walking. The disorder is slowly progressive and most patients follow a chronic course. Muscle biopsy shows variable findings, including type 1 fiber predominance, minicore lesions, and myofibrillar disorganization (Boyden et al., 2012; Harris et al., 2018). Patients with missense mutations affecting conserved cysteine residues in the EGF-like domain show the mild variant phenotype (CMYP10B) with later onset of respiratory failure and minicores on muscle biopsy, whereas patients with more damaging mutations, including nonsense or frameshift null mutations, show the severe variant phenotype (CMYP10A) (Croci et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2Q
MedGen UID:
767280
Concept ID:
C3554366
Disease or Syndrome
A rare subtype of autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 with characteristics of adolescent to adulthood-onset of symmetrical, slowly progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy (with a predominant weakness of the distal lower limbs) associated with reduced or absent deep tendon reflexes, pes cavus and mild to moderated deep sensory impairment. There is evidence this disease is caused by a heterozygous loss-of-function mutation in the DHTKD1 gene on chromosome 10p14.
Lower motor neuron syndrome with late-adult onset
MedGen UID:
767312
Concept ID:
C3554398
Disease or Syndrome
CHCHD10-related disorders are characterized by a spectrum of adult-onset neurologic phenotypes that can include: Mitochondrial myopathy (may also be early onset): weakness, amyotrophy, exercise intolerance. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS): progressive degeneration of upper motor neurons and lower motor neurons. Frontotemporal dementia (FTD): slowly progressive behavioral changes, language disturbances, cognitive decline, extrapyramidal signs. Late-onset spinal motor neuronopathy (SMA, Jokela type): weakness, cramps, and/or fasciculations; areflexia. Axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy: slowly progressive lower-leg muscle weakness and atrophy, small hand muscle weakness, loss of tendon reflexes, sensory abnormalities. Cerebellar ataxia: gait ataxia, kinetic ataxia (progressive loss of coordination of lower- and upper-limb movements), dysarthria/dysphagia, nystagmus, cerebellar oculomotor disorder. Because of the recent discovery of CHCHD10-related disorders and the limited number of affected individuals reported to date, the natural history of these disorders (except for SMAJ caused by the p.Gly66Val pathogenic variant) is largely unknown.
Proximal myopathy with extrapyramidal signs
MedGen UID:
816615
Concept ID:
C3810285
Disease or Syndrome
Myopathy with extrapyramidal signs is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early childhood onset of proximal muscle weakness and learning disabilities. While the muscle weakness is static, most patients develop progressive extrapyramidal signs that may become disabling (summary by Logan et al., 2014). Brain MRI in 1 patient showed congenital malformations, including polymicrogyria and cerebellar dysplasia (Wilton et al., 2020).
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 35
MedGen UID:
854733
Concept ID:
C3888031
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia-35 (SCA35) is an autosomal dominant adult-onset neurologic disorder characterized by difficulty walking due to cerebellar ataxia. The age at onset ranges from teenage years to late adulthood, and the disorder is slowly progressive. Additional features may include hand tremor, dysarthria, hyperreflexia, and saccadic eye movements (summary by Guo et al., 2014). For a general discussion of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia, see SCA1 (164400).
Neuronopathy, distal hereditary motor, type 2D
MedGen UID:
854832
Concept ID:
C3888271
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant distal hereditary motor neuronopathy-6 (HMND6) is a neurologic disorder characterized by onset of slowly progressive distal lower limb weakness and atrophy between the second and fourth decades of life. Weakness usually begins in the calf muscles and later involves more proximal muscles. The severity is variable, and some patients have difficulty walking or running. Most also have upper limb involvement, particularly of the triceps and intrinsic hand muscles. Some patients may lose independent ambulation later in the disease course. Sensory impairment is typically not present, and cognition and bulbar function are normal (summary by Sumner et al., 2013). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant distal HMN (dHMN), see HMND1 (182960).
Polyglucosan body myopathy type 2
MedGen UID:
863889
Concept ID:
C4015452
Disease or Syndrome
Polyglucosan body myopathy-2 is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by proximal muscle weakness of the lower limbs resulting in gait disturbances. Some patients also have involvement of the upper limbs and/or distal muscle weakness. The age at onset is highly variable, and the disorder is slowly progressive. Muscle biopsy shows accumulation of polyglucosan, which contains abnormally long and poorly branched glucosyl chains and is variably resistant to digestion by alpha-amylase (summary by Malfatti et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PGBM, see PGBM1 (615895).
Congenital myasthenic syndrome 15
MedGen UID:
864033
Concept ID:
C4015596
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myasthenic syndrome-15 is one of a heterogeneous group of disorders that arise from impaired signal transmission at the neuromuscular synapse and are characterized by fatigable muscle weakness (summary by Cossins et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMS, see CMS1A (601462).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2U
MedGen UID:
906504
Concept ID:
C4084821
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2U (CMT2U) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by late-adult onset of distal sensory impairment resulting in distal muscle weakness and atrophy affecting the upper and lower limbs. The disorder is slowly progressive (summary by Gonzalez et al., 2013). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT, see CMT2A1 (118210).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4K
MedGen UID:
895560
Concept ID:
C4225246
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4K is an autosomal recessive demyelinating peripheral neuropathy characterized by onset in the first decade of distal muscle weakness and atrophy associated with impaired distal sensation. Both upper and lower limbs are affected. Affected individuals may also have nystagmus and late-onset cerebellar ataxia. Laboratory studies show increased serum lactate and isolated mitochondrial complex IV deficiency (summary by Echaniz-Laguna et al., 2013). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, see CMT4A (214400).
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal recessive 2
MedGen UID:
901897
Concept ID:
C4225312
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions-2 (PEOB2) is a mitochondrial disorder characterized by adult onset of progressive external ophthalmoplegia, exercise intolerance, muscle weakness, and signs and symptoms of spinocerebellar ataxia, such as impaired gait and dysarthria. Some patients may have respiratory insufficiency. Laboratory studies are consistent with a defect in mtDNA replication (summary by Reyes et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive PEO, see PEOB1 (258450).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 31
MedGen UID:
894942
Concept ID:
C4225357
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-31A (DEE31A) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by the global developmental delay apparent in early infancy. Most individuals have onset of various types of refractory seizures in the first months or years of life, which exacerbates the psychomotor deficits. Patients have hypotonia and profound intellectual disability with absent speech and inability to walk or ataxic gait. Some patients may have additional features, including dysmorphic features or cortical visual impairment (summary by the EuroEPINOMICS-RES Consortium et al., 2014 and Deciphering Developmental Disorders Study, 2015). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Congenital myasthenic syndrome 18
MedGen UID:
906793
Concept ID:
C4225364
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myasthenic syndrome-18 is an autosomal dominant presynaptic neuromuscular disorder characterized by early-onset muscle weakness and easy fatigability associated with delayed psychomotor development and ataxia (summary by Shen et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMS, see CMS1A (601462).
Congenital myasthenic syndrome 17
MedGen UID:
895078
Concept ID:
C4225377
Disease or Syndrome
Any congenital myasthenic syndrome in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the LRP4 gene.
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 62
MedGen UID:
924879
Concept ID:
C4284588
Disease or Syndrome
A pure or complex form of hereditary spastic paraplegia with characteristics of onset in the first decade of life of spastic paraparesis (more prominent in lower than upper extremities) and unsteady gait, as well as increased deep tendon reflexes, amyotrophy, cerebellar ataxia and flexion contractures of the knees in some.
Congenital myasthenic syndrome 21
MedGen UID:
934621
Concept ID:
C4310654
Disease or Syndrome
Any congenital myasthenic syndrome in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the SLC18A3 gene.
Myofibrillar myopathy 7
MedGen UID:
934678
Concept ID:
C4310711
Disease or Syndrome
Myofibrillar myopathy-7 (MFM7) is an autosomal recessive muscle disorder characterized by early childhood onset of slowly progressive muscle weakness that primarily affects the lower limbs and is associated with joint contractures (summary by Straussberg et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of myofibrillar myopathy, see MFM1 (601419).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, axonal, autosomal recessive, type 2a2b;
MedGen UID:
934692
Concept ID:
C4310725
Disease or Syndrome
MFN2 hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (MFN2-HMSN) is a classic axonal peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy, inherited in either an autosomal dominant (AD) manner (~90%) or an autosomal recessive (AR) manner (~10%). MFN2-HMSN is characterized by more severe involvement of the lower extremities than the upper extremities, distal upper-extremity involvement as the neuropathy progresses, more prominent motor deficits than sensory deficits, and normal (>42 m/s) or only slightly decreased nerve conduction velocities (NCVs). Postural tremor is common. Median onset is age 12 years in the AD form and age eight years in the AR form. The prevalence of optic atrophy is approximately 7% in the AD form and approximately 20% in the AR form.
Neurodevelopmental disorder with epilepsy, cataracts, feeding difficulties, and delayed brain myelination
MedGen UID:
1377894
Concept ID:
C4479333
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with epilepsy, cataracts, feeding difficulties, and delayed brain myelination is a syndromic form of severe to profound intellectual disability with onset of delayed psychomotor development and seizures in infancy. Affected children have hypotonia, feeding difficulties resulting in failure to thrive, and inability to speak or walk, and they tend to show repetitive stereotypic behaviors. Brain imaging shows cerebral atrophy and delayed myelination (summary by Schoch et al., 2017).
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2P
MedGen UID:
1386785
Concept ID:
C4511963
Disease or Syndrome
MDDGC9 is an autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy showing onset in early childhood. It is part of a group of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of DAG1, collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (summary by Hara et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type C, see MDDGC1 (609308).
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type R18
MedGen UID:
1385598
Concept ID:
C4517996
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-18 (LGMD18) is characterized by childhood-onset of proximal muscle weakness resulting in gait abnormalities and scapular winging. Serum creatine kinase is increased. A subset of patients may show a hyperkinetic movement disorder with chorea, ataxia, or dystonia and global developmental delay (summary by Bogershausen et al., 2013). Additional more variable features include alacrima, achalasia, cataracts, or hepatic steatosis (Liang et al., 2015; Koehler et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, see LGMDR1 (253600).
Psychomotor regression-oculomotor apraxia-movement disorder-nephropathy syndrome
MedGen UID:
1621949
Concept ID:
C4539828
Disease or Syndrome
Birk-Landau-Perez syndrome (BILAPES) is an autosomal recessive syndromic developmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay apparent from infancy or early childhood. Some patients have developmental regression with loss of speech and motor skills, whereas other patients never achieve these milestones. More variable features may include hypotonia, poor overall growth, ataxia, dystonia, abnormal eye movements, and renal insufficiency (Perez et al., 2017; Kleyner et al., 2022).
Mitochondrial myopathy-cerebellar ataxia-pigmentary retinopathy syndrome
MedGen UID:
1620960
Concept ID:
C4540096
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial myopathy and ataxia (MMYAT) is an autosomal recessive mtDNA depletion disorder characterized by cerebellar ataxia, congenital muscle involvement with histologic findings ranging from myopathic to dystrophic, and pigmentary retinopathy (summary by Donkervoort et al., 2019).
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia, type 11
MedGen UID:
1627627
Concept ID:
C4540164
Congenital Abnormality
PCH11 is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severely delayed psychomotor development with intellectual disability and poor speech, microcephaly, dysmorphic features, and pontocerebellar hypoplasia on brain imaging. Additional features are more variable (summary by Marin-Valencia et al., 2017). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PCH, see PCH1 (607596).
Neuronopathy, distal hereditary motor, type 9
MedGen UID:
1617571
Concept ID:
C4540265
Disease or Syndrome
HMND9 is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by juvenile onset of slowly progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy affecting both the lower and upper limbs (summary by Tsai et al., 2017). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant distal HMN, see HMND1 (182960).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with ataxic gait, absent speech, and decreased cortical white matter
MedGen UID:
1621102
Concept ID:
C4540498
Disease or Syndrome
NDAGSCW is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severely delayed psychomotor development apparent from infancy. Affected individuals have delayed and difficulty walking, intellectual disability, absent speech, and variable additional features, including hip dysplasia, tapering fingers, and seizures. Brain imaging shows decreased cortical white matter, often with decreased cerebellar white matter, thin corpus callosum, and thin brainstem (summary by Lamers et al., 2017).
Epileptic encephalopathy, infantile or early childhood, 2
MedGen UID:
1638319
Concept ID:
C4693362
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-92 (DEE92) is characterized in most patients by onset of seizures in infancy or childhood and associated with global developmental delay and variable impairment of intellectual development. The seizure type and severity varies, and seizures may be intractable in some patients. Some patients are severely affected, unable to walk or speak, whereas others show some development. Additional neurologic features, including cortical blindness, dystonia, and spasticity, may occur. Mutations occur de novo (summary by Hamdan et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, dominant intermediate G
MedGen UID:
1642893
Concept ID:
C4693509
Disease or Syndrome
CMTDIG is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder with a highly variable phenotype. Most affected individuals have onset in the first or second decades of slowly progressive distal motor weakness and atrophy, resulting in gait instability and distal upper limb impairment, as well as distal sensory impairment. More severely affected individuals may have pes cavus and claw hands and become wheelchair-bound, whereas other affected individuals have later onset with a milder disease course. Electrophysiologic studies tend to show median motor nerve conduction velocities (NCV) in the 'intermediate' range, between 25 and 45 m/s (summary by Berciano et al., 2017). In a review of intermediate CMT, Berciano et al. (2017) noted that advanced axonal degeneration may induce secondary demyelinating changes resulting in decreased NCV and attenuated compound muscle action potential (CMAP) in median nerve conduction studies. They thus suggested that testing the upper arm, axilla to elbow, may provide more accurate assessment of NCV and CMAP and reveal an intermediate phenotype (review by Berciano et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMTDI, see 606482.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 5
MedGen UID:
1648461
Concept ID:
C4721916
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies (HMSN) are a heterogeneous group of peripheral nervous system disorders affecting motor and sensory function. HMSN I, also known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, or peroneal muscular atrophy, type 1, is a demyelinating neuropathy (see CMT1B; 118200) and HMSN II, also known as CMT type 2, is an axonal neuropathy (see CMT2A1; 118210). See also HMSN III (145900) and HMSN IV (266500). For an autosomal recessive disorder with similarities to HMSN V, see 607731.
Mitochondrial complex 1 deficiency, nuclear type 2
MedGen UID:
1648466
Concept ID:
C4748737
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex 1 deficiency, nuclear type 21
MedGen UID:
1648383
Concept ID:
C4748792
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, demyelinating, type 1G
MedGen UID:
1648290
Concept ID:
C4748940
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1G is an autosomal dominant progressive peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy characterized by distal muscle weakness and atrophy with onset in the first or second decade. Affected individuals have difficulty walking, distal sensory impairment with decreased or absent reflexes, and often have foot deformities. Median motor nerve conduction velocities (NCV) are decreased (less than 38 m/s) and sural nerve biopsy shows myelin defects and onion bulb formation (summary by Hong et al., 2016 and Motley et al., 2016). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1, see CMT1B (118200).
Progressive myoclonic epilepsy type 6
MedGen UID:
1681379
Concept ID:
C5190805
Disease or Syndrome
Progressive myoclonic epilepsy-6 is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by onset of ataxia in the first years of life, followed by action myoclonus and seizures later in childhood, and loss of independent ambulation in the second decade. Cognition is not usually affected, although mild memory difficulties may occur in the third decade (summary by Corbett et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of progressive myoclonic epilepsy, see EPM1A (254800).
Intellectual developmental disorder, X-linked 108
MedGen UID:
1680544
Concept ID:
C5193009
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked intellectual developmental disorder-108 (MRX108) is characterized by early hypotonia, global developmental delay, and moderately to severely impaired intellectual development. Brisk tendon reflexes, variable facial dysmorphism, and fifth finger clinodactyly may be present (Khayat et al., 2019).
Lethal arthrogryposis-anterior horn cell disease syndrome
MedGen UID:
1677784
Concept ID:
C5193016
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital arthrogryposis with anterior horn cell disease (CAAHD) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder with highly variable severity. Affected individuals are usually noted to have contractures in utero on prenatal ultrasound studies, and present at birth with generalized contractures manifest as arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC). Patients have severe hypotonia with respiratory insufficiency, often resulting in death in infancy or early childhood. Some patients may survive into later childhood with supportive care, but may be unable to walk or sit independently due to a combination of muscle weakness and contractures. Cognition may be normal. The disorder also includes multiple congenital anomalies associated with AMC and hypotonia, including high-arched palate, myopathic facies, and bulbar weakness. Neuropathologic studies demonstrate severe loss of anterior horn cells in the spinal cord, as well as diffuse motor neuron axonopathy (summary by Smith et al., 2017 and Tan et al., 2017). Distinction from Lethal Congenital Contracture Syndrome 1 Biallelic mutation in the GLE1 gene can also cause LCCS1, which is lethal in utero. However, distinguishing between LCCS1 and CAAHD is controversial. Smith et al. (2017) suggested that differentiating between the 2 disorders has limited utility, and that they may represent a genotype/phenotype correlation rather than 2 different disease entities. In contrast, Said et al. (2017) concluded that LCCS1 represents a distinct clinical entity in which all affected individuals die prenatally and exhibit no fetal movements. Vuopala et al. (1995) differentiated CAAHD from LCCS1, noting that both are prevalent in Finland. LCCS1 is always fatal during the fetal period, presenting with severe hydrops and intrauterine growth retardation. In LCCS1, the spinal cord is macroscopically thinned because of an early reduction of the anterior horn and a paucity of anterior horn cells. The skeletal muscles are extremely hypoplastic, even difficult to locate. Infants with CAAHD survive longer than those with LCCS1, and when present, hydrops and intrauterine growth retardation are mild. The macroscopic findings of the central nervous system and skeletal muscles are closer to normal, although microscopic analysis also shows degeneration of anterior horn cells. In addition, birthplaces of ancestors of affected individuals do not show clustering in the northeast part of Finland, as is the case with LCCS1.
Brain abnormalities, neurodegeneration, and dysosteosclerosis
MedGen UID:
1678789
Concept ID:
C5193117
Disease or Syndrome
Brain abnormalities, neurodegeneration, and dysosteosclerosis (BANDDOS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by brain abnormalities, progressive neurologic deterioration, and sclerotic bone dysplasia similar to dysosteosclerosis (DOS). The age at onset is highly variable: some patients may present in infancy with hydrocephalus, global developmental delay, and hypotonia, whereas others may have onset of symptoms in the late teens or early twenties after normal development. Neurologic features include loss of previous motor and language skills, cognitive impairment, spasticity, and focal seizures. Brain imaging shows periventricular white matter abnormalities and calcifications, large cisterna magna or Dandy-Walker malformation, and sometimes agenesis of the corpus callosum (summary by Guo et al., 2019).
Mitochondrial myopathy, episodic, with optic atrophy and reversible leukoencephalopathy
MedGen UID:
1679560
Concept ID:
C5193223
Disease or Syndrome
Episodic mitochondrial myopathy with or without optic atrophy and reversible leukoencephalopathy (MEOAL) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized mainly by childhood onset of progressive muscle weakness and exercise intolerance. Patients have episodic exacerbation, which may be associated with increased serum creatine kinase or lactic acid. Additional more variable features may include optic atrophy, reversible leukoencephalopathy, and later onset of a sensorimotor polyneuropathy. The disorder results from impaired formation of Fe-S clusters, which are essential cofactors for proper mitochondrial function (summary by Gurgel-Giannetti et al., 2018)
Oculopharyngodistal myopathy 1
MedGen UID:
1684682
Concept ID:
C5231388
Disease or Syndrome
Oculopharyngodistal myopathy-1 (OPDM1) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by adult-onset ptosis, external ophthalmoplegia, facial muscle weakness, distal limb muscle weakness and atrophy, and pharyngeal involvement, resulting in dysphagia and dysarthria. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows myopathic changes with rimmed vacuoles. There are variable manifestations of the disorder regarding muscle involvement and severity (summary by Ishiura et al., 2019). Genetic Heterogeneity of Oculopharyngodistal Myopathy See also OPDM2 (618940), caused by trinucleotide repeat expansion in the GIPC1 gene (605072) on chromosome 19p13; OPDM3 (619473), caused by trinucleotide repeat expansion in the NOTCH2NLC gene (618025) on chromosome 1q21; and OPDM4 (619790), caused by trinucleotide repeat expansion in the RILPL1 gene (614092) on chromosome 12q24. Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD; 164300) is a similar disorder with overlapping features. It is caused by a similar heterozygous trinucleotide repeat expansion in the PABPN1 gene (602279) (summary by Durmus et al., 2011).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with cataracts, poor growth, and dysmorphic facies
MedGen UID:
1684661
Concept ID:
C5231414
Disease or Syndrome
Intellectual developmental disorder with impaired language and dysmorphic facies
MedGen UID:
1684804
Concept ID:
C5231444
Disease or Syndrome
Intellectual developmental disorder with impaired language and dysmorphic facies (IDDILF) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by global developmental delay apparent from infancy, impaired language development, and dysmorphic facial features, including hypertelorism, epicanthal folds, and abnormal palpebral fissures. Some patients may have additional findings, including feeding difficulties, mild cardiac or genitourinary defects, and distal skeletal anomalies (summary by Balak et al., 2019).
Intellectual developmental disorder with hypotonia and behavioral abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1684709
Concept ID:
C5231489
Disease or Syndrome
Intellectual developmental disorder with hypotonia and behavioral abnormalities (IDDHBA) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by onset of hypotonia and variably impaired global developmental delay in infancy. Affected individuals tend to have learning disability, usually requiring special schooling, as well as behavioral abnormalities, such as autistic features and attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Additional more variable features may include nonspecific dysmorphic facial features, congenital heart defects, visual or ocular movement anomalies, and poor feeding and/or gastroesophageal reflux (summary by Calpena et al., 2019).
Sorbitol dehydrogenase deficiency with peripheral neuropathy
MedGen UID:
1714781
Concept ID:
C5394466
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive distal hereditary motor neuronopathy-8 (HMNR8), or sorbitol dehydrogenase deficiency with peripheral neuropathy (SORDD), is characterized by onset of distal muscle weakness mainly affecting the lower limbs and resulting in difficulty walking. Onset of symptoms is usually in the first or second decades of life, although later adult onset has been reported; the disorder is slowly progressive. Nerve conduction velocities are most consistent with an axonal process. More variable features include distal sensory impairment, upper limb tremor, and scoliosis. Laboratory studies show increased serum sorbitol (summary by Cortese et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive HMN, see HMNR1 (604320).
Mitchell syndrome
MedGen UID:
1714342
Concept ID:
C5394554
Disease or Syndrome
Mitchell syndrome (MITCH) is a progressive disorder characterized by episodic demyelination, sensorimotor polyneuropathy, and hearing loss (Chung et al., 2020).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, axonal, mitochondrial form, 1
MedGen UID:
1731194
Concept ID:
C5435765
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial form of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease-1 (CMTMA1) is inherited only through the maternal line. The disorder is characterized by onset of distal muscle weakness and atrophy mainly affecting the lower limbs and resulting in difficulty walking in the second decade of life, although both earlier and later onset can occur. Upper limb involvement often develops with time, and affected individuals have weakness and atrophy of the intrinsic hand muscles. Other features may include distal sensory impairment, foot deformities, scoliosis, hypo- or hyperreflexia, spastic paraparesis, and neurogenic bladder. Electrophysiologic studies are compatible with an axonal sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy, and muscle and nerve biopsy show evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction with decreased activities of respiratory complexes, mtDNA deletions, and mitochondrial hyperplasia (summary by Fay et al., 2020).
Frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 6
MedGen UID:
1759760
Concept ID:
C5436279
Disease or Syndrome
Frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-6 (FTDALS6) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder with highly variable manifestations. Some patients present in adulthood with progressive FTD, often classified as the 'behavioral variant,' which is characterized by reduced empathy, impulsive behavior, personality changes, and reduced verbal output. Other patients present with features of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), which is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by upper and lower motor neuron dysfunction resulting in rapidly progressive paralysis and death from respiratory failure. The pathologic hallmarks of this disease include pallor of the corticospinal tract due to loss of motor neurons (in ALS). In both ALS and FTD, there are ubiquitin-positive inclusions within surviving neurons as well as deposition of pathologic TDP43 (TARDBP; 605078) or p62 (SQSTM1; 601530) aggregates. Patients with a D395G mutation (601023.0014) have been shown to develop pathologic tau (MAPT; 157140) aggregates. Some patients with the disorder may have features of both diseases, and there is significant interfamilial and intrafamilial phenotypic variability (summary by Johnson et al., 2010; Wong et al., 2018; Al-Obeidi et al., 2018; Darwich et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of FTDALS, see FTDALS1 (105550).
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 49
MedGen UID:
1762338
Concept ID:
C5436616
Disease or Syndrome
Neuronopathy, distal hereditary motor, type 5C
MedGen UID:
1760720
Concept ID:
C5436838
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant distal hereditary motor neuronopathy-13 (HMND13) is a neurologic disorder characterized by distal muscle weakness and atrophy affecting both the upper and lower limbs, resulting in difficulty walking and poor fine hand motor skills. Some patients show spasticity and hyperreflexia, mainly of the lower limbs: these features overlap with those observed in Silver syndrome, an allelic disorder. In addition, some patients with BSCL2 mutations show features of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2 (CMT2) with distal sensory impairment. HMND13, Silver syndrome (SPG17), and features of axonal sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy (CMT2) thus represent a phenotypic spectrum associated with heterozygous mutations in the BSCL2 gene. Individuals with the same mutation may manifest features consistent with any of those disorders; variability is even observed within the same family (summary by Van de Warrenburg et al., 2006; Luigetti et al., 2010; Choi et al., 2013). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of distal HMN, see HMND1 (182960).
Dysostosis multiplex, Ain-Naz type
MedGen UID:
1780944
Concept ID:
C5444223
Disease or Syndrome
The Ain-Naz type of dysostosis multiplex (DMAN) is a severe progressive skeletal dysplasia with features of a metabolic disorder. Patients exhibit marked short stature, coarse facies with broad nose and prominent lips, and a distended abdomen, and experience severe physical disability. Early death has been observed in some patients (Ain et al., 2021).
Epilepsy, progressive myoclonic, 12
MedGen UID:
1778162
Concept ID:
C5543069
Disease or Syndrome
Progressive myoclonic epilepsy-12 (EPM12) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by onset of tonic-clonic seizures and/or myoclonus in the second decade of life. Affected individuals develop cerebellar ataxia associated with progressive cerebral and cerebellar atrophy on brain imaging. Most patients lose ambulation and become wheelchair-bound. Additional more variable features include mild cognitive dysfunction or psychiatric manifestations, such as depression or anxiety (summary by Mazzola et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of progressive myoclonic epilepsy, see EPM1A (254800).
Mitochondrial dna depletion syndrome 16B (neuroophthalmic type)
MedGen UID:
1780329
Concept ID:
C5543632
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome-16B (MTDPS16B) is an autosomal recessive childhood-onset and progressive neuroophthalmic mtDNA depletion disorder characterized by optic atrophy, mixed polyneuropathy, spinal and cerebellar ataxia, and generalized chorea (Dosekova et al., 2020).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease, axonal, type 2GG
MedGen UID:
1794143
Concept ID:
C5561933
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2GG (CMT2GG) is an autosomal dominant axonal peripheral neuropathy characterized by slowly progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy primarily affecting the lower limbs and causing difficulty walking. The onset is usually in adulthood, although rare patients may have mild symptoms from childhood. Some individuals may also have involvement of the hands. Although most patients have hypo- or areflexia at the ankles, distal sensory impairment is not always present, indicating a spectrum of disease encompassing both distal hereditary neuropathy and axonal CMT. Electrophysiologic studies are consistent with a axonal process (summary by Mendoza-Ferreira et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT, see CMT2A1 (118210).
Central hypoventilation syndrome, congenital, 2, and autonomic dysfunction
MedGen UID:
1794173
Concept ID:
C5561963
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome-2 and autonomic dysfunction (CCHS2) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by shallow breathing and apneic spells apparent in the neonatal period. Affected infants require mechanical ventilation due to impaired ventilatory response to hypercapnia, as well as tube feeding due to poor swallowing, aspiration, and gastrointestinal dysmotility. Some patients have other features of autonomic dysfunction, including bladder dysfunction, sinus bradycardia, and temperature dysregulation. Although mild global developmental delay with learning difficulties and seizures were present in the single family reported, it was unclear if these features were related to the hypoventilation phenotype (Spielmann et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CCHS, see CCHS1 (209880).
Boudin-Mortier syndrome
MedGen UID:
1794202
Concept ID:
C5561992
Disease or Syndrome
Boudin-Mortier syndrome (BOMOS) is characterized by tall stature, arachnodactyly, disproportionately elongated great toes, and multiple extra epiphyses. Some patients also show joint hypermobility and dilation of the aortic root (Boudin et al., 2018). Mutation in the NPR2 gene (108961) results in a similar phenotype of increased stature and elongation of the digits, particularly of the great toes, with multiple extra epiphyses (epiphyseal chondrodysplasia, Miura type; 615923).
Dystonia 31
MedGen UID:
1794211
Concept ID:
C5562001
Disease or Syndrome
Dystonia-31 (DYT31) is an autosomal recessive progressive neurologic disorder characterized by involuntary muscle twisting movements and postural abnormalities affecting the upper and lower limbs, neck, face, and trunk. Some patients may have orofacial dyskinesia resulting in articulation and swallowing difficulties. The age at onset ranges from childhood to young adulthood. There are usually no additional neurologic symptoms, although late-onset parkinsonism was reported in 1 family (summary by Zech et al., 2022).
Spastic paraplegia 84, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
1794235
Concept ID:
C5562025
Disease or Syndrome
PI4KA-related disorder is a clinically variable disorder characterized primarily by neurologic dysfunction (limb spasticity, developmental delay, intellectual disability, seizures, ataxia, nystagmus), gastrointestinal manifestations (multiple intestinal atresia, inflammatory bowel disease), and combined immunodeficiency (leukopenia, variable immunoglobulin defects). Age of onset is typically antenatal or in early childhood; individuals can present with any combination of these features. Rare individuals present with later-onset hereditary spastic paraplegia. Brain MRI findings can include hypomyelinating leukodystrophy, cerebellar hypoplasia/atrophy, thin or dysplastic corpus callosum, and/or perisylvian polymicrogyria.
Leukoencephalopathy, hereditary diffuse, with spheroids 2
MedGen UID:
1794254
Concept ID:
C5562044
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids-2 (HDLS2) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive cognitive and executive dysfunction, psychiatric disturbances, and neurologic symptoms, such as gait abnormalities, paresis, seizures, and rigidity. Symptom onset is usually in adulthood, although earlier onset has been reported. Some patients have an acute encephalopathic course with severe neurologic decline resulting in early death, whereas other patients have a more protracted and chronic disease course. Neuropathologic examination shows a leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and myelination defects (summary by Sundal et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HDLS, see HDLS1 (221820).
Dystonia, early-onset, and/or spastic paraplegia
MedGen UID:
1794261
Concept ID:
C5562051
Disease or Syndrome
Early-onset dystonia and/or spastic paraplegia (DYTSPG) is an autosomal dominant neurologic movement disorder characterized by phenotypic variability, even within the same family. Some patients have onset of progressive focal and generalized dystonia in the first decade, as young as infancy, whereas others develop progressive spastic paraplegia as adults, suggesting that age affects the phenotype. Some patients have manifestations of both disorders. Most patients have ambulation difficulties (Gilbert et al., 2009). Rare patients may show hypotonia and neurodevelopmental delay (Zech et al., 2022).
Autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia type 76
MedGen UID:
1798906
Concept ID:
C5567483
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia-76 is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by young-adult onset of slowly progressive spasticity of the lower limbs resulting in gait difficulties. Most affected individuals have upper limb involvement and additional features such as foot deformities and dysarthria. Cognition is unaffected (summary by Gan-Or et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia, see SPG5A (270800).
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2X
MedGen UID:
1799561
Concept ID:
C5568138
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-25 (LGMDR25) is characterized by slowly progressive onset of proximal lower limb weakness in adulthood. Affected individuals also develop cardiac arrhythmias resulting in syncopal episodes as young adults or later in life (summary by Schindler et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD), see LGMDR1 (253600).
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 73
MedGen UID:
1800404
Concept ID:
C5568981
Disease or Syndrome
A pure form of hereditary spastic paraplegia with characteristics of adult onset of crural spastic paraparesis, hyperreflexia, extensor plantar responses, proximal muscle weakness, mild muscle atrophy, decreased vibration sensation at ankles and mild urinary dysfunction. Foot deformities have been reported to eventually occur in some patients. No abnormalities are noted on brain magnetic resonance imaging and peripheral nerve conduction velocity studies.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2Z
MedGen UID:
1800448
Concept ID:
C5569025
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2Z (CMT2Z) is an autosomal dominant axonal peripheral neuropathy characterized by onset, usually in the first decade, of distal lower limb muscle weakness and sensory impairment. The disorder is progressive, and affected individuals tend to develop upper limb and proximal muscle involvement in an asymmetric pattern, resulting in severe disability late in adulthood. Rare occurrence of global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development or learning difficulties has been observed. In some instances, the same mutation may result in different phenotypic manifestations (CMT2Z or DIGFAN), which highlights the clinical spectrum associated with MORC2 mutations and may render the classification of patients into one or the other disorder challenging (summary by Sevilla et al., 2016, Ando et al., 2017, Guillen Sacoto et al., 2020). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT, see CMT2A1 (118210).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, demyelinating, type 1J
MedGen UID:
1824022
Concept ID:
C5774249
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1J (CMT1J) is an autosomal dominant sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy characterized by distal muscle weakness and atrophy, as well as distal sensory impairment, predominantly affecting the lower limbs and resulting in gait abnormalities. The age at onset is highly variable, ranging from early childhood to mid-adulthood, and the disorder is progressive, although the severity is also variable. Additional features may include foot deformities, upper limb or hand involvement, and decreased or absent deep tendon reflexes. Electrophysiologic studies tend to show nerve conduction velocities in the demyelinating range, although some patients may have results in the intermediate range, likely reflecting secondary axonal degeneration (summary by Ronkko et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1, see CMT1B (118200).
Nemaline myopathy 5C, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1841185
Concept ID:
C5830549
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant nemaline myopathy-5C (NEM5C) is a relatively mild skeletal muscle disorder with wide clinical variability, even within families. Affected individuals develop symptoms of muscle weakness in the first or second decades; those with earlier onset tend to have a more severe disease course. Features include difficulty walking on the heels, waddling gait, proximal muscle weakness affecting the upper and lower limbs, and Gowers sign. Additional features may include myopathic facies, high-arched palate, scoliosis or kyphosis, and ankle weakness. Patients remain ambulatory into late adulthood. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows hypotrophy of type 1 fibers, hypertrophy of type 2 fibers, fiber size variation, and myofibrillar disorganization. Nemaline rods in type 1 fibers are often observed, but are not always present (Konersman et al., 2017; Holling et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of nemaline myopathy, see NEM2 (256030).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Morgan JC, Ye X, Mellor JA, Golden KJ, Zamudio J, Chiodo LA, Bao Y, Xie T
J Neurol Sci 2021 Feb 15;421:117293. Epub 2020 Dec 25 doi: 10.1016/j.jns.2020.117293. PMID: 33385754
Nero H, Dahlberg J, Dahlberg LE
J Med Internet Res 2017 Dec 18;19(12):e422. doi: 10.2196/jmir.9255. PMID: 29254906Free PMC Article
Elewski BE
Am J Clin Dermatol 2000 Jan-Feb;1(1):19-26. doi: 10.2165/00128071-200001010-00002. PMID: 11702301

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Allahyari F, Molaee H, Hosseini Nejad J
Z Naturforsch C J Biosci 2023 Jan 27;78(1-2):1-8. Epub 2022 Sep 12 doi: 10.1515/znc-2022-0092. PMID: 36087300
Deardorff WJ, Barnes DE, Jeon SY, Boscardin WJ, Langa KM, Covinsky KE, Mitchell SL, Whitlock EL, Smith AK, Lee SJ
JAMA Intern Med 2022 Nov 1;182(11):1161-1170. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2022.4326. PMID: 36156062Free PMC Article
Fu JL, Perloff MD
Drugs Aging 2022 Jul;39(7):523-550. Epub 2022 Jun 27 doi: 10.1007/s40266-022-00946-x. PMID: 35754070
Mansfield A, Inness EL, Mcilroy WE
Handb Clin Neurol 2018;159:205-228. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-444-63916-5.00013-6. PMID: 30482315
Ikemoto T, Arai YC
Clin Interv Aging 2018;13:819-827. Epub 2018 Apr 30 doi: 10.2147/CIA.S148683. PMID: 29750024Free PMC Article

Diagnosis

Malhotra N, Patro M, Gothi D
Chest 2022 Jul;162(1):e33-e36. doi: 10.1016/j.chest.2022.02.010. PMID: 35809947
Fu JL, Perloff MD
Drugs Aging 2022 Jul;39(7):523-550. Epub 2022 Jun 27 doi: 10.1007/s40266-022-00946-x. PMID: 35754070
Benson JC, Trejo-Lopez JA, Nassiri AM, Eschbacher K, Link MJ, Driscoll CL, Tiegs RD, Sfeir J, DeLone DR
AJNR Am J Neuroradiol 2022 Jun;43(6):817-822. Epub 2022 May 19 doi: 10.3174/ajnr.A7513. PMID: 35589138Free PMC Article
Ikemoto T, Arai YC
Clin Interv Aging 2018;13:819-827. Epub 2018 Apr 30 doi: 10.2147/CIA.S148683. PMID: 29750024Free PMC Article
Osman AA, Govender S
Clin Orthop Relat Res 1995 Apr;(313):214-9. PMID: 7641483

Therapy

Allahyari F, Molaee H, Hosseini Nejad J
Z Naturforsch C J Biosci 2023 Jan 27;78(1-2):1-8. Epub 2022 Sep 12 doi: 10.1515/znc-2022-0092. PMID: 36087300
Ilari S, Passacatini LC, Malafoglia V, Oppedisano F, Maiuolo J, Gliozzi M, Palma E, Tomino C, Fini M, Raffaeli W, Mollace V, Muscoli C
Pharmacol Res 2022 Dec;186:106547. Epub 2022 Nov 4 doi: 10.1016/j.phrs.2022.106547. PMID: 36336218
Fu JL, Perloff MD
Drugs Aging 2022 Jul;39(7):523-550. Epub 2022 Jun 27 doi: 10.1007/s40266-022-00946-x. PMID: 35754070
Barclay RE, Stevenson TJ, Poluha W, Semenko B, Schubert J
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2020 May 25;5(5):CD005950. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD005950.pub5. PMID: 32449959Free PMC Article
Ellis C, Barley J, Grubaugh A
Cerebrovasc Dis 2013;35(6):572-81. Epub 2013 Jul 6 doi: 10.1159/000351209. PMID: 23838851

Prognosis

Deardorff WJ, Barnes DE, Jeon SY, Boscardin WJ, Langa KM, Covinsky KE, Mitchell SL, Whitlock EL, Smith AK, Lee SJ
JAMA Intern Med 2022 Nov 1;182(11):1161-1170. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2022.4326. PMID: 36156062Free PMC Article
Fu JL, Perloff MD
Drugs Aging 2022 Jul;39(7):523-550. Epub 2022 Jun 27 doi: 10.1007/s40266-022-00946-x. PMID: 35754070
Salamon A , Dézsi L , Radics B , Varga ET , Hortobágyi T , Tömösvári A , Vécsei L , Klivényi P , Rajda C
Ideggyogy Sz 2020 Mar 30;73(3-4):141-144. doi: 10.18071/isz.73.0141. PMID: 32364342
King LK, Kendzerska T, Waugh EJ, Hawker GA
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) 2018 Jan;70(1):71-79. Epub 2017 Dec 15 doi: 10.1002/acr.23250. PMID: 28513082
Osman AA, Govender S
Clin Orthop Relat Res 1995 Apr;(313):214-9. PMID: 7641483

Clinical prediction guides

Deardorff WJ, Barnes DE, Jeon SY, Boscardin WJ, Langa KM, Covinsky KE, Mitchell SL, Whitlock EL, Smith AK, Lee SJ
JAMA Intern Med 2022 Nov 1;182(11):1161-1170. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2022.4326. PMID: 36156062Free PMC Article
Hogan SE, Nehler MR, Anand S, Patel MR, Debus S, Jackson MT, Buchanan C, King RW, Hess C, Muehlhofer E, Haskell LP, Bauersachs RM, Berkowitz SD, Hsia J, Bonaca MP
Vasc Med 2022 Aug;27(4):343-349. Epub 2022 Apr 25 doi: 10.1177/1358863X221085606. PMID: 35467452
Barclay RE, Stevenson TJ, Poluha W, Semenko B, Schubert J
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2020 May 25;5(5):CD005950. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD005950.pub5. PMID: 32449959Free PMC Article
Na A, Buchanan TS
Hum Mov Sci 2019 Apr;64:409-419. Epub 2018 Nov 15 doi: 10.1016/j.humov.2018.11.002. PMID: 30448202
Hawker GA, Croxford R, Bierman AS, Harvey P, Ravi B, Kendzerska T, Stanaitis I, King LK, Lipscombe L
Osteoarthritis Cartilage 2017 Jan;25(1):67-75. Epub 2016 Aug 16 doi: 10.1016/j.joca.2016.08.003. PMID: 27539890

Recent systematic reviews

Allahyari F, Molaee H, Hosseini Nejad J
Z Naturforsch C J Biosci 2023 Jan 27;78(1-2):1-8. Epub 2022 Sep 12 doi: 10.1515/znc-2022-0092. PMID: 36087300
Ilari S, Passacatini LC, Malafoglia V, Oppedisano F, Maiuolo J, Gliozzi M, Palma E, Tomino C, Fini M, Raffaeli W, Mollace V, Muscoli C
Pharmacol Res 2022 Dec;186:106547. Epub 2022 Nov 4 doi: 10.1016/j.phrs.2022.106547. PMID: 36336218
Barclay RE, Stevenson TJ, Poluha W, Semenko B, Schubert J
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2020 May 25;5(5):CD005950. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD005950.pub5. PMID: 32449959Free PMC Article
Gewandter JS, Burke L, Cavaletti G, Dworkin RH, Gibbons C, Gover TD, Herrmann DN, Mcarthur JC, McDermott MP, Rappaport BA, Reeve BB, Russell JW, Smith AG, Smith SM, Turk DC, Vinik AI, Freeman R
Muscle Nerve 2017 Mar;55(3):366-372. Epub 2016 Dec 23 doi: 10.1002/mus.25264. PMID: 27447116Free PMC Article
Ellis C, Barley J, Grubaugh A
Cerebrovasc Dis 2013;35(6):572-81. Epub 2013 Jul 6 doi: 10.1159/000351209. PMID: 23838851

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