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Items: 17

1.

CHARGE association

CHD7 disorder encompasses the entire phenotypic spectrum of heterozygous CHD7 pathogenic variants that includes CHARGE syndrome as well as subsets of features that comprise the CHARGE syndrome phenotype. The mnemonic CHARGE syndrome, introduced in the premolecular era, stands for coloboma, heart defect, choanal atresia, retarded growth and development, genital hypoplasia, ear anomalies (including deafness). Following the identification of the genetic cause of CHD7 disorder, the phenotypic spectrum expanded to include cranial nerve anomalies, vestibular defects, cleft lip and/or palate, hypothyroidism, tracheoesophageal anomalies, brain anomalies, seizures, and renal anomalies. Life expectancy highly depends on the severity of manifestations; mortality can be high in the first few years when severe birth defects (particularly complex heart defects) are present and often complicated by airway and feeding issues. In childhood, adolescence, and adulthood, decreased life expectancy is likely related to a combination of residual heart defects, infections, aspiration or choking, respiratory issues including obstructive and central apnea, and possibly seizures. Despite these complications, the life expectancy for many individuals can be normal. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
75567
Concept ID:
C0265354
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Fanconi anemia complementation group B

Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
336901
Concept ID:
C1845292
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Fanconi anemia complementation group D2

Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
463627
Concept ID:
C3160738
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Fanconi anemia complementation group L

Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
854018
Concept ID:
C3469528
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Townes-Brocks syndrome 1

Townes-Brocks syndrome (TBS) is characterized by the triad of imperforate anus (84%), dysplastic ears (87%; overfolded superior helices and preauricular tags; frequently associated with sensorineural and/or conductive hearing impairment [65%]), and thumb malformations (89%; triphalangeal thumbs, duplication of the thumb [preaxial polydactyly], and rarely hypoplasia of the thumbs). Renal impairment (42%), including end-stage renal disease (ESRD), may occur with or without structural abnormalities (mild malrotation, ectopia, horseshoe kidney, renal hypoplasia, polycystic kidneys, vesicoutereral reflux). Congenital heart disease occurs in 25%. Foot malformations (52%; flat feet, overlapping toes) and genitourinary malformations (36%) are common. Intellectual disability occurs in approximately 10% of individuals. Rare features include iris coloboma, Duane anomaly, Arnold-Chiari malformation type 1, and growth retardation. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1635275
Concept ID:
C4551481
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Feingold syndrome type 1

Feingold syndrome 1 (referred to as FS1 in this GeneReview) is characterized by digital anomalies (shortening of the 2nd and 5th middle phalanx of the hand, clinodactyly of the 5th finger, syndactyly of toes 2-3 and/or 4-5, thumb hypoplasia), microcephaly, facial dysmorphism (short palpebral fissures and micrognathia), gastrointestinal atresias (primarily esophageal and/or duodenal), and mild-to-moderate learning disability. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1637716
Concept ID:
C4551774
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type cblF

Disorders of intracellular cobalamin metabolism have a variable phenotype and age of onset that are influenced by the severity and location within the pathway of the defect. The prototype and best understood phenotype is cblC; it is also the most common of these disorders. The age of initial presentation of cblC spans a wide range: In utero with fetal presentation of nonimmune hydrops, cardiomyopathy, and intrauterine growth restriction. Newborns, who can have microcephaly, poor feeding, and encephalopathy. Infants, who can have poor feeding and slow growth, neurologic abnormality, and, rarely, hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Toddlers, who can have poor growth, progressive microcephaly, cytopenias (including megaloblastic anemia), global developmental delay, encephalopathy, and neurologic signs such as hypotonia and seizures. Adolescents and adults, who can have neuropsychiatric symptoms, progressive cognitive decline, thromboembolic complications, and/or subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
336373
Concept ID:
C1848578
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Alveolar capillary dysplasia with pulmonary venous misalignment

Congenital alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins (ACDMPV) is characterized histologically by failure of formation and ingrowth of alveolar capillaries that then do not make contact with alveolar epithelium, medial muscular thickening of small pulmonary arterioles with muscularization of the intraacinar arterioles, thickened alveolar walls, and anomalously situated pulmonary veins running alongside pulmonary arterioles and sharing the same adventitial sheath. Less common features include a reduced number of alveoli and a patchy distribution of the histopathologic changes. The disorder is associated with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the neonate and shows varying degrees of lability and severity (Boggs et al., 1994). Affected infants present with respiratory distress resulting from pulmonary hypertension in the early postnatal period, and the disease is uniformly fatal within the newborn period (Vassal et al., 1998). Additional features of ACDMPV include multiple congenital anomalies affecting the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and musculoskeletal systems, as well as disruption of the normal right-left asymmetry of intrathoracic or intraabdominal organs (Sen et al., 2004). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
755478
Concept ID:
C2960310
Congenital Abnormality
9.

VACTERL association, X-linked, with or without hydrocephalus

VACTERL is an acronym for vertebral anomalies (similar to those of spondylocostal dysplasia), anal atresia, cardiac malformations, tracheoesophageal fistula, renal anomalies (urethral atresia with hydronephrosis), and limb anomalies (hexadactyly, humeral hypoplasia, radial aplasia, and proximally placed thumb; see 192350). Some patients may have hydrocephalus, which is referred to as VACTERL-H (Briard et al., 1984). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
419019
Concept ID:
C2931228
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Tracheoesophageal fistula

An abnormal connection (fistula) between the esophagus and the trachea. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
21228
Concept ID:
C0040588
Anatomical Abnormality
11.

VATER association

VATER is a mnemonically useful acronym for the nonrandom association of vertebral defects (V), anal atresia (A), tracheoesophageal fistula with esophageal atresia (TE), and radial or renal dysplasia (R). This combination of associated defects was pointed out by Quan and Smith (1972). Nearly all cases have been sporadic. VACTERL is an acronym for an expanded definition of the association that includes cardiac malformations (C) and limb anomalies (L). The VACTERL association is a spectrum of various combinations of its 6 components, which can be a manifestation of several recognized disorders rather than a distinct anatomic or etiologic entity (Khoury et al., 1983). Also see VATER/VACTERL association with hydrocephalus (VACTERL-H; 276950) and VACTERL with or without hydrocephalus (VACTERLX; 314390). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
902479
Concept ID:
C4225671
Disease or Syndrome
12.

X-linked intellectual disability, van Esch type

Van Esch-O'Driscoll syndrome (VEODS) is characterized by varying degrees of intellectual disability, moderate to severe short stature, microcephaly, hypogonadism, and variable congenital malformations (Van Esch et al., 2019). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
930741
Concept ID:
C4305072
Disease or Syndrome
13.

ACCES syndrome

Aplasia cutis congenita and ectrodactyly skeletal syndrome (ACCES) is characterized by highly variable expressivity, even within the same family. Most patients exhibit scalp defects, whereas ectrodactyly is less common; however, more variable and less obvious digital and skeletal anomalies are often present. Early growth deficiency and neurodevelopmental delay are also commonly seen (Schnur et al., 2021). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1804308
Concept ID:
C5677019
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Martinez-Frias syndrome

The Martinez-Frias syndrome is characterized by pancreatic hypoplasia, intestinal atresia, and gallbladder aplasia or hypoplasia, with or without tracheoesophageal fistula. There is considerable phenotypic overlap between Martinez-Frias syndrome and Mitchell-Riley syndrome (MTCHRS; 615710), the latter being characterized by neonatal diabetes in addition to the features of the Martinez-Frias syndrome, but without tracheoesophageal fistula (Smith et al., 2010). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
318628
Concept ID:
C1832443
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Delpire-McNeill syndrome

Delpire-McNeill syndrome (DELMNES) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with highly variable manifestations. Patients present in infancy with global developmental delay, including motor, speech, and impaired intellectual development. The most severely affected patients have hypotonia, inability to hold their head or walk, bilateral sensorineural deafness, and absent language, whereas others have delayed walking and mild to moderate intellectual disability, often with speech delay and autistic features. More variable features may include spasticity or minor involvement of other organ systems, such as hip dislocation or ventricular septal defect (summary by McNeill et al., 2020). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1725056
Concept ID:
C5436771
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Phosphoribosylaminoimidazole carboxylase deficiency

Phosphoribosylaminoimidazole carboxylase deficiency (PAICSD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies and early neonatal death (Pelet et al., 2019). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
713858
Concept ID:
C1291561
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Vertebral, cardiac, tracheoesophageal, renal, and limb defects

VCTERL syndrome is characterized by anomalies of the vertebrae, heart, trachea, esophagus, kidneys, and limbs. Some patients also exhibit craniofacial abnormalities. Incomplete penetrance and markedly variable disease expression have been observed, including intrafamilial variability (Martin et al., 2020). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1788069
Concept ID:
C5543189
Disease or Syndrome
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