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Alagille syndrome due to a JAG1 point mutation(ALGS1)

MedGen UID:
365434
Concept ID:
C1956125
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: Alagille syndrome 1; HEPATIC DUCTULAR HYPOPLASIA, SYNDROMATIC; JAG1-Related Alagille Syndrome
 
Gene (location): JAG1 (20p12.2)
 
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0016862
OMIM®: 118450
Orphanet: ORPHA261619

Disease characteristics

Excerpted from the GeneReview: Alagille Syndrome
Alagille syndrome (ALGS) is a multisystem disorder with a wide spectrum of clinical variability; this variability is seen even among individuals from the same family. The major clinical manifestations of ALGS are bile duct paucity on liver biopsy, cholestasis, congenital cardiac defects (primarily involving the pulmonary arteries), butterfly vertebrae, ophthalmologic abnormalities (most commonly posterior embryotoxon), and characteristic facial features. Renal abnormalities, growth failure, behavioral differences, splenomegaly, retinal changes, and vascular abnormalities may also occur. [from GeneReviews]
Authors:
Nancy B Spinner  |  Kathleen M Loomes  |  Ian D Krantz, et. al.   view full author information

Additional description

From MedlinePlus Genetics
Problems associated with Alagille syndrome generally become evident in infancy or early childhood. The severity of the disorder varies among affected individuals, even within the same family. Symptoms range from so mild as to go unnoticed to severe heart and/or liver disease requiring transplantation.

People with Alagille syndrome may have distinctive facial features including a broad, prominent forehead; deep-set eyes; and a small, pointed chin. The disorder may also affect the blood vessels within the brain and spinal cord (central nervous system) and the kidneys. Affected individuals may have an unusual butterfly shape of the bones of the spinal column (vertebrae) that can be seen in an x-ray.

Alagille syndrome is also associated with several heart problems, including impaired blood flow from the heart into the lungs (pulmonic stenosis). Pulmonic stenosis may occur along with a hole between the two lower chambers of the heart (ventricular septal defect) and other heart abnormalities. This combination of heart defects is called tetralogy of Fallot.

One of the major features of Alagille syndrome is liver damage caused by abnormalities in the bile ducts. These ducts carry bile (which helps to digest fats) from the liver to the gallbladder and small intestine. In Alagille syndrome, the bile ducts may be narrow, malformed, and reduced in number (bile duct paucity). As a result, bile builds up in the liver and causes scarring that prevents the liver from working properly to eliminate wastes from the bloodstream. Signs and symptoms arising from liver damage in Alagille syndrome may include a yellowish tinge in the skin and the whites of the eyes (jaundice), itchy skin, and deposits of cholesterol in the skin (xanthomas).

Alagille syndrome is a genetic disorder that can affect the liver, heart, and other parts of the body.

Some people with Alagille syndrome may have isolated signs of the disorder, such as a heart defect like tetralogy of Fallot, or a characteristic facial appearance. These individuals do not have liver disease or other features typical of the disorder.  https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/alagille-syndrome

Clinical features

From HPO
Papillary thyroid carcinoma
MedGen UID:
66773
Concept ID:
C0238463
Neoplastic Process
The presence of a papillary adenocarcinoma of the thyroid gland.
Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis
MedGen UID:
4904
Concept ID:
C0017668
Disease or Syndrome
Segmental accumulation of scar tissue in individual (but not all) glomeruli.
Vesicoureteral reflux
MedGen UID:
21852
Concept ID:
C0042580
Disease or Syndrome
Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is characterized by the reflux of urine from the bladder into the ureters and sometimes into the kidneys. It is a risk factor for urinary tract infections. Primary VUR results from a developmental defect of the ureterovesical junction (UVJ). In combination with intrarenal reflux, the resulting inflammatory reaction may result in renal injury or scarring, also called reflux nephropathy (RN). Extensive renal scarring impairs renal function and may predispose patients to hypertension, proteinuria, and renal insufficiency (summary by Lu et al., 2007). Genetic Heterogeneity of Vesicoureteral Reflux A locus designated VUR1 maps to chromosome 1p13. VUR2 (610878) is caused by mutation in the ROBO2 gene (602431) on chromosome 3p12; VUR3 (613674) is caused by mutation in the SOX17 gene (610928) on chromosome 8q11; VUR4 (614317) maps to chromosome 5; VUR5 (614318) maps to chromosome 13; VUR6 (614319) maps to chromosome 18; VUR7 (615390) maps to chromosome 12; and VUR8 (615963) is caused by mutation in the TNXB gene (600985) on chromosome 6p21. A possible X-linked form has been reported (VURX; 314550).
Renal hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
120571
Concept ID:
C0266295
Congenital Abnormality
Hypoplasia of the kidney.
Duplicated collecting system
MedGen UID:
346936
Concept ID:
C1858565
Anatomical Abnormality
A duplication of the collecting system of the kidney, defined as a kidney with two (instead of, normally, one) pyelocaliceal systems. The pyelocaliceal system is comprised of the renal pelvis and calices. The duplicated renal collecting system can be associated with a single ureter or with double ureters. In the latter case, the two ureters empty separately into the bladder or fuse to form a single ureteral orifice.
Stage 5 chronic kidney disease
MedGen UID:
384526
Concept ID:
C2316810
Disease or Syndrome
A degree of kidney failure severe enough to require dialysis or kidney transplantation for survival characterized by a severe reduction in glomerular filtration rate (less than 15 ml/min/1.73 m2) and other manifestations including increased serum creatinine.
Renal dysplasia
MedGen UID:
760690
Concept ID:
C3536714
Congenital Abnormality
The presence of developmental dysplasia of the kidney.
Multiple small medullary renal cysts
MedGen UID:
892386
Concept ID:
C4024644
Disease or Syndrome
The presence of many cysts in the medulla of the kidney.
Short distal phalanx of finger
MedGen UID:
326590
Concept ID:
C1839829
Finding
Short distance from the end of the finger to the most distal interphalangeal crease or the distal interphalangeal joint flexion point. That is, hypoplasia of one or more of the distal phalanx of finger.
Hypoplasia of the ulna
MedGen UID:
395934
Concept ID:
C1860614
Congenital Abnormality
Underdevelopment of the ulna.
Coarctation of aorta
MedGen UID:
1617
Concept ID:
C0003492
Congenital Abnormality
Coarctation of the aorta is a narrowing or constriction of a segment of the aorta.
Atrial septal defect
MedGen UID:
6753
Concept ID:
C0018817
Congenital Abnormality
Atrial septal defect (ASD) is a congenital abnormality of the interatrial septum that enables blood flow between the left and right atria via the interatrial septum.
Ventricular septal defect
MedGen UID:
42366
Concept ID:
C0018818
Congenital Abnormality
A hole between the two bottom chambers (ventricles) of the heart. The defect is centered around the most superior aspect of the ventricular septum.
Renal artery stenosis
MedGen UID:
19727
Concept ID:
C0035067
Disease or Syndrome
The presence of stenosis of the renal artery.
Stroke disorder
MedGen UID:
52522
Concept ID:
C0038454
Disease or Syndrome
Sudden impairment of blood flow to a part of the brain due to occlusion or rupture of an artery to the brain.
Tetralogy of Fallot
MedGen UID:
21498
Concept ID:
C0039685
Congenital Abnormality
Each of the heart defects associated with CCHD affects the flow of blood into, out of, or through the heart. Some of the heart defects involve structures within the heart itself, such as the two lower chambers of the heart (the ventricles) or the valves that control blood flow through the heart. Others affect the structure of the large blood vessels leading into and out of the heart (including the aorta and pulmonary artery). Still others involve a combination of these structural abnormalities.\n\nSome people with treated CCHD have few related health problems later in life. However, long-term effects of CCHD can include delayed development and reduced stamina during exercise. Adults with these heart defects have an increased risk of abnormal heart rhythms, heart failure, sudden cardiac arrest, stroke, and premature death.\n\nAlthough babies with CCHD may appear healthy for the first few hours or days of life, signs and symptoms soon become apparent. These can include an abnormal heart sound during a heartbeat (heart murmur), rapid breathing (tachypnea), low blood pressure (hypotension), low levels of oxygen in the blood (hypoxemia), and a blue or purple tint to the skin caused by a shortage of oxygen (cyanosis). If untreated, CCHD can lead to shock, coma, and death. However, most people with CCHD now survive past infancy due to improvements in early detection, diagnosis, and treatment.\n\nCritical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a term that refers to a group of serious heart defects that are present from birth. These abnormalities result from problems with the formation of one or more parts of the heart during the early stages of embryonic development. CCHD prevents the heart from pumping blood effectively or reduces the amount of oxygen in the blood. As a result, organs and tissues throughout the body do not receive enough oxygen, which can lead to organ damage and life-threatening complications. Individuals with CCHD usually require surgery soon after birth.\n\nPeople with CCHD have one or more specific heart defects. The heart defects classified as CCHD include coarctation of the aorta, double-outlet right ventricle, D-transposition of the great arteries, Ebstein anomaly, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, interrupted aortic arch, pulmonary atresia with intact septum, single ventricle, total anomalous pulmonary venous connection, tetralogy of Fallot, tricuspid atresia, and truncus arteriosus.
Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis
MedGen UID:
138014
Concept ID:
C0345030
Finding
Stenosis of a peripheral branch of the pulmonary artery.
Failure to thrive
MedGen UID:
746019
Concept ID:
C2315100
Disease or Syndrome
Failure to thrive (FTT) refers to a child whose physical growth is substantially below the norm.
Cholestasis
MedGen UID:
925
Concept ID:
C0008370
Disease or Syndrome
Impairment of bile flow due to obstruction in bile ducts.
Cirrhosis of liver
MedGen UID:
7368
Concept ID:
C0023890
Disease or Syndrome
A chronic disorder of the liver in which liver tissue becomes scarred and is partially replaced by regenerative nodules and fibrotic tissue resulting in loss of liver function.
Liver failure
MedGen UID:
88444
Concept ID:
C0085605
Disease or Syndrome
A disorder characterized by the inability of the liver to metabolize chemicals in the body. Causes include cirrhosis and drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Signs and symptoms include jaundice and encephalopathy. Laboratory test results reveal abnormal plasma levels of ammonia, bilirubin, lactic dehydrogenase, and alkaline phosphatase.
Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency
MedGen UID:
75647
Concept ID:
C0267963
Disease or Syndrome
Impaired function of the exocrine pancreas associated with a reduced ability to digest foods because of lack of digestive enzymes.
Prolonged neonatal jaundice
MedGen UID:
347108
Concept ID:
C1859236
Finding
Neonatal jaundice refers to a yellowing of the skin and other tissues of a newborn infant as a result of increased concentrations of bilirubin in the blood. Neonatal jaundice affects over half of all newborns to some extent in the first week of life. Prolonged neonatal jaundice is said to be present if the jaundice persists for longer than 14 days in term infants and 21 days in preterm infants.
Hepatocellular carcinoma
MedGen UID:
389187
Concept ID:
C2239176
Neoplastic Process
Hepatocellular carcinoma is the major histologic type of malignant primary liver neoplasm. It is the fifth most common cancer and the third most common cause of death from cancer worldwide. The major risk factors for HCC are chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, prolonged dietary aflatoxin exposure, alcoholic cirrhosis, and cirrhosis due to other causes. Hepatoblastomas comprise 1 to 2% of all malignant neoplasms of childhood, most often occurring in children under 3 years of age. Hepatoblastomas are thought to be derived from undifferentiated hepatocytes (Taniguchi et al., 2002).
Reduced number of intrahepatic bile ducts
MedGen UID:
892333
Concept ID:
C4021591
Finding
The presence of reduced numbers of intrahepatic bile duct than normal.
Macrotia
MedGen UID:
488785
Concept ID:
C0152421
Congenital Abnormality
Median longitudinal ear length greater than two standard deviations above the mean and median ear width greater than two standard deviations above the mean (objective); or, apparent increase in length and width of the pinna (subjective).
Low-set ears
MedGen UID:
65980
Concept ID:
C0239234
Congenital Abnormality
Upper insertion of the ear to the scalp below an imaginary horizontal line drawn between the inner canthi of the eye and extending posteriorly to the ear.
Intellectual disability, mild
MedGen UID:
10044
Concept ID:
C0026106
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Mild intellectual disability is defined as an intelligence quotient (IQ) in the range of 50-69.
Areflexia
MedGen UID:
115943
Concept ID:
C0234146
Finding
Absence of neurologic reflexes such as the knee-jerk reaction.
Delayed speech and language development
MedGen UID:
105318
Concept ID:
C0454644
Finding
A degree of language development that is significantly below the norm for a child of a specified age.
Severe global developmental delay
MedGen UID:
332436
Concept ID:
C1837397
Finding
A severe delay in the achievement of motor or mental milestones in the domains of development of a child.
Specific learning disability
MedGen UID:
871302
Concept ID:
C4025790
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Impairment of certain skills such as reading or writing, coordination, self-control, or attention that interfere with the ability to learn. The impairment is not related to a global deficiency of intelligence.
Hypotonia
MedGen UID:
10133
Concept ID:
C0026827
Finding
Hypotonia is an abnormally low muscle tone (the amount of tension or resistance to movement in a muscle). Even when relaxed, muscles have a continuous and passive partial contraction which provides some resistance to passive stretching. Hypotonia thus manifests as diminished resistance to passive stretching. Hypotonia is not the same as muscle weakness, although the two conditions can co-exist.
Frontal bossing
MedGen UID:
67453
Concept ID:
C0221354
Congenital Abnormality
Bilateral bulging of the lateral frontal bone prominences with relative sparing of the midline.
Hemivertebrae
MedGen UID:
82720
Concept ID:
C0265677
Congenital Abnormality
Absence of one half of the vertebral body.
Abnormal rib morphology
MedGen UID:
330763
Concept ID:
C1842083
Anatomical Abnormality
An anomaly of the rib.
Butterfly vertebral arch
MedGen UID:
349323
Concept ID:
C1861627
Finding
Butterfly vertebrae have a cleft through the body of the vertebrae and a funnel shape at the ends.
Renal tubular acidosis
MedGen UID:
90
Concept ID:
C0001126
Disease or Syndrome
Acidosis owing to malfunction of the kidney tubules with accumulation of metabolic acids and hyperchloremia, potentially leading to complications including hypokalemia, hypercalcinuria, nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis.
Hypercholesterolemia
MedGen UID:
5687
Concept ID:
C0020443
Disease or Syndrome
An increased concentration of cholesterol in the blood.
Hypertriglyceridemia
MedGen UID:
167238
Concept ID:
C0813230
Finding
An abnormal increase in the level of triglycerides in the blood.
Elevated circulating hepatic transaminase concentration
MedGen UID:
338525
Concept ID:
C1848701
Finding
Elevations of the levels of SGOT and SGPT in the serum. SGOT (serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase) and SGPT (serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase) are transaminases primarily found in the liver and heart and are released into the bloodstream as the result of liver or heart damage. SGOT and SGPT are used clinically mainly as markers of liver damage.
Bulbous nose
MedGen UID:
66013
Concept ID:
C0240543
Finding
Increased volume and globular shape of the anteroinferior aspect of the nose.
Concave nasal ridge
MedGen UID:
78105
Concept ID:
C0264169
Finding
Nasal ridge curving posteriorly to an imaginary line that connects the nasal root and tip.
Upslanted palpebral fissure
MedGen UID:
98390
Concept ID:
C0423109
Finding
The palpebral fissure inclination is more than two standard deviations above the mean for age (objective); or, the inclination of the palpebral fissure is greater than typical for age.
Triangular face
MedGen UID:
324383
Concept ID:
C1835884
Finding
Facial contour, as viewed from the front, triangular in shape, with breadth at the temples and tapering to a narrow chin.
Depressed nasal bridge
MedGen UID:
373112
Concept ID:
C1836542
Finding
Posterior positioning of the nasal root in relation to the overall facial profile for age.
Long nose
MedGen UID:
326583
Concept ID:
C1839798
Finding
Distance from nasion to subnasale more than two standard deviations above the mean, or alternatively, an apparently increased length from the nasal root to the nasal base.
Broad forehead
MedGen UID:
338610
Concept ID:
C1849089
Finding
Width of the forehead or distance between the frontotemporales is more than two standard deviations above the mean (objective); or apparently increased distance between the two sides of the forehead.
Hypertelorism
MedGen UID:
9373
Concept ID:
C0020534
Finding
Although hypertelorism means an excessive distance between any paired organs (e.g., the nipples), the use of the word has come to be confined to ocular hypertelorism. Hypertelorism occurs as an isolated feature and is also a feature of many syndromes, e.g., Opitz G syndrome (see 300000), Greig cephalopolysyndactyly (175700), and Noonan syndrome (163950) (summary by Cohen et al., 1995).
Myopia
MedGen UID:
44558
Concept ID:
C0027092
Disease or Syndrome
Nearsightedness, also known as myopia, is an eye condition that causes blurry distance vision. People who are nearsighted have more trouble seeing things that are far away (such as when driving) than things that are close up (such as when reading or using a computer). If it is not treated with corrective lenses or surgery, nearsightedness can lead to squinting, eyestrain, headaches, and significant visual impairment.\n\nNearsightedness usually begins in childhood or adolescence. It tends to worsen with age until adulthood, when it may stop getting worse (stabilize). In some people, nearsightedness improves in later adulthood.\n\nFor normal vision, light passes through the clear cornea at the front of the eye and is focused by the lens onto the surface of the retina, which is the lining of the back of the eye that contains light-sensing cells. People who are nearsighted typically have eyeballs that are too long from front to back. As a result, light entering the eye is focused too far forward, in front of the retina instead of on its surface. It is this change that causes distant objects to appear blurry. The longer the eyeball is, the farther forward light rays will be focused and the more severely nearsighted a person will be.\n\nNearsightedness is measured by how powerful a lens must be to correct it. The standard unit of lens power is called a diopter. Negative (minus) powered lenses are used to correct nearsightedness. The more severe a person's nearsightedness, the larger the number of diopters required for correction. In an individual with nearsightedness, one eye may be more nearsighted than the other.\n\nEye doctors often refer to nearsightedness less than -5 or -6 diopters as "common myopia." Nearsightedness of -6 diopters or more is commonly called "high myopia." This distinction is important because high myopia increases a person's risk of developing other eye problems that can lead to permanent vision loss or blindness. These problems include tearing and detachment of the retina, clouding of the lens (cataract), and an eye disease called glaucoma that is usually related to increased pressure within the eye. The risk of these other eye problems increases with the severity of the nearsightedness. The term "pathological myopia" is used to describe cases in which high myopia leads to tissue damage within the eye.
Strabismus
MedGen UID:
21337
Concept ID:
C0038379
Disease or Syndrome
A misalignment of the eyes so that the visual axes deviate from bifoveal fixation. The classification of strabismus may be based on a number of features including the relative position of the eyes, whether the deviation is latent or manifest, intermittent or constant, concomitant or otherwise and according to the age of onset and the relevance of any associated refractive error.
Cataract
MedGen UID:
39462
Concept ID:
C0086543
Disease or Syndrome
A cataract is an opacity or clouding that develops in the crystalline lens of the eye or in its capsule.
Band-shaped keratopathy
MedGen UID:
56354
Concept ID:
C0155120
Disease or Syndrome
An abnormality of the cornea characterized by the deposition of calcium in a band across the central cornea, leading to decreased vision, foreign body sensation, and ocular irritation.
Microcornea
MedGen UID:
78610
Concept ID:
C0266544
Congenital Abnormality
A congenital abnormality of the cornea in which the cornea and the anterior segment of the eye are smaller than normal. The horizontal diameter of the cornea does not reach 10 mm even in adulthood.
Axenfeld anomaly
MedGen UID:
78611
Concept ID:
C0266548
Congenital Abnormality
Axenfeld's anomaly is a bilateral disorder characterized by a prominent, anteriorly displaced Schwalbe's line (posterior embryotoxon) and peripheral iris strands which span the anterior chamber angle to attach to Schwalbe's line.
Deeply set eye
MedGen UID:
473112
Concept ID:
C0423224
Finding
An eye that is more deeply recessed into the plane of the face than is typical.
Posterior embryotoxon
MedGen UID:
154282
Concept ID:
C0546967
Congenital Abnormality
A posterior embryotoxon is the presence of a prominent and anteriorly displaced line of Schwalbe.
Abnormal anterior chamber morphology
MedGen UID:
463532
Concept ID:
C3152182
Finding
Abnormality of the anterior chamber, which is the space in the eye that is behind the cornea and in front of the iris.
Chorioretinal atrophy
MedGen UID:
884881
Concept ID:
C4048273
Disease or Syndrome
Atrophy of the choroid and retinal layers of the fundus.
Pigmentary retinopathy
MedGen UID:
1643295
Concept ID:
C4551715
Disease or Syndrome
An abnormality of the retina characterized by pigment deposition. It is typically associated with migration and proliferation of macrophages or retinal pigment epithelial cells into the retina; melanin from these cells causes the pigmentary changes. Pigmentary retinopathy is a common final pathway of many retinal conditions and is often associated with visual loss.

Term Hierarchy

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Jurkiewicz D, Gliwicz D, Ciara E, Gerfen J, Pelc M, Piekutowska-Abramczuk D, Kugaudo M, Chrzanowska K, Spinner NB, Krajewska-Walasek M
J Appl Genet 2014 Aug;55(3):329-36. Epub 2014 Apr 20 doi: 10.1007/s13353-014-0212-2. PMID: 24748328Free PMC Article
Giannakudis J, Röpke A, Kujat A, Krajewska-Walasek M, Hughes H, Fryns JP, Bankier A, Amor D, Schlicker M, Hansmann I
Eur J Hum Genet 2001 Mar;9(3):209-16. doi: 10.1038/sj.ejhg.5200613. PMID: 11313761

Diagnosis

Li L, Dong J, Wang X, Guo H, Wang H, Zhao J, Qiu Y, Abuduxikuer K, Wang J
PLoS One 2015;10(6):e0130355. Epub 2015 Jun 15 doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0130355. PMID: 26076142Free PMC Article
Jurkiewicz D, Gliwicz D, Ciara E, Gerfen J, Pelc M, Piekutowska-Abramczuk D, Kugaudo M, Chrzanowska K, Spinner NB, Krajewska-Walasek M
J Appl Genet 2014 Aug;55(3):329-36. Epub 2014 Apr 20 doi: 10.1007/s13353-014-0212-2. PMID: 24748328Free PMC Article
Fischer A, Klamt B, Schumacher N, Glaeser C, Hansmann I, Fenge H, Gessler M
Mamm Genome 2004 Sep;15(9):711-6. doi: 10.1007/s00335-004-2389-x. PMID: 15389319
Giannakudis J, Röpke A, Kujat A, Krajewska-Walasek M, Hughes H, Fryns JP, Bankier A, Amor D, Schlicker M, Hansmann I
Eur J Hum Genet 2001 Mar;9(3):209-16. doi: 10.1038/sj.ejhg.5200613. PMID: 11313761

Clinical prediction guides

Jurkiewicz D, Popowska E, Gläser C, Hansmann I, Krajewska-Walasek M
Hum Mutat 2005 Mar;25(3):321. doi: 10.1002/humu.9313. PMID: 15712272

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