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Leukodystrophy

MedGen UID:
6070
Concept ID:
C0023520
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy; Metachromatic leukodystrophy variant
SNOMED CT: Leukodystrophy (192781003)
 
HPO: HP:0002415
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0019046
OMIM® Phenotypic series: PS312080
Orphanet: ORPHA68356

Definition

Leukodystrophy refers to deterioration of white matter of the brain resulting from degeneration of myelin sheaths in the CNS. Their basic defect is directly related to the synthesis and maintenance of myelin membranes. Symmetric white matter involvement at MRI is a typical finding in patients with leukodystrophies. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVLeukodystrophy
Follow this link to review classifications for Leukodystrophy in Orphanet.

Conditions with this feature

Pyruvate carboxylase deficiency
MedGen UID:
18801
Concept ID:
C0034341
Disease or Syndrome
Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) deficiency is characterized in most affected individuals by failure to thrive, developmental delay, recurrent seizures, and metabolic acidosis. Three clinical types are recognized: Type A (infantile form), in which most affected children die in infancy or early childhood. Type B (severe neonatal form), in which affected infants have hepatomegaly, pyramidal tract signs, and abnormal movement and die within the first three months of life. Type C (intermittent/benign form), in which affected individuals have normal or mildly delayed neurologic development and episodic metabolic acidosis.
DE SANCTIS-CACCHIONE SYNDROME
MedGen UID:
75550
Concept ID:
C0265201
Disease or Syndrome
A rare autosomal recessive inherited syndrome. It is characterized by xeroderma pigmentosum, mental retardation, dwarfism, hypogonadism, and neurologic abnormalities.
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 1B
MedGen UID:
79470
Concept ID:
C0282527
Disease or Syndrome
Zellweger spectrum disorder (ZSD) is a phenotypic continuum ranging from severe to mild. While individual phenotypes (e.g., Zellweger syndrome [ZS], neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy [NALD], and infantile Refsum disease [IRD]) were described in the past before the biochemical and molecular bases of this spectrum were fully determined, the term "ZSD" is now used to refer to all individuals with a defect in one of the ZSD-PEX genes regardless of phenotype. Individuals with ZSD usually come to clinical attention in the newborn period or later in childhood. Affected newborns are hypotonic and feed poorly. They have distinctive facies, congenital malformations (neuronal migration defects associated with neonatal-onset seizures, renal cysts, and bony stippling [chondrodysplasia punctata] of the patella[e] and the long bones), and liver disease that can be severe. Infants with severe ZSD are significantly impaired and typically die during the first year of life, usually having made no developmental progress. Individuals with intermediate/milder ZSD do not have congenital malformations, but rather progressive peroxisome dysfunction variably manifest as sensory loss (secondary to retinal dystrophy and sensorineural hearing loss), neurologic involvement (ataxia, polyneuropathy, and leukodystrophy), liver dysfunction, adrenal insufficiency, and renal oxalate stones. While hypotonia and developmental delays are typical, intellect can be normal. Some have osteopenia; almost all have ameleogenesis imperfecta in the secondary teeth.
Gamma-aminobutyric acid transaminase deficiency
MedGen UID:
137977
Concept ID:
C0342708
Disease or Syndrome
GABA-transaminase deficiency is characterized by neonatal or early infantile-onset encephalopathy, hypotonia, hypersomnolence, epilepsy, choreoathetosis, and accelerated linear growth. Electroencephalograms show burst-suppression, modified hypsarrhythmia, multifocal spikes, and generalized spike-wave. Severity varies, but most patients have profound developmental impairment and some patients die in infancy (summary by Koenig et al., 2017).
Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome
MedGen UID:
208645
Concept ID:
C0795889
Disease or Syndrome
Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome (AHDS), an X-linked disorder, is characterized in males by neurologic findings (hypotonia and feeding difficulties in infancy, developmental delay / intellectual disability ranging from mild to profound) and later-onset pyramidal signs, extrapyramidal findings (dystonia, choreoathetosis, paroxysmal movement disorder, hypokinesia, masked facies), and seizures, often with drug resistance. Additional findings can include dysthyroidism (manifest as poor weight gain, reduced muscle mass, and variable cold intolerance, sweating, elevated heart rate, and irritability) and pathognomonic thyroid test results. Most heterozygous females are not clinically affected but may have minor thyroid test abnormalities.
Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
332084
Concept ID:
C1835912
Disease or Syndrome
Most characteristically, Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) manifests as an early-onset encephalopathy that usually, but not always, results in severe intellectual and physical disability. A subgroup of infants with AGS present at birth with abnormal neurologic findings, hepatosplenomegaly, elevated liver enzymes, and thrombocytopenia, a picture highly suggestive of congenital infection. Otherwise, most affected infants present at variable times after the first few weeks of life, frequently after a period of apparently normal development. Typically, they demonstrate the subacute onset of a severe encephalopathy characterized by extreme irritability, intermittent sterile pyrexias, loss of skills, and slowing of head growth. Over time, as many as 40% develop chilblain skin lesions on the fingers, toes, and ears. It is becoming apparent that atypical, sometimes milder, cases of AGS exist, and thus the true extent of the phenotype associated with pathogenic variants in the AGS-related genes is not yet known.
Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy 2
MedGen UID:
325157
Concept ID:
C1837355
Disease or Syndrome
Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease 1 (PMLD1) is a slowly progressive leukodystrophy that typically presents during the neonatal or early-infantile period with nystagmus, commonly associated with hypotonia, delayed acquisition of motor milestones, speech delay, and dysarthria. Over time the hypotonia typically evolves into spasticity that affects the ability to walk and communicate. Cerebellar signs (gait ataxia, dysmetria, intention tremor, head titubation, and dysdiadochokinesia) frequently manifest during childhood. Some individuals develop extrapyramidal movement abnormalities (choreoathetosis and dystonia). Hearing loss and optic atrophy are observed in rare cases. Motor impairments can lead to swallowing difficulty and orthopedic complications, including hip dislocation and scoliosis. Most individuals have normal cognitive skills or mild intellectual disability – which, however, can be difficult to evaluate in the context of profound motor impairment.
Mitochondrial complex I deficiency
MedGen UID:
374101
Concept ID:
C1838979
Disease or Syndrome
Isolated complex I deficiency is a rare inborn error of metabolism due to mutations in nuclear or mitochondrial genes encoding subunits or assembly factors of the human mitochondrial complex I (NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase) and is characterized by a wide range of manifestations including marked and often fatal lactic acidosis, cardiomyopathy, leukoencephalopathy, pure myopathy and hepatopathy with tubulopathy. Among the numerous clinical phenotypes observed are Leigh syndrome, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and MELAS syndrome (see these terms).
Waardenburg syndrome type 4A
MedGen UID:
341244
Concept ID:
C1848519
Disease or Syndrome
Waardenburg syndrome type 4 (WS4), also known as Waardenburg-Shah syndrome, is an auditory-pigmentary syndrome characterized by pigmentary abnormalities of the hair, skin, and eyes, congenital sensorineural hearing loss, and Hirschsprung disease (reviews by Read and Newton, 1997 and Pingault et al., 2010). WS type 4A is caused by mutation in the EDNRB gene (131244). Clinical Variability of Waardenburg Syndrome Types 1-4 Waardenburg syndrome has been classified into 4 main phenotypes. Type I Waardenburg syndrome (WS1; 193500) is characterized by pigmentary abnormalities of the hair, including a white forelock and premature graying; pigmentary changes of the iris, such as heterochromia iridis and brilliant blue eyes; congenital sensorineural hearing loss; and 'dystopia canthorum.' WS type II (WS2) is distinguished from type I by the absence of dystopia canthorum. WS type III (WS3; 148820) has dystopia canthorum and is distinguished by the presence of upper limb abnormalities. WS type 4 has the additional feature of Hirschsprung disease (reviews by Read and Newton, 1997 and Pingault et al., 2010). Genetic Heterogeneity of Waardenburg Syndrome Type 4 Waardenburg syndrome type 4 is genetically heterogeneous. WS4B (613265) is caused by mutation in the EDN3 gene (131242) on chromosome 20q13, and WS4C (613266) is caused by mutation in the SOX10 gene (602229) on chromosome 22q13.
Acyl-CoA oxidase deficiency
MedGen UID:
376636
Concept ID:
C1849678
Disease or Syndrome
Peroxisomal acyl-CoA oxidase deficiency is a disorder of peroxisomal fatty acid beta-oxidation. See also D-bifunctional protein deficiency (261515), caused by mutation in the HSD17B4 gene (601860) on chromosome 5q2. The clinical manifestations of these 2 deficiencies are similar to those of disorders of peroxisomal assembly, including Zellweger cerebrohepatorenal syndrome (see 214100) and neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (see 601539) (Watkins et al., 1995).
Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy 3
MedGen UID:
342403
Concept ID:
C1850053
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive hypomyelinating leukodystrophy-3 (HLD3) is a severe neurologic disorder characterized by early infantile onset of global developmental delay, lack of development, lack of speech acquisition, and peripheral spasticity associated with decreased myelination in the central nervous system (summary by Feinstein et al., 2010). The disorder is phenotypically similar to X-linked Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD; 312080), which is caused by mutation in the PLP1 gene (300401). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HLD, see 312080.
Progressive encephalopathy with leukodystrophy due to DECR deficiency
MedGen UID:
346552
Concept ID:
C1857252
Disease or Syndrome
2,4-Dienoyl-CoA reductase deficiency (DECRD) is a rare autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction due to impaired production of NADPH, which is an essential cofactor for several mitochondrial enzymes. Affected individuals have a variable phenotype: some may have severe neurologic symptoms and metabolic dysfunction beginning in early infancy, whereas others may present with more subtle features, such as childhood-onset optic atrophy or intermittent muscle weakness. The variable severity is putatively dependent on the effect of the mutation on the NADK2 enzyme. Biochemical analysis typically shows hyperlysinemia, due to defective activity of the mitochondrial NADP(H)-dependent enzyme AASS (605113), which is usually a benign finding. More severe cases have increased C10:2-carnitine levels, due to defective activity of the enzyme DECR (DECR1; 222745) (summary by Houten et al., 2014 and Pomerantz et al., 2018).
Dermatoleukodystrophy
MedGen UID:
387794
Concept ID:
C1857314
Disease or Syndrome
This syndrome is characterized by the association of a progressive leukodystrophy marked by generalized mental and motor impairment with the presence of thickened and wrinkled skin. It has been described in a Japanese brother and sister born to healthy parents. Both patients died in early childhood.
Combined oxidative phosphorylation defect type 4
MedGen UID:
387884
Concept ID:
C1857682
Disease or Syndrome
A rare mitochondrial disorder due to a defect in mitochondrial protein synthesis with characteristics of neonatal onset of severe metabolic acidosis and respiratory distress, persistent lactic acidosis with episodes of metabolic crises, developmental regression, microcephaly, abnormal gaze fixation and pursuit, axial hypotonia with limb spasticity and reduced spontaneous movements. Neuroimaging studies reveal polymicrogyria, white matter abnormalities and multiple cystic brain lesions, including basal ganglia, and cerebral atrophy. Decreased activity of complex I and IV have been determined in muscle biopsy.
Hypomyelination and Congenital Cataract
MedGen UID:
501134
Concept ID:
C1864663
Congenital Abnormality
Hypomyelination and congenital cataract (HCC) is usually characterized by bilateral congenital cataracts and normal psychomotor or only mildly delayed development in the first year of life, followed by slowly progressive neurologic impairment manifest as ataxia, spasticity (brisk tendon reflexes and bilateral extensor plantar responses), and mild-to-moderate cognitive impairment. Dysarthria and truncal hypotonia are observed. Cerebellar signs (truncal titubation and intention tremor) and peripheral neuropathy (muscle weakness and wasting of the legs) are present in the majority of affected individuals. Seizures can occur. Cataracts may be absent in some individuals.
Adult-onset autosomal dominant demyelinating leukodystrophy
MedGen UID:
356995
Concept ID:
C1868512
Disease or Syndrome
LMNB1-related autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD) is a slowly progressive disorder of central nervous system white matter characterized by onset of autonomic dysfunction in the fourth to fifth decade, followed by pyramidal and cerebellar abnormalities resulting in spasticity, ataxia, and tremor. Autonomic dysfunction can include bladder dysfunction, constipation, postural hypotension, erectile dysfunction, and (less often) impaired sweating. Pyramidal signs are often more prominent in the lower extremities (e.g., spastic weakness, hypertonia, clonus, brisk deep tendon reflexes, and bilateral Babinski signs). Cerebellar signs typically appear at the same time as the pyramidal signs and include gait ataxia, dysdiadochokinesia, intention tremor, dysmetria, and nystagmus. Many individuals have sensory deficits starting in the lower limbs. Pseudobulbar palsy with dysarthria, dysphagia, and forced crying and laughing may appear in the seventh or eighth decade. Although cognitive function is usually preserved or only mildly impaired early in the disease course, dementia and psychiatric manifestations can occur as late manifestations. Affected individuals may survive for decades after onset.
Leukoencephalopathy-ataxia-hypodontia-hypomyelination syndrome
MedGen UID:
390993
Concept ID:
C2676243
Disease or Syndrome
POLR3-related leukodystrophy, a hypomyelinating leukodystrophy with specific features on brain MRI, is characterized by varying combinations of four major clinical findings: Neurologic dysfunction, typically predominated by motor dysfunction (progressive cerebellar dysfunction, and to a lesser extent extrapyramidal [i.e., dystonia], pyramidal [i.e., spasticity] and cognitive dysfunctions). Abnormal dentition (delayed dentition, hypodontia, oligodontia, and abnormally placed or shaped teeth). Endocrine abnormalities such as short stature (in ~50% of individuals) with or without growth hormone deficiency, and more commonly, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism manifesting as delayed, arrested, or absent puberty. Ocular abnormality in the form of myopia, typically progressing over several years and becoming severe. POLR3-related leukodystrophy and 4H leukodystrophy are the two recognized terms for five previously described overlapping clinical phenotypes (initially described as distinct entities before their molecular basis was known). These include: Hypomyelination, hypodontia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (4H syndrome); Ataxia, delayed dentition, and hypomyelination (ADDH); Tremor-ataxia with central hypomyelination (TACH); Leukodystrophy with oligodontia (LO); Hypomyelination with cerebellar atrophy and hypoplasia of the corpus callosum (HCAHC). Age of onset is typically in early childhood but later-onset cases have also been reported. An infant with Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome (neonatal progeroid syndrome) was recently reported to have pathogenic variants in POLR3A on exome sequencing. Confirmation of this as a very severe form of POLR3-related leukodystrophy awaits replication in other individuals with a clinical diagnosis of Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome.
Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy 6
MedGen UID:
436642
Concept ID:
C2676244
Disease or Syndrome
TUBB4A-related leukodystrophy comprises a phenotypic spectrum in which the MRI findings range from hypomyelination with atrophy of the basal ganglia and cerebellum (H-ABC) at the severe end to isolated hypomyelination at the mild end. Progressive neurologic findings reflect involvement of the pyramidal tracts (spasticity, brisk deep tendon reflexes, and Babinski sign), extrapyramidal system (rigidity, dystonia, choreoathetosis, oculogyric crisis, and perioral dyskinesia), cerebellum (ataxia, intention tremor, dysmetria), and bulbar function (dysarthria, dysphonia, and swallowing). Cognition is variably affected, usually less severely than motor function. Typically, those with H-ABC present in early childhood (ages 1-3 years) and those with isolated hypomyelination in later childhood or adulthood. The rate of progression varies with disease severity.
Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy 4
MedGen UID:
383026
Concept ID:
C2677109
Disease or Syndrome
Any leukodystrophy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the HSPD1 gene.
Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 5
MedGen UID:
413116
Concept ID:
C2749659
Disease or Syndrome
Most characteristically, Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) manifests as an early-onset encephalopathy that usually, but not always, results in severe intellectual and physical disability. A subgroup of infants with AGS present at birth with abnormal neurologic findings, hepatosplenomegaly, elevated liver enzymes, and thrombocytopenia, a picture highly suggestive of congenital infection. Otherwise, most affected infants present at variable times after the first few weeks of life, frequently after a period of apparently normal development. Typically, they demonstrate the subacute onset of a severe encephalopathy characterized by extreme irritability, intermittent sterile pyrexias, loss of skills, and slowing of head growth. Over time, as many as 40% develop chilblain skin lesions on the fingers, toes, and ears. It is becoming apparent that atypical, sometimes milder, cases of AGS exist, and thus the true extent of the phenotype associated with pathogenic variants in the AGS-related genes is not yet known.
Multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
482008
Concept ID:
C3280378
Disease or Syndrome
Multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome-2 (MMDS2) with hyperglycinemia is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by developmental regression in infancy. Affected children have an encephalopathic disease course with seizures, spasticity, loss of head control, and abnormal movement. Additional more variable features include optic atrophy, cardiomyopathy, and leukodystrophy. Laboratory studies show increased serum glycine and lactate. Most patients die in childhood. The disorder represents a form of 'variant' nonketotic hyperglycinemia and is distinct from classic nonketotic hyperglycinemia (NKH, or GCE; 605899), which is characterized by significantly increased CSF glycine. Several forms of 'variant' NKH, including MMDS2, appear to result from defects of mitochondrial lipoate biosynthesis (summary by Baker et al., 2014). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome, see MMDS1 (605711).
Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy 8 with or without oligodontia and-or hypogonadotropic hypogonadism
MedGen UID:
482274
Concept ID:
C3280644
Disease or Syndrome
POLR3-related leukodystrophy, a hypomyelinating leukodystrophy with specific features on brain MRI, is characterized by varying combinations of four major clinical findings: Neurologic dysfunction, typically predominated by motor dysfunction (progressive cerebellar dysfunction, and to a lesser extent extrapyramidal [i.e., dystonia], pyramidal [i.e., spasticity] and cognitive dysfunctions). Abnormal dentition (delayed dentition, hypodontia, oligodontia, and abnormally placed or shaped teeth). Endocrine abnormalities such as short stature (in ~50% of individuals) with or without growth hormone deficiency, and more commonly, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism manifesting as delayed, arrested, or absent puberty. Ocular abnormality in the form of myopia, typically progressing over several years and becoming severe. POLR3-related leukodystrophy and 4H leukodystrophy are the two recognized terms for five previously described overlapping clinical phenotypes (initially described as distinct entities before their molecular basis was known). These include: Hypomyelination, hypodontia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (4H syndrome); Ataxia, delayed dentition, and hypomyelination (ADDH); Tremor-ataxia with central hypomyelination (TACH); Leukodystrophy with oligodontia (LO); Hypomyelination with cerebellar atrophy and hypoplasia of the corpus callosum (HCAHC). Age of onset is typically in early childhood but later-onset cases have also been reported. An infant with Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome (neonatal progeroid syndrome) was recently reported to have pathogenic variants in POLR3A on exome sequencing. Confirmation of this as a very severe form of POLR3-related leukodystrophy awaits replication in other individuals with a clinical diagnosis of Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome.
Lipoic acid synthetase deficiency
MedGen UID:
482517
Concept ID:
C3280887
Disease or Syndrome
Hyperglycinemia, lactic acidosis, and seizures is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by onset of hypotonia and seizures associated with increased serum glycine and lactate in the first days of life. Affected individuals develop an encephalopathy or severely delayed psychomotor development, which may result in death in childhood. The disorder represents a form of 'variant' nonketotic hyperglycinemia and is distinct from classic nonketotic hyperglycinemia (NKH, or GCE; 605899), which is characterized by significantly increased CSF glycine. Several forms of 'variant' NKH, including HGCLAS, appear to result from defects of mitochondrial lipoate biosynthesis (summary by Baker et al., 2014).
Leukoencephalopathy with calcifications and cysts
MedGen UID:
482830
Concept ID:
C3281200
Disease or Syndrome
Leukoencephalopathy, brain calcifications, and cysts (LCC), also known as Labrune syndrome, is characterized by a constellation of features restricted to the central nervous system, including leukoencephalopathy, brain calcifications, and cysts, resulting in spasticity, dystonia, seizures, and cognitive decline (summary by Labrune et al., 1996). See also cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts (CRMCC; 612199), an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutation in the CTC1 gene (613129) that shows phenotypic similarities to Labrune syndrome. CRMCC includes the neurologic findings of intracranial calcifications, leukodystrophy, and brain cysts, but also includes retinal vascular abnormalities and other systemic manifestations, such as osteopenia with poor bone healing, a high risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, hair, skin, and nail changes, and anemia and thrombocytopenia. Although Coats plus syndrome and Labrune syndrome were initially thought to be manifestations of the same disorder, namely CRMCC, molecular evidence has excluded mutations in the CTC1 gene in patients with Labrune syndrome, suggesting that the 2 disorders are not allelic (Anderson et al., 2012; Polvi et al., 2012).
Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 6
MedGen UID:
761287
Concept ID:
C3539013
Disease or Syndrome
Most characteristically, Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) manifests as an early-onset encephalopathy that usually, but not always, results in severe intellectual and physical disability. A subgroup of infants with AGS present at birth with abnormal neurologic findings, hepatosplenomegaly, elevated liver enzymes, and thrombocytopenia, a picture highly suggestive of congenital infection. Otherwise, most affected infants present at variable times after the first few weeks of life, frequently after a period of apparently normal development. Typically, they demonstrate the subacute onset of a severe encephalopathy characterized by extreme irritability, intermittent sterile pyrexias, loss of skills, and slowing of head growth. Over time, as many as 40% develop chilblain skin lesions on the fingers, toes, and ears. It is becoming apparent that atypical, sometimes milder, cases of AGS exist, and thus the true extent of the phenotype associated with pathogenic variants in the AGS-related genes is not yet known.
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 6B
MedGen UID:
766862
Concept ID:
C3553948
Disease or Syndrome
The overlapping phenotypes of neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD) and infantile Refsum disease (IRD) represent the milder manifestations of the Zellweger syndrome spectrum (ZSS) of peroxisome biogenesis disorders. The clinical course of patients with the NALD and IRD presentation is variable and may include developmental delay, hypotonia, liver dysfunction, sensorineural hearing loss, retinal dystrophy, and visual impairment. Children with the NALD presentation may reach their teens, and those with the IRD presentation may reach adulthood. Some patients with PEX10 mutations have a milder disorder characterized by childhood-onset cerebellar ataxia and neuropathy without mental retardation (summary by Waterham and Ebberink, 2012). For a complete phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PBD(NALD/IRD), see 601539. Individuals with mutations in the PEX10 gene have cells of complementation group 7 (CG7, equivalent to CGB). For information on the history of PBD complementation groups, see 214100.
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 8B
MedGen UID:
766874
Concept ID:
C3553960
Disease or Syndrome
The overlapping phenotypes of neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD) and infantile Refsum disease (IRD) represent the milder manifestations of the Zellweger syndrome spectrum (ZSS) of peroxisome biogenesis disorders. The clinical course of patients with the NALD and IRD presentation is variable and may include developmental delay, hypotonia, liver dysfunction, sensorineural hearing loss, retinal dystrophy, and visual impairment. Children with the NALD presentation may reach their teens, and those with the IRD presentation may reach adulthood (summary by Waterham and Ebberink, 2012). For a complete phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PBD(NALD/IRD), see 601539. Individuals with mutations in the PEX16 gene have cells of complementation group 9 (CG9, equivalent to CGD). For information on the history of PBD complementation groups, see 214100.
Multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
815495
Concept ID:
C3809165
Disease or Syndrome
Multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome-3 (MMDS3) is an autosomal recessive severe neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of previously acquired developmental milestones in the first months or years of life. Some affected patients have normal development in early infancy before the onset of symptoms, whereas others show delays from birth. Features included loss of motor function, spasticity, pyramidal signs, loss of speech, and cognitive impairment. The disease course is highly variable: some patients die of respiratory failure early in childhood, whereas some survive but may be bedridden with a feeding tube. Less commonly, some patients may survive and have a stable course with motor deficits and mild or even absent cognitive impairment, although there may be fluctuating symptoms, often in response to infection. Other variable features include visual problems and seizures. Brain imaging shows diffuse leukodystrophy in the subcortical region, brainstem, cerebellum, and spinal cord. Laboratory studies tend to show increased lactate and CSF glycine, and decreased activity of mitochondrial complexes I and II, although these findings are also variable. There may be additional biochemical evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction (summary by Liu et al., 2018). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome, see MMDS1 (605711).
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 13
MedGen UID:
815922
Concept ID:
C3809592
Disease or Syndrome
FBXL4-related encephalomyopathic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome is a multi-system disorder characterized primarily by congenital or early-onset lactic acidosis and growth failure, feeding difficulty, hypotonia, and developmental delay. Other neurologic manifestations can include seizures, movement disorders, ataxia, autonomic dysfunction, and stroke-like episodes. All affected individuals alive at the time they were reported (median age: 3.5 years) demonstrated significant developmental delay. Other findings can involve the heart (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, congenital heart malformations, arrhythmias), liver (mildly elevated transaminases), eyes (cataract, strabismus, nystagmus, optic atrophy), hearing (sensorineural hearing loss), and bone marrow (neutropenia, lymphopenia). Survival varies; the median age of reported deaths was two years (range 2 days – 75 months), although surviving individuals as old as 36 years have been reported. To date FBXL4-related mtDNA depletion syndrome has been reported in 50 individuals.
Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy 9
MedGen UID:
863760
Concept ID:
C4015323
Disease or Syndrome
Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy-9 is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by onset of delayed psychomotor development, spasticity, and nystagmus in the first year of life. Additional neurologic features such as ataxia and abnormal movements may also occur. Brain imaging shows diffuse hypomyelination affecting all regions of the brain (summary by Wolf et al., 2014). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HLD, see 312080.
Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy 13
MedGen UID:
896545
Concept ID:
C4225170
Disease or Syndrome
Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy-13 is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by infantile onset of delayed psychomotor development, axial hypotonia, and spasticity associated with delayed myelination and periventricular white matter abnormalities on brain imaging. More variable neurologic deficits, such as visual impairment, may also occur. Some patients may experience cardiac failure during acute illness (summary by Edvardson et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HLD, see 312080.
Spasticity-ataxia-gait anomalies syndrome
MedGen UID:
905660
Concept ID:
C4225178
Disease or Syndrome
Childhood-onset spasticity with hyperglycinemia is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by onset of slowly progressive spasticity that results in impaired gait in the first decade of life. Imaging of the central nervous system shows leukodystrophy and/or lesions in the upper spinal cord. More variable features include visual defects and mild learning disabilities. Serum glycine is increased, but CSF glycine is only mildly increased or normal; serum lactate is normal. The disorder represents a form of 'variant' nonketotic hyperglycinemia and is distinct from classic nonketotic hyperglycinemia (NKH, or GCE; 605899), which is characterized by significantly increased CSF glycine. Several forms of 'variant' NKH, including SPAHGC, appear to result from defects of mitochondrial lipoate biosynthesis (summary by Baker et al., 2014).
Leukodystrophy and acquired microcephaly with or without dystonia;
MedGen UID:
908888
Concept ID:
C4225213
Disease or Syndrome
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (congenital with brain and eye anomalies), type A9
MedGen UID:
902513
Concept ID:
C4225291
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies (type A) is an autosomal recessive disorder with characteristic brain and eye malformations, profound mental retardation, and congenital muscular dystrophy. The phenotype includes the alternative clinical designation Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS), which is associated with death in infancy. The disorder represents the most severe end of a phenotypic spectrum of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (summary by Geis et al., 2013 and Riemersma et al., 2015). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type A, see MDDGA1 (236670).
Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy 11
MedGen UID:
897960
Concept ID:
C4225305
Disease or Syndrome
POLR3-related leukodystrophy, a hypomyelinating leukodystrophy with specific features on brain MRI, is characterized by varying combinations of four major clinical findings: Neurologic dysfunction, typically predominated by motor dysfunction (progressive cerebellar dysfunction, and to a lesser extent extrapyramidal [i.e., dystonia], pyramidal [i.e., spasticity] and cognitive dysfunctions). Abnormal dentition (delayed dentition, hypodontia, oligodontia, and abnormally placed or shaped teeth). Endocrine abnormalities such as short stature (in ~50% of individuals) with or without growth hormone deficiency, and more commonly, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism manifesting as delayed, arrested, or absent puberty. Ocular abnormality in the form of myopia, typically progressing over several years and becoming severe. POLR3-related leukodystrophy and 4H leukodystrophy are the two recognized terms for five previously described overlapping clinical phenotypes (initially described as distinct entities before their molecular basis was known). These include: Hypomyelination, hypodontia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (4H syndrome); Ataxia, delayed dentition, and hypomyelination (ADDH); Tremor-ataxia with central hypomyelination (TACH); Leukodystrophy with oligodontia (LO); Hypomyelination with cerebellar atrophy and hypoplasia of the corpus callosum (HCAHC). Age of onset is typically in early childhood but later-onset cases have also been reported. An infant with Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome (neonatal progeroid syndrome) was recently reported to have pathogenic variants in POLR3A on exome sequencing. Confirmation of this as a very severe form of POLR3-related leukodystrophy awaits replication in other individuals with a clinical diagnosis of Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome.
Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy 10
MedGen UID:
904191
Concept ID:
C4225332
Disease or Syndrome
Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy-10 is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by postnatal progressive microcephaly, severely delayed psychomotor development, and hypomyelination on brain imaging (summary by Nakayama et al., 2015). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HLD, see 312080.
Multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
899010
Concept ID:
C4225348
Disease or Syndrome
Infants with ISCA2-related mitochondrial disorder (IRMD) typically attain normal development in the first months of life. At age three to seven months, affected individuals usually present with a triad of neurodevelopmental regression, nystagmus with optic atrophy, and diffuse white matter disease. As the disease progresses, global psychomotor regression continues at a variable pace and seizures may develop. Affected children become vegetative within one to two years. During their vegetative state, which may persist for years, affected individuals are prone to recurrent chest infections that may require ventilator support. Most affected individuals die during early childhood.
Spastic ataxia 8, autosomal recessive, with hypomyelinating leukodystrophy
MedGen UID:
1382553
Concept ID:
C4479653
Disease or Syndrome
NKX6-2-related disorder is characterized by a spectrum of progressive neurologic manifestations resulting from diffuse central nervous system hypomyelination. At the severe end of the spectrum is neonatal-onset nystagmus, severe spastic tetraplegia with joint contractures and scoliosis, and visual and hearing impairment, all of which rapidly progress resulting in death in early childhood. At the milder end of the spectrum is normal achievement of early motor milestones in the first year of life followed by slowly progressive complex spastic ataxia with pyramidal findings (spasticity with increased muscle tone and difficulty with gait and fine motor coordination) and cerebellar findings (nystagmus, extraocular movement disorder, dysarthria, titubation, and ataxia) with loss of developmental milestones. To date NKX6-2-related disorder has been reported in 25 individuals from 13 families.
Multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome 5
MedGen UID:
1623132
Concept ID:
C4539919
Disease or Syndrome
ISCA1-related multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome (ISCA1-MMDS) is a severe neurodegenerative condition typically characterized by either no attainment of developmental milestones or very early loss of achieved milestones, seizures in early infancy, development of spasticity with exaggerated deep tendon reflexes, nystagmus, and risk for sensorineural hearing loss. Affected individuals may also demonstrate elevated blood lactate levels with an elevated lipid-lactate peak on brain MR spectroscopy. Further brain MRI findings may include extensive cerebral and cerebellar deep white matter hyperintensities, marked dilatation of the cerebral ventricles, and pachygyria. Prognosis is poor and most individuals succumb to an intercurrent illness in early childhood.
Alkaline ceramidase 3 deficiency
MedGen UID:
1622324
Concept ID:
C4540358
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic disorder with characteristics of infantile onset of stagnation and regression of motor and language development resulting in complete lack of communication and purposeful movement. Further neurological manifestations include truncal hypotonia, appendicular spasticity, dystonia, optic disc pallor, peripheral neuropathy and neurogenic bladder. Patients also present multiple contractures, late-onset relative macrocephaly, short stature and facial dysmorphism (including coarse facial features, sloping forehead, thick eyebrows, low-set ears, prominent nose, flat philtrum, and prominent lower lip). Brain imaging at advanced stages shows diffuse abnormal white matter signal and severe atrophy. Sural nerve biopsy reveals decreased myelination.
Cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts 1
MedGen UID:
1636142
Concept ID:
C4552029
Disease or Syndrome
Dyskeratosis congenita and related telomere biology disorders (DC/TBD) are caused by impaired telomere maintenance resulting in short or very short telomeres. The phenotypic spectrum of telomere biology disorders is broad and includes individuals with classic dyskeratosis congenita (DC) as well as those with very short telomeres and an isolated physical finding. Classic DC is characterized by a triad of dysplastic nails, lacy reticular pigmentation of the upper chest and/or neck, and oral leukoplakia, although this may not be present in all individuals. People with DC/TBD are at increased risk for progressive bone marrow failure (BMF), myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myelogenous leukemia, solid tumors (usually squamous cell carcinoma of the head/neck or anogenital cancer), and pulmonary fibrosis. Other findings can include eye abnormalities (epiphora, blepharitis, sparse eyelashes, ectropion, entropion, trichiasis), taurodontism, liver disease, gastrointestinal telangiectasias, and avascular necrosis of the hips or shoulders. Although most persons with DC/TBD have normal psychomotor development and normal neurologic function, significant developmental delay is present in both forms; additional findings include cerebellar hypoplasia (Hoyeraal Hreidarsson syndrome) and bilateral exudative retinopathy and intracranial calcifications (Revesz syndrome and Coats plus syndrome). Onset and progression of manifestations of DC/TBD vary: at the mild end of the spectrum are those who have only minimal physical findings with normal bone marrow function, and at the severe end are those who have the diagnostic triad and early-onset BMF.
Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation 7
MedGen UID:
1647672
Concept ID:
C4693583
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation-7 (NBIA7) is characterized by iron accumulation in the basal ganglia and manifests as a progressive extrapyramidal syndrome with dystonia, rigidity, and choreoathetosis. Severity and rate of progression are variable (Drecourt et al., 2018). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of NBIA, see NBIA1 (234200).
Leukodystrophy, hypomyelinating, 15
MedGen UID:
1633653
Concept ID:
C4693733
Disease or Syndrome
Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy-15 is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by onset of motor and cognitive impairment in the first or second decade of life. Features include dystonia, ataxia, spasticity, and dysphagia. Most patients develop severe optic atrophy, and some have hearing loss. Brain imaging shows hypomyelinating leukodystrophy with thin corpus callosum. The severity of the disorder is variable (summary by Mendes et al., 2018) For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HLD, see 312080.
Leukodystrophy, hypomyelinating, 16
MedGen UID:
1631337
Concept ID:
C4693779
Disease or Syndrome
Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy-16 is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by onset of hypotonia, nystagmus, and mildly delayed motor development in infancy. Affected individuals have motor disabilities, including ataxic or broad-based gait, hyperreflexia, intention tremor, dysmetria, and a mild pyramidal syndrome. Some patients have cognitive impairment, whereas others may have normal cognition or mild intellectual disability with speech difficulties. Brain imaging typically shows hypomyelination, leukodystrophy, and thin corpus callosum (summary by Simons et al., 2017). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of hypomyelinating leukodystrophy, see 312080.
Leukodystrophy, hypomyelinating, 17
MedGen UID:
1644557
Concept ID:
C4693912
Disease or Syndrome
Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy-17 is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by poor, if any, development apparent from infancy. Affected individuals never learn to walk or speak, and have early-onset multifocal seizures, spasticity, poor overall growth, and microcephaly (up to -10 SD). Brain imaging shows multiple abnormalities, including cerebral and cerebellar atrophy, thin corpus callosum, abnormal signals in the basal ganglia, and features suggesting hypo- or demyelination. Some patients may die in childhood (summary by Shukla et al., 2018). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of hypomyelinating leukodystrophy, see 312080.
Combined oxidative phosphorylation defect type 13
MedGen UID:
1631854
Concept ID:
C4706283
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-13 (COXPD13) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder resulting from mitochondrial dysfunction. Affected individuals develop severe neurologic impairment in the first months of life, including hypotonia, abnormal dystonic movements, hearing loss, poor feeding, global developmental delay, and abnormal eye movements. Brain imaging shows signal abnormalities in putamen, basal ganglia, caudate nuclei, or corpus callosum, as well as delayed myelination. Analysis of patient tissues shows multiple defects in enzymatic activities of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, although some tissues may show normal values since tissue expression of the mitochondrial defect and metabolic needs of specific tissues are variable (summary by Vedrenne et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Mitochondrial complex 1 deficiency, nuclear type 4
MedGen UID:
1648324
Concept ID:
C4748753
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex 1 deficiency, nuclear type 5
MedGen UID:
1648292
Concept ID:
C4748754
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex 1 deficiency, nuclear type 21
MedGen UID:
1648383
Concept ID:
C4748792
Disease or Syndrome
Leukodystrophy, hypomyelinating, 19, transient infantile
MedGen UID:
1684698
Concept ID:
C5231463
Disease or Syndrome
Transient infantile hypomyelinating leukodystrophy-19 (HLD19) is a disorder characterized by onset of transient neurologic abnormalities in early infancy, with resolution within the first or second decades. Affected individuals typically present in the newborn period or in early infancy with nystagmus and motor deficits associated with marked hypomyelination on brain imaging. Both neurologic impairment and abnormal brain imaging spontaneously resolve during childhood. Most patients have normal cognition and can attend regular schools, although some may have persistent neurologic deficits, such as gait ataxia, speech pronunciation defects, and/or mild cognitive impairment (summary by Yan et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HLD, see 312080.
Mitochondrial complex 4 deficiency, nuclear type 7
MedGen UID:
1754683
Concept ID:
C5436685
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency nuclear type 7 (MC4DN7) is an autosomal recessive metabolic encephalomyopathic disorder with highly variable manifestations. Only a few patients have been reported. Some patients have normal early development then show rapid neurodegeneration with progressive muscle weakness, gait disturbances, and cognitive decline in mid to late childhood. Other features may include seizures and visual impairment. Brain imaging shows progressive leukodystrophy with cystic lesions. In contrast, at least 1 patient has been reported who presented in the neonatal period with metabolic acidosis, hydrocephalus, hypotonia, and cortical blindness. This patient developed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy resulting in early death. All patients had increased serum lactate and decreased levels and activity of mitochondrial respiratory complex IV (summary by Massa et al., 2008 and Abdulhag et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) deficiency, see 220110.
Deafness, congenital, and adult-onset progressive leukoencephalopathy
MedGen UID:
1784506
Concept ID:
C5543087
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital deafness and adult-onset progressive leukoencephalopathy (DEAPLE) is an autosomal recessive complex neurodegenerative disorder characterized by congenital neurosensory deafness followed by onset of neurodegenerative symptoms, including pyramidal signs and cognitive decline, in young adulthood. Some patients may have mild developmental delay or learning difficulties in childhood, but most can function independently. The onset of motor and cognitive decline in adulthood can be rapid and may result in early death. Brain imaging shows diffuse white matter abnormalities affecting various brain regions, consistent with a progressive leukoencephalopathy. More variable additional features may include visual impairment and axonal peripheral neuropathy (summary by Scheidecker et al., 2019).
Mitochondrial complex 2 deficiency, nuclear type 4
MedGen UID:
1782861
Concept ID:
C5543176
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex II deficiency nuclear type 4 (MC2DN4) is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early-onset progressive neurodegeneration with leukoencephalopathy. Acute episodes of neurodegeneration are often triggered by catabolic stress such as infection or fasting.
Developmental delay, impaired speech, and behavioral abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1794167
Concept ID:
C5561957
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental delay, impaired speech, and behavioral abnormalities (DDISBA) is characterized by global developmental delay apparent from early childhood. Intellectual disability can range from mild to severe. Additional variable features may include dysmorphic facial features, seizures, hypotonia, motor abnormalities such as Tourette syndrome or dystonia, and hearing loss (summary by Cousin et al., 2021).
Developmental delay with or without intellectual impairment or behavioral abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1794214
Concept ID:
C5562004
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental delay with or without intellectual impairment or behavioral abnormalities (DDIB) is an autosomal dominant disorder with a nonspecific phenotype of developmental delay. Additional features may include neonatal feeding problems, hypotonia, and dysmorphic facial features (Dulovic-Mahlow et al., 2019; van Woerden et al., 2021).
Cerebellar ataxia, brain abnormalities, and cardiac conduction defects
MedGen UID:
1794215
Concept ID:
C5562005
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebellar ataxia, brain abnormalities, and cardiac conduction defects (CABAC) is an autosomal recessive primarily neurologic disorder with variable manifestations. Common features included infantile-onset hypotonia, poor motor development, poor feeding and overall growth, and ataxic gait due to cerebellar ataxia. Other features include dysarthria, nystagmus, variable ocular anomalies, spasticity, hyperreflexia, and nonspecific dysmorphic features. Most, but not all, patients have global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development and speech delay. Brain imaging shows cerebellar hypoplasia, often with brainstem hypoplasia, enlarged ventricles, delayed myelination, and thin corpus callosum. A significant number of patients develop cardiac conduction defects in childhood or adolescence, often requiring pacemaker placement (summary by Slavotinek et al., 2020).
Gastrointestinal defects and immunodeficiency syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
1811526
Concept ID:
C5676901
Disease or Syndrome
PI4KA-related disorder is a clinically variable disorder characterized primarily by neurologic dysfunction (limb spasticity, developmental delay, intellectual disability, seizures, ataxia, nystagmus), gastrointestinal manifestations (multiple intestinal atresia, inflammatory bowel disease), and combined immunodeficiency (leukopenia, variable immunoglobulin defects). Age of onset is typically antenatal or in early childhood; individuals can present with any combination of these features. Rare individuals present with later-onset hereditary spastic paraplegia. Brain MRI findings can include hypomyelinating leukodystrophy, cerebellar hypoplasia/atrophy, thin or dysplastic corpus callosum, and/or perisylvian polymicrogyria.
Leukodystrophy, hypomyelinating, 24
MedGen UID:
1805365
Concept ID:
C5676974
Disease or Syndrome
Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy-24 (HLD24) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by global developmental delay and neurologic deterioration (Segawa et al., 2021). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HLD, see 312080.
Leukodystrophy, childhood-onset, remitting
MedGen UID:
1804145
Concept ID:
C5676979
Disease or Syndrome
Childhood-onset remitting leukodystrophy (CORLK) is a very rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized in some patients by onset of a metabolic crisis at the end of the first year of life that leads to widespread demyelination and leukodystrophy on brain imaging and a dramatic loss of developmental abilities. Affected children recover over the following several months, regaining normal development accompanied by remyelination. Not all patients have documented acute episodes of metabolic demyelination in infancy, but individuals with the FBP2 mutation show persistent white matter abnormalities on brain imaging that resemble the abnormalities observed in infants with the acute crisis. Other neurologic disturbances that may or may not be related to the FBP2 mutation have been observed, including psychiatric manifestations, seizures, and mild learning difficulties (Gizak et al., 2021).
Leukodystrophy, hypomyelinating, 26, with chondrodysplasia
MedGen UID:
1840948
Concept ID:
C5830312
Disease or Syndrome
Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy-26 with chondrodysplasia (HLD26) is characterized by severe psychomotor delay, predominantly involving motor and expressive language development, with cerebral and cerebellar atrophy and corpus callosum hypoplasia. In addition, patients show pre- and postnatal growth retardation, early-onset scoliosis, and dislocations of large joints (Guasto et al., 2022). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HLD, see HLD1 (312080).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Engelen M, van Ballegoij WJC, Mallack EJ, Van Haren KP, Köhler W, Salsano E, van Trotsenburg ASP, Mochel F, Sevin C, Regelmann MO, Tritos NA, Halper A, Lachmann RH, Davison J, Raymond GV, Lund TC, Orchard PJ, Kuehl JS, Lindemans CA, Caruso P, Turk BR, Moser AB, Vaz FM, Ferdinandusse S, Kemp S, Fatemi A, Eichler FS, Huffnagel IC
Neurology 2022 Nov 22;99(21):940-951. Epub 2022 Sep 29 doi: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000201374. PMID: 36175155Free PMC Article
Dangouloff T, Boemer F, Servais L
Neuromuscul Disord 2021 Oct;31(10):1070-1080. Epub 2021 Jul 28 doi: 10.1016/j.nmd.2021.07.008. PMID: 34620514
Bruijstens AL, Lechner C, Flet-Berliac L, Deiva K, Neuteboom RF, Hemingway C, Wassmer E; E.U. paediatric MOG consortium, Baumann M, Bartels F, Finke C, Adamsbaum C, Hacohen Y, Rostasy K
Eur J Paediatr Neurol 2020 Nov;29:2-13. Epub 2020 Nov 4 doi: 10.1016/j.ejpn.2020.10.006. PMID: 33162302

Curated

Leukodystrophies in Children: Diagnosis, Care, and Treatment, Pediatrics (2021) 148 (3): e2021053126.

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Shaimardanova AA, Solovyeva VV, Issa SS, Rizvanov AA
Int J Mol Sci 2023 Feb 11;24(4) doi: 10.3390/ijms24043627. PMID: 36835039Free PMC Article
Ashrafi MR, Amanat M, Garshasbi M, Kameli R, Nilipour Y, Heidari M, Rezaei Z, Tavasoli AR
Expert Rev Neurother 2020 Jan;20(1):65-84. Epub 2019 Dec 12 doi: 10.1080/14737175.2020.1699060. PMID: 31829048
Platt FM, d'Azzo A, Davidson BL, Neufeld EF, Tifft CJ
Nat Rev Dis Primers 2018 Oct 1;4(1):27. doi: 10.1038/s41572-018-0025-4. PMID: 30275469
Köhler W, Curiel J, Vanderver A
Nat Rev Neurol 2018 Feb;14(2):94-105. Epub 2018 Jan 5 doi: 10.1038/nrneurol.2017.175. PMID: 29302065
Zhang Y, Parikh A, Qian S
Stroke Vasc Neurol 2017 Sep;2(3):160-167. Epub 2017 May 29 doi: 10.1136/svn-2017-000077. PMID: 28989805Free PMC Article

Diagnosis

Modesti NB, Evans SH, Jaffe N, Vanderver A, Gavazzi F
Curr Probl Pediatr Adolesc Health Care 2022 Dec;52(12):101311. Epub 2022 Dec 2 doi: 10.1016/j.cppeds.2022.101311. PMID: 36470810
Bradbury AM, Ream MA
Semin Pediatr Neurol 2021 Apr;37:100876. Epub 2021 Feb 10 doi: 10.1016/j.spen.2021.100876. PMID: 33892849
Raymond GV
Adv Neurobiol 2017;15:365-382. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-57193-5_14. PMID: 28674989
Escolar ML, West T, Dallavecchia A, Poe MD, LaPoint K
J Neurosci Res 2016 Nov;94(11):1118-25. doi: 10.1002/jnr.23891. PMID: 27638597
Pastores GM
Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther 2009;47 Suppl 1:S75-81. doi: 10.5414/cpp47075. PMID: 20040316

Therapy

Duperron MG, Knol MJ, Le Grand Q, Evans TE, Mishra A, Tsuchida A, Roshchupkin G, Konuma T, Trégouët DA, Romero JR, Frenzel S, Luciano M, Hofer E, Bourgey M, Dueker ND, Delgado P, Hilal S, Tankard RM, Dubost F, Shin J, Saba Y, Armstrong NJ, Bordes C, Bastin ME, Beiser A, Brodaty H, Bülow R, Carrera C, Chen C, Cheng CY, Deary IJ, Gampawar PG, Himali JJ, Jiang J, Kawaguchi T, Li S, Macalli M, Marquis P, Morris Z, Muñoz Maniega S, Miyamoto S, Okawa M, Paradise M, Parva P, Rundek T, Sargurupremraj M, Schilling S, Setoh K, Soukarieh O, Tabara Y, Teumer A, Thalamuthu A, Trollor JN, Valdés Hernández MC, Vernooij MW, Völker U, Wittfeld K, Wong TY, Wright MJ, Zhang J, Zhao W, Zhu YC, Schmidt H, Sachdev PS, Wen W, Yoshida K, Joutel A, Satizabal CL, Sacco RL, Bourque G; CHARGE consortium, Lathrop M, Paus T, Fernandez-Cadenas I, Yang Q, Mazoyer B, Boutinaud P, Okada Y, Grabe HJ, Mather KA, Schmidt R, Joliot M, Ikram MA, Matsuda F, Tzourio C, Wardlaw JM, Seshadri S, Adams HHH, Debette S
Nat Med 2023 Apr;29(4):950-962. Epub 2023 Apr 17 doi: 10.1038/s41591-023-02268-w. PMID: 37069360Free PMC Article
Engelen M, van Ballegoij WJC, Mallack EJ, Van Haren KP, Köhler W, Salsano E, van Trotsenburg ASP, Mochel F, Sevin C, Regelmann MO, Tritos NA, Halper A, Lachmann RH, Davison J, Raymond GV, Lund TC, Orchard PJ, Kuehl JS, Lindemans CA, Caruso P, Turk BR, Moser AB, Vaz FM, Ferdinandusse S, Kemp S, Fatemi A, Eichler FS, Huffnagel IC
Neurology 2022 Nov 22;99(21):940-951. Epub 2022 Sep 29 doi: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000201374. PMID: 36175155Free PMC Article
Adang L
Continuum (Minneap Minn) 2022 Aug 1;28(4):1194-1216. doi: 10.1212/CON.0000000000001130. PMID: 35938662
Fumagalli F, Calbi V, Natali Sora MG, Sessa M, Baldoli C, Rancoita PMV, Ciotti F, Sarzana M, Fraschini M, Zambon AA, Acquati S, Redaelli D, Attanasio V, Miglietta S, De Mattia F, Barzaghi F, Ferrua F, Migliavacca M, Tucci F, Gallo V, Del Carro U, Canale S, Spiga I, Lorioli L, Recupero S, Fratini ES, Morena F, Silvani P, Calvi MR, Facchini M, Locatelli S, Corti A, Zancan S, Antonioli G, Farinelli G, Gabaldo M, Garcia-Segovia J, Schwab LC, Downey GF, Filippi M, Cicalese MP, Martino S, Di Serio C, Ciceri F, Bernardo ME, Naldini L, Biffi A, Aiuti A
Lancet 2022 Jan 22;399(10322):372-383. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(21)02017-1. PMID: 35065785Free PMC Article
Biffi A, Montini E, Lorioli L, Cesani M, Fumagalli F, Plati T, Baldoli C, Martino S, Calabria A, Canale S, Benedicenti F, Vallanti G, Biasco L, Leo S, Kabbara N, Zanetti G, Rizzo WB, Mehta NA, Cicalese MP, Casiraghi M, Boelens JJ, Del Carro U, Dow DJ, Schmidt M, Assanelli A, Neduva V, Di Serio C, Stupka E, Gardner J, von Kalle C, Bordignon C, Ciceri F, Rovelli A, Roncarolo MG, Aiuti A, Sessa M, Naldini L
Science 2013 Aug 23;341(6148):1233158. Epub 2013 Jul 11 doi: 10.1126/science.1233158. PMID: 23845948

Prognosis

Engelen M, van Ballegoij WJC, Mallack EJ, Van Haren KP, Köhler W, Salsano E, van Trotsenburg ASP, Mochel F, Sevin C, Regelmann MO, Tritos NA, Halper A, Lachmann RH, Davison J, Raymond GV, Lund TC, Orchard PJ, Kuehl JS, Lindemans CA, Caruso P, Turk BR, Moser AB, Vaz FM, Ferdinandusse S, Kemp S, Fatemi A, Eichler FS, Huffnagel IC
Neurology 2022 Nov 22;99(21):940-951. Epub 2022 Sep 29 doi: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000201374. PMID: 36175155Free PMC Article
Bradbury AM, Bongarzone ER, Sands MS
Neurosci Lett 2021 May 1;752:135841. Epub 2021 Mar 22 doi: 10.1016/j.neulet.2021.135841. PMID: 33766733Free PMC Article
Platt FM, d'Azzo A, Davidson BL, Neufeld EF, Tifft CJ
Nat Rev Dis Primers 2018 Oct 1;4(1):27. doi: 10.1038/s41572-018-0025-4. PMID: 30275469
Koeppen AH
Handb Clin Neurol 2018;154:129-149. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-444-63956-1.00008-4. PMID: 29903436Free PMC Article
Köhler W, Curiel J, Vanderver A
Nat Rev Neurol 2018 Feb;14(2):94-105. Epub 2018 Jan 5 doi: 10.1038/nrneurol.2017.175. PMID: 29302065

Clinical prediction guides

Engelen M, van Ballegoij WJC, Mallack EJ, Van Haren KP, Köhler W, Salsano E, van Trotsenburg ASP, Mochel F, Sevin C, Regelmann MO, Tritos NA, Halper A, Lachmann RH, Davison J, Raymond GV, Lund TC, Orchard PJ, Kuehl JS, Lindemans CA, Caruso P, Turk BR, Moser AB, Vaz FM, Ferdinandusse S, Kemp S, Fatemi A, Eichler FS, Huffnagel IC
Neurology 2022 Nov 22;99(21):940-951. Epub 2022 Sep 29 doi: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000201374. PMID: 36175155Free PMC Article
Fumagalli F, Calbi V, Natali Sora MG, Sessa M, Baldoli C, Rancoita PMV, Ciotti F, Sarzana M, Fraschini M, Zambon AA, Acquati S, Redaelli D, Attanasio V, Miglietta S, De Mattia F, Barzaghi F, Ferrua F, Migliavacca M, Tucci F, Gallo V, Del Carro U, Canale S, Spiga I, Lorioli L, Recupero S, Fratini ES, Morena F, Silvani P, Calvi MR, Facchini M, Locatelli S, Corti A, Zancan S, Antonioli G, Farinelli G, Gabaldo M, Garcia-Segovia J, Schwab LC, Downey GF, Filippi M, Cicalese MP, Martino S, Di Serio C, Ciceri F, Bernardo ME, Naldini L, Biffi A, Aiuti A
Lancet 2022 Jan 22;399(10322):372-383. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(21)02017-1. PMID: 35065785Free PMC Article
Resende LL, de Paiva ARB, Kok F, da Costa Leite C, Lucato LT
Radiographics 2019 Jan-Feb;39(1):153-168. doi: 10.1148/rg.2019180081. PMID: 30620693
Biffi A, Montini E, Lorioli L, Cesani M, Fumagalli F, Plati T, Baldoli C, Martino S, Calabria A, Canale S, Benedicenti F, Vallanti G, Biasco L, Leo S, Kabbara N, Zanetti G, Rizzo WB, Mehta NA, Cicalese MP, Casiraghi M, Boelens JJ, Del Carro U, Dow DJ, Schmidt M, Assanelli A, Neduva V, Di Serio C, Stupka E, Gardner J, von Kalle C, Bordignon C, Ciceri F, Rovelli A, Roncarolo MG, Aiuti A, Sessa M, Naldini L
Science 2013 Aug 23;341(6148):1233158. Epub 2013 Jul 11 doi: 10.1126/science.1233158. PMID: 23845948
Kumar N
Semin Neurol 2010 Feb;30(1):38-43. Epub 2010 Feb 1 doi: 10.1055/s-0029-1244993. PMID: 20127580

Recent systematic reviews

Armstrong N, Olaye A, Noake C, Pang F
Orphanet J Rare Dis 2023 Aug 29;18(1):248. doi: 10.1186/s13023-023-02814-2. PMID: 37644601Free PMC Article
Mickeviciute GC, Valiuskyte M, Plattén M, Wszolek ZK, Andersen O, Danylaité Karrenbauer V, Ineichen BV, Granberg T
J Intern Med 2022 Mar;291(3):269-282. Epub 2021 Dec 22 doi: 10.1111/joim.13420. PMID: 34875121
Søndergaard CB, Nielsen JE, Hansen CK, Christensen H
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    Clinical resources

    Practice guidelines

    • PubMed
      See practice and clinical guidelines in PubMed. The search results may include broader topics and may not capture all published guidelines. See the FAQ for details.
    • Bookshelf
      See practice and clinical guidelines in NCBI Bookshelf. The search results may include broader topics and may not capture all published guidelines. See the FAQ for details.

    Curated

    • AAP, 2021
      Leukodystrophies in Children: Diagnosis, Care, and Treatment, Pediatrics (2021) 148 (3): e2021053126.

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