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Deficiency of isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase(IBDD)

MedGen UID:
370754
Concept ID:
C1969809
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: ACYL-CoA DEHYDROGENASE FAMILY, MEMBER 8, DEFICIENCY OF; Acyl-CoaA dehydrogenase family, member 8, deficiency of; IBD deficiency; Isobutyryl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency
SNOMED CT: Deficiency of isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase (445274004); Deficiency of isobutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (445274004)
Modes of inheritance:
Autosomal recessive inheritance
MedGen UID:
141025
Concept ID:
C0441748
Intellectual Product
Source: Orphanet
A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on one of the autosomes (i.e., the human chromosomes 1-22) in which a trait manifests in individuals with two pathogenic alleles, either homozygotes (two copies of the same mutant allele) or compound heterozygotes (whereby each copy of a gene has a distinct mutant allele).
 
Gene (location): ACAD8 (11q25)
 
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0012648
OMIM®: 611283
Orphanet: ORPHA79159

Definition

Isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase (IBD) deficiency is a condition that disrupts the breakdown of certain proteins. Normally, proteins from food are broken down into parts called amino acids. Amino acids can be further processed to provide energy for growth and development. People with IBD deficiency have inadequate levels of an enzyme that helps break down a particular amino acid called valine.

Most people with IBD deficiency are asymptomatic, which means they do not have any signs or symptoms of the condition. A few children with IBD deficiency have developed features such as a weakened and enlarged heart (dilated cardiomyopathy), weak muscle tone (hypotonia), and developmental delay. This condition may also cause low numbers of red blood cells (anemia) and very low blood levels of carnitine, which is a natural substance that helps convert certain foods into energy. The range of signs and symptoms associated with IBD deficiency remains unclear because very few affected individuals have been reported. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

Clinical features

From HPO
Primary dilated cardiomyopathy
MedGen UID:
2880
Concept ID:
C0007193
Disease or Syndrome
Familial dilated cardiomyopathy is a genetic form of heart disease. It occurs when heart (cardiac) muscle becomes thin and weakened in at least one chamber of the heart, causing the open area of the chamber to become enlarged (dilated). As a result, the heart is unable to pump blood as efficiently as usual. To compensate, the heart attempts to increase the amount of blood being pumped through the heart, leading to further thinning and weakening of the cardiac muscle. Over time, this condition results in heart failure.\n\nIt usually takes many years for symptoms of familial dilated cardiomyopathy to cause health problems. They typically begin in mid-adulthood, but can occur at any time from infancy to late adulthood. Signs and symptoms of familial dilated cardiomyopathy can include an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia), shortness of breath (dyspnea), extreme tiredness (fatigue), fainting episodes (syncope), and swelling of the legs and feet. In some cases, the first sign of the disorder is sudden cardiac death. The severity of the condition varies among affected individuals, even in members of the same family.
Anemia
MedGen UID:
1526
Concept ID:
C0002871
Disease or Syndrome
A reduction in erythrocytes volume or hemoglobin concentration.
Hypotonia
MedGen UID:
10133
Concept ID:
C0026827
Finding
Hypotonia is an abnormally low muscle tone (the amount of tension or resistance to movement in a muscle). Even when relaxed, muscles have a continuous and passive partial contraction which provides some resistance to passive stretching. Hypotonia thus manifests as diminished resistance to passive stretching. Hypotonia is not the same as muscle weakness, although the two conditions can co-exist.

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVDeficiency of isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase
Follow this link to review classifications for Deficiency of isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase in Orphanet.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Oglesbee D, He M, Majumder N, Vockley J, Ahmad A, Angle B, Burton B, Charrow J, Ensenauer R, Ficicioglu CH, Keppen LD, Marsden D, Tortorelli S, Hahn SH, Matern D
Genet Med 2007 Feb;9(2):108-16. doi: 10.1097/gim.0b013e31802f78d6. PMID: 17304052

Curated

American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics, Newborn Screening ACT Sheet, Elevated C4 Acylcarnitine, Short-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase (SCAD) Deficiency, 2022

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    Clinical resources

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    • PubMed
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    Curated

    • ACMG ACT, 2022
      American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics, Newborn Screening ACT Sheet, Elevated C4 Acylcarnitine, Short-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase (SCAD) Deficiency, 2022

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