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1.

Cholestasis, progressive familial intrahepatic 1

The phenotypic spectrum of ATP8B1 deficiency ranges from severe through moderate to mild. Severe ATP8B1 deficiency is characterized by infantile-onset cholestasis that progresses to cirrhosis, hepatic failure, and early death. Although mild-to-moderate ATP8B1 deficiency initially was thought to involve intermittent symptomatic cholestasis with a lack of hepatic fibrosis, it is now known that hepatic fibrosis may be present early in the disease course. Furthermore, in some persons with ATP8B1 deficiency the clinical findings can span the phenotypic spectrum, shifting over time from the mild end of the spectrum (episodic cholestasis) to the severe end of the spectrum (persistent cholestasis). Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is common across the phenotypic spectrum. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1645830
Concept ID:
C4551898
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Protoporphyria, erythropoietic, 1

Erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP) is characterized by cutaneous photosensitivity (usually beginning in infancy or childhood) that results in tingling, burning, pain, and itching within 30 minutes after exposure to sun or ultraviolet light and may be accompanied by swelling and redness. Symptoms (which may seem out of proportion to the visible skin lesions) may persist for hours or days after the initial phototoxic reaction. Photosensitivity remains for life. Multiple episodes of acute photosensitivity may lead to chronic changes of sun-exposed skin (lichenification, leathery pseudovesicles, grooving around the lips) and loss of lunulae of the nails. Approximately 20%-30% of individuals with EPP have some degree of liver dysfunction, which is typically mild with slight elevations of the liver enzymes. Up to 5% may develop more advanced liver disease which may be accompanied by motor neuropathy similar to that seen in the acute porphyrias. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1643471
Concept ID:
C4692546
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Primary erythromelalgia

SCN9A neuropathic pain syndromes (SCN9A-NPS) comprise SCN9A erythromelalgia (EM), SCN9A paroxysmal extreme pain disorder (PEPD), and SCN9A small fiber neuropathy (SFN). SCN9A-EM is characterized by recurrent episodes of bilateral intense, burning pain, and redness, warmth, and occasionally swelling. While the feet are more commonly affected than the hands, in severely affected individuals the legs, arms, face, and/or ears may be involved. SCN9A-PEPD is characterized by neonatal or infantile onset of autonomic manifestations that can include skin flushing, harlequin (patchy or asymmetric) color change, tonic non-epileptic attacks (stiffening), and syncope with bradycardia. Later manifestations are episodes of excruciating deep burning rectal, ocular, or submandibular pain accompanied by flushing (erythematous skin changes). SCN9A-SFN is characterized by adult-onset neuropathic pain in a stocking and glove distribution, often with a burning quality; autonomic manifestations such as dry eyes, mouth, orthostatic dizziness, palpitations, bowel or bladder disturbances; and preservation of large nerve fiber functions (normal strength, tendon reflexes, and vibration sense). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
8688
Concept ID:
C0014805
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis 2

The phenotypic spectrum of ATP8B1 deficiency ranges from severe through moderate to mild. Severe ATP8B1 deficiency is characterized by infantile-onset cholestasis that progresses to cirrhosis, hepatic failure, and early death. Although mild-to-moderate ATP8B1 deficiency initially was thought to involve intermittent symptomatic cholestasis with a lack of hepatic fibrosis, it is now known that hepatic fibrosis may be present early in the disease course. Furthermore, in some persons with ATP8B1 deficiency the clinical findings can span the phenotypic spectrum, shifting over time from the mild end of the spectrum (episodic cholestasis) to the severe end of the spectrum (persistent cholestasis). Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is common across the phenotypic spectrum. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
483742
Concept ID:
C3489789
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Cholestasis, benign recurrent intrahepatic 1

The phenotypic spectrum of ATP8B1 deficiency ranges from severe through moderate to mild. Severe ATP8B1 deficiency is characterized by infantile-onset cholestasis that progresses to cirrhosis, hepatic failure, and early death. Although mild-to-moderate ATP8B1 deficiency initially was thought to involve intermittent symptomatic cholestasis with a lack of hepatic fibrosis, it is now known that hepatic fibrosis may be present early in the disease course. Furthermore, in some persons with ATP8B1 deficiency the clinical findings can span the phenotypic spectrum, shifting over time from the mild end of the spectrum (episodic cholestasis) to the severe end of the spectrum (persistent cholestasis). Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is common across the phenotypic spectrum. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1637492
Concept ID:
C4551899
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis type 2

The phenotypic spectrum of ATP8B1 deficiency ranges from severe through moderate to mild. Severe ATP8B1 deficiency is characterized by infantile-onset cholestasis that progresses to cirrhosis, hepatic failure, and early death. Although mild-to-moderate ATP8B1 deficiency initially was thought to involve intermittent symptomatic cholestasis with a lack of hepatic fibrosis, it is now known that hepatic fibrosis may be present early in the disease course. Furthermore, in some persons with ATP8B1 deficiency the clinical findings can span the phenotypic spectrum, shifting over time from the mild end of the spectrum (episodic cholestasis) to the severe end of the spectrum (persistent cholestasis). Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is common across the phenotypic spectrum. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
435857
Concept ID:
C2608083
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Hypercholanemia, familial

Familial hypercholanemia-1 (FHCA1) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by elevated concentrations of bile acids (usually conjugated), itching, and fat malabsorption, leading to poor overall growth and deficiencies of fat-soluble vitamins. Vitamin D deficiency results in rickets, and vitamin K deficiency results in a coagulopathy (Morton et al., 2000; Shneider et al., 1997; summary by Carlton et al., 2003). See also bile acid conjugation defect-1 (BACD1; 619232), which can also show increased bile acid levels, although the bile acids in BACD1 are unconjugated. Genetic Heterogeneity of FHCA See FHCA2 (619256), caused by mutation in the SLC10A1 gene (182396) on chromosome 14q24. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
334689
Concept ID:
C1843139
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Keratosis follicularis

Darier-White disease, also known as keratosis follicularis, is an autosomal dominant skin disorder characterized by warty papules and plaques in seborrheic areas (central trunk, flexures, scalp, and forehead), palmoplantar pits, and distinctive nail abnormalities (Sakuntabhai et al., 1999). Onset is usually before the third decade, and penetrance is complete in adults, although expressivity is variable. Involvement may be severe, with widespread itchy malodorous crusted plaques, painful erosions, blistering, and mucosal lesions. Secondary infection is common. Sun, heat, and sweating exacerbate the symptoms. Darier disease never remits, but oral retinoids may reduce hyperkeratosis. Neuropsychiatric abnormalities, including mild mental retardation and epilepsy, have been described in association with Darier disease in a few families (Burge and Wilkinson, 1992); whether this is an association based on pleiotropism of the mutant gene or reflects coincidence is not clear. Histologic findings are (1) mild nonspecific perivascular infiltration in the dermis; (2) dermal villi protruding into the epidermis; (3) suprabasal detachment of the spinal layer leading to the formation of lacunae containing acantholytic cells; (4) in the more superficial epidermis, dyskeratotic round epidermal cells ('corps ronds'), the most distinctive feature; and (5) in the stratum corneum, 'grains' that resemble parakeratotic cells embedded in a hyperkeratotic horny layer. Electron microscopy reveals loss of desmosomal attachments, perinuclear aggregations of keratin filaments, and cytoplasmic vacuolization. Ultrastructural and immunologic studies suggest the disease results from an abnormality in the desmosome-keratin filament complex leading to a breakdown in cell adhesion. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
5956
Concept ID:
C0022595
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis 3

Most people with PFIC3 have signs and symptoms related to liver disease only. Signs and symptoms of PFIC3 usually do not appear until later in infancy or early childhood; rarely, people are diagnosed in early adulthood. Liver failure can occur in childhood or adulthood in people with PFIC3.\n\nThe signs and symptoms of PFIC2 are typically related to liver disease only; however, these signs and symptoms tend to be more severe than those experienced by people with PFIC1. People with PFIC2 often develop liver failure within the first few years of life. Additionally, affected individuals are at increased risk of developing a type of liver cancer called hepatocellular carcinoma.\n\nIn addition to signs and symptoms related to liver disease, people with PFIC1 may have short stature, deafness, diarrhea, inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), and low levels of fat-soluble vitamins (vitamins A, D, E, and K) in the blood. Affected individuals typically develop liver failure before adulthood.\n\nThere are three known types of PFIC: PFIC1, PFIC2, and PFIC3. The types are also sometimes described as shortages of particular proteins needed for normal liver function. Each type has a different genetic cause.\n\nSigns and symptoms of PFIC typically begin in infancy and are related to bile buildup and liver disease. Specifically, affected individuals experience severe itching, yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes (jaundice), failure to gain weight and grow at the expected rate (failure to thrive), high blood pressure in the vein that supplies blood to the liver (portal hypertension), and an enlarged liver and spleen (hepatosplenomegaly).\n\nProgressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) is a disorder that causes progressive liver disease, which typically leads to liver failure. In people with PFIC, liver cells are less able to secrete a digestive fluid called bile. The buildup of bile in liver cells causes liver disease in affected individuals. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
356333
Concept ID:
C1865643
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Cardiomyopathy, dilated, with woolly hair, keratoderma, and tooth agenesis

Keratoderma with woolly hair is a group of related conditions that affect the skin and hair and in many cases increase the risk of potentially life-threatening heart problems. People with these conditions have hair that is unusually coarse, dry, fine, and tightly curled. In some cases, the hair is also sparse. The woolly hair texture typically affects only scalp hair and is present from birth. Starting early in life, affected individuals also develop palmoplantar keratoderma, a condition that causes skin on the palms of the hands and the soles of the feet to become thick, scaly, and calloused.\n\nCardiomyopathy, which is a disease of the heart muscle, is a life-threatening health problem that can develop in people with keratoderma with woolly hair. Unlike the other features of this condition, signs and symptoms of cardiomyopathy may not appear until adolescence or later. Complications of cardiomyopathy can include an abnormal heartbeat (arrhythmia), heart failure, and sudden death.\n\nKeratoderma with woolly hair comprises several related conditions with overlapping signs and symptoms. Researchers have recently proposed classifying keratoderma with woolly hair into four types, based on the underlying genetic cause. Type I, also known as Naxos disease, is characterized by palmoplantar keratoderma, woolly hair, and a form of cardiomyopathy called arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). Type II, also known as Carvajal syndrome, has hair and skin abnormalities similar to type I but features a different form of cardiomyopathy, called dilated left ventricular cardiomyopathy. Type III also has signs and symptoms similar to those of type I, including ARVC, although the hair and skin abnormalities are often milder. Type IV is characterized by palmoplantar keratoderma and woolly and sparse hair, as well as abnormal fingernails and toenails. Type IV does not appear to cause cardiomyopathy. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
862830
Concept ID:
C4014393
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Peeling skin syndrome 1

Peeling skin syndrome is a rare genodermatosis with variable age of onset from birth to adulthood. Clinically, it is characterized by a pruritic or nonpruritic spontaneous superficial peeling of the skin, which sometimes is accompanied by erythema or vesiculation. The skin involvement is usually general, but in some patients the scalp, face, palms, and soles may be unaffected. Seasonal changes have been reported. The histologic picture is characterized by separation of the epidermis between the statum corneum and the stratum granulosum (summary by Hacham-Zadeh and Holubar, 1985). Generalized PSS has been subclassified into a noninflammatory type, designated type A, and an inflammatory type, designated type B (Traupe, 1989; Judge et al., 2004). Type B, in which generalized peeling skin is associated with pruritus and atopy, is characterized by lifelong patchy peeling of the entire skin with onset at birth or shortly thereafter. Several patients have been reported with high IgE levels (summary by Oji et al., 2010). Type A, a continuous nonerythematous exfoliation, is usually congenital or appears during childhood (summary by Mallet et al., 2013). Genetic Heterogeneity of Peeling Skin Syndrome Peeling skin syndrome-2 (PSS2; 609796), an acral form of the disorder that mainly involves palmar and plantar skin, is caused by mutation in the TGM5 gene (603805) on chromosome 15q15. Peeling skin syndrome-3 (PSS3; 616265) is caused by mutation in the CHST8 gene (610190) on chromosome 19q13. Peeling skin syndrome-4 (PSS4; 607936) is caused by mutation in the CSTA gene (184600) on chromosome 3q21. Peeling skin syndrome-5 (PSS5; 617115) is caused by mutation in the SERPINB8 gene (601697) on chromosome 18q22. PSS6 (618084) is caused by mutation in the FLG2 gene (616284) on chromosome 1q21. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
336530
Concept ID:
C1849193
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Pretibial epidermolysis bullosa

Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) is a genetic skin disorder affecting skin and nails that usually presents at birth. DEB is divided into two major types depending on inheritance pattern: recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) and dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DDEB). Each type is further divided into multiple clinical subtypes. Absence of a known family history of DEB does not preclude the diagnosis. Clinical findings in severe generalized RDEB include skin fragility manifest by blistering with minimal trauma that heals with milia and scarring. Blistering and erosions affecting the whole body may be present in the neonatal period. Oral involvement may lead to mouth blistering, fusion of the tongue to the floor of the mouth, and progressive diminution of the size of the oral cavity. Esophageal erosions can lead to webs and strictures that can cause severe dysphagia. Consequently, malnutrition and vitamin and mineral deficiency may lead to growth restriction in young children. Corneal erosions can lead to scarring and loss of vision. Blistering of the hands and feet followed by scarring fuses the digits into "mitten" hands and feet, with contractures and pseudosyndactyly. The lifetime risk of aggressive squamous cell carcinoma is higher than 90%. In contrast, the blistering in the less severe forms of RDEB may be localized to hands, feet, knees, and elbows with or without involvement of flexural areas and the trunk, and without the mutilating scarring seen in severe generalized RDEB. In DDEB, blistering is often mild and limited to hands, feet, knees, and elbows, but nonetheless heals with scarring. Dystrophic nails, especially toenails, are common and may be the only manifestation of DDEB. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
98154
Concept ID:
C0432321
Congenital Abnormality
13.

Cholestasis, intrahepatic, of pregnancy, 1

Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy is a reversible form of cholestasis that occurs most often in the third trimester of pregnancy and recurs in 45 to 70% of subsequent pregnancies. Symptoms include pruritus, jaundice, increased serum bile salts, and abnormal liver enzymes, all of which resolve rapidly after delivery. However, the condition is associated with fetal complications, including placental insufficiency, premature labor, fetal distress, and intrauterine death. Some women with ICP may also be susceptible to oral contraceptive-induced cholestasis (OCIC) (summary by Pasmant et al., 2012). Genetic Heterogeneity of Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy See also ICP3 (614972), caused by mutation in the ABCB4 gene (171060). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
762759
Concept ID:
C3549845
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome 3

Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome-2 is an autosomal dominant immune disorder characterized by the development of cutaneous urticaria, erythema, and pruritus in response to cold exposure. Affected individuals have variable additional immunologic defects, including antibody deficiency, decreased numbers of B cells, defective B cells, increased susceptibility to infection, and increased risk of autoimmune disorders (summary by Ombrello et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of FCAS, see FCAS1 (120100). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
482544
Concept ID:
C3280914
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Cholestasis, intrahepatic, of pregnancy 3

Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy is a reversible form of cholestasis that occurs most often in the third trimester of pregnancy and recurs in 45 to 70% of subsequent pregnancies. Symptoms include pruritus, jaundice, increased serum bile salts, and abnormal liver enzymes, all of which resolve rapidly after delivery. However, the condition is associated with fetal complications, including placental insufficiency, premature labor, fetal distress, and intrauterine death. Women with ICP are also susceptible to oral contraceptive-induced cholestasis (OCIC). Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is an effective treatment for conditions caused by ABCB4 mutations (summary by Pasmant et al., 2012). Mutation in the ABCB4 gene accounts for about 15% of ICP cases (summary by Ziol et al., 2008). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of ICP, see ICP1 (147480). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
767155
Concept ID:
C3554241
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome

PDGFRA-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia is a form of blood cell cancer characterized by an elevated number of cells called eosinophils in the blood. These cells help fight infections by certain parasites and are involved in the inflammation associated with allergic reactions. However, these circumstances do not account for the increased number of eosinophils in PDGFRA-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia.\n\nAnother characteristic feature of PDGFRA-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia is organ damage caused by the excess eosinophils. Eosinophils release substances to aid in the immune response, but the release of excessive amounts of these substances causes damage to one or more organs, most commonly the heart, skin, lungs, or nervous system. Eosinophil-associated organ damage can lead to a heart condition known as eosinophilic endomyocardial disease, skin rashes, coughing, difficulty breathing, swelling (edema) in the lower limbs, confusion, changes in behavior, or impaired movement or sensations. People with PDGFRA-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia can also have an enlarged spleen (splenomegaly) and elevated levels of certain chemicals called vitamin B12 and tryptase in the blood.\n\nSome people with PDGFRA-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia have an increased number of other types of white blood cells, such as neutrophils or mast cells. Occasionally, people with PDGFRA-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia develop other blood cell cancers, such as acute myeloid leukemia or B-cell or T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma.\n\nPDGFRA-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia is often grouped with a related condition called hypereosinophilic syndrome. These two conditions have very similar signs and symptoms; however, the cause of hypereosinophilic syndrome is unknown. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
61525
Concept ID:
C0206141
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Hypotrichosis 6

Localized autosomal recessive hypotrichosis is characterized by fragile hairs that break easily, leaving short, sparse scalp hairs. The disorder affects the trunk and extremities as well as the scalp, and the eyebrows and eyelashes may also be involved, whereas beard, pubic, and axillary hairs are largely spared. In addition, patients can develop hyperkeratotic follicular papules, erythema, and pruritus in affected areas. In some patients with congenital hypotrichosis, monilethrix-like hairs showing elliptical nodes have been observed (summary by Schaffer et al., 2006). Genetic Heterogeneity of Autosomal Recessive Localized Hypotrichosis LAH2 (HYPT7; 604379) is caused by mutation in the LIPH gene (607365) on chromosome 3q27, and LAH3 (HYPT8; 278150) is caused by mutation in the LPAR6 (P2RY5) gene (609239) on chromosome 13q14.12-q14.2. See also hypotrichosis and recurrent skin vesicles (613102), which is caused by mutation in the DSC3 gene (600271). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
335812
Concept ID:
C1842839
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Erythrocytosis, familial, 4

Familial erythrocytosis-4 (ECYT4) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by increased serum red blood cell mass and hemoglobin concentration as well as elevated serum erythropoietin (EPO; 133170). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial erythrocytosis, see ECYT1 (133100). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
435867
Concept ID:
C2673187
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Neuropathy, hereditary sensory and autonomic, type VII

A rare genetic peripheral neuropathy with characteristics of congenital insensitivity to pain, muscular hypotonia and gastrointestinal disturbances. Patients present with delayed motor milestones achievement, self-mutilations, skin ulcers, poor wound healing, painless fractures, hyperhidrosis, abdominal discomfort, diarrhea and/or constipation. Cognitive development is normal. Caused by heterozygous mutation in the SCN11A gene on chromosome 3p22. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
816212
Concept ID:
C3809882
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Reynolds syndrome

An autoimmune disorder characterized by the association of primary biliary cirrhosis with limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis. Onset occurs between 30-65 years. Occurs sporadically, but rare familial cases with an unknown inheritance pattern have been observed. There is no cure and management is mainly supportive. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
450547
Concept ID:
C0748397
Disease or Syndrome
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