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Increased circulating cortisol level

MedGen UID:
871175
Concept ID:
C4025651
Finding
Synonyms: Cushing syndrome; Hypercortisolism; Increased cortisol production
 
HPO: HP:0003118

Definition

Overproduction of the hormone of cortisol by the adrenal cortex, resulting in a characteristic combination of clinical symptoms termed Cushing syndrome, with truncal obesity, a round, full face, striae atrophicae and acne, muscle weakness, and other features. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Multiple endocrine neoplasia, type 1
MedGen UID:
9957
Concept ID:
C0025267
Neoplastic Process
Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) includes varying combinations of more than 20 endocrine and non-endocrine tumors. Endocrine tumors become evident either by overproduction of hormones by the tumor or by growth of the tumor itself. Parathyroid tumors are the most common MEN1-associated endocrinopathy; onset in 90% of individuals is between ages 20 and 25 years with hypercalcemia evident by age 50 years; hypercalcemia causes lethargy, depression, confusion, anorexia, constipation, nausea, vomiting, diuresis, dehydration, hypercalciuria, kidney stones, increased bone resorption/fracture risk, hypertension, and shortened QT interval. Pituitary tumors include prolactinoma (the most common), which manifests as oligomenorrhea/amenorrhea and galactorrhea in females and sexual dysfunction in males. Well-differentiated endocrine tumors of the gastro-entero-pancreatic (GEP) tract can manifest as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (gastrinoma); hypoglycemia (insulinoma); hyperglycemia, anorexia, glossitis, anemia, diarrhea, venous thrombosis, and skin rash (glucagonoma); and watery diarrhea, hypokalemia, and achlorhydria syndrome (vasoactive intestinal peptide [VIP]-secreting tumor). Carcinoid tumors are non-hormone-secreting and can manifest as a large mass after age 50 years. Adrenocortical tumors can be associated with primary hypercortisolism or hyperaldosteronism. Non-endocrine tumors include facial angiofibromas, collagenomas, lipomas, meningiomas, ependymomas, and leiomyomas.
Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A
MedGen UID:
9958
Concept ID:
C0025268
Neoplastic Process
Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2) includes the following phenotypes: MEN2A, FMTC (familial medullary thyroid carcinoma, which may be a variant of MEN2A), and MEN2B. All three phenotypes involve high risk for development of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid (MTC); MEN2A and MEN2B involve an increased risk for pheochromocytoma; MEN2A involves an increased risk for parathyroid adenoma or hyperplasia. Additional features in MEN2B include mucosal neuromas of the lips and tongue, distinctive facies with enlarged lips, ganglioneuromatosis of the gastrointestinal tract, and a marfanoid habitus. MTC typically occurs in early childhood in MEN2B, early adulthood in MEN2A, and middle age in FMTC.
McCune-Albright syndrome
MedGen UID:
69164
Concept ID:
C0242292
Disease or Syndrome
Fibrous dysplasia / McCune-Albright syndrome (FD/MAS), the result of an early embryonic postzygotic somatic activating pathogenic variant in GNAS (encoding the cAMP pathway-associated G-protein, Gsa), is characterized by involvement of the skin, skeleton, and certain endocrine organs. However, because Gsa signaling is ubiquitous, additional tissues may be affected. Café au lait skin macules are common and are usually the first manifestation of the disease, apparent at or shortly after birth. Fibrous dysplasia (FD), which can involve any part and combination of the craniofacial, axial, and/or appendicular skeleton, can range from an isolated, asymptomatic monostotic lesion discovered incidentally to severe disabling polyostotic disease involving practically the entire skeleton and leading to progressive scoliosis, facial deformity, and loss of mobility, vision, and/or hearing. Endocrinopathies include: Gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty resulting from recurrent ovarian cysts in girls and autonomous testosterone production in boys; Testicular lesions with or without associated gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty; Thyroid lesions with or without non-autoimmune hyperthyroidism; Growth hormone excess; FGF23-mediated phosphate wasting with or without hypophosphatemia in association with fibrous dysplasia; and Neonatal hypercortisolism. The prognosis for individuals with FD/MAS is based on disease location and severity.
Glucocorticoid resistance
MedGen UID:
333960
Concept ID:
C1841972
Disease or Syndrome
Generalized glucocorticoid resistance is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by increased plasma cortisol concentration and high urinary free cortisol, resistance to adrenal suppression by dexamethasone, and the absence of clinical stigmata of Cushing syndrome. The clinical expression of the disease is variable. Common features include hypoglycemia, hypertension, and metabolic alkalosis. In females, overproduction of adrenal androgens has been associated with infertility, male-pattern baldness, hirsutism, and menstrual irregularities. Other features include chronic fatigue and profound anxiety (summary by Chrousos et al., 1983; Donner et al., 2013).
ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia 1
MedGen UID:
347456
Concept ID:
C1857451
Disease or Syndrome
ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (AIMAH) is an endogenous form of adrenal Cushing syndrome characterized by multiple bilateral adrenocortical nodules that cause a striking enlargement of the adrenal glands. Although some familial cases have been reported, the vast majority of AIMAH cases are sporadic. Patients typically present in the fifth or sixth decade of life, approximately 10 years later than most patients with other causes of Cushing syndrome (Swain et al., 1998; Christopoulos et al., 2005). Approximately 10 to 15% of adrenal Cushing syndrome is due to primary bilateral ACTH-independent adrenocortical pathology. The 2 main subtypes are AIMAH and primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD; see 610489), which is often a component of the Carney complex (160980) and associated with mutations in the PRKAR1A gene (188830). AIMAH is rare, representing less than 1% of endogenous causes of Cushing syndrome (Swain et al., 1998; Christopoulos et al., 2005). See also ACTH-independent Cushing syndrome (615830) due to somatic mutation in the PRKACA gene (601639). Cushing 'disease' (219090) is an ACTH-dependent disorder caused in most cases by pituitary adenomas that secrete excessive ACTH. Genetic Heterogeneity of ACTH-Independent Macronodular Adrenal Hyperplasia AIMAH2 (615954) is caused by germline mutation on 1 allele of the ARMC5 gene (615549) coupled with a somatic mutation in the other allele.
Pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease, primary, 1
MedGen UID:
400627
Concept ID:
C1864846
Disease or Syndrome
Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD) is a form of ACTH-independent adrenal hyperplasia resulting in Cushing syndrome. It is usually seen as a manifestation of the Carney complex (CNC1; 160980), a multiple neoplasia syndrome. However, PPNAD can also occur in isolation (Groussin et al., 2002). Genetic Heterogeneity of Primary Pigmented Nodular Adrenocortical Disease See also PPNAD2 (610475), caused by mutation in the PDE11A gene (604961) on chromosome 2q31; PPNAD3 (614190), caused by mutation in the PDE8B gene (603390) on chromosome 5q13; and PPNAD4 (615830), caused by a duplication on chromosome 19p13 that includes the PRKACA gene (601639).
Pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease, primary, 2
MedGen UID:
355843
Concept ID:
C1864851
Disease or Syndrome
Any primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the PDE11A gene.
Pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease, primary, 3
MedGen UID:
481724
Concept ID:
C3280094
Disease or Syndrome
Any primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the PDE8B gene.
Menstrual cycle-dependent periodic fever
MedGen UID:
766332
Concept ID:
C3553418
Disease or Syndrome
Women show menstrual cycle-dependent physiologic changes in relation to sex hormone levels. Because ovulation triggers a significant change in the hormonal milieu that is similar to local inflammation, a 0.5 to 1.0 degree Celsius increase in basal body temperature after ovulation is commonly associated with progesterone secretion and is believed to be triggered by the induction of several inflammatory cytokines. Rare menstrual cycle-dependent febrile episodes have been reported, some of which have shown a luteal-phase-dependent pattern (summary by Jiang et al., 2012).
Pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease, primary, 4
MedGen UID:
862862
Concept ID:
C4014425
Disease or Syndrome
Cushing syndrome is a clinical designation for the systemic signs and symptoms arising from excess cortisol production. Affected individuals typically show hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance, central obesity, osteoporosis, and sometimes depression. Corticotropin-independent Cushing syndrome results from autonomous cortisol production by the adrenal glands, often associated with adrenocortical tumors. Adrenocortical tumors are most common in adult females (summary by Cao et al., 2014; Sato et al., 2014).
ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia 2
MedGen UID:
863240
Concept ID:
C4014803
Disease or Syndrome
ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia-2 is an autosomal dominant tumor susceptibility with syndromic incomplete penetrance, as a second hit to the ARMC5 gene is required to develop macronodular hyperplasia (Assie et al., 2013).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Wang F, Giskeødegård GF, Skarra S, Engstrøm MJ, Hagen L, Geisler J, Mikkola TS, Tikkanen MJ, Debik J, Reidunsdatter RJ, Bathen TF
Clin Exp Med 2023 Nov;23(7):3883-3893. Epub 2023 Jul 3 doi: 10.1007/s10238-023-01109-x. PMID: 37395895Free PMC Article
Lakshminrusimha S, Konduri GG, Steinhorn RH
J Perinatol 2016 Jun;36 Suppl 2:S12-9. doi: 10.1038/jp.2016.44. PMID: 27225960
Lindsay JR, Nieman LK
Endocr Rev 2005 Oct;26(6):775-99. Epub 2005 Apr 12 doi: 10.1210/er.2004-0025. PMID: 15827110

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