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1.

Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome

Autosomal dominant hyper IgE syndrome (AD-HIES) is a primary immune deficiency characterized by the classic triad of recurrent skin boils, cyst-forming pneumonias, and extreme elevations of serum IgE. It is now recognized that other common manifestations include eczema, mucocutaneous candidiasis, and several connective tissue and skeletal abnormalities. A rash in the newborn period subsequently evolves into an eczematoid dermatitis. Recurrent staphylococcal skin boils and bacterial pneumonias usually manifest in the first years of life. Pneumatocoeles and bronchiectasis often result from aberrant healing of pneumonias. Mucocutaneous candidiasis is common. A characteristic facial appearance typically emerges in adolescence. Skeletal abnormalities include osteopenia, minimal trauma fractures, and scoliosis. Vascular abnormalities include middle-sized artery tortuosity and aneurysms, with infrequent clinical sequelae of myocardial infarction and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Gastrointestinal (GI) manifestations include gastroesophageal reflux disease; esophageal dysmotility; and rarely colonic perforations, some of which are associated with diverticuli. Fungal infection of the GI tract (typically histoplasmosis, Cryptococcus, and Coccidioides) also occur infrequently. Survival is typically into adulthood, but life span is often shortened. Most deaths are associated with Gram-negative (Pseudomonas) or filamentous fungal pneumonias resulting in hemoptysis. Lymphomas occur at an increased frequency. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1648470
Concept ID:
C4721531
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Gingival fibromatosis 1

MedGen UID:
1647111
Concept ID:
C4551558
Disease or Syndrome
3.

TUMORAL CALCINOSIS, HYPERPHOSPHATEMIC, FAMILIAL, 2

Hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis is a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by the progressive deposition of basic calcium phosphate crystals in periarticular spaces, soft tissues, and sometimes bone (Chefetz et al., 2005). The biochemical hallmark of tumoral calcinosis is hyperphosphatemia caused by increased renal absorption of phosphate due to loss-of-function mutations in the FGF23 or GALNT3 (601756) gene. The term 'hyperostosis-hyperphosphatemia syndrome' is sometimes used when the disorder is characterized by involvement of the long bones associated with the radiographic findings of periosteal reaction and cortical hyperostosis. Although some have distinguished HHS from FTC by the presence of bone involvement and the absence of skin involvement (Frishberg et al., 2005), Ichikawa et al. (2010) concluded that the 2 entities represent a continuous spectrum of the same disease, best described as familial hyperphosphatemic tumoral calcinosis. HFTC is considered to be the clinical converse of autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (ADHR; 193100), an allelic disorder caused by gain-of-function mutations in the FGF23 gene and associated with hypophosphatemia and decreased renal phosphate absorption (Chefetz et al., 2005; Ichikawa et al., 2005). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HFTC, see 211900. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1640532
Concept ID:
C4693863
Disease or Syndrome
4.

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENTAL DELAY WITH OR WITHOUT IMPAIRED INTELLECTUAL DEVELOPMENT

MedGen UID:
941247
Concept ID:
CN258211
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Follicular thyroid carcinoma

Nonmedullary thyroid cancer (NMTC) comprises thyroid cancers of follicular cell origin and accounts for more than 95% of all thyroid cancer cases. The remaining cancers originate from parafollicular cells (medullary thyroid cancer, MTC; 155240). NMTC is classified into 4 groups: papillary, follicular, Hurthle cell (607464), and anaplastic. Approximately 5% of NMTC is hereditary, occurring as a minor component of a familial cancer syndrome (e.g., familial adenomatous polyposis, 175100, Carney complex, 160980) or as a primary feature (familial NMTC or FNMTC). Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is the most common histologic subtype of FNMTC, accounting for approximately 85% of cases (summary by Vriens et al., 2009). Follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) accounts for approximately 15% of NMTC and is defined by invasive features that result in infiltration of blood vessels and/or full penetration of the tumor capsule, in the absence of the nuclear alterations that characterize papillary carcinoma. FTC is rarely multifocal and usually does not metastasize to the regional lymph nodes but tends to spread via the bloodstream to the lung and bones. An important histologic variant of FTC is the oncocytic (Hurthle cell, oxyphilic) follicular carcinoma composed of eosinophilic cells replete with mitochondria (summary by Bonora et al., 2010). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of NMTC, see NMTC1 (188550). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
904175
Concept ID:
C4225426
Neoplastic Process
6.

Immunodeficiency 36

IMD36 is a primary immunodeficiency with a highly heterogeneous clinical phenotype, characterized primarily by recurrent respiratory tract infections, lymphoproliferation, and antibody deficiency. Other features include growth retardation, mild neurodevelopmental delay, and autoimmunity. The major complication is development of B-cell lymphoma (Elkaim et al., 2016). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
863371
Concept ID:
C4014934
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Autoimmune disease, multisystem, infantile-onset, 1

Infantile-onset multisystem autoimmune disease-1 is characterized by early childhood onset of a spectrum of autoimmune disorders affecting multiple organs. Common manifestations include insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and autoimmune enteropathy, or celiac disease, and autoimmune hematologic disorders. Other features include short stature and nonspecific dermatitis. More variable features include hypothyroidism, autoimmune arthritis, and delayed puberty. Some patients may show recurrent infections. The disorder results from an inborn error of cytokine signaling (summary by Flanagan et al., 2014 and Milner et al., 2015). Genetic Heterogeneity of Infantile-Onset Multisystem Autoimmune Disease See also ADMIO2 (617006), caused by mutation in the ZAP70 gene (176947) on chromosome 2q12. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
863232
Concept ID:
C4014795
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Immunodeficiency 31a

IMD31A results from autosomal dominant (AD) STAT1 deficiency. STAT1 is crucial for cellular responses to IFNA (147660)/IFNB (147640) (type I interferon) and IFNG (147570) (type III interferon). AD STAT1 deficiency selectively affects the IFNG pathway, but not the IFNA/IFNB pathway, and confers a predisposition to mycobacterial infections. Pathogens reported in IMD31A patients include bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and Mycobacterium avium complex, as well as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. IMD31A has low penetrance and a mild clinical phenotype with good prognosis for recovery (review by Al-Muhsen and Casanova, 2008). Two patients with heterozygous STAT1 mutations have been reported with increased susceptibility to adult-onset herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) without a history of other significant infections (Mork et al., 2015). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
862387
Concept ID:
C4013950
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Renal hypodysplasia/aplasia 2

Renal hypodysplasia/aplasia belongs to a group of perinatally lethal renal diseases, including bilateral renal aplasia, unilateral renal agenesis with contralateral dysplasia (URA/RD), and severe obstructive uropathy. Renal aplasia falls at the most severe end of the spectrum of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT; 610805), and usually results in death in utero or in the perinatal period. Families have been documented in which bilateral renal agenesis or aplasia coexists with unilateral renal aplasia, renal dysplasia, or renal aplasia with renal dysplasia, suggesting that these conditions may belong to a pathogenic continuum or phenotypic spectrum (summary by Joss et al., 2003; Humbert et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of renal hypodysplasia/aplasia, see RHDA1 (191830). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
816689
Concept ID:
C3810359
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome 2

Cardiofaciocutaneous (CFC) syndrome is characterized by cardiac abnormalities (pulmonic stenosis and other valve dysplasias, septal defects, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, rhythm disturbances), distinctive craniofacial appearance, and cutaneous abnormalities (including xerosis, hyperkeratosis, ichthyosis, keratosis pilaris, ulerythema ophryogenes, eczema, pigmented moles, hemangiomas, and palmoplantar hyperkeratosis). The hair is typically sparse, curly, fine or thick, woolly or brittle; eyelashes and eyebrows may be absent or sparse. Nails may be dystrophic or fast growing. Some form of neurologic and/or cognitive delay (ranging from mild to severe) is seen in all affected individuals. Neoplasia, mostly acute lymphoblastic leukemia, has been reported in some individuals. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
815335
Concept ID:
C3809005
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism 20 with or without anosmia

Isolated gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) deficiency (IGD) is characterized by inappropriately low serum concentrations of the gonadotropins LH (luteinizing hormone) and FSH (follicle-stimulating hormone) in the presence of low circulating concentrations of sex steroids. IGD is associated with a normal sense of smell (normosmic IGD) in approximately 40% of affected individuals and an impaired sense of smell (Kallmann syndrome) in approximately 60%. IGD can first become apparent in infancy, adolescence, or adulthood. Infant boys with congenital IGD often have micropenis and cryptorchidism. Adolescents and adults with IGD have clinical evidence of hypogonadism and incomplete sexual maturation on physical examination. Adult males with IGD tend to have prepubertal testicular volume (i.e., <4 mL), absence of secondary sexual features (e.g., facial and axillary hair growth, deepening of the voice), decreased muscle mass, diminished libido, erectile dysfunction, and infertility. Adult females have little or no breast development and primary amenorrhea. Although skeletal maturation is delayed, the rate of linear growth is usually normal except for the absence of a distinct pubertal growth spurt. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
815313
Concept ID:
C3808983
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Agammaglobulinemia 7, autosomal recessive

MedGen UID:
767603
Concept ID:
C3554689
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Cowden syndrome 5

MedGen UID:
767432
Concept ID:
C3554518
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Kallmann syndrome 6

Isolated gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) deficiency (IGD) is characterized by inappropriately low serum concentrations of the gonadotropins LH (luteinizing hormone) and FSH (follicle-stimulating hormone) in the presence of low circulating concentrations of sex steroids. IGD is associated with a normal sense of smell (normosmic IGD) in approximately 40% of affected individuals and an impaired sense of smell (Kallmann syndrome) in approximately 60%. IGD can first become apparent in infancy, adolescence, or adulthood. Infant boys with congenital IGD often have micropenis and cryptorchidism. Adolescents and adults with IGD have clinical evidence of hypogonadism and incomplete sexual maturation on physical examination. Adult males with IGD tend to have prepubertal testicular volume (i.e., <4 mL), absence of secondary sexual features (e.g., facial and axillary hair growth, deepening of the voice), decreased muscle mass, diminished libido, erectile dysfunction, and infertility. Adult females have little or no breast development and primary amenorrhea. Although skeletal maturation is delayed, the rate of linear growth is usually normal except for the absence of a distinct pubertal growth spurt. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
765488
Concept ID:
C3552574
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Immunodeficiency 31C

IMD31C is disorder of immunologic dysregulation with highly variable manifestations resulting from autosomal dominant gain-of-function mutations in STAT1 (600555). Most patients present in infancy or early childhood with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC). Other highly variable features include recurrent bacterial, viral, fungal, and mycoplasmal infections, disseminated dimorphic fungal infections, enteropathy with villous atrophy, and autoimmune disorders, such as hypothyroidism or diabetes mellitus. A subset of patients show apparently nonimmunologic features, including osteopenia, delayed puberty, and intracranial aneurysms. Laboratory studies show increased activation of gamma-interferon (IFNG; 147570)-mediated inflammation. (summary by Uzel et al., 2013 and Sampaio et al., 2013). [from NCBI]

MedGen UID:
481620
Concept ID:
C3279990
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Mycobacterial and viral infections, susceptibility to, autosomal recessive

IMD31B results from autosomal recessive (AR) STAT1 deficiency. STAT1 is crucial for cellular responses to IFNA (147660)/IFNB (147640) (type I interferon) and IFNG (147570) (type III interferon). AR STAT1 deficiency affects both the IFNA/IFNB and the IFNG pathways, resulting in susceptibility to mycobacteria, Salmonella, and viruses, with a severe disease course and often fatal outcome (review by Al-Muhsen and Casanova, 2008). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
462438
Concept ID:
C3151088
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Congenital lipomatous overgrowth, vascular malformations, and epidermal nevi

PIK3CA-associated segmental overgrowth includes disorders of brain (e.g., MCAP [megalencephaly-capillary malformation] syndrome, hemimegalencephaly); and segmental body overgrowth (e.g., CLOVES [congenital lipomatous asymmetric overgrowth of the trunk, lymphatic, capillary, venous, and combined-type vascular malformations, epidermal nevi, skeletal and spinal anomalies] syndrome, fibroadipose hyperplasia [FH]). Heterozygous (usually somatic mosaic) pathogenic variants of PIK3CA are causative. MCAP syndrome is characterized by the major findings of (1) megalencephaly (MEG) or hemimegalencephaly (HMEG) associated with neurologic findings of hypotonia, seizures, and mild to severe intellectual disability; and (2) cutaneous capillary malformations with focal or generalized somatic overgrowth. Additional findings can include digital anomalies (syndactyly, polydactyly), cortical malformations – most distinctively polymicrogyria (PMG); and variable connective tissue dysplasia. CLOVES (or CLOVE) syndrome and fibroadipose hyperplasia (FH) may be associated with (1) MEG or HMEG; and (2) patchy segmental overgrowth associated with skeletal anomalies, lipomatosis, vascular malformations, and epidermal nevi. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
442876
Concept ID:
C2752042
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Spastic paraplegia 18

Spastic paraplegia-18 is a severe autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by onset in early childhood of progressive spastic paraplegia resulting in motor disability. Most affected individuals have severe psychomotor retardation. Some may develop significant joint contractures (summary by Alazami et al., 2011 and Yildirim et al., 2011). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
442343
Concept ID:
C2749936
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Capillary malformation of the lower lip, lymphatic malformation of face and neck, asymmetry of face and limbs, and partial/generalized overgrowth

A syndrome consisting of capillary malformation of the lower lip (C), lymphatic malformation of the face and neck (L), asymmetry of face and limbs (A) and partial or generalised overgrowth (O). It has been described in six unrelated patients. Capillary malformation of the lower lip is observed in all patients. The overgrowth was noted at birth in three patients but was generalised in only one patient; it was partial in the other patients and involved one or more body segments. Inheritance of this association is not known. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
416522
Concept ID:
C2751313
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
20.

Multiple synostoses syndrome 3

MedGen UID:
414116
Concept ID:
C2751826
Disease or Syndrome
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