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1.

Pigmentary pallidal degeneration

Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) is a type of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA). The phenotypic spectrum of PKAN includes classic PKAN and atypical PKAN. Classic PKAN is characterized by early-childhood onset of progressive dystonia, dysarthria, rigidity, and choreoathetosis. Pigmentary retinal degeneration is common. Atypical PKAN is characterized by later onset (age >10 years), prominent speech defects, psychiatric disturbances, and more gradual progression of disease. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
6708
Concept ID:
C0018523
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Kufor-Rakeb syndrome

Kufor-Rakeb syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive form of juvenile-onset atypical Parkinson disease (PARK9) associated with supranuclear gaze palsy, spasticity, and dementia. Some patients have neuroradiologic evidence of iron deposition in the basal ganglia, indicating that the pathogenesis of PARK9 can be considered among the syndromes of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA; see 234200) (summary by Bruggemann et al., 2010). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Parkinson disease (PD), see 168600. Biallelic mutation in the ATP13A2 gene also causes autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia-78 (SPG78; 617225), an adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder with overlapping features. Patients with SPG78 have later onset and prominent spasticity, but rarely parkinsonism. Loss of ATP13A2 function results in a multidimensional spectrum of neurologic features reflecting various regions of the brain and nervous system, including cortical, pyramidal, extrapyramidal, brainstem, cerebellar, and peripheral (summary by Estrada-Cuzcano et al., 2017). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
338281
Concept ID:
C1847640
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation 5

Beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration (BPAN) is typically characterized by early-onset seizures, infantile-onset developmental delay, intellectual disability, absent-to-limited expressive language, motor dysfunction (ataxia), and abnormal behaviors often similar to autism spectrum disorder. Seizure types including generalized (absence, tonic, atonic, tonic-clonic and myoclonic), focal with impaired consciousness, and epileptic spasms, as well as epileptic syndromes (West syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome) can be seen. With age seizures tend to resolve or become less prominent, whereas cognitive decline and movement disorders (progressive parkinsonism and dystonia) emerge as characteristic findings. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
763887
Concept ID:
C3550973
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Gaucher disease perinatal lethal

Gaucher disease (GD) encompasses a continuum of clinical findings from a perinatal lethal disorder to an asymptomatic type. The identification of three major clinical types (1, 2, and 3) and two other subtypes (perinatal-lethal and cardiovascular) is useful in determining prognosis and management. GD type 1 is characterized by the presence of clinical or radiographic evidence of bone disease (osteopenia, focal lytic or sclerotic lesions, and osteonecrosis), hepatosplenomegaly, anemia and thrombocytopenia, lung disease, and the absence of primary central nervous system disease. GD types 2 and 3 are characterized by the presence of primary neurologic disease; in the past, they were distinguished by age of onset and rate of disease progression, but these distinctions are not absolute. Disease with onset before age two years, limited psychomotor development, and a rapidly progressive course with death by age two to four years is classified as GD type 2. Individuals with GD type 3 may have onset before age two years, but often have a more slowly progressive course, with survival into the third or fourth decade. The perinatal-lethal form is associated with ichthyosiform or collodion skin abnormalities or with nonimmune hydrops fetalis. The cardiovascular form is characterized by calcification of the aortic and mitral valves, mild splenomegaly, corneal opacities, and supranuclear ophthalmoplegia. Cardiopulmonary complications have been described with all the clinical subtypes, although varying in frequency and severity. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
374996
Concept ID:
C1842704
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Perry syndrome

The spectrum of DCTN1-related neurodegeneration includes Perry syndrome, distal hereditary motor neuronopathy type 7B (dHMN7B), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), motor neuron disease / amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and progressive supranuclear palsy. Some individuals present with overlapping phenotypes (e.g., FTD-ALS, Perry syndrome-dHMN7B). Perry syndrome (the most common of the phenotypes associated with DCTN1) is characterized by parkinsonism, neuropsychiatric symptoms, hypoventilation, and weight loss. The mean age of onset in those with Perry syndrome is 49 years (range: 35-70 years), and the mean disease duration is five years (range: 2-14 years). In most affected persons, the reported cause/circumstance of death relates to sudden death/hypoventilation or suicide. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
357007
Concept ID:
C1868594
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Lethal multiple pterygium syndrome

In people with multiple pterygium syndrome, Escobar type, the webbing typically affects the skin of the neck, fingers, forearms, inner thighs, and backs of the knee. People with this type may also have arthrogryposis. A side-to-side curvature of the spine (scoliosis) is sometimes seen. Affected individuals may also have respiratory distress at birth due to underdeveloped lungs (lung hypoplasia). People with multiple pterygium syndrome, Escobar type usually have distinctive facial features including droopy eyelids (ptosis), outside corners of the eyes that point downward (downslanting palpebral fissures), skin folds covering the inner corner of the eyes (epicanthal folds), a small jaw, and low-set ears. Males with this condition can have undescended testes (cryptorchidism). This condition does not worsen after birth, and affected individuals typically do not have muscle weakness later in life.

The two forms of multiple pterygium syndrome are differentiated by the severity of their symptoms. Multiple pterygium syndrome, Escobar type (sometimes referred to as Escobar syndrome) is the milder of the two types. Lethal multiple pterygium syndrome is fatal before birth or very soon after birth.

Lethal multiple pterygium syndrome has many of the same signs and symptoms as the Escobar type. In addition, affected fetuses may develop a buildup of excess fluid in the body (hydrops fetalis) or a fluid-filled sac typically found on the back of the neck (cystic hygroma). Individuals with this type have severe arthrogryposis. Lethal multiple pterygium syndrome is associated with abnormalities such as underdevelopment (hypoplasia) of the heart, lung, or brain; twisting of the intestines (intestinal malrotation); kidney abnormalities; an opening in the roof of the mouth (a cleft palate); and an unusually small head size (microcephaly). Affected individuals may also develop a hole in the muscle that separates the abdomen from the chest cavity (the diaphragm), a condition called a congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Lethal multiple pterygium syndrome is typically fatal in the second or third trimester of pregnancy.

Multiple pterygium syndrome is a condition that is evident before birth with webbing of the skin (pterygium) at the joints and a lack of muscle movement (akinesia) before birth. Akinesia frequently results in muscle weakness and joint deformities called contractures that restrict the movement of joints (arthrogryposis). As a result, multiple pterygium syndrome can lead to further problems with movement such as arms and legs that cannot fully extend. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
381473
Concept ID:
C1854678
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Supranuclear palsy, progressive, 1

The spectrum of clinical manifestations of MAPT-related frontotemporal dementia (MAPT-FTD) has expanded from its original description of frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonian manifestations to include changes in behavior, motor function, memory, and/or language. A recent retrospective study suggested that the majority of affected individuals have either behavioral changes consistent with a diagnosis of behavioral variant FTD (bvFTD) or, less commonly, a parkinsonian syndrome (i.e., progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal syndrome, or Parkinson disease). Fewer than 5% of people with MAPT-FTD have primary progressive aphasia or Alzheimer disease. Clinical presentation may differ between and within families with the same MAPT variant. MAPT-FTD is a progressive disorder that commonly ends with a relatively global dementia in which some affected individuals become mute. Progression of motor impairment in affected individuals results in some becoming chairbound and others bedbound. Mean disease duration is 9.3 (SD: 6.4) years but is individually variable and can be more than 30 years in some instances. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1640811
Concept ID:
C4551863
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Parkinson disease 17

VPS35-related Parkinson disease (VPS35-PD) is defined as Parkinson disease caused by heterozygous VPS35 pathogenic variants. Currently, the only known VPS35 variant with confirmed pathogenicity is c.1858G>A (p.Asp620Asn). Except for a younger age of onset, VPS35-PD is clinically indistinguishable from Parkinson disease of unknown cause (so-called sporadic Parkinson disease). Variability among 50 individuals reported with molecularly confirmed VPS35-PD includes age of onset (mean: 51.0±8.7 years; range: 34-68 years), Parkinson subtype (tremor, akinetic rigid, mixed), first motor symptom, course of the disease (unilateral onset and slow disease progression are typical; dyskinesia and motor fluctuations may occur), and presence/absence of neuropsychiatric manifestations (including depression, schizophrenia, learning difficulties, mild cognitive impairment, and dementia). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
481763
Concept ID:
C3280133
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Compton-North congenital myopathy

Congenital myopathy-12 (CMYP12) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe neonatal hypotonia resulting in feeding difficulties and respiratory failure within the first months of life. There is evidence of the disorder in utero, with decreased fetal movements and polyhydramnios. Additional features may include high-arched palate and contractures. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows myopathic changes with disrupted sarcomeres and minicore-like structures (Compton et al., 2008). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
393406
Concept ID:
C2675527
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Spinocerebellar ataxia type 21

Spinocerebellar ataxia-21 (SCA21) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by onset in the first decades of life of slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia, which is associated with cognitive impairment in most patients (summary by Delplanque et al., 2014). For a general discussion of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia, see SCA1 (164400). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
375311
Concept ID:
C1843891
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Lethal congenital contracture syndrome 2

Lethal congenital contracture syndrome-2 (LCCS2) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe multiple congenital contractures with muscle wasting and atrophy. Micrognathia and other craniofacial anomalies, including cleft palate, as well as cardiac defects and enlarged urinary bladder at birth have also been reported. Hydrops fetalis and multiple pterygia are absent. Most patients have died in the neonatal period, although 2 survived to early adolescence (Landau et al., 2003). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of LCCS, see LCCS1 (253310). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
334413
Concept ID:
C1843478
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Fowler syndrome

The proliferative vasculopathy and hydranencephaly-hydrocephaly syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive, usually prenatally lethal disorder characterized by hydranencephaly, a distinctive glomerular vasculopathy in the central nervous system and retina, and diffuse ischemic lesions of the brain stem, basal ganglia, and spinal cord with calcifications. It is usually diagnosed by ultrasound between 26 and 33 weeks' gestation (summary by Meyer et al., 2010). Rarely, affected individuals may survive, but are severely impaired with almost no neurologic development (Kvarnung et al., 2016). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
384026
Concept ID:
C1856972
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita 6

Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita-6 (AMC6) is a severe autosomal recessive disorder of skeletal muscle with onset of symptoms in utero. The pregnancies are usually complicated by polyhydramnios and reduced fetal movements. Affected individuals have congenital joint contractures, dysmorphic facial features, distal skeletal anomalies with clenched hands and clubfeet, and edema with fetal hydrops. Fetal demise or termination of pregnancy often occurs after ultrasound detection of abnormalities. Those that survive to birth have significant hypotonia with absent spontaneous movements, respiratory insufficiency, arthrogryposis, and multiple pterygia. Skeletal muscle is hypoplastic, immature, and underdeveloped, with nemaline rods, poorly developed sarcomeres, and poor cross-striation. Death in infancy usually occurs (summary by Ahmed et al., 2018, Rocha et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of AMC, see AMC1 (617468). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1786758
Concept ID:
C5543431
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita 5

Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita-5 (AMC5) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe joint contractures apparent at birth. Affected individuals usually have hypertonia and abnormal movements suggestive of dystonia, as well as feeding and/or breathing difficulties. More variable features may include poor overall growth, strabismus, dysmorphic facies, and global developmental delay with impaired speech (summary by Kariminejad et al., 2017). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1731112
Concept ID:
C5436453
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Leukoencephalopathy, progressive, infantile-onset, with or without deafness

Infantile-onset progressive leukoencephalopathy with or without deafness (LEPID) is an autosomal recessive complex neurodegenerative disorder with onset of symptoms in infancy or early childhood. Most patients present with sensorineural deafness or hypoacousia and global developmental delay. Affected individuals show episodic regression with progressive motor deterioration resulting in spastic tetraplegia and loss of ambulation, as well as impaired intellectual development with poor or absent speech. Additional more variable features may include poor overall growth with microcephaly, seizures, visual loss, microcytic anemia, and hepatic enlargement or abnormal liver enzymes. Brain imaging shows deep white matter abnormalities consistent with a progressive leukoencephalopathy. The brain and spinal cord are usually both involved; calcifications of these regions are often observed. Laboratory studies show increased serum lactate and deficiencies of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, consistent with global mitochondrial dysfunction. Early death often occurs (summary by Itoh et al., 2019). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1779519
Concept ID:
C5542996
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Autosomal recessive early-onset Parkinson disease 23

Parkinson disease-23 is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by young-adult onset of parkinsonism associated with progressive cognitive impairment leading to dementia and dysautonomia. Some individuals have additional motor abnormalities. Affected individuals become severely disabled within a few decades (summary by Lesage et al., 2016). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
896607
Concept ID:
C4225186
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Intellectual developmental disorder with language impairment and early-onset DOPA-responsive dystonia-parkinsonism

Intellectual developmental disorder with language impairment and early-onset dopa-responsive dystonia-parkinsonism (IDLDP) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay affecting motor, cognitive, and speech domains apparent in early childhood or infancy. Some patients may have normal early development in infancy before symptom onset. There is phenotypic heterogeneity and the severity is highly variable; less severely affected individuals have only mild deficits and are able to attend special schools. About half of patients develop various types of seizures that may be refractory or responsive to treatment. Most patients also show movement abnormalities, often hypotonia early in the disease course with later development of dopa-responsive dystonia or parkinsonism (Ramos et al., 2019, Wirth et al., 2020; Singh et al., 2020). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1805453
Concept ID:
C5677001
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Mitochondrial complex 1 deficiency, nuclear type 28

MedGen UID:
1648493
Concept ID:
C4748827
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Supranuclear palsy, progressive, 2

MedGen UID:
324446
Concept ID:
C1836148
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Myopathy, congenital, with respiratory insufficiency and bone fractures

Congenital myopathy-9A (CMYP9A) is an autosomal recessive early-onset severe muscular disorder resulting in early death. Affected individuals present at birth with neonatal hypotonia, poor feeding, fractures of the long bones, and respiratory insufficiency. Laboratory investigations are consistent with a defect in early muscle development (summary by Estan et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1718097
Concept ID:
C5394189
Disease or Syndrome
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